c# pdf viewer library free : Reorder pdf pages in preview Library control class asp.net web page html ajax Wirecast-User-Guide-Windows12-part1681

121
Setting Encoder
Presets
Introduction
Wirecast supports a wide variety of encoders (also known as codecs).
An encoder is a program that compresses the audio and/or video output of Wirecast for 
broadcast. Without an encoder, the uncompressed data is too large to successfully 
broadcast across a network. This is why encoders are so important.
The settings for encoders range from simple to very complex. Because of this, Wirecast 
offers presets of the most common settings for encoders. This provides a starting point, 
reduces complexity, and enables you to experiment and adjust settings as you test your 
broadcast.
Note:  Encoder Presets can also be edited in the Broadcast Settings window. To do this 
select Broadcast > Broadcast Settings, choose an Encoder Preset from the drop-down 
menu, then click Edit.
Topics
The Encoder Presets Window
Windows Media
QuickTime Video
QuickTime Audio
Flash H.264
Flash VP6
The Encoder Presets Window
To open the Encoder Presets window, select Encoder Presets from the Window menu. 
The encoder presets menu at the top of the window provides a list of encoder presets. 
Select a preset to edit from this list.
Reorder pdf pages in preview - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf reorder pages online; pdf reorder pages
Reorder pdf pages in preview - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pdf page; switch page order pdf
Setting Encoder Presets
The Encoder Presets Window
122
Wirecast User Guide | 104730
Creating New Presets
The default encoder presets cannot be changed. However, you can make a copy of any 
preset, modify it as needed, and save it under a new name. You can refer back to the 
default presets at any time since they are never modified.
To create a new preset, you must make a copy of an existing preset. To do this, select an 
existing preset from the Encoder Presets menu that is close to what you what you need, 
change settings as needed, then click Save As to save the preset with a new name.
You are not required to modify a copy of a default preset. You can create a new (empty) 
preset by clicking the New button in the Broadcast Settings window and renaming the 
newly created preset. (See the New button in Encoder Presets).
Profile Options
Many encoder presets enable you to select one of three profiles: Baseline, Main, or 
High.
Baseline Profile (BP) Baseline profile is primarily for low-cost applications that require 
additional data loss robustness. This profile is used in some video conferencing and 
Select an encoder 
preset
change settings
Save as new 
encoder preset
VB.NET Image: Web Image and Document Viewer Creation & Design
can rotate, redact & annotate images and add, delete & reorder document pages with zero It is a powerful toolkit to print bitonal images, PDF, and so
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to reorder pdf pages
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
thumbnail preview for accurate Word page navigation and location in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in
change page order in pdf file; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
Setting Encoder Presets
Windows Media
123
Wirecast User Guide | 104730
mobile applications. It includes all features supported in the Constrained Baseline 
Profile, plus three additional features used for loss robustness (or for other purposes 
such as low-delay multi-point video stream compositing). The importance of this 
profile has faded somewhat since the definition of the Constrained Baseline Profile in 
2009. All Constrained Baseline Profile bitstreams are also considered to be Baseline 
Profile bitstreams, since these two profiles share the same profile identifier code value.
Main Profile (MP) The Main profile is used for standard-definition digital TV broadcasts 
that use the MPEG-4 format as defined in the DVB standard. It is not, however, used for 
high-definition television broadcasts, since the importance of this profile faded when 
the High Profile was developed in 2004 for that application.
High Profile (HiP) The High profile is the primary profile used for broadcast and disc 
storage applications, particularly for high-definition television applications. For 
example, this profile is used by the Blu-ray Disc storage format and the DVB HDTV 
broadcast service.
Windows Media
To modify a Windows Media encoder preset, follow these steps:
1. Open the Encoder Presets window
2. Select a Windows Media preset from the Encoder Presets menu.
3. Check the Video checkbox and select the Windows Media codec version to use.
4. Check the Audio checkbox and select the Windows Media codec version to use.
5. Use the Multiple Streams Panel (left side of window) to set up multiple 
simultaneous streams in a single encoder. This allows the media player receiving 
the stream to adjust it's quality depending on the connection speed and reliability. 
Multiple Streams 
Panel
Select a Windows 
Media preset
Setting Encoder Presets
Windows Media
124
Wirecast User Guide | 104730
The plus and minus buttons at the bottom enable you add or remove additional 
streams to your preset.
6. Select the Audio Format. This is a pre-configured audio encoder setting.
7. Enter the Video Size. This sets the width and height of your resulting broadcast. 
Every stream should have the same aspect ratio. For example, if 640x480 is used, it 
has an aspect ratio of 4:3. Therefore, all other streams should also have a 4:3 aspect 
ratio.
8. Enter the broadcast frame rate in frames per second (FPS). This is a target rate and is 
only a goal for the encoder. It is not a guaranteed value. 
9. Enter the Key Frame Interval in seconds. This controls how often the encoder makes 
a new keyframe. The more keyframes your broadcast has, the more bandwidth it 
takes (since less compression can occur). However, more keyframes means motion 
in your video stream is better supported.
10. Enter the bit rate in Kbits (1000 bits) per second. This is a target setting for the 
encoder, not a guaranteed value. Higher numbers provide better quality - lower 
numbers, lower quality. The connection speed of your audience is a significant 
factor in determining your target bit rate. 
11. Set the smoothness using the slider. Video smoothness determines the trade-off 
between sharp images and smooth motion. Video appears smooth when objects 
move across the screen with non-jagged object edges. If you are dropping frames 
during encoding, consider decreasing video smoothness.
12. Select Complexity Some video codecs support multiple complexity levels. 
Complexity level does not directly affect the bit rate of a stream, but it can affect its 
quality. Complexity level is a measure of the processing power needed to 
reconstruct the compressed data.
13. Enter the buffer size. The bit rate and quality depends on the buffer size. A larger 
buffer size enables more bits to be allocated for complex video. For example, if you 
set the buffer size to 10 seconds, the codec may choose to allocate some bytes to 
the first 8 seconds and the rest during the last 2 seconds. Increasing the buffer 
typically improves overall quality. For lower bit rates, it is recommended to increase 
the buffer size. For higher bit rates, increasing the buffer size has less effect.
Setting Encoder Presets
QuickTime Video
125
Wirecast User Guide | 104730
QuickTime Video
To modify a QuickTime video preset, follow these steps:
1. Open the Encoder Presets window.
2. Select a QuickTime preset from the Encoder Presets menu.
Note:  To use a newly created preset (See Creating New Presets).
Note:  Select QuickTime from the Output Format menu.
3. Select the Video tab.
4. Check the Video Enabled checkbox. When checked, the video for your broadcast is 
encoded. When unchecked, a blank video screen is provided. This is the preferred 
method of producing audio-only broadcasts.
5. Select the encoder from the Encoder menu. The encoder is sometimes called a 
Codec or Compressor.
6. Click Options to view and/or set the encoder options. Many, but not all encoders 
provide optional settings. 
Note:  If the Options button is greyed-out, no options are available.
7. Select color depth from the Depth menu. Some Encoders allow you to modify the 
color depth (or bits per pixel) of the broadcast. Picking a higher color depth results 
in larger output, but lower color quality. 
8. Enter the width of your broadcast video.
Select a QuickTime 
preset
Setting Encoder Presets
QuickTime Audio
126
Wirecast User Guide | 104730
9. Enter the height of your broadcast video.
10. Select the quality of your broadcast by adjusting the slider between least and best. 
Generally, encoders make a trade-off between higher quality (greater bandwidth) 
and speed (CPU usage).
Note:  If the Quality scale is greyed-out, quality is a fixed value.
11. Select the desired frames per second (FPS) of your broadcast. This is a target value 
for the encoder and is not guaranteed.
12. Check Key Frame Every checkbox (optionally) and enter the number of frames. A 
movie is a sequence of images and each image is called a frame. To compress video 
data, most encoders take a frame and make it a reference (also known as a key). This 
keyframe is sent as part of the broadcast, and all of the data after that keyframe is 
relative to it. The benefit of this is that the compressor only needs to send what has 
changed since the last keyframe. The main drawback of this is that over time it 
becomes harder for the encoder to distinguish the frame-difference information, 
especially if there is a lot of motion in the video. Another drawback is if your 
viewer’s computer misses a keyframe, the video is distorted until the next keyframe 
is sent. However, you can control how often the encoder makes a new keyframe by 
setting the number of frames. The more keyframes you broadcast, the more 
bandwidth required and less compression, but results in better quality video.
13. Check Average Bit Rate checkbox (optionally) and enter the average bit rate as a 
target setting. 
14. Check Limit Peak Bit Rate checkbox to request the encoder to limit the output to a 
specific rate.
Note:  Some encoders use this as a target value, not as an absolute value.
15. Click the Packetize button to modify how the QTSS packets are created. This is an 
advanced feature for knowledgable users.
16. Click Save to save your settings.
QuickTime Audio 
To modify a QuickTime audio preset, follow these steps:
1. Open the Encoder Presets window.
2. Select a QuickTime preset from the Encoder Presets menu.
Setting Encoder Presets
QuickTime Audio
127
Wirecast User Guide | 104730
3. Select the Audio tab.
Note:  To use a newly created preset (See Creating New Presets).
4. Check (optionally) the Audio Enabled checkbox. When checked, the audio for your 
broadcast is included. When unchecked, audio is absent from your broadcast. This 
is the preferred method of producing video-only broadcasts because the presence 
of silent audio uses bandwidth.
5. Select the encoder to use.
6. Click Options to view and/or set the encoder options. Many, but not all encoders 
have options that are specific to the encoder. 
Note:  If the Options button is greyed-out, no options are available.
7. Select the audio bit rate from the Rate menu. The higher the value you choose, the 
better the quality, but more bandwidth is required.
8. Select Bits Per Sample. This is how much data each sample of audio uses. The 
higher the value, the better the quality, but more bandwidth is required.
9. Select the number of channels: Mono or Stereo. Mono uses less bandwidth than 
stereo, but stereo is more pleasing to the listener.
10. Click Save to save your settings.
11.
Select a QuickTime 
preset
Select the Audio 
tab
Setting Encoder Presets
Flash H.264
128
Wirecast User Guide | 104730
Flash H.264
To modify a Flash H.264 preset, follow these steps:
1. Open the Encoder Presets window.
2. Select a Flash encoder preset from the Encoder Presets menu.
Note:  To use a newly created preset (See Creating New Presets).
3. Check the Video Encoding checkbox. When checked, the video for your broadcast 
is encoded. When unchecked, a blank video screen is provided. This is the preferred 
method of producing audio-only broadcasts.
4. Select the H.264 encoder from the Encoder menu.
5. Enter the width of your broadcast video.
6. Enter the height of your broadcast video.
7. Select the desired frames per second (FPS) of your broadcast. This value is a target 
value for the encoder and the exact value is not guaranteed.
8. Enter the average bit rate in Kbits (1000 bits) per second. This is the target bit rate of 
your video. Higher numbers provide better quality. The connection speed of your 
audience is a significant factor in determining your target bit rate. The encoder 
compresses the video to approximate this target. However, at different times 
during your broadcast the bit rate may be higher lower than the target rate.
9.  Select an encoder profile from the Profile menu. Two profiles are provided: Baseline 
and Main. The Baseline profile is commonly used in mobile applications. It is also 
used in other applications which operate with limited processing power, storage 
Select a Flash 
preset
Setting Encoder Presets
Flash VP6
129
Wirecast User Guide | 104730
capacity, and/or bandwidth. The Main profile is appropriate for general-purpose 
applications of broadcast media, such as high-bandwidth Internet broadcasting.
10.  Check Key Frame (optionally) and enter the number of frames. A movie is a 
sequence of images and each image is called a frame. To compress video data, 
most encoders take a frame and make it a reference (also known as a key). This 
keyframe is sent as part of the broadcast, and all of the data after that keyframe is 
relative to it. The benefit of this is that the compressor only needs to send what has 
changed since the last keyframe. The main drawback of this is that over time it 
becomes harder for the encoder to distinguish the frame-difference information, 
especially if there is a lot of motion in the video. Another drawback is if your 
viewer’s computer misses a keyframe, the video is distorted until the next keyframe 
is sent. However, you can control how often the encoder makes a new keyframe by 
setting the number of frames. The more keyframes you broadcast, the more 
bandwidth required and less compression, but results in better quality video.
11.  Check (optionally) the Timecode Every checkbox and enter the number of frames 
between timecodes. Wirecast can generate timecodes embedded in the flash 
stream. If a frames value of zero is entered, the timecode is never sent. Wirecast 
sends metadata along with the frames. This data looks like an ONFi call. Various 
timecodes and timestamps are also sent with the stream.
12.  Check (optionally) the Audio Encoding (AAC) checkbox. When checked, the audio 
for your broadcast is included. When unchecked, audio is absent. This is the 
preferred method of producing video-only broadcasts because the presence of 
silent audio uses bandwidth.
13.  Select the number of channels: Mono or Stereo. Mono uses less bandwidth than 
stereo, but stereo is more pleasing to the listener.
14.  Select the audio bit rate, in Kbits (1000 bits) per second, from the Target Bit Rate 
menu. This is the target bit rate of your audio. Higher numbers provide better 
quality. The connection speed of your audience is a significant factor in 
determining your target bit rate. The encoder compresses the audio to 
approximate this target. However, at different times during your broadcast the bit 
rate may be higher lower than the target rate. The total broadcast bit rate is a 
function of video bit rate plus audio bit rate.
15.  Select the audio sample rate, in kHz (1000 Hz) per second, from the Sample Rate 
menu. This value specifies how many thousands of times per second to sample the 
audio in the broadcast. Higher values provide better quality sound, but at greater 
bandwidth.
16.  Click Save to save your settings.
Flash VP6
To modify a Flash VP6 preset, follow these steps:
Setting Encoder Presets
Flash VP6
130
Wirecast User Guide | 104730
1. Open the Encoder Presets window.
2. Select a Flash preset from the Encoder Presets menu.
Note:  To use a newly created preset (See Creating New Presets).
3. Check the Video Encoding checkbox. When checked, the video for your broadcast 
is encoded. When unchecked, a blank video screen is provided. This is the preferred 
method of producing audio-only broadcasts.
4. Select the VP6 encoder from the Encoder menu.
5. Enter the width of your broadcast video.
6. Enter the height of your broadcast video.
7. Select the desired frames per second (FPS) of your broadcast. This is a target value 
for the encoder and is not guaranteed.
8. Enter the average bit rate in Kbits (1000 bits) per second. This is the target bit rate of 
your video. Higher numbers provide better quality. The connection speed of your 
audience is a significant factor in determining your target bit rate. The encoder 
compresses the video to approximate this target. However, at different times 
during your broadcast the bit rate may be higher lower than the target rate.
9. Check Key Frame (optionally) and enter the number of frames. A movie is a 
sequence of images and each image is called a frame. To compress video data, 
most encoders take a frame and make it a reference (also known as a key). This 
keyframe is sent as part of the broadcast, and all of the data after that keyframe is 
relative to it. The benefit of this is that the compressor only needs to send what has 
changed since the last keyframe. The main drawback of this is that over time it 
Select a Flash 
preset
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested