c# pdf viewer library free : Rearrange pages in pdf reader software control cloud windows web page wpf class Winter20110-part1666

ALUMNI THEATRE
THEN &
NOW
PAGE 10
VISIONS
FOR THE
FUTURE
PAGE 12
Rearrange pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader; reverse page order pdf
Rearrange pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pages of pdf; how to reverse pages in pdf
Agricola News
 For the alumni and friends of Nova Scotia Agricultural College
Dear Friend, 
Happy New Year to you and your 
family and best wishes for 2011! 
It’s hard to picture what the year 
ahead of us will bring.  One can 
only imagine…
As this edition of Agricola News 
highlights, NSAC has come a long 
way since it opened in 1905. Cam-
pus has seen many changes. 
From just a few buildings with 
a handful of program offerings, to additions of residences and a de-
gree program, to a sustainable campus with no idling zones and a 
tray-less cafeteria, to a governance transition. 
Don Drayton (Class of ’58) compares the changes he’s noticed on 
campus from his days as a student to when he returned for his 50th 
class reunion, two years ago. His story is quite moving.
But what does the future hold? Plans are underway for a horse 
barn (page 15) and a proposition has been made for upgrades to 
Alumni Theatre (page10), among many other improvements (page 
12). However, one can merely sit back and picture what NSAC will 
look like in 10, 30 and 50 years from now.
It’s definitely an exciting time to be witnessing first-hand these 
changes from my office at NSAC. I look forward to the future at NSAC, 
whatever that may look like, working with you and your classmates!
As always, I hope you’ll keep in touch and let me know what you’ve 
been up to. We enjoy hearing from alumni!
Enjoy this edition of Agricola News.
Regards, 
Alisha Johnson 
A Message from the Editor 
Agricola News
Published twice yearly by NSAC’s Alumni Association
Editor:
Alisha Johnson
Contributing Writers:
Stephanie Rogers , Don Drayton, Gillian Fraser and 
Justine Gelevan 
Design & Layout:
Matthew Leights, NSAC Print Centre
Please send your letters, comments or correspondence to:
Agricola News
Nova Scotia Agricultural College
P.O. Box 550
Truro, Nova Scotia
B2N 5E3
phone: 902-893-6022
fax: 902-897-9399
email: alumni@nsac.ca
Mailed under Canada Post Publication Mail
Sales Agreement No. 40063668
Keep in Touch!
Follow us online
You can now reconnect with former classmates, hear about 
events and find out what’s going on at NSAC by following 
us online. Join us on the following social media sites: 
Twitter: twitter.com/nsacu
Facebook: facebook.com/nsacu
YouTube: youtube.com/nsacalumni
If you haven’t already, sign up for our monthly alumni  
e-News by sending a request to alumni@nsac.ca 
To request your version of Agricola news electronically 
e-mail us at alumni@nsac.ca
“in Touch!”
Submissions for the regular feature in Agricola News can be 
sent to alumni@nsac.ca, through a Facebook message, or 
by mailing the Development & External Relations office,  
PO Box 550, Truro, NS B2N 5E3
Address change
Update your address by calling 902-893-6721, e-mailing 
alumni@nsac.ca or fill out our online form at nsac.ca/
alumni/update
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
how to move pdf pages around; how to move pages in pdf acrobat
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pages in pdf document; move pages in a pdf
Contents
COvER STORY 
12
visions for the Future
During the past 106 years, campus has seen significant changes, as 
have the programs, facilities, students and staff of NSAC. But what 
will the future bring?
HIGHLIGHTS
NSAC’s New Ring Catches On 
9
NSAC’s new ring, which was launched last spring, is gaining attention. 
Not only is it being purchased and worn, but also recognized!
Nova Scotia’s Farm Equipment Museum   11
From tractors, hay loaders, milk bottles, to tea pots and even old sports 
equipment, you can see the progression of farm life since the mid 1800’s 
as you tour through Nova Scotia’s Farm Equipment Museum. The dedi-
cated individuals who came up with the concept never pictured the  
museum to be what it is today.
Fifty-Two Years Ago 
13       
Don Drayton (Class of ‘58) reflects on his experiences as a West 
Indian at NSAC in the late 50’s. He compares his experiences to his 
most recent visit to NSAC.
Honouring our Stars 
21        
NSAC alumni have distinguished themselves through outstanding 
service to their alma mater, their communities, the Province of Nova 
Scotia and beyond. Our alumni stars were awarded at NSAC’s 2010 
Blue & Gold Awards Gala.
REGULAR SECTIONS
Message from the Co-Presidents 
04
Around & About 
06
Research 
16
In Memory 
17
Events & Reunions 
18
Athletics 
27
Look Who’s Talking 
29
In Touch 
30
9
27
18
Volume 36, Number 1, 2011
16
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
reverse pdf page order online; move pages in pdf
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
pages simply with a few lines of C# code. C# Codes to Sort Slides Order. If you want to use a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange
move pdf pages in preview; pdf reverse page order online
Agricola News / Co-Presidents Message
Page 4
If we were asked to close our eyes and picture an ideal NSAC, 
what would it look like?  
We would only have to open our eyes for the answer.  
This has been an extraordinary and historic year for our uni-
versity.  NSAC is poised to become a board governed post-sec-
ondary institution in just a few short months (April 2011).  This 
transition is the first, but significant step, in NSAC’s transforma-
tion to a more vibrant, competitive and responsive organization 
- empowered to define itself. 
Although we have enjoyed our roles as co-presidents during 
this time of transition, plans are underway for the recruitment of 
an interim president to lead our university forward.  The process 
will be an accelerated one with involvement from key stakehold-
ers, including our alumni, through a brief survey which will be 
distributed for input over the next several weeks. 
This fall saw us reach our highest enrollment in our 105 year 
history with 961 students, surpassing an all-time high of 950 
students in 1996.  Of these students, 85 were new international 
students from nearly 20 countries bringing international student 
enrollment to 19 per cent of the student body – another all-time 
high!
For the fourth consecutive year in a row, NSAC is ranked No. 1 
in research intensity among Atlantic Canada’s 18 universities ac-
cording to Research Infosource Inc. and its Canada’s Top 50 Re-
search Universities List.
An official sod turning was held in early November for the 
Atlantic Centre for Agricultural Innovation (ACAI) which is set to 
open its doors this summer.  The centre will be the first building 
on our campus to be built to LEED Silver standards, following the 
Green Building Rating System. ACAI will be a one-stop-shop for 
new agri-business development and will pursue incubation of 
new products, attraction of new agri-business and acceleration 
of new technologies.
We were also pleased to be able to interact with many of our 
alumni over the past year at many special events on campus and 
various reunions held across the region. We were particularly 
pleased to participate in honoring three of our alumni stars at 
the annual Blue & Gold Awards Gala. ( see page 21).
Many of our alumni who were once honored with scholar-
ships during their time as students have returned to participate 
as donors at our annual scholarship banquet.  This year close to 
$1 million in scholarships and bursaries was distributed to one 
third of our student body.  We are very appreciative of this sup-
port and enjoyed an insightful speech, given by guest speaker 
and alumnus Ryan Riordan (Class of ’04), who was recently elect-
ed to the New Brunswick legislature (see page 7).
So as we begin a new year we look forward to all that is possi-
ble for our university, our staff and faculty, our students and you, 
our alumni.  We wish you and yours much prosperity and success.  
The year 2011 promises to be a great one!
Sincerely, 
Dr. Leslie MacLaren
Co-President, vice President Academic
Dr. Bernie MacDonald
Co-President, vice President Administration 
A Message from NSAC’s Co-Presidents 
As co-presidents of Nova Scotia 
Agricultural  College,  we  are  very 
pleased to provide you with an update 
on the activities and developments 
taking place at your alma mater.
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages in extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
move pages in pdf file; moving pages in pdf
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
reorder pdf pages; how to reorder pages in pdf
Page 5
Agricola News / Governance Update
As part of our commitment to keep our alumni informed as our 
governance structure transitions, I am pleased to provide you 
with this update.    
As you know, we are currently working towards a new gover-
nance model that establishes NSAC as a distinct legal entity, gov-
erned by a board of governors and an academic senate.  
This transition was made possible by the passing of the NSAC 
Act in 2008 which will enable us to be competitive in the post-
secondary education market and to more effectively contribute 
to the province’s economic and social fabric.  
A crown corporation model was one of three governance op-
tions considered including operating as a stand-alone university 
or merger with another. This model provides the administrative 
processes most suitable to a post-secondary institution and is 
free of civil service constraints.  It is the most feasible option and 
faces the least opposition and risk.  The process of transitioning to 
a crown corporation model also completes the intermediate steps 
necessary for consideration of the other two options in the future.
The NSAC Act was passed on May 27, 2008 and partially pro-
claimed on February 11, 2009. This allowed for the establishment 
of a transitional board of governors and formalization of the proj-
ect. The Transitional Board of Governors includes Bob MacKay, 
Chair, Arnold Rovers (Class of ‘65), Frazer Hunter, Dan O’Brien, 
Sarah Campbell and Mike Chisholm, Secretary.  
The initial focus of transition for April 1, 2011 will be on mak-
ing the administrative changes necessary to provide the founda-
tion for longer term transformation as a stand alone institution.
The following elements fall within the project scope:
1.  Establishment of an NSAC Board of Governors and support 
structure
2.  Establishment of an initial NSAC corporate management team
3.  Provisioning of a corporate operational support environment
4.  Transitioning of NSAC employees to the NSAC corporate entity
5.  Initiation of some longer term transformation visioning  
activities.
The NSAC Governance Transition Project is following three phases:
Planning and preparation – fall of 2010.  This phase involves review-
ing the current environment, identifying alternatives and devel-
oping evaluation criteria for the alternatives with the Transitional 
Board.
Design and development – spring of 2011.  During this phase pre-
ferred solution paths will be selected and more detailed plans 
developed.  This includes negotiation of possible service level/
business arrangements. 
Implementation – spring 2011 and onward.  All the “must-haves’ will 
be implemented or with a clear line of sight to completion as de-
termined by the Transitional Board and the government.
Future of NSAC
When asked about the future of NSAC under the new model, 
Bob McKay Transition Board Chairperson offered the following 
comment, “After transition, the new NSAC will be better able to 
deliver on its important role in developing the bio resource and 
agri-food sector in Nova Scotia and beyond. We’re excited about 
the possibilities.” 
Please visit the NSAC Governance Transition Project website 
where you will find information on the roles and responsibili-
ties of the NSAC Transitional Board of Governors; terms of refer-
ence for the Steering Committee and Executive Sponsor as well 
as the NSAC Governance Transition Project team and the proj-
ect governance model, which have been defined and posted at  
http://nsac.ca/governance.   
Sincerely,
Bernie MacDonald,
Co-President, vP Administration
Executive Sponsor, NSAC Transition
NSAC Governance Transition Project 
Update 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order pdf reader; how to move pages around in pdf file
Page 6
Around & About...
passion turned to career
Meghan Hickey (Class of ’03)
After graduating in 2003, 
Meghan Hickey knew she 
wanted to go on an experi-
ence of a lifetime. Armed 
with her passion for wine-
making, which she discov-
ered while studying at NSAC, 
Meghan headed to New Zea-
land then the UK. While hav-
ing the time of her life, she’s 
also now in the midst of turn-
ing her passion into a career. 
“I fell in love with wine making during my small fruit production 
class at NSAC,” says Meghan. “Dr. Hal Ju took our class on a tour of 
Jost vineyards and vineyards in the Annapolis valley - ever since, I’ve 
been hooked.” 
When Meghan received her diploma at NSAC, she knew she 
couldn’t settle for working in a garden centre. She wanted to work 
towards her dream job.
“I would love to be a winemaker and vineyard manager of a small 
boutique winery,” says Meghan, ”one that produces top class wines.”
When she first settled in New Zealand, Meghan worked in vari-
ous vineyards learning the ropes of grape growing. “Getting my first 
job at a vineyard in New Zealand was easy,” she says. “There is a huge 
demand for seasonal workers.” She knew almost instantly that she 
could never handle an office job. She needed to be outside tending 
the vines. 
“Right away I wanted to go back to school and study wine mak-
ing,” she said. 
A few years ago Meghan and her husband moved to England. 
She is in now in her second and final year, at Plumpton College (part 
of University of Brighton), where she is taking her passion to the next 
step. 
“In some ways, Plumpton College is a lot like NSAC,” says Meghan. 
“However it has a fully functional commercial winery, with 10 ha of 
vines.”  The school also boasts an equine unit with over 20 horses. 
When she graduates next year, Meghan and her husband are 
contemplating heading back to New Zealand. However, return-
ing to Nova Scotia isn’t out of the question either. “During a recent 
trip home, we visited the Annapolis valley and were shocked at the 
amazing quality of wine being produced there,” says Meghan. “So, 
who knows?”
As for Meghan’s favorite wine, “I always get asked that question,” 
she says. “It always changes too, but at this moment in time my fa-
vorite would have to be the Pegasus Bay Riesling, from the Waipara 
region of New Zealand. However, ‘Blow me Down’, from Blomidon 
Estate in the Annapolis valley is closing in on second.”
Seeing the Glass half Full
Jim Hamilton (Class of ‘74)
It didn’t take a career in inter-
national development to open 
Jim Hamilton’s eyes to the way 
people live around the globe. He 
loves traveling and has visited 
more than 25 countries.
But it is his commitment 
to  improving  water  condi-
tions in developing countries 
that has taken him to some 
of the most challenging re-
gions of the world.  
One of those countries is 
Bangladesh, where naturally oc-
curring arsenic in groundwater may be exposing as much as 20 
per cent of the population to chronic poisoning and other arse-
nic-related health problems.  
Jim was recently involved with the CIDA-funded Bangladesh 
Environmental Technology verification – Support to Arsenic Miti-
gation Project (BETv-SAM). In a nutshell, the project aimed to im-
prove the safety of drinking water for Bangladeshis. 
It did this by verifying the performance of selected arsenic 
removal technologies. It also helped local Bangladeshi laborato-
ries carry out the verification and monitoring of arsenic removal 
technologies. 
“We provided Canadian technical expertise to enhance the 
knowledge and skills of Bangladeshi scientists,” says Jim. “This al-
lowed Bangladesh to draw on international best practice in the 
design and delivery of environmental technology verification 
programs.”  
“BETv-SAM provided Bangladesh scientists with the skills 
and tools to ensure that only certified arsenic removal technolo-
gies would find their way into the marketplace; ensuring only 
technologies with proven performance were sold to people in 
arsenic-contaminated areas. In this way, the consumption of ar-
senic-unsafe water and the ensuing effects of arsenicosis could 
be avoided.”
In addition to training Bangladeshi scientists, Jim’s project 
team introduced quality assurance/quality control and stan-
dard operating procedures to participating laboratories.  One 
government laboratory, at the Bangladesh Council of Scientific 
& Industrial Research Analytical Chemistry Lab, has become the 
first government laboratory in Bangladesh to achieve ISO 17025 
international accreditation. The achievement underscores the ef-
fectiveness of the capacity building work undertaken by the project.
“Bangladesh is a small country with huge population pres-
sures, limited natural resources and frequent natural disasters, 
Agricola News / Around & About
Page 7
amongst other issues of political, religious and civil challenges,” 
explains Jim. “But it is also very dynamic and has great potential 
for mobilizing human capital for economic benefit and social 
progress.  
“The majority of Bangladeshis are no different than you or I. They 
have their own aspirations, family commitments and personal 
goals.”
Leading a career he characterizes as serendipitous, Jim has 
been living NSAC’s brand of “making a difference.”
In his new role with CHF, a Canadian non-profit international 
development organization, Jim continues to make a difference.   
CHF works with local developing country partners to provide 
targeted support to poor rural communities through transfer of 
skills and knowledge, technical expertise and livelihood assis-
tance to help lift them out of poverty. 
According to Jim, “There are so many people of various cul-
tures, ethnicities and educational backgrounds around the 
world; including vulnerable and excluded groups which have 
limited opportunity, but all kinds of potential. They deserve our 
attention and stewardship.”
‘The Guy on the Bike’
Ryan Riordon (Class of ’04 & ‘09)
Does the story about 
the young politician, 
who visited everyone 
in his riding using only 
his bicycle for trans-
portation, sound famil-
iar? That young politi-
cian was Ryan Riordon, 
a 28-year-old MLA can-
didate, in NB.
Last fall, Ryan want-
ed to campaign differ-
ently from his competitors. That he did. By visiting 3,020 homes 
out of 4,000 on his bike, Ryan achieved something many said 
could not be done. 
Ryan became a conversation piece for people and was quick-
ly known as ‘the guy on the bike’. The benefits of using this mode 
of transportation helped not only his campaign, but also the en-
vironment and his health, as his busy schedule didn’t leave much 
time for exercise. 
He is proud of this campaign choice saying, “if you always do 
the same thing, you’ll get the same results. People always cam-
paign using a car, but my goal was to think outside the box and 
still get to visit everyone in my riding.” 
Riordon succeeded in gaining the title of MLA of Nepisiguit, NB 
in October 2010.
He is also known around NSAC as an accomplished former 
student. It was just in 2009 that he completed his M.Sc. in Rumi-
nant Animal Nutrition and prior to that a B.Sc. in Animal Science 
(Agr.) in 2004. 
Ryan enjoyed his student life at NSAC for its small class size, 
excellent facilities and professors and staff that were passionately 
devoted to the education of those enrolled. He was a multiple 
scholarship winner each of his four years in his undergrad degree 
and also received a significant scholarship with his Masters pro-
gram.  
Though he never planned a career as a politician, he decided 
to run after watching his province collapse over the past four 
years. With the support of his friends and family, he decided to 
step forward in the hopes of helping his riding of Nepisiguit. 
“I don’t like watching from the sidelines.  Too often we sit back 
and say ‘why are they doing that? That doesn’t make sense! If I 
was in that position I’d do it differently.’  I was always told, if you 
are going to complain, suggest a better way and do it.  But if you 
want it done right, do it yourself.  So I got involved.” 
Ryan’s journey is only beginning in this new position. He was 
sworn in as a Member of the Legislative Assembly on Oct. 23, 
2010, a surreal moment for him. 
In his new role he has learned a lot about different back-
grounds and new perspectives. He understands how important 
it is to act on behalf of his community and bring their voices and 
opinions to the Legislative Assembly. 
Ryan will work as an MLA for a four-year term and cannot say 
for certain if his career in politics will continue after that. He is still 
interested in his original field of study and jokes that maybe one 
day he will be able to combine the two interests of politics and 
agriculture.
He encourages current students saying, ”whatever you do, 
do it passionately and without regret. It doesn’t matter how hard 
you hit, what matters is how hard you can get hit and keep mov-
ing towards your goal.”
north Kingston Young 
Farmer encourages, 
Leads
Justin Beck (Class of ‘08)
You could say Justin Beck was born to be a farmer.
His father, Terry Beck, has been a pork producer in Nova 
Scotia for 30 years and, while Justin remembers times growing 
up when he would rather have been playing than doing barn 
chores, “farming was always part of my life and I just sort of 
evolved into it being my career choice.”
When he realized he’d rather be working in the barns or the 
fields than playing games or watching television, he knew farm-
ing would be his future and took steps to learn even more about 
his chosen profession.
The 24-year old from North Kingston now has a degree in 
bio-environmental systems from NSAC, works full-time in crop 
and processing systems at Lyndhurst Farms in Canning, helps his 
father with the 650-sow farrow-to-weaner hog farm, raises corn, 
soybeans and cereal crops on his own 60-acre operation and is 
Agricola News / Around & About
Page 8
involved in a variety of volunteer organizations.
Having a staunch, long held belief that young farmers are 
the key to a successful agricultural future in Canada, Beck has 
been actively involved in several organizations to foster growth 
and development of youth in agriculture. He is currently past 
chairman of the Nova Scotia Young Farmers Forum, having 
served as chairman for the past four years and is in his third year 
as the director representing Nova Scotia and Newfoundland & 
Labrador on the Canadian Young Farmers Forum, where he also 
serves as vice-chairman. Both organizations are educational 
groups as opposed to lobby organizations, dedicated to foster-
ing up-and-coming leaders in agriculture, helping to nurture ex-
perience and skills for service 
on commodity boards and 
other agricultural agencies.
“Young farmers need to build 
up confidence in their abili-
ties, gain some experience 
and plan for their farming 
futures and succession 
concerns,” Beck says. “When 
we get informed and work 
together, we can really make 
things happen - including 
influencing future agricul-
tural policy.”
Beck is quite proud good 
management decisions 
helped his family’s farm 
weather the on-going crisis in the Canadian hog industry.
“That’s not to say it hasn’t been tough at times and we’re still 
not out of the woods,” he acknowledges, “but we believe in hav-
ing a positive attitude towards our profession and our industry 
and that has helped us through both bad and good times.”
Beck’s father, Terry, has been a strong and positive influence 
on his own development as a young farmer.
“My father has always been innovative and willing to do 
things a little differently, with a focus on good management 
practices, and not merely expansion for the sake of getting 
larger.”
As far as his own future goes, Beck is gradually taking more 
of a lead role in the farm, allowing his father to work on another 
facet of their operation: marketing their own pork directly to 
consumers. Beck is keen to develop a completely local product, 
where even the grains milled into hog ration are all grown on 
the farm. His experience with environmental science and agri-
cultural engineering has him also studying ways to harness the 
methane from manure for energy to produce electricity.
“There’s always more to learn in agriculture and new, even 
better ways of doing things,” he says.
“If I can encourage other young men and women to see the 
opportunities in farming, and share the huge job satisfaction 
that can come from agriculture, I’ll be well pleased.”
Tree climbers compete 
Among Truro’s Branches 
Steve Munroe (Class of ‘00)
As Steve Munroe waits for his chance to climb a tree, it’s easy to 
see that he’s a man who loves his job.
A resident of Fredericton, Munroe was one of 60 arborists 
from Atlantic Canada who gathered in the town on Truro in Oct. 
for the International Society of Arboriculture Atlantic chapter’s 
tree climbing championships, an event run in conjunction with 
the Canadian Urban Forest 
Conference.
The  event  featured 
events such as rescuing 
an injured person from a 
tree, getting to the top of 
it as quickly as possible and 
navigating  through the 
branches in a manner that 
would not place too much 
strain on the tree. All events 
required the use of an elab-
orate system of ropes, pul-
leys and harnesses.
Munroe said he’s been 
involved with the indus-
try ever since he gradu-
ated several years ago from 
NSAC. He’s worked in the 
U.S. as well as Canada and 
is now glad to be working near his hometown of Saint John, N.B.
He said the event is different from his day-to-day work becase 
of its competitive nature.
“A lot of us are really good climbers, but some of us don’t do 
really well under pressure,” he said. “There’s a time element to a 
lot of these events, but in real life you get the job done safely 
without worrying about time.”
The Canadian Urban Forest Conference focused on issues 
of planning and the significance of trees in towns and cities. It 
occurs every two years, usually in large cities. Truro, the smallest 
location to host the conference, landed the event because of its 
active urban forestry program.
As he prepared to strap in to his harness and retrieve a man-
nequin from a branch, Munroe’s inner child was beaming.
“I get paid to climb trees all day,” he said. “How fun is that?”
Written by Michael Gorman of 周e Chronicle Herald.  Re-printed by 
permission of 周e Chronicle Herald.
Agricola News / Around & About
Page 9
NSAC’s New Ring 
Catches On
NSAC’s new ring, which 
was launched last spring, is 
gaining attention.
That’s why NSAC alum-
nus Arnold Blenkhorn (Class 
of ’41), decided to purchase 
the  university’s  newest 
symbol.
“I really liked it when 
I saw it on the news,” says 
Blenkhorn.
 “I said go for it, life’s too 
short,” adds his wife of 65 
years, Catherine. 
 Nearly 90 years-old, 
Blenkhorn took a drive to NSAC, from his home in Southampton, NS, 
this past summer and placed his order. He completed his stainless 
steel ring by having “AB ‘41” engraved on the inside. 
When NSAC’s Development 
& External Relations staff members, 
Executive Director, Jim Goit, and De-
velopment Officer, Alisha Johnson, 
presented Blenkhorn with his ring, 
at his home, he was all smiles.  Blen-
khorn, who never wore a wedding 
ring, proudly tried it on.
 “It feels great,” he said. 
However, this wasn’t Blenkhorn’s first NSAC ring. “I had one of the 
old ones, back in the day,” he said. “But I wore it out.”
Delivering the ring to Blenkhorn wasn’t a simple task. Despite 
his age, he maintains a very active social schedule. As the calendar, 
managed by his wife, indicated, Blenkhorn is a busy man. “I’m part of 
a group that sings to seniors every week,” he says with a laugh. 
Blenkhorn says he won’t wear this ring out. “I’m not going to 
wear it all the time, just for special oc-
casions.”
But Blenkhorn’s not the only one 
proudly wearing NSAC’s new ring. 
Since it was launched, NSAC has 
been astounded with the number of 
sales. The “barley ring” (or tractor tire, 
animal footprints – whatever way 
you want to interpret it), has made its 
way on the fingers of countless proud 
alumni. 
Not only is it being worn, but also recognized! The Alumni office 
has had many reported sightings of rings across the country.
visit http://nsac.ca/alumni/gradring.asp for more information or 
call 902-893-6022
For more information, including online 
orders, visit  nsac.ca/alumni/gradring.asp  
or call 902-893-6022
Order yours
today!
Exclusively for alumni, NSAC’s ring is available 
in stainless steel and 14k gold.
Drop by NSAC’s Bookstore, Cox 152, to view 
samples and place your order.
Arnold proudly wearing his new ring 
at home. 
Arnold with wife, Catherine
Agricola News / Ring Update
Agricola News / Co-Presidents Message
Alumni 周eatre 
周en & Now
New Recognition for
Donors:
A new plaque is now mounted on the wall outside of Alumni 
Theatre in Cumming Hall. The plaque clearly indicates the 
location and names of designated seats in the theatre.
Alumni 周eatre 
Project:
Following a recommendation to 
the Alumni Association, in the 
early 1970’s, a capital projects com-
mittee was formed to address the 
furnishings and decoration of the 
auditorium in Cumming Hall.
At the Alumni Association’s an-
nual meeting in 1974, the com-
mittee proposed a project to help 
convert the old auditorium/gym-
nasium into a theatre. The Prov-
ince of Nova Scotia had previously 
agreed to support the project, 
providing the Alumni Association 
would raise at least $50, 000, as its 
share.
The proposal was endorsed and 
the theatre project became NSAC Alumni Association’s first capi-
tal campaign. While steps were taken to expand NSAC’s charita-
ble status to include fundraising for campus enrichment, a new 
committee was appointed to organize and conduct the theatre 
fundraising campaign.
After receiving guidance from Harold Chute (Class of ’44) 
who had fundraising experience at the University of Maine, the 
campus enrichment fund campaign committee, Dr. Ross Mitton 
(Class of ‘47 ), Char-
lie Douglas (Class 
of ’33), Reg Gilbert 
(Class of ’33), Paul 
Gallant (Class of ’67), 
Karl Winter (Class of 
’51), Moris Kennie 
(Class of ’46), Peter 
Hamilton (Class of 
’44), Dale Ells (Class 
of ’59), Rollie Hay-
man (Class of ’64), 
Harold Chute and Parker Cox, went to work.
The plan was to contact every NSAC alumni, as well as orga-
nizations and friends of the institution, seeking donations. The 
goal of the committee was to raise $100,000 towards the theatre 
renovations, doubling the initial requirement from the govern-
ment.  
Two years into the campaign, an impressive amount of nearly 
$104, 000 was gathered through the committee’s fundraising ef-
forts. In the end, the total exceeded 
$132, 000. 
Alumni Theatre was first 
used in January 1980, for the De-
partment of Agriculture and Mar-
keting’s staff conference. The official 
opening was held as part of NSAC’s 
75th anniversary celebrations on 
February 14, 1980. 
Special gifts to the theatre 
project were acknowledged with 
engraved plaques on designated 
seats, in the first few rows. These 
designated seats, along with their 
engraving, are indicated on the new 
plaque.
Alumni 周eatre Project 
Phase II:
Over 20 years later, Alumni Theatre has been the stage for count-
less NSAC student plays, community productions, children’s con-
certs, campus events, meetings and even a few weddings. But 
with age and constant use come a number of issues.
Alumni Theatre is now in need of an overhaul - Theatre Project 
Phase II. In addition to a new central air system, the theatre also 
requires upgrades to lighting, sound and paint. These improve-
ments would modernize the theatre, making it more functional 
and comfortable for its audiences and stage users. 
To help pay for these costs, the remaining unnamed or undes-
ignated seats could be sold for a minimum donation. To move 
forward with this phase, making upgrades to Alumni Theatre 
even possible, a fundraising committee is required. 
If you would like to be part of this rewarding experience, that 
would see the theater modernized and help make a difference for 
our community, contact 902-893-6022 or ajohnson@nsac.ca 
Agricola News / Cover 
Dick Huggard (Class of ‘56) and NSAC Develop-
ment Officer, Alisha Johnson, hang the new plaque.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested