c# pdf viewer free : How to reorder pdf pages software application cloud windows html winforms class Windows%20Powershell%20in%20Action%202nd%20Edition49-part1504

460
CHAPTER 12
R
EMOTING
AND
BACKGROUND
JOBS
[int] $NumProcesses = 5 
)
The first two are obvious: 
$ServerList
is the name of the file containing the list of 
servers to check, and 
$ThrottleLimit
is the the throttle limit. Both of these param-
eters have reasonable defaults. The third one, 
$NumProcesses
, is less obvious. This 
parameter controls the number of process objects to include in the 
TopCPU
and 
TopWS 
entries in the table returned from the remote host. Although you could, in theory, 
trim the list that gets returned locally, you can’t add to it, so you need to evaluate this 
parameter on the remote end to get full control. That means it has to be a parameter 
to the remote command. This is another reason scriptblocks are useful. You can add 
parameters to the scriptblock that’s executed on the remote end. You’re finally modi-
fying the data collection scriptblock; the modified scriptblock looks like this:
$gatherInformation ={
param ($procLimit = 5)
@{
Date = Get-Date
FreeSpace = (Get-PSDrive c).Free
PageFaults = (Get-WmiObject `
Win32_PerfRawData_PerfOS_Memory).PageFaultsPersec
TopCPU = Get-Process | sort CPU -desc | select -First $procLimit
TopWS = Get-Process | sort -desc WS | select -First $procLimit
}
And the updated call to 
Invoke-Command
looks like this:
Invoke-Command -Throttle 10 -ComputerName $servers `
-ScriptBlock $gatherInformation `
-ArgumentList $numProcesses
Once again, let’s look at the complete updated script, shown in the following listing.
param (
[parameter]
[string] $serverFile = "servers.txt",
[parameter]
[int] $throttleLimit = 10,
[parameter]
[int] $numProcesses = 5 
)
$gatherInformation ={
param ([int] $procLimit = 5)
@{
Date = Get-Date
FreeSpace = (Get-PSDrive c).Free
PageFaults = (Get-WmiObject `
Win32_PerfRawData_PerfOS_Memory).PageFaultsPersec
TopCPU = Get-Process | sort CPU -desc | select -First $procLimit
Listing12.3    Parameterized data acquisition script
How to reorder pdf pages - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pdf pages online; rearrange pdf pages in reader
How to reorder pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to move pages in pdf reader; switch page order pdf
A
PPLYING
P
OWER
S
HELL
REMOTING
461
TopWS = Get-Process | sort -desc WS | select -First $procLimit
}
$servers = Import-CSV servers.csv |
where { $_.Day -eq (Get-Date).DayOfWeek } |
foreach { $_.Name }
Invoke-Command -Throttle 10 -ComputerName $servers `
-ScriptBlock $gatherInformation `
-ArgumentList $numProcesses
This script is starting to become a bit complex. At this point, it’s a good idea to sepa-
rate the script code in 
$gatherInformation
that gathers the remote information 
from the “infrastructure” script that orchestrates the information gathering. You’ll put 
this information-gathering part into its own script. Call this new script BasicHealth-
Model.ps1 (shown in the following listing) because it gathers some basic information 
about the state of a machine. 
param ($procLimit = 5) 
@{
Date = Get-Date
FreeSpace = (Get-PSDrive c).Free
PageFaults = (Get-WmiObject `
Win32_PerfRawData_PerfOS_Memory).PageFaultsPersec
TopCPU = Get-Process | sort CPU -desc | select -First $procLimit
TopWS = Get-Process | sort -desc WS | select -First $procLimit 
}
The orchestration code has to be changed to invoke this script. This step turns out to 
be easy—you can just use the 
-FilePath
option on 
Invoke-Command
:
Invoke-Command -Throttle 10 -ComputerName $servers `
-FilePath BasicHealthModel.ps1 `
-ArgumentList $numProcesses
You’ll put the final revised orchestration script into a file called Get-HealthData.ps1, 
shown in the next listing.
param (
[parameter]
[string] $serverFile = "servers.txt",
[parameter]
[int] $throttleLimit = 10,
[parameter]
[int] $numProcesses = 5
[parameter]
[string] $model = "BasicHealthModel.ps1" 
)
Listing 12.4    Basic Health Model script
Listing 12.5    Data acquisition driver script
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
pdf rearrange pages online; move pages in pdf acrobat
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
change pdf page order reader; how to move pages in a pdf document
462
CHAPTER 12
R
EMOTING
AND
BACKGROUND
JOBS
$servers = Import-CSV servers.csv |
where { $_.Day -eq (Get-Date).DayOfWeek } |
foreach { $_.Name }
Invoke-Command -Throttle 10 -ComputerName $servers `
-FilePath $model `
-ArgumentList $numProcesses 
This separation of concerns allows you to add a parameter for specifying alternative 
health models.
The result is that, with a small amount of code, you’ve created a flexible frame-
work for an “agentless” distributed health monitoring system. With this system, you 
can run this health model on any machine without having to worry about whether 
the script is installed on that machine or whether the machine has the correct version 
of the script. It’s always “available” and always the right version because the infra-
structure is pushing it out to the target machines.
NOTE
What we’re doing here isn’t what most people would call mon-
itoring. Monitoring usually implies a continual semi-real-time mecha-
nism for noticing a problem and then generating an alert. This system 
is certainly not real-time and it’s a pull model, not a push. This solu-
tion  is  more  appropriate  for  configuration  analysis.  The  Microsoft 
Baseline Configuration  Analyzer  has  a similar (though  much  more 
sophisticated) architecture.
You now have an idea of how to use remoting to execute a command on a remote 
server. This is a powerful mechanism, but sometimes you need to send more than one 
command to a server—for example, you might want to run multiple data-gathering 
scripts, one after the other on the same machine. Because there’s a significant over-
head in setting up each remote connection, you don’t want to create a new connec-
tion for every script you execute. Instead, you want to be able to establish a persistent 
connection to a machine, run all the scripts, and then shut down the connection. In 
the next section you’ll learn how this is accomplished with sessions.
12.3
S
ESSIONS
AND
PERSISTENT
CONNECTIONS
In the previous section, you learned how to run individual scriptblocks on remote 
machines. For each scriptblock you sent, a new connection was set up that involved 
authentication and version checks, an instance of PowerShell was created, the script-
block was executed, the results were serialized and returned to the caller, and finally, 
the PowerShell instance was discarded and the connection was torn down. From the 
user’s point of view, the 
Invoke-Command
operation is simple, but under the covers a 
lot of work has to be done by the system, which makes creating a new connection 
each time a costly proposition. A new connection for each operation also means that 
you  can’t maintain any state  on  the  remote host—things  like variable  settings or
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf change page order online; pdf reverse page order preview
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
Support navigating to the previous or next page of the PDF document; Able to insert, delete or reorder PDF document page in VB.NET document viewer;
pdf reverse page order online; how to reorder pages in pdf
S
ESSIONS
AND
PERSISTENT
CONNECTIONS
463
function definitions. To address these issues, in this section we’ll show you how to 
create persistent connections called sessions that will give you much better perfor-
mance when you want to perform a series of interactions with the remote host as 
well as allow you to maintain remote state.
In simplest terms, a session is the environment where PowerShell commands are 
executed. This is true even when you run the console host: 
PowerShell.exe
. The 
console host program creates a local session that it uses to execute the commands you 
type. This session remains alive until you exit the program.
When you use remoting to connect to another computer, you’re also creating one 
remote session for every local session you remote from, as shown in figure 12.2.
As mentioned earlier, each session contains all the things you work with in Power-
Shell—all the variables, all the functions that are defined, and the history of the com-
mands you typed—and each session is independent of any other session. If you want 
to work with these sessions, then you need a way to manipulate them. You do this in 
the  “usual way”:  through objects  and  cmdlets.  PowerShell  represents  sessions  as 
objects that are of type 
PSSession
.
These 
PSSession
objects play an important role in remote computing: they hold 
the state on the remote computer. By default, every time you connect to a remote 
computer by name with 
Invoke-Command
, a new 
PSSession
object is created to 
represent the connection to that remote machine. For example, when you run the 
command
Invoke-Command mycomputer { "hello world" }
PowerShell connects to the remote machine, creates a 
PSSession
on that computer, 
executes the command, and then discards the session. This process is inefficient and 
will be quite slow because setting up a connection and then creating and configuring 
a session object is a lot of work. This pattern of operations is shown in figure 12.3.
Local machine 1
Remote machine
Remote session
for user 1
Local session for
user 1
Local machine 2
Local session for
user 2
Remote session
for user 2
User 1
User 2
Figure 12.2 Each local session that connects to a remote target requires a corresponding 
session on the target machine. This session may be transient and go away at the end of the 
command, or it may remain open until explicitly closed.
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader; reordering pages in pdf document
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pdf pages online; move pages in pdf reader
464
CHAPTER 12
R
EMOTING
AND
BACKGROUND
JOBS
In this figure, you see the local machine setting up and then tearing down a session 
for each call to 
Invoke-Command
. If you’re going to run more than one command on 
a computer, you need a way to create persistent connections to that computer. You 
can do this with 
New-PSSession
; the syntax for this cmdlet is shown in figure 12.4.
Invoke-Command creates connection 1
Session created
Scriptblock 1 sent for processing
VB.NET PDF: VB.NET Guide to Process PDF Document in .NET Project
It can be used to add or delete PDF document page(s), sort the order of PDF pages, add image to PDF document page and extract page(s) from PDF document in VB
change pdf page order online; pdf reorder pages online
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
SDK, developers are easily to access, extract, swap, reorder, insert, mark up and delete pages in any multi upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents.
how to reorder pages in pdf file; rearrange pages in pdf file
Remote machine
New-PSSession creates connection
PSSessioncreated
Invoke-Command sends scriptblock 1 for processing
he result from 
Measure-Command
shows that each operation appears to be taking 
bout 1 second. Modify the example to create a session at the beginning, and then 
use it in each call to 
Invoke-Command
S (2) > Measure-Command { 
  $s = New-PSSession brucepayx61 
  1..5 | 
    foreach { Invoke-Command $s {Get-Date} } 
  Remove-PSSession $s 
> } | 
> Format-Table -AutoSize TotalSeconds 
>
otalSeconds 
-----------
1.138609
his output shows that it’s taking about one-fifth the time as the first command. As a 
urther experiment, you’ll change the number of remote invocations from 5 to 50:
S (3) > Measure-Command { 
  $s = New-PSSession brucepayx61 
prompting is done, and so on. The host services are made available to scripts through 
the 
$host
variable, which also has a 
Name
property used to determine what host the 
script is running under. Two client host applications are included with PowerShell 
v2—the PowerShell console host
PS (1) > $host.Name
ConsoleHost
and the PowerShell 
ISE
:
PS (1) > $host.Name
Windows PowerShell ISE Host
Also included is a server host used by the remoting layer:
PS (2) > Invoke-Command localhost { $host.Name } 
ServerRemoteHost
NOTE
An impressive number of third-party client hosts are also avail-
able. As of this writing, these third-party hosts include PowerShell Plus 
from Idera Software, 
P
ower
GUI
from Quest Software, PowerWF from 
nly one command runs at a time
final characteristic of a session instance is that you can run only one command (or 
ommand pipeline) in a session at one time. If you try to run more than one com-
and at a time, a “session busy” error will be raised. But there’s some limited com-
and queuing: if there’s a request to run a second command synchronously (one at a 
me), the command will wait up to 4 minutes for the first command to be completed 
efore generating the “session busy” error. But if a second command is requested to 
un  asynchronously—that  is,  without  waiting—the  busy  error  will  be  generated 
mmediately.
With some knowledge of the characteristics and limitations of PowerShell ses-
ons, you can start to look at how to use them.
sing the New-PSSession cmdlet
n this section, you’ll learn how to use the 
New-PSSession
cmdlet. Let’s start with an 
xample. First, you’ll create a 
PSSession
on the local machine by specifying 
ost
as the target computer:
You get the expected value back. If you had done this without using the session, you 
wouldn’t have gotten the correct value back because the value of 
$x
lost when the remote session was closed down. Next, define a function 
PS (6) > Invoke-Command $s { function hi { "Hello there" } }
And then use 
Invoke-Command
to call it:
PS (7) > Invoke-Command $s { hi } 
Hello there
This works in much the same way as it does in the local case—changes to the remote 
environment are persisted across the invocations. You can redefine the function and 
make it reference the 
$x
variable you defined earlier:
PS (8) > Invoke-Command $s { function hi { "Hello there, x is $x" } } 
PS (9) > Invoke-Command $s { hi }
Hello there, x is 1234
You get the preserved value.
NOTE
We’ve had people ask if other users on the computer can see 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested