c# pdf viewer component : How to move pages around in pdf application control cloud windows web page .net class Why-Nations-Fail-Daron-Acemoglu16-part1134

dynasty that would reign for four hundred years. Some of
K’inich Yax’s successors had equally graphic names. The
thirteenth ruler’s glyph translates as “18 Rabbit,” who was
followed by “Smoke Monkey” and then “Smoke Shell,” who
died in 
AD
763. The last name on the altar is King Yax Pasaj
Chan Yoaat, or “First Dawned Sky Lightening God,” who
was the sixteenth ruler of this line and assumed the throne
at the death of Smoke Shell. After him we know of only one
more king, Ukit Took (“Patron of Flint”), from a fragment of
an altar. After Yax Pasaj, the buildings and inscriptions
stopped, and  it  seems that the dynasty was shortly
overthrown. Ukit Took was probably not even the real
claimant to the throne but a pretender.
There is a final way of looking at this evidence at Copán,
one developed by the archaeologists AnnCorinne Freter,
Nancy Gonlin, and David Webster. These researchers
mapped the rise and fall of Copán by examining the spread
of the settlement in the Copán Valley over a period of 850
years, from 
AD
400 to 
AD
1250, using a technique called
obsidian hydration, which calculates the water content of
obsidian on the date it was mined. Once mined, the water
content falls at a known rate, allowing archaeologists to
calculate the date a piece of obsidian was mined. Freter,
Gonlin, and Webster were then able to map where pieces
of dated obsidian were found in the Copán Valley and trace
how the city expanded and then contracted. Since it is
possible to make a reasonable guess about the number of
houses and buildings  in a  particular  area,  the total
population of the city can be estimated. In the period 
AD
400–449, the population was negligible, estimated at about
six hundred people. It rose steadily to a peak of twenty-
eight  thousand  in 
AD
750–799. Though this does not
appear large by contemporary urban standards, it was
massive for that period; these numbers imply that in this
period, Copán had a larger population than London or
Paris. Other Maya cities, such as Tikal and Calakmul, were
undoubtedly much larger. In line with the evidence from the
Long Count dates, 
AD
800 was the population peak for
Copán. After this it began to decline, and by 
AD
900 it had
fallen to around fifteen thousand people. From there the fall
continued, and by 
AD
1200 the population had returned to
what it was eight hundred years previously.
How to move pages around in pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf rearrange pages; move pages in pdf file
How to move pages around in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to rearrange pages in a pdf document; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
The basis for the economic development of the Maya
Classical Era was the same as that for the Bushong and
the Natufians: the creation of extractive institutions with
some degree of state centralization. These institutions had
several key elements. Around 
AD
100, in the city of Tikal in
Guatemala,  there  emerged  a  new  type  of  dynastic
kingdom. A ruling class based on the ajaw (lord or ruler)
took root with a king called the k’uhul ajaw (divine lord) and,
underneath him, a hierarchy of aristocrats. The divine lord
organized the society with the cooperation of these elites
and also communicated with the gods. As far as we know,
this new set of political institutions did not allow for any sort
of popular participation, but it did bring stability. The k’uhul
ajaw raised tribute from farmers and organized labor to
build the great monuments, and the coalescence of these
institutions created the basis for an impressive economic
expansion. The Maya’s economy was based on extensive
occupational specialization, with skilled potters, weavers,
woodworkers, and tool and ornament makers. They also
traded obsidian, jaguar pelts, marine shells, cacao, salt,
and feathers among themselves and other polities over
long distances in Mexico. They probably had money, too,
and like the Aztecs, used cacao beans for currency.
The way in which the Maya Classical Era was founded
on the creation of extractive political institutions was very
similar to the situation among the Bushong, with Yax Ehb’
Xook at Tikal playing a role similar to that of King Shyaam.
The new political institutions led to a significant increase in
economic prosperity, much of which was then extracted by
the new elite based around the k’uhul ajaw. Once this
system had consolidated, by around 
AD
300, there was little
further technological change, however. Though there is
some  evidence  of  improved  irrigation  and  water
management  techniques,  agricultural  technology  was
rudimentary and appears not to have changed. Building
and artistic techniques became much more sophisticated
over time, but in total there was little innovation.
There was no creative destruction. But there were other
forms of destruction as the wealth that the extractive
institutions created for the k’uhul ajaw and the Maya elite
led to constant warfare, which worsened over time. The
sequence of conflicts is recorded in the Maya inscriptions,
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Pan around the PDF document
how to change page order in pdf document; change page order pdf preview
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET Pan around the PDF document.
move pages within pdf; how to reverse pages in pdf
with special glyphs indicating that a war took place at a
particular date in the Long Count. The planet Venus was
the celestial patron of war, and the Mayas regarded some
phases of the planet’s orbit as particularly auspicious for
waging war. The glyph that indicated warfare, known as
“star wars” by archaeologists, shows a star showering the
earth with a liquid that could be water or blood. The
inscriptions  also  reveal  patterns  of  alliance  and
competition. There were long contests for power between
the larger states, such as Tikal, Calakmul, Copán, and
Palenque, and these subjugated smaller states into a
vassal status. Evidence for this comes from glyphs marking
royal accessions. During this period, they start indicating
that the smaller states were now being dominated by
another, outside ruler.
Map 10 (this page
) shows the main Maya cities and the
various patterns of contact between them as reconstructed
by the archaeologists Nikolai Grube and Simon Martin.
These patterns indicate that though the large cities such as
Calakmul, Dos Pilas, Piedras Negras, and Yaxchilan had
extensive diplomatic contacts, some were often dominated
by others and they also fought each other.
The overwhelming fact about the Maya collapse is that it
coincides with the overthrow of the political model based
on the k’uhul ajaw. We saw in Copán that after Yax Pasaj’s
death in 
AD
810 there were no more kings. At around this
time the royal palaces were abandoned. Twenty miles to
the north of Copán, in the city of Quiriguá, the last king,
Jade Sky, ascended to the throne between 
AD
795 and
800. The last dated monument is from 
AD
810 by the Long
Count, the same year that Yax Pasaj died. The city was
abandoned soon after. Throughout the Maya area the story
is the same; the political institutions that had provided the
context  for  the  expansion  of  trade,  agriculture,  and
population  vanished.  Royal  courts  did  not  function,
monuments and temples were not carved, and palaces
were emptied. As political and social institutions unraveled,
reversing the process of state centralization, the economy
contracted and the population fell.
In  some  cases  the  major  centers  collapsed  from
widespread violence. The Petexbatun region of Guatemala
—where the great temples were subsequently pulled down
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy and Users can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Pan around the document.
how to reorder pdf pages; rearrange pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Users can view PDF document in single page or continue pages. Pan around the document.
how to reverse page order in pdf; pdf change page order
and the stone used to build extensive defensive walls—
provides one vivid example. As we’ll see in the next
chapter, it was very similar to what happened in the later
Roman Empire. Later, even in places such as Copán,
where there are fewer signs of violence at the time of the
collapse, many monuments were defaced or destroyed. In
some places the elite remained even after the initial
overthrow of the k’uhul ajaw. In Copán there is evidence of
the elite continuing to erect new buildings for at least
another two hundred years before they also disappeared.
Elsewhere elites seem to have gone at the same time as
the divine lord.
Existing archaeological evidence does not allow us to
reach a definitive conclusion about why the k’uhul ajaw and
elites surrounding him were overthrown and the institutions
that had created the Maya Classical Era collapsed. We
know this took place in the context of intensified inter-city
warfare, and it seems likely that opposition and rebellion
within the cities, perhaps led by different factions of the
elite, overthrew the institution.
Though the extractive institutions that the Mayas created
produced sufficient wealth for the cities to flourish and the
elite to  become wealthy and generate great art and
monumental buildings, the system was not stable. The
extractive institutions upon which this narrow elite ruled
created extensive inequality, and thus the potential for
infighting between those who could benefit from the wealth
extracted from the people. This conflict ultimately led to the
undoing of the Maya civilization.
W
HAT
G
OES
W
RONG
?
Extractive institutions are so common in history because
they have a powerful logic: they can generate some limited
prosperity while at the same time distributing it into the
hands of a small elite. For this growth to happen, there must
be political centralization. Once this is in place, the state—
or the elite controlling the state—typically has incentives to
invest and generate wealth, encourage others to invest so
that the state can extract resources from them, and even
mimic some of the processes that would normally be set in
motion by inclusive economic institutions and markets. In
the Caribbean plantation economies, extractive institutions
took the form of the elite using coercion to force slaves to
produce sugar. In the Soviet Union, they took the form of the
Communist Party reallocating resources from agriculture to
industry  and  structuring  some  sort  of  incentives  for
managers and workers. As we have seen, such incentives
were undermined by the nature of the system.
The potential for creating extractive growth gives an
impetus to political centralization and is the reason why
King Shyaam wished to create the Kuba Kingdom, and
likely accounts for why the Natufians in the Middle East set
up a primitive form of law and order, hierarchy, and
extractive institutions that would ultimately lead to the
Neolithic  Revolution.  Similar  processes  also  likely
underpinned the emergence of settled societies and the
transition to agriculture in the Americas, and can be seen in
the sophisticated  civilization that  the  Mayas  built  on
foundations laid by highly extractive institutions coercing
many for the benefit of their narrow elites.
The growth generated by extractive institutions is very
different in nature from growth created under inclusive
institutions, however. Most important, it is not sustainable.
By their very nature, extractive institutions do not foster
creative destruction and generate at best only a limited
amount  of  technological  progress.  The  growth  they
engender thus lasts for only so long. The Soviet experience
gives  a  vivid  illustration  of  this  limit.  Soviet  Russia
generated rapid growth as it caught up rapidly with some of
the advanced technologies in the world, and resources
were allocated out of the highly inefficient agricultural sector
and into industry. But ultimately the incentives faced in
every  sector,  from  agriculture  to  industry,  could  not
stimulate technological progress. This took place in only a
few pockets where resources were being poured and
where innovation was strongly rewarded because of its role
in the competition with the West. Soviet growth, however
rapid it was, was bound to be relatively short lived, and it
was already running out of steam by the 1970s.
Lack of creative destruction and innovation is not the only
reason why  there are severe  limits  to growth  under
extractive institutions. The history of the Maya city-states
illustrates a more ominous and, alas, more common end,
again implied by the internal logic of extractive institutions.
As these institutions create significant gains for the elite,
there will be strong incentives for others to fight to replace
the current elite. Infighting and instability are thus inherent
features of extractive institutions, and they not only create
further inefficiencies but also often reverse any political
centralization,  sometimes  even  leading  to  the  total
breakdown of law and order and descent into chaos, as the
Maya  city-states  experienced  following  their  relative
success during their Classical Era.
Though  inherently  limited,  growth  under  extractive
institutions may nonetheless appear spectacular when it’s
in motion. Many in the Soviet Union and many more in the
Western world were awestruck by Soviet growth in the
1920s, ’30s, ’40s, ’50s, ’60s, and even as late as the ’70s,
in  the  same  way  that they are  mesmerized by  the
breakneck pace of economic growth in China today. But as
we will discuss in greater detail in chapter 15
, China under
the rule of the Communist Party is another example of
society experiencing growth under extractive institutions
and is similarly unlikely to generate sustained growth unless
it undergoes a fundamental political transformation toward
inclusive political institutions.
6.
DRIFTING APART
H
OW
V
ENICE
B
ECAME A
M
USEUM
T
HE GROUP OF ISLANDS
that form Venice lie at the far north
of the Adriatic Sea. In the Middle Ages, Venice was
possibly the richest place in the world, with the most
advanced  set  of  inclusive  economic  institutions
underpinned by nascent political inclusiveness. It gained its
independence  in 
AD
810, at what turned out to be a
fortuitous time. The economy of Europe was recovering
from the decline it had suffered as the Roman Empire
collapsed,  and  kings  such  as  Charlemagne  were
reconstituting strong central political power. This led to
stability, greater security, and an expansion of trade, which
Venice was in a unique position to take advantage of. It
was a nation of seafarers, placed right in the middle of the
Mediterranean. From the East came spices, Byzantine-
manufactured goods, and slaves. Venice became rich. By
1050,  when  Venice  had  already  been  expanding
economically for at least a century, it had a population of
45,000 people. This increased by more than 50 percent, to
70,000, by 1200. By 1330 the population had again
increased by another 50 percent, to 110,000; Venice was
then as big as Paris, and probably three times the size of
London.
One of the key bases for the economic expansion of
Venice was a series of contractual innovations making
economic  institutions much  more inclusive.  The  most
famous was the commenda, a rudimentary type of joint
stock company, which formed only for the duration of a
single trading mission. A commenda involved two partners,
a “sedentary” one who stayed in Venice and one who
traveled. The sedentary partner put capital into the venture,
while  the  traveling  partner  accompanied the  cargo.
Typically, the sedentary partner put in the lion’s share of the
capital. Young entrepreneurs who did not have wealth
themselves could then get into the trading business by
traveling with the merchandise. It was a key channel of
upward social mobility. Any losses in the voyage were
shared according to the amount of capital the partners had
put in. If the voyage made money, profits were based on
two types of commenda contracts. If the commenda was
unilateral,  then the sedentary  merchant  provided 100
percent of the capital and received 75 percent of the
profits. If it was bilateral, the sedentary merchant provided
67 percent of the capital and received 50 percent of the
profits. Studying official documents, one sees how powerful
a force the commenda was in fostering upward social
mobility: these documents are full of new names, people
who had previously not been among the Venetian elite. In
government  documents  of 
AD
960, 971, and 982, the
number of new names comprise 69 percent, 81 percent,
and 65 percent, respectively, of those recorded.
This economic inclusiveness and the rise of new families
through trade forced the political system to become even
more open. The doge, who governed Venice, was selected
for  life  by the General Assembly. Though a  general
gathering of all citizens, in practice the General Assembly
was dominated by a core group of powerful families.
Though the doge was very powerful, his power was
gradually  reduced  over  time  by  changes  in  political
institutions. After 1032 the doge was elected along with a
newly created Ducal Council, whose job was also to ensure
that the doge did not acquire absolute power. The first
doge hemmed in by this council, Domenico Flabianico,
was a wealthy silk merchant from a family that had not
previously held high office. This institutional change was
followed by a huge expansion of Venetian mercantile and
naval power. In 1082 Venice was granted extensive trade
privileges in Constantinople, and a Venetian Quarter was
created in that city. It soon housed ten thousand Venetians.
Here we see inclusive economic and political institutions
beginning to work in tandem.
The economic expansion of Venice, which created more
pressure for political change, exploded after the changes in
political and economic institutions that followed the murder
of the doge in 1171. The first important innovation was the
creation of a Great Council, which was to be the ultimate
source of political power in Venice from this point on. The
council was made up of officeholders of the Venetian state,
such as judges, and was dominated by aristocrats. In
addition to these officeholders, each year a hundred new
members were nominated to the council by a nominating
committee whose four members were chosen by lot from
the existing council. The council also subsequently chose
the members for two subcouncils, the Senate and the
Council  of  Forty,  which  had  various  legislative  and
executive tasks. The Great Council also chose the Ducal
Council, which was expanded from two to six members.
The second innovation was the creation of yet another
council, chosen by the Great Council by lot, to nominate the
doge. Though the choice had to be ratified by the General
Assembly, since they nominated only one person, this
effectively gave the choice of doge to the council. The third
innovation was that a new doge had to swear an oath of
office that circumscribed ducal power. Over time these
constraints were continually expanded so that subsequent
doges  had  to  obey  magistrates,  then  have  all  their
decisions approved by the Ducal Council. The Ducal
Council also took on the role of ensuring that the doge
obeyed all decisions of the Great Council.
These political  reforms  led to a  further  series  of
institutional innovations: in law, the creation of independent
magistrates, courts, a court of appeals, and new private
contract  and  bankruptcy  laws.  These  new  Venetian
economic institutions allowed the creation of new legal
business forms and new types of contracts. There was
rapid financial innovation, and we see the beginnings of
modern banking around this time in Venice. The dynamic
moving Venice toward fully inclusive institutions looked
unstoppable.
But there was a tension in all this. Economic growth
supported  by  the  inclusive  Venetian  institutions  was
accompanied by creative destruction. Each new wave of
enterprising  young  men  who  became  rich  via  the
commenda or other similar economic institutions tended to
reduce the profits and economic success of established
elites. And they did not just reduce their profits; they also
challenged their political power. Thus there was always a
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested