E
XTRACTIVE
I
NSTITUTIONS
What Stalin, King Shyaam, the Neolithic Revolution, and
the Maya city-states all had in common and how this
explains why China’s current economic growth cannot last
6
.
D
RIFTING
A
PART
How institutions evolve over time, often slowly drifting
apart
7
.
T
HE
T
URNING
P
OINT
How a political revolution in 1688 changed institutions in
England and led to the Industrial Revolution
8
.
N
OT ON
O
UR
T
URF:
B
ARRIERS TO
D
EVELOPMENT
Why the politically powerful in many nations opposed the
Industrial Revolution
Photo Inserts
9
.
R
EVERSING
D
EVELOPMENT
How European colonialism impoverished large parts of
the world
10
.
T
HE
D
IFFUSION OF
P
ROSPERITY
How some parts of the world took different paths to
prosperity from that of Britain
11
.
T
HE
V
IRTUOUS
C
IRCLE
How institutions that encourage prosperity create positive
feedback loops that prevent the efforts by elites to
undermine them
12
.
T
HE
V
ICIOUS
C
IRCLE
How institutions that create poverty generate negative
feedback loops and endure
Change page order in pdf online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages within a pdf; how to move pages in pdf acrobat
Change page order in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pdf pages; move pages in a pdf file
13
.
W
HY
N
ATIONS
F
AIL
T
ODAY
Institutions, institutions, institutions
14
.
B
REAKING THE
M
OLD
How a few countries changed their economic trajectory by
changing their institutions
15
.
U
NDERSTANDING
P
ROSPERITY AND
P
OVERTY
How the world could have been different and how
understanding this can explain why most attempts to
combat poverty have failed
A
CKNOWLEDGMENTS
B
IBLIOGRAPHICAL
E
SSAY AND
S
OURCES
R
EFERENCES
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C#
pdf reverse page order; pdf change page order acrobat
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
Note: if you are trying to change the order of a you want to see other VB.NET Word document editing controls, please read this Word reading page which has
reordering pages in pdf; change page order in pdf reader
PREFACE
T
HIS BOOK IS
about the huge differences in incomes and
standards of living that separate the rich countries of the
world, such as the United States, Great Britain, and
Germany, from the poor, such as those in sub-Saharan
Africa, Central America, and South Asia.
As we write this preface, North Africa and the Middle
East have been shaken by the “Arab Spring” started by the
so-called Jasmine Revolution, which was initially ignited by
public outrage over the self-immolation of a street vendor,
Mohamed Bouazizi, on December 17, 2010. By January
14, 2011, President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, who had ruled
Tunisia since 1987, had stepped down, but far from
abating,  the  revolutionary  fervor  against  the  rule  of
privileged elites in Tunisia was getting stronger and had
already spread to the rest of the Middle East. Hosni
Mubarak, who had ruled Egypt with a tight grip for almost
thirty years, was ousted on February 11, 2011. The fates of
the regimes in Bahrain, Libya, Syria, and Yemen are
unknown as we complete this preface.
The roots of discontent in these countries lie in their
poverty. The average Egyptian has an income level of
around 12 percent of the average citizen of the United
States and can expect to live ten fewer years; 20 percent of
the population is in dire poverty. Though these differences
are significant, they are actually quite small compared with
those between the United States and the poorest countries
in the world, such as North Korea, Sierra Leone, and
Zimbabwe, where well over half the population lives in
poverty.
Why is Egypt so much poorer than the United States?
What  are  the constraints  that  keep  Egyptians  from
becoming more prosperous? Is  the poverty of Egypt
immutable, or can it be eradicated? A natural way to start
thinking about this is to  look  at what  the Egyptians
themselves are saying about the problems they face and
why they rose up against the Mubarak regime. Noha
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
For example, you may change your Word document order from 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 to 3, 5, 4, 2,1 with C# coding. C#.NET: Extracting Page(s) from Word.
reorder pages in a pdf; reorder pdf pages online
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page from PDF file and changing the position, orientation and order of PDF PDF Page and File Splitting. If you want to split PDF file into two or small files
reorder pages in pdf reader; how to move pages around in a pdf document
Hamed, twenty-four, a worker at an advertising agency in
Cairo, made her views clear as she demonstrated in Tahrir
Square: “We are suffering from corruption, oppression and
bad education. We are living amid a corrupt system which
has to change.” Another in the square, Mosaab El Shami,
twenty, a pharmacy student, concurred: “I hope that by the
end of this year we will have an elected government and
that universal freedoms are applied and that we put an end
to the corruption that has taken over this country.” The
protestors in Tahrir Square spoke with one voice about the
corruption of the government, its inability to deliver public
services, and the lack of equality of opportunity in their
country. They particularly complained about repression and
the absence of political rights. As Mohamed ElBaradei,
former director of the International Atomic Energy Agency,
wrote on Twitter on January 13, 2011, “Tunisia: repression
+ absence of social justice + denial of channels for
peaceful  change  =  a  ticking  bomb.”  Egyptians  and
Tunisians both saw their economic problems as being
fundamentally caused by their lack of political rights. When
the protestors started to formulate their demands more
systematically, the first twelve immediate demands posted
by Wael Khalil, the software engineer and blogger who
emerged as one of the leaders of the Egyptian protest
movement, were all focused on political change. Issues
such as raising the minimum wage appeared only among
the transitional demands that were to be implemented later.
To Egyptians, the things that have held them back
include an ineffective and corrupt state and a society where
they cannot use their talent, ambition, ingenuity, and what
education they can get. But they also recognize that the
roots of these problems are political. All the economic
impediments they face stem from the way political power in
Egypt is exercised and monopolized by a narrow elite.
This, they understand, is the first thing that has to change.
Yet, in believing this, the protestors of Tahrir Square have
sharply diverged from the conventional wisdom on this
topic. When they reason about why a country such as Egypt
is poor, most academics and commentators emphasize
completely different factors. Some stress that Egypt’s
poverty is determined primarily by its geography, by the fact
that the country is mostly a desert and lacks adequate
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
how to rearrange pdf pages online; pdf rearrange pages online
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
move pdf pages; how to move pages around in pdf file
rainfall,  and  that  its soils  and climate do  not  allow
productive agriculture.  Others instead point  to cultural
attributes of Egyptians that are supposedly inimical to
economic development and prosperity. Egyptians, they
argue, lack the same sort of work ethic and cultural traits
that have allowed others to prosper, and instead have
accepted  Islamic  beliefs  that  are  inconsistent  with
economic success. A third approach, the one dominant
among economists and policy pundits, is based on the
notion that the rulers of Egypt simply don’t know what is
needed  to make  their  country  prosperous,  and have
followed incorrect policies and strategies in the past. If
these rulers would only get the right advice from the right
advisers, the thinking goes, prosperity would follow. To
these academics and pundits, the fact that Egypt has been
ruled by narrow elites feathering their nests at the expense
of society seems irrelevant to understanding the country’s
economic problems.
In this book we’ll argue that the Egyptians in Tahrir
Square, not most academics and commentators, have the
right idea. In fact, Egypt is poor precisely because it has
been ruled by a narrow elite that have organized society for
their own benefit at the expense of the vast mass of people.
Political power has been narrowly concentrated, and has
been used to create great wealth for those who possess it,
such as the $70 billion fortune apparently accumulated by
ex-president Mubarak. The losers have been the Egyptian
people, as they only too well understand.
We’ll show that this interpretation of Egyptian poverty, the
people’s interpretation, turns out to provide a general
explanation for why poor countries are poor. Whether it is
North Korea, Sierra Leone, or Zimbabwe, we’ll show that
poor countries are poor for the same reason that Egypt is
poor. Countries such as Great Britain and the United
States became rich because their citizens overthrew the
elites who controlled power and created a society where
political rights were much more broadly distributed, where
the  government  was accountable  and  responsive  to
citizens, and where the great mass of people could take
advantage of economic opportunities. We’ll show that to
understand why there is such inequality in the world today
we have to delve into the past and study the historical
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Enable C#.NET developers to change the page order of source PDF document file; Allow C#.NET developers to add image to specified area of source PDF
rearrange pages in pdf file; pdf page order reverse
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via Change PDF original password. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be
reverse page order pdf online; rearrange pages in pdf
dynamics of societies. We’ll see that the reason that Britain
is richer than Egypt is because in 1688, Britain (or
England, to be exact) had a revolution that transformed the
politics and thus the economics of the nation. People fought
for and won more political rights, and they used them to
expand their economic opportunities. The result was a
fundamentally different political and economic trajectory,
culminating in the Industrial Revolution.
The  Industrial  Revolution  and  the  technologies  it
unleashed didn’t spread to Egypt, as that country was
under the control of the Ottoman Empire, which treated
Egypt in rather the same way as the Mubarak family later
did. Ottoman rule in Egypt was overthrown by Napoleon
Bonaparte in 1798, but the country then fell under the
control of British colonialism, which had as little interest as
the Ottomans in promoting Egypt’s prosperity. Though the
Egyptians shook off the Ottoman and British empires and,
in  1952,  overthrew  their  monarchy,  these  were  not
revolutions like that of 1688 in England, and rather than
fundamentally transforming politics in Egypt, they brought to
power another elite as disinterested in achieving prosperity
for ordinary Egyptians as the Ottoman and British had
been. In consequence, the basic structure of society did not
change, and Egypt stayed poor.
In this book we’ll study how these patterns reproduce
themselves over time and why sometimes they are altered,
as they were in England in 1688 and in France with the
revolution of 1789. This will help us to understand if the
situation in Egypt has changed today and whether the
revolution that overthrew Mubarak will lead to a new set of
institutions  capable  of  bringing  prosperity  to  ordinary
Egyptians. Egypt has had revolutions in the past that did
not change  things,  because those  who mounted  the
revolutions simply took over the reins from those they’d
deposed and re-created a similar system. It is indeed
difficult for ordinary citizens to acquire real political power
and change the way their society works. But it is possible,
and we’ll see how this happened in England, France, and
the United States, and also in Japan, Botswana, and Brazil.
Fundamentally it is a political transformation of this sort that
is required for a poor society to become rich. There is
evidence that this may be happening in Egypt. Reda
Metwaly, another protestor in Tahrir Square, argued, “Now
you see Muslims and Christians together, now you see old
and young together, all wanting the same thing.” We’ll see
that such a broad movement in society was a key part of
what happened in these other political transformations. If
we understand when and why such transitions occur, we will
be in a better position to evaluate when we expect such
movements to fail as they have often done in the past and
when we may hope that they will succeed and improve the
lives of millions.
1.
SO CLOSE AND YET SO DIFFERENT
T
HE
E
CONOMICS OF THE
R
IO
G
RANDE
T
HE CITY OF
N
OGALES
is cut in half by a fence. If you stand
by it and look north, you’ll see Nogales, Arizona, located in
Santa Cruz County. The income of the average household
there is about $30,000 a year. Most teenagers are in
school, and the majority of the adults are high school
graduates. Despite all the arguments people make about
how deficient the U.S. health care system is, the population
is relatively healthy, with high life expectancy by global
standards. Many of the residents are above age sixty-five
and have access to Medicare. It’s just one of the many
services the government  provides  that  most  take for
granted, such as electricity, telephones, a sewage system,
public health, a road network linking them to other cities in
the area and to the rest of the United States, and, last but
not least, law and order. The people of Nogales, Arizona,
can go about their daily activities without fear for life or
safety and not constantly afraid of theft, expropriation, or
other things that might jeopardize their investments in their
businesses and houses. Equally important, the residents of
Nogales, Arizona, take it for granted that, with all its
inefficiency and occasional corruption, the government is
their  agent.  They  can  vote  to  replace  their  mayor,
congressmen, and senators; they vote in the presidential
elections  that  determine  who  will  lead  their  country.
Democracy is second nature to them.
Life south of the fence, just a few feet away, is rather
different. While the residents of Nogales, Sonora, live in a
relatively prosperous part of Mexico, the income of the
average household there is about one-third that in Nogales,
Arizona. Most adults in Nogales, Sonora, do not have a
high school degree, and many teenagers are not in school.
Mothers have to worry about high rates of infant mortality.
Poor public health conditions mean it’s no surprise that the
residents of Nogales, Sonora, do not live as long as their
northern neighbors. They also don’t have access to many
public amenities. Roads are in bad condition south of the
fence. Law and order is in worse condition. Crime is high,
and opening a business is a risky activity. Not only do you
risk robbery, but getting all the permissions and greasing
all the palms just to open is no easy endeavor. Residents of
Nogales,  Sonora, live with  politicians’ corruption and
ineptitude every day.
In contrast to their northern neighbors, democracy is a
very recent experience for them. Until the political reforms
of 2000, Nogales, Sonora, just like the rest of Mexico, was
under the corrupt control of the Institutional Revolutionary
Party, or Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI).
How could the two halves of what is essentially the same
city be so different? There is no difference in geography,
climate, or the types of diseases prevalent in the area,
since germs do not face any restrictions crossing back and
forth between the United States and Mexico. Of course,
health conditions are very different, but this has nothing to
do with the disease environment; it is because the people
south of the border live with inferior sanitary conditions and
lack decent health care.
But perhaps the residents are very different. Could it be
that the residents of Nogales, Arizona, are grandchildren of
migrants  from Europe,  while those  in  the  south  are
descendants of Aztecs? Not so. The backgrounds of
people on both sides of the border are quite similar. After
Mexico became independent from Spain in 1821, the area
around “Los dos Nogales” was part of the Mexican state of
Vieja California and remained so even after the Mexican-
American War of 1846–1848. Indeed, it was only after the
Gadsden Purchase of 1853 that the U.S. border was
extended into this area. It was Lieutenant N. Michler who,
while surveying the border, noted the presence of the
“pretty little valley of Los Nogales.” Here, on either side of
the border, the two cities rose up. The inhabitants of
Nogales, Arizona, and Nogales, Sonora, share ancestors,
enjoy the same food and the same music, and, we would
hazard to say, have the same “culture.”
Of course, there is a very simple and obvious explanation
for the differences between the two halves of Nogales that
you’ve probably long since guessed: the very border that
defines the two halves. Nogales, Arizona, is in the United
States.  Its inhabitants  have access to  the  economic
institutions of the United States, which enable them to
choose their occupations freely, acquire schooling and
skills, and encourage their employers to invest in the best
technology, which leads to higher wages for them. They
also have access to political institutions that allow them to
take  part  in  the  democratic  process,  to  elect  their
representatives, and replace them if they misbehave. In
consequence,  politicians  provide  the  basic  services
(ranging from public health to roads to law and order) that
the citizens demand. Those of Nogales, Sonora, are not so
lucky. They live in a different world shaped by different
institutions.  These  different  institutions  create  very
disparate  incentives  for  the  inhabitants  of  the  two
Nogaleses and for  the entrepreneurs and businesses
willing to invest there. These incentives created by the
different institutions of the Nogaleses and the countries in
which they are situated are the main reason for the
differences in economic prosperity on the two sides of the
border.
Why are the institutions of the United States so much
more conducive to economic success than those of Mexico
or, for that matter, the rest of Latin America? The answer to
this question lies in the way the different societies formed
during the early colonial period. An institutional divergence
took place then, with implications lasting into the present
day. To understand this divergence we must begin right at
the foundation of the colonies in North and Latin America.
T
HE
F
OUNDING OF
B
UENOS
A
IRES
Early in 1516 the Spanish navigator Juan Díaz de Solís
sailed into a wide estuary on the Eastern Seaboard of
South America. Wading ashore, de Solís claimed the land
for Spain, naming the river the Río de la Plata, “River of
Silver,” since the local people possessed silver. The
indigenous peoples on either side of the estuary—the
Charrúas in what is now Uruguay, and the Querandí on the
plains that were to be known as the Pampas in modern
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested