continued 
Disadvantages of client-side processing include:
• 
it is browser specific: Not all scripts work the same way on all browsers, so you may 
have to create different versions depending on the browsers used.
• 
computer speed: It can be affected by the speed of your own computer. As 
all of the activity is taking place on a downloaded web page, the speed of the 
download and the speed of processing will depend on your computer system. If the 
processing is complex or resource hungry, it may run slowly or cause other programs 
to run slowly on your system.
]
Server-side processing
Server-side processing involves the use of scripts which reside and are run on another 
computer on the internet (the web server). Information is submitted to a server which 
processes it to provide results in the form of a web page.
A good example of server-side processing is the submission of a search through a 
search engine. The search engine matches the word or phrase against an index of 
website content on the web server using scripts.
Benefits of server-side processing include:
• 
efficiency: Complex code may run more efficiently, as it does not have to be 
downloaded on to the user’s computer.
• 
Browser independent: The code is browser independent so therefore can be run 
on any web browser.
• 
Speed: Performance is affected only by the speed of the web server. As all of the 
processing is done on the web server, the speed of your own computer is only 
significant for the downloading of the web pages. All of the other processing takes 
place on a highly resourced and speedy server.
Disadvantages of server-side processing include:
• 
Security: The exchange of data over the network may present security risks.
• 
overloading: A server needs to be able to cope with large volumes of users.
uSB (universal serial bus) – 
Ahigher speed serial connection 
standard that supports low-speed 
devices (e.g. mice, keyboards, 
scanners) and higher-speed 
devices (e.g. digital cameras). 
client-side processing – When 
the interaction between a web 
page and code occurs directly on 
a user’s computer. 
Server-side processing – When 
the interaction between a 
web page and a computer is 
processed through a server. 
Key terms
There are lots of good examples 
of server-side scripting on the 
web. Identify three examples.
Have a look at these examples 
and search for other material 
using a suitable web search.
Create a leaflet listing examples 
of some of the server-side 
processes.
Research
Learn the difference between server-side and client-side processing, including 
examples of each.
Assessment tip
Name three methods of transmitting data over a network, and give examples of what 
each is used for.
What does VoIP stand for and what is it used for?
Explain the difference between client-side and server-side processing.
Just checking
32
BTEC First in Information and Creative Technology
Data exchange 2
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   32
27/09/2012   14:44
Draft
Pdf rearrange pages online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf page order reverse; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
Pdf rearrange pages online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf reverse page order; how to reverse page order in pdf
Think about it 
1 Why is it important that Sam keeps his 
skills and knowledge up to date?
2 What skills and qualities has Sam 
developed?
3 What do you think are the benefi ts of 
taking an apprenticeship? 
Think about it 
hink about it 
Why is it important that Sam keeps his 
skills and knowledge up to date?
What skills and qualities has Sam 
developed?
What do you think are the benefi ts of 
taking an apprenticeship? 
]
Sam Matthews
Technical support technician
I took a holiday job with my current company 
before I planned to start the BTEC National 
Diploma. I’d already taken the BTEC First 
Diploma in IT and I was keen to continue my 
studies. Part-way through the summer, the 
company offered me an apprenticeship as 
an alternative way of pursuing my education 
and earning some money at the same time. 
That was two years ago. When I complete the 
apprenticeship, the company is going to give me a job and help me 
continue with my education. 
I work as part of a team, dealing with IT queries from staff members. 
Not everyone in the team is an expert in every fi eld: each of us has 
developed knowledge in specialised areas, but we also need to have 
good all-round general technical knowledge. Myspecialist areas 
include threats to data, especially online threats, and I continually have 
to update myself by attending courses and by doing lots of background 
reading. Some of the most up-to-date courses are provided by 
manufacturers and suppliers of hardware and software. 
I work closely with a senior technician and between us we ensure 
that all the company’s systems are equipped with the latest 
security software and that it is kept up to date. Any sign of 
a virus, or any form of sustained attack, means that we 
take priority action to identify and remove the problem. 
If we’re unable to remove it, then we contain it and 
limit the damage until removal is possible. I like 
the adrenalin rush caused by a major security 
alert, even though most of these prove false 
alarms.
I really love my job. Down the line, 
Ihope to progress to a managerial 
post in the technical support fi eld. 
WorkSpace
me a job and help me 
rom staff members. 
eld: each of us has 
we also need to have 
yspecialist areas 
33
The online world
UNIT 1
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   33
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
pdf reorder pages; how to move pages in a pdf file
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
Then press the button below and download your PDF. By dragging your pages in the editor area you can rearrange them or delete single pages.
change page order pdf reader; how to reverse pages in pdf
]
Database structure 
 database  is a system for managing a collection of data. Data about a particular type 
of thing – for example, customers or products – is stored in a  table . You can think of a 
table as a grid. Every row in the table holds information about a single item; this is also 
called a  record  . Every column holds information about a property of the items in the 
table, such as a customer’s name or an item’s price – these properties are called  fi elds . 
What types of data do 
you think can be held on 
computer systems? 
Choose four different 
sectors (e.g. healthcare, the 
media, leisure and tourism 
and the fi nancial sector), 
and discuss in small groups 
the types of data each 
sector might need stored. 
Compare and contrast each 
sector’s needs. 
Do you think the same type 
of database could be used 
for each sector?  
Get started
Introduction 
The term data storage covers all of the many ways in which data is held. For the purposes of 
this unit it means holding data on a computer system. The main way that we hold data on a 
computer is by using a database. This is simply a collection of data that is usually organised 
in some way. It is important that you understand not only what databases can do, but also 
how they are structured. 
Unit 10 Database development 
takes the subject further than 
we can in this short section. 
Cloud storage (see page 15) 
is also a form of online data 
storage. 
Link 
Figure 1.13   Example of a table displayed in a Microsoft
®
database program  
]
Data types 
Every fi eld (column) in a database is set up to hold a certain type of data. The main 
data types are as follows: 
• 
text  (also called  characters  or  strings ): sequences of letters, numbers and other 
symbols. Someone’s name would be a text fi eld. A fi eld that can accept multi-line 
text is often called a memo fi eld. 
• 
number:  represents a numerical value. A product’s price or the number of items left 
in stock would be stored as numbers. This would enable you to produce a report 
summing up the prices of all the products you had sold, which wouldn’t be possible 
if they were stored as text. 
• 
date/time:  stores dates or a combination of dates and times. 
• 
Logical  (also called  Boolean  or  Yes/no ): represents a value that is either true or 
false. For example, when a customer opens an account with an online company, 
they might be asked whether they are happy to receive marketing material. Their 
answer could be stored in a logical fi eld (true if they are happy to receive marketing 
information, false if they are not). 
One of the reasons that data is 
displayed as a table is because 
people were familiar with the 
table format from printed 
information such as timetables 
and bank statements. 
Did you know? 
34
BTEC First in Information and Creative Technology
Learning aim B 
Data storage 1 
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   34
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pages in a pdf document; reorder pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages to a
how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader; reorder pages in pdf online
Figure 1.14   An example of a simple database relationship    
Product item number
Product description
Supplier account
Minimum stock
Number in stock
Other product details
Product table
Supplier table
Supplier account
Name
Address
Telephone
Other supplier details
]
Relationships between database tables 
A benefi t of databases is the ease with which the information they hold can be assessed. 
All tables have a  primary key  on which they are organised. The primary key is the 
unique identifi er of each record in the table. The tables may themselves hold fi elds 
which are primary keys in other tables ( foreign keys ) which can be used to access 
associated information from many tables in one query. 
In the example shown in Figure 1.14, the primary key of the product table is the 
product item number, as each product in the database has a unique number. 
The primary key of the supplier table is the supplier account number, which is also held 
as a foreign key in the product table. 
This allows you to fi nd a product in the product table and at the same time fi nd the 
supplier’s details in the supplier table, and to display all of the information you want 
about both items. 
This link using a foreign key is known as a relation, and you can build up any number of 
relationships between different tables. 
Relationships can be one-way (as shown in Figure 1.14), two-way, one-to-many or 
many-to-one. Many-to-many relationships also exist in some databases but are 
extremely complex to provide. 
database  – A collection of data 
stored in a structured way. 
table  – A two-dimensional 
representation of data in a 
database. 
Record  – A group of selected 
data which are associated in 
some way. 
Field  – A single piece of data 
within a record. 
Primary key – A single unique 
key used to identify each record 
in a table. 
Foreign key – A fi eld which can 
be used to cross-reference and 
access associated information 
across many tables. 
Key terms 
You can fi nd further information 
on database structures and 
relationships in Unit 10 
Database development. 
Link 
UNIT 1
35
The online world
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   35
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
the simplest procedures, for instance, using online clear C# out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides
pdf rearrange pages; rearrange pdf pages in reader
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages in extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pages in pdf file; reorder pages pdf file
]
Online databases 
Online databases are databases which are accessible using a network, including the 
internet. They are very different to local databases as they have to be accessed, and 
possibly updated, by millions of users. Normally these databases will have thousands 
of rows of information. Usually information is found in online databases by using a 
search engine (see page 22). 
Special database software is available to help users build online databases. Some of 
the basic software is free, but you will usually have to pay for upgrades to do more 
sophisticated things. The more sophisticated software usually incurs a charge (for 
example, KeepandShare, Vectorwise, Microsoft 
®
Offi ce 
®
365, Alventis). 
Quite often the data is held by a hosting service, which also supplies the software as 
part of cloud storage on the internet. (See the section on Cloud computing and cloud 
storage on page 15.) 
These online databases hold many different types of information, from databases of 
cartoons to databases of fi nancial information. 
Introduction 
Databases are simply collections of data held in a central place. How they are organised and 
engaged with by users can vary a lot, depending on what the information is and how it needs 
to be used. 
Figure 1.15  An online database  
image to follow
36
BTEC First in Information and Creative Technology
Learning aim B 
Data storage 2 
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   36
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
pdf reverse page order online; reorder pdf pages reader
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to move pages around in pdf; reverse page order pdf
Structured Query Language (SQL) 
Structured Query Language (SQL) is a high-level language which is used to undertake 
this management activity. It is normally in two parts: 
  data defi nition Language (ddL):  This is the part which is used to defi ne the 
database structure. 
  data Manipulation Language (dML):  This is the part used to add, delete, change 
and query the data which is held in the database structure. 
SQL is the language that generates the code used by the DBMS. 
]
Database management systems 
Database management systems (DBMS) are the programs which allow you to create 
any database that you need and to use the databases you have created. 
The DBMS allows you to create, maintain, search and sort data on a database. It allows 
different users to access the database at the same time, and can provide different 
levels of access to the data. (See the section on Levels of access and  le permissions 
on pages 9–10.) 
W3Schools has a web page where you can try out some SQL commands for 
yourself. To access the relevant page, go to www.pearsonhotlinks.co.uk and 
search for this title. 
Try out the example queries. 
Write down any other useful queries you come up with. 
Activity 
1.7 
You will need to know all of the terminology associated with databases, including 
the purpose of a DBMS. 
You will be required to know about online databases. 
Assessment tip 
 Give three examples of data types that can be used in a database fi eld. 
 Give an example of how an online database might be used. 
 Explain the difference between a database and a database management system (DBMS). 
Just checking 
 database  is a collection of 
data which is usually structured. 
Whereas a  dBMS  is the software 
that allows you to make use of 
that data. 
Remember 
UNIT 1
37
The online world
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   37
In small groups, research 
some examples of high-
profi le companies who have 
had their systems hacked. 
Answer the following 
questions
•   Why do you think that 
company was targeted? 
•  What do you think 
were the intensions of the 
hacker(s)? 
•  How did the company 
respond to the attack?
•  Do you think it is possible 
to create a secure network 
which will never be hacked? 
If so, how would you go 
about creating this?
Get started
Introduction 
Online facilities, whether on public networks or private networks, are vulnerable to attacks 
from determined individuals. There have been many high-profi le examples of people hacking 
into secure government systems, and of newspaper journalists hacking people’s mobile 
phones. It is extremely diffi cult to keep the hacker out if they are very determined, but there 
are things we can do to prevent access by the opportunist. This section also looks at why 
secure network access is important for individuals, businesses and society. 
]
Types of threats 
Threats to computer systems come in many forms. 
• 
opportunist threats.  People who fi nd an unattended computer which has been 
left logged in to a system may view, steal or damage information, programs or even 
hardware. 
• 
computer viruses.  These are small programs which can replicate themselves and 
spread from computer to computer. They are never benefi cial; usually they will make 
some changes to the system they infect and, even if they do no real damage, they 
are undesirable. They arrive by attaching themselves to fi les or email messages. 
• 
other malware.  Examples of  malware  include: computer worms (essentially a 
computer virus which does not need to attach itself to a fi le or message); Trojan 
horses, which appear as some benign program allowing a hacker full access to a 
system; spyware; adware; and various other nasties. Malware is never benefi cial. 
• 
Phishing.  This is a type of threat which attempts to gain access to passwords, 
fi nancial details and other such privileged information. Often this is done by email 
messages pretending to come from trusted websites, instant messaging or social 
networks. Normally they try to divert you to a website which looks original and which 
asks for information about you. 
Malware – A hostile, intrusive or 
annoying piece of software or 
program code.  
Key term 
Figure 1.16   Example of a phishing email  
• 
Accidental damage.  This may be caused by a natural disaster (e.g. fl ooding), 
mischief or accidental mishap, and can result in losing all of a computer’s data. 
The term Trojan Horse is taken 
from Greek mythology. The 
Greeks and the city of Troy had 
been at war for a very long time. 
The Greeks delivered a large 
wooden horse to the gates of 
Troy as a gesture that the war 
was over and they withdrew their 
fl eet of ships from the harbour 
surrounding Troy. The people of 
Troy took this gesture as a sign 
that they had won the war and 
they celebrated their victory 
by allowing the Trojan Horse to 
enter the city gates. However, 
during the night Greek soldiers, 
who were hidden inside the 
horse, snuck out and opened 
the gates to allow in the Greek 
army, who had sailed back to 
port under the cover of darkness. 
The Greeks entered the city and 
destroyed it, thus ending the war. 
Did you know? 
image to follow
38
BTEC First in Information and Creative Technology
Learning aim C 
Possible threats to data 1 
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   38
]
Importance of security 
Computer/technology systems are under continuous threat of attack and the threats 
are continuous and ever changing. All computers and systems are vulnerable to attack 
and it is impossible to provide 100% protection. 
An attack could result in some form of loss (data or fi nancial) to an individual, 
organisation and/or society. Examples include: 
• 
Organisations which trade online have to build up a reputation for being a secure 
organisation with secure network access. If this reputation is damaged, potential 
customers might be put off, costing the business money. 
• 
When an organisation’s secrets are spread to competitors or to the wider public, 
any particular advantage the organisation has will be lost. An example is when an 
organisation has been doing research on a new product, and the results of that 
research fi nd their way to a competitor. 
• 
Identity theft could cause problems with obtaining loans and other contractual 
agreements (see page 41). 
• 
Disclosure of information could cause legal problems. A company can be sued by 
its customers if it sells their personal information or fails to protect it properly. The 
obligations of organisations to protect customers’ data are covered by the Data 
Protection Act (1998). Organisations that store people’s personal information have 
to register with the Information Commissioner’s Offi ce (ICO) and must undertake to 
treat the information responsibly. 
Find out more about the Data 
Protection Act by looking at 
websites such as the Information 
Commissioner’s Offi ce: Guide 
to data protection. To access 
this web page, go to 
www.pearsonhotlinks.co.uk 
and search for this title. 
Find out what a company’s legal 
obligations are regarding storage 
and use of personal data. Write a 
list of the rules. 
Research 
In April 2011, the gaming giant, Sony
®
, has its PlayStation Network hacked in 
whatis thought to be the largest internet security break-in to date. 
Sony
®
revealed that the data for approximately 77 million users had been stolen 
during the attack. Users’ data stolen included:
• 
usernames 
• 
passwords
• 
credit card details
• 
security answers
• 
purchase history
• 
address. 
Research the attack. 
How do you think online networks can protect users’ data from attacks of 
thiskind? 
How do you think an attack of this scale has affected:
• 
The general public’s confi dence in online networks?
• 
The security protocols of companies who trade online?
• 
The internet as a whole? 
Case study 
UNIT 1
39
The online world
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   39
Introduction 
As you saw on pages 38 and 39, there are ways in which information can be damaged, stolen 
or lost by malicious action or accidental events. There are many things we can do to limit 
the possibility of this happening. This section looks at some of the measures you can take to 
protect your data and your personal safety online. 
]
Preventative and remedial actions 
It is important to protect both IT systems and their data. Using the following can help: 
• 
Physical barriers.  These include turning off computers and locking offi ces when the 
systems are unattended to prevent damage by people, the environment (e.g. fi re, 
fl ooding, electrical interference) or theft. 
• 
Password control of access.  Passwords are sequences of characters, known only 
to the computer user, which allow access to a computer, network or application. 
Passwords should always be strong so that it is hard for someone else to guess them 
or work them out. 
• 
Access levels.  These can be set up to allow individuals to have access to only 
specifi c levels of an application and to prevent unauthorised users from accessing 
particular data. 
• 
Anti-virus software.  This is set up to intercept computer viruses before they can 
become resident on the computer. The software can isolate the virus, remove it and 
sometimes repair any damage. Equivalent security programs exist for other types of 
malware. 
• 
Firewall.  This is a piece of software that monitors all data arriving at your computer 
from the internet and all data leaving your computer. It stops anything that it thinks 
is harmful or unwanted (such as viruses, spam, Trojan horses and hackers). 
• 
encryption.  This is used to codify data so that it cannot be read by anyone who does 
not have the key to the code. An algorithm, sometimes known as a cipher, is applied 
to the data at the transmission end and the reverse is applied at the reception end. 
• 
Backup and recovery.  Making a backup of data is the only way of recovering from a 
total data disaster. Many individuals and organisations back up data to Flash 
®
solid 
state storage devices or magnetic tape at night. The tapes are stored safely in a 
separate place, so that they are not destroyed by any disaster which could destroy 
the master system (fi re, earthquake, etc.). Many types of backup exist, including: 
Full system backup of all data held for a specifi c purpose. 
Incremental backups of fi les or data that has been changed since the last full 
backup. This is faster than running a full back up every time. 
Backups to removable media, such as a removable hard drive (if you have a large 
amount of data), USB sticks, CDs and DVDs. 
It is also possible to back up data across a network (or across the internet) to a server in 
a completely separate location (for example, backing up data to the cloud). 
Access is often set up on a need-
to-know basis. For example, 
sales personnel have access to 
particular groups of customers, 
supervisors have access to an 
area of customers, the sales 
manager has access to all 
customers but only in the sales 
area, and the managing director 
has access to all information. 
Did you know? 
Passwords should be strong. 
Thismeans they should: 
•  be at least 8 characters long 
•  use a combination of lower 
case letters, upper case 
letters, numbers and symbols 
•  be hard to guess – make 
sure they aren’t an easy 
combination, e.g. abc123, or 
something related to you that 
is obvious, e.g. your name 
and a number. 
•  avoid dictionary words, which 
could be guessed by trial and 
error. 
Remember 
40
BTEC First in Information and Creative Technology
Learning aim C 
Possible threats to data 2 
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   40
]
Personal safety 
The dangers of  identity theft  and of revealing too much personal information on 
social networks and via instant messaging are often reported in the news. 
These threats can affect both your security and your reputation. Think about who 
has access to the information you put online. Before you put photos on your social 
networking profi le, think about who might see them and whether you would mind. 
You might not want your employer or teacher to see something that might be 
embarrassing or harmful to your reputation. 
Use security settings to protect your privacy and identity. Remember that not everyone 
is who they claim to be. Criminals access social networking sites trying to fi nd out 
information about people. This may put you at risk of identity theft and password theft 
if you have revealed too much information about yourself. Be careful not to reveal 
information that you might use in a password, such as your pet’s name. 
Discuss the ways that companies 
and government have access to 
your personal information via 
online services. Discuss the pros 
and cons of this. 
Discussion point 
identity theft  – When someone 
steals your personal details in 
order to use them to open bank 
accounts and get credit cards, 
loans, a passport or a driving 
licence in your name. 
Key term 
Technology can be used to 
monitor individuals’ movements 
and communications. Burglars, 
for example could see from a 
public social network site that 
someone is away on holiday and 
break into their house. Similarly, 
if you send unencrypted email, it 
can potentially be read by other 
people. 
Can you think of any other 
examples? 
Refl ect 
Make sure you know the methods that can be used to protect and restore data. 
Assessment tip 
 Give three examples of threats to computer systems. 
 Give the methods that you can use to reduce the threats you listed in question 1. 
 How can you help to prevent identity theft when using social networking sites? 
Just checking 
Emails and email attachments 
can contain viruses. It is 
important to run up-to-date 
anti-virus software. 
Remember 
UNIT 1
41
The online world
M01_FICT_SB_1878_U01.indd   41
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested