c# pdf viewer windows form : Reverse pdf page order online application SDK tool html .net asp.net online WorldEconomicForum1-part1916

Women’s Empowerment:
Measuring the Global Gender Gap
9
South Africa
36
3.95
39
56
16
30
21
Israel
37
3.94
28
40
32
28
39
Japan
38
3.75
33
52
54
26
3
Bangladesh
39
3.74
18
53
42
37
37
Malaysia
40
3.70
40
36
51
32
15
Romania
41
3.70
23
31
35
51
47
Zimbabwe
42
3.66
2
57
34
52
41
Malta
43
3.65
56
43
45
16
24
Thailand
44
3.61
1
39
49
54
32
Italy
45
3.50
51
49
48
41
11
Indonesia
46
3.50
29
24
46
53
29
Peru
47
3.47
50
44
38
47
31
Chile
48
3.46
52
20
44
40
45
Venezuela
49
3.42
38
13
52
33
58
Greece
50
3.41
44
48
50
45
22
Brazil
51
3.29
46
21
57
27
53
Mexico
52
3.28
47
45
41
44
51
India
53
3.27
54
35
24
57
34
Korea
54
3.18
34
55
56
48
27
Jordan
55
2.96
58
32
58
43
43
Pakistan
56
2.90
53
54
37
58
33
Turkey
57
2.67
22
58
53
55
50
Egypt
58
2.38
57
50
55
56
49
Russian
Federation
31
4.03
3
10
47
29
57
Uruguay
32
4.01
36
26
36
2
56
China
33
4.01
9
23
40
46
36
Switzerland
34
3.97
43
42
17
49
7
Argentina
35
3.97
55
29
26
3
54
* All scores are reported on a scale of 1 to 7, with 7 representing maximum gender equality. 
Country
Overall
rank
Overall score*
Economic
participation
Economic
opportunity
Political
empowerment
Educational
attainment
Health and
well-being
The Gender Gap Rankings (cont’d)
Reverse pdf page order online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; reorder pages pdf
Reverse pdf page order online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pages in pdf online; reorder pdf pages
The preceding table illustrates the overall rankings, as
well as the scores obtained in the five dimensions
surveyed. Scores for the developing and middle-income
countries clearly demonstrate that even the most basic
criteria for gender equality are unmet, especially those
concerning maternal health and primary education.
Moreover, while high income countries, such as those
in the OECD, have made great progress over the past
half century in removing some fundamental gender
biases, they continue to display significant disparities in
the opportunities presented to men and women in the
workplace and in the political realm. 
Not surprisingly, the top five places are occupied by
Nordic countries, characterized by strongly liberal
societies, protection of minority rights and
comprehensive welfare systems. While women in these
countries clearly have access to a wider spectrum of
educational, political and work opportunities and enjoy
a higher standard of living than women in other parts of
the world, it is interesting to note that the rates of
economic participationin some of these countries are
not necessarily the highest in the world. For example,
although Norway and Iceland occupy the second and
third places in the overall ranking, they hold ranks of 13
and 17 in terms of economic participation. This is not
necessarily the result of barriers to women’s entry to
the workforce, since it is certainly the case that women
in some developed countries are in the fortunate
position of being able tochoose notto work outside
their homes. It is a potential caveat of the economic
participation methodology that it does not take into
account those who may voluntarily choose not to
participate. However, it should be noted that while
some women may indeed have chosen to “opt out,”
that choice is usually made in a structure where work-
family issues are seen as problems primarily facing
women, while decision-making structures are
dominated by men.39
These are followed by a number of “woman-friendly”
nations such as New Zealand, Canada, the UK,
Germany and Australia. Several Eastern European and
transition economies place well, appearing among the
top 25. This is not too surprising, considering that
these countries subscribed for long periods of time in
recent history to a socialist ideology, which, however
nominally, encouraged a “worker-woman” notion of
equality, albeit one in which women had to do
everything: all the work inside the home, while at the
same time participating in industry and all the
professions.40The most notable of these are Latvia
(11), Lithuania (12) and Estonia (15), the first two
coming ahead of France (13) and all three appearing
ahead of the United States (17). It should be noted,
however, that while these nations perform well in terms
of economic opportunity, economic participation and
educational attainment, they lag far behind in terms of
health and well-being, ranking 48, 44 and 46
respectively. The poor reproductive health statistics,
despite the profusion of health professionals, indicate
an inefficient use of health facilities in providing
reproductive healthcare to women. 
The United States (17) performs particularly well on
educational attainment and only slightly less so on
economic participation and political empowerment.
However, the United States ranks poorly on the specific
dimensions of economic opportunity and health and
well-being, compromised by the meagre maternity
leave, lack of maternity leave benefits and limited
government-provided childcare. Moreover, the health
and well-being rank of the United States is brought
down, in comparison with other developed nations, by
the large number of adolescents bearing children and
by the high maternal mortality ratio—especially given
the relatively high number of physicians available. 
The four European nations Switzerland (34), Malta (43),
Italy (45) and Greece (50) rank low overall, falling below
Latin American nations such as Costa Rica (18),
Colombia (30) and Uruguay (32), and (in the case of the
latter three) below Asian countries such as Bangladesh
(39) and Malaysia (40), a clear reflection of the
shortcomings of these so-called “advanced” nations in
implementing gender equality. Although Switzerland
performs well on the health and well-being dimension
(7), and relatively high on political empowerment (17)—
a notable achievement for a country which gave
women the right to vote and stand for national election
only in 1971—the country lags behind not only in
economic participation and economic opportunity, but
also in educational attainment, being one of the very
few developed nations where female enrolment rates
are consistently lower than male rates. As is to be
expected of countries notorious for their patriarchal
cultures, Italy and Greece each perform particularly
poorly on the economic participation and economic
opportunity dimensions. 
Women’s Empowerment:
Measuring the Global Gender Gap
10
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader; reorder pages in a pdf
While the rankings speak for themselves, they both
confirm many commonly held beliefs, on the one hand,
and dispel some prevailing myths, on the other. In the
United States, for example, the low rank of 46 for
economic opportunity appears to corroborate the
much-discussed “glass ceiling.” And while American
women have generally high levels of economic
participation, they also appear to be subject to a lack of
opportunity for advancement in their careers. Given
China’s labour policies, it will probably not surprise
many that China ranks high in economic participation
(9), but falls close to the bottom of the rankings in
education (46) and political empowerment (40). With an
overall rank of 33, the Chinese government’s much-
touted gender equality objective still falls far short of
expectations. Nonetheless, China remains the highest
ranking nation in Asia, followed by Japan (38). The
Russia Federation (31) shows similar results to those of
China, boosted in the rankings by a high economic
participation (3), but compromised by low political
empowerment (47) and health and well-being (57). 
Costa Rica (18) occupies first place in Latin America by
a large margin, followed by Colombia (30), Uruguay (32)
and Argentina (35). Peru (47), Chile (48), Venezuela (49),
Brazil (51) and Mexico (52) all fare badly, due to poor
performances on all five areas of this index, with the
exception of the economic opportunity ranks of
Venezuela (13), Chile (20) and Brazil (21). The problem
here appears to be not in the lack of opportunity, once
women have entered the workforce, but rather in giving
them access to the educational training and basic
rights, such as healthcare and political empowerment,
that will enable them to join the workforce. 
Out of the seven predominantly Muslim nations covered
by the study, Bangladesh (39) and Malaysia (40)
outperform Indonesia (46), while Jordan (55), Pakistan
(56), Turkey (57) and Egypt (58) occupy the bottom four
ranks. There is little doubt that traditional, deeply
conservative attitudes regarding the role of women
have made their integration into the world of public
decision-making extremely difficult.41As the newly-
independent Arab governments of Egypt and Jordan
focused on modernization more than half a century
ago, they neglected the needs of women, one of their
most important assets.42In recent times however,
some progress has evidently been made. Bangladesh
performs relatively well on economic participation (18),
Malaysia on health and well-being (15), Indonesia on
economic opportunity (24) and Turkey on economic
participation (22), no doubt reflecting the economic
freedoms that are increasingly available to women in
Islamic countries. While it is encouraging that the
countries of the Middle East and North Africa region
have invested impressively in women’s education in
recent years, increasing their productive potential and
earning capacity, it is clear from the low ranks of these
countries on labour force participation—among the
lowest in the world—that the region is not benefiting
from the potential returns on this investment. Despite
having ratified the Beijing Convention for the Elimination
of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, most of
these nations lack a coherent strategy for empowering
women. Such a strategy will be necessary for building
on the achievements thus far, learning from past
mistakes, and improving the future of women in these
economies. 
Regional and Country Performance
In this section, we present graphic illustrations of our
findings. The first six charts below show the
performance of each region on the overall index as well
as the five components. This is followed by figures
illustrating six selected cases: Sweden (1), the United
Kingdom (8), the United States (17), China (33), Greece
(50) and Egypt (58), showing the relative advantages
and disadvantages within each nation. Finally, we
provide two correlation plots: one showing the
correlation between the Gender Gap Index ranks and
the Growth Competitiveness Index ranks for
2004–2005 and the other showing the correlation
between the Gender Gap Index ranks and the log of
the GDP per capita. While correlation does not
necessarily entail causation, these comparisons provide
a preliminary indication of the link between women’s
empowerment and a nation’s long-term growth
potential. 
Women’s Empowerment:
Measuring the Global Gender Gap
11
Women’s Empowerment:
Measuring the Global Gender Gap
12
Average overall score by region
Economic participation
Economic opportunity
*includes Israel,  **includes Mexico,  ***includes Russia and Turkey,  ****includes the 15 members of the EU before
May 2004 and Iceland,  ***** includes Australia and New Zealand
Women’s Empowerment:
Measuring the Global Gender Gap
13
Political empowerment
Educational attainment
Health and well-being
Women’s Empowerment:
Measuring the Global Gender Gap
14
Sweden (1)
United Kingdom (8)
United States (17)
Women’s Empowerment:
Measuring the Global Gender Gap
15
China (33)
Egypt (58)
Greece (50)
Women’s Empowerment:
Measuring the Global Gender Gap
16
Correlation: Growth Competitiveness Index (GCI) ranks and
gender gap ranks
Correlation: Log of GDP per capita and gender gap ranks
Conclusions
True models of gender equality do not exist. Given the
lamentable international picture, no one who studies
the gender gap can doubt that no country in the
world has yet managed to achieve it. True, the Nordic
countries are getting closer, leading the way in
providing women with a quality of life almost equal to
that of men, with almost comparable levels of political
participation, and with relatively equal educational and
economic opportunity and participation. Yet, as this
study indicates, other countries show wide variation,
lagging far behind in particular areas, some across all
five dimensions.
Aside from this general conclusion, and broad country
comparisons, the data we have presented here shed
light on the disparities within countries, in some cases
either confirming information gathered in other ways,
or, in others, countering prevailing assumptions. 
By identifying and quantifying the gender gap, we
hope to provide policy-makers with a tool offering
direction and focus for the work of significantly
improving the economic, political and social potential
of all their citizens. In addition, we hope that this work
provides the impetus for policy-makers to strengthen
their commitment to the idea of women’s
empowerment, and to concentrate the political will,
energy and resources, in concert with aid agencies
and civil society organizations, to make gender
equality a reality. 
GCI ranks
log of gdp per capita
Categories of the Gender Gap
Sources
Economic Participation
Economic Opportunity
Female unemployment (in female labour force) as percentage
of male unemployment (in male labour force), 2002 or latest
year available
World Development Indicators, 2004 (World Bank)
Female youth unemployment (in female labour force aged 15-
24) as percentage of male unemployment (in male labour
force aged 15-24), 2002 or latest year 
available
World Development Indicators, 2004 (World Bank)
Ratio of estimated female to male earned income
Human Development Report, 2004 (UNDP)
Female economic activity rate as percentage of male
economic activity rate
Human Development Report, 2004 (UNDP)
Wage equality between women and men for similar work
Executive Opinion Survey, 2004 (World Economic Forum)
Weeks of paid maternity leave allowed per country
International Labour Organization, 1998
Maternity leave benefits (percentage of wages paid in
covered period)
International Labour Organization, 1998
Female professional and technical workers (as percentage of
total)
Human Development Report, 2004 (UNDP)
Availability of government provided childcare
Executive Opinion Survey, 2004 (World Economic Forum)
Impact of maternity laws on the hiring of women 
Executive Opinion Survey, 2004 (World Economic Forum)
Equality between women and men for private sector
employment 
Executive Opinion Survey, 2004 (World Economic Forum)
Political Empowerment
Number of years of a female president or prime minister in
the last 50 years
Various national sources 
Women in government at ministerial level (as percentage of
total), 2002 or latest available
Human Development Report, 2004 (UNDP); various national
sources
Seats in parliament held by women (as percentage of total),
2002 or latest available
Human Development Report, 2004 (UNDP)
Female legislators, senior officials and managers (as
percentage of total), 2002 or latest available
Human Development Report, 2004 (UNDP)
Educational Attainment
Average years of schooling, females as percentage of males,
2002 or latest year available 
World Development Indicators, 2003 (World Bank)
Female to male ratio, gross primary level enrolment, 2002 or
latest year available 
UNDP Human Development Report, 2004 
Female to male ratio, gross secondary level enrolment, 2002
or latest year available
UNDP Human Development Report, 2004 
Female to male ratio, gross tertiary level enrolment, 2002 or
latest year available 
UNDP Human Development Report, 2004 
Adult literacy, female rate as percentage of male rate, 2002
or latest year available 
UNDP Human Development Report, 2004; various national
sources
Health and Well-being
Births attended by skilled health staff (percentage of total),
2002 or latest year available
World Development Indicators, 2004 (World Bank); WHO
Reproductive Health Database; various national sources
Adolescent fertility rate (births per woman, age 15-19), 2002
or latest year available, adjusted by number of physicians
World Development Indicators, 2004 (World Bank); various
national sources
Maternal mortality ratio per 100,000 live births, 2002 or latest
year available, adjusted by number of physicians
World Development Indicators, 2004 (World Bank); WHO
Reproductive Health Database; various national sources
Infant mortality rate, per 1,000 live births, adjusted by
number of physicians
World Development Indicators, 2004 (World Bank)
Effectiveness of government efforts to reduce poverty and
inequality 
Executive Opinion Survey, 2004 (World Economic Forum)
Appendix
Women’s Empowerment:
Measuring the Global Gender Gap
18
References
Alan Guttmacher Institute. 1999. International Family Planning
Perspectives. 25 (Supplement). S30–S38. 
Ali-Riza, S. 2005. “Women in the Arab Region: Learning from the
Past, Preparing for the Future.” ” Paper for TheArab World
Competitiveness Report–2005. World Economic Forum. In press.
Amnesty International. 2004. “Female Genital Mutilation.” Online
at: http://www
.amnesty
.org/ailib/intcam/femgen/fgm1.htm#a1
Bridge. 2004. “Gender and Development: Gender and Budgets.”
In-Brief Issue No. 12. Online at
http://www
.bridge.ids.ac.uk/dgb12.html
Elson D. 2003. “Gender mainstreaming and gender budgeting.”
Paper presented at Conference of the European Commission
“Gender Equality and Europe’s Future.” Brussels. March.
Feminist Women’s Health Centre. 2004. “World Wide Status of
Women.” Online at:  http://www
.fwhc.org/stats.htm
Ghosh, J. 1999. “Economic Empowerment of Women.” Paper
presented at UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and
the Pacific conference. 
Gray, Francine du Plessix, 1990.Soviet Women: Walking The
Tightrope. New York: Doubleday.
Hewlett, Sylvia Ann. “Executive Women and the Myth of Having it
All”. Harvard Business Review, April, 2002. 
Hill, A. and E. King. 1995. Women’s Education in Developing
Countries.Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press. 
International Herald Tribune, March 30, 2005. “Sweden Faces
Facts on Violence Against Women” by Lizette Alvarez. 
International Labour Organization. 1997. “Maternity Protection at
Work.” Report V(1), No. ILC87. Geneva.
International Labour Organization. 1998.
Inter-Parliamentary Union. 2004. “Women in National
Parliaments.” Online at http://www.ipu.org/wmn-e/world.htm
Kellerman, B. and D. Rhode. “Options: Rethinking Women and
Leadership.” Center for Public Leadership. Online at
http://www
.ksg.harvar
d.edu/leadership/Pdf/V
iableOptions.pdf
Klasen, S. 2002. “Low Schooling for Girls, Slower Growth for All?
Cross-Country Evidence on the Effect of Gender Inequality in
Education on Economic Development.” The World Bank
Economic Review, Vol.16, No.3, pp. 345–373. Washington: World
Bank. 
Leach, F. 1998. “Gender, education and training: an international
perspective.” C. Sweetman, ed. Gender and Development.
Oxford. Oxfam.
Marcoux, A. 1998. “The Feminization of Poverty: Claims, Facts
and Data Needs.” Population and Development Review 24 (1):
131–139. New York: The Population Council.
National Organization for Women. 2005. “10 for Change.” Online
at: http://www
.10for
change.org/issues/violence_brief.pdf
One Country.1993. “Traditional Media as Change Agent.” Vol. 5,
Issue 3. October–December 1993. New York: Baha’i International
Community.
Parliament of Australia. 2002. “Measuring violence against
women: a review of the literature and statistics.” Online at:
http://www
.aph.gov
.au/library/intguide/SP/V
iolenceAgainstW
omen
.htm
Planned Parenthood Federation of America. 2000. “Unsafe
Abortion Around the World.” Online at:
http://www
.plannedpar
enthood.org/pp2/portal/files/portal/medicali
nfo/abortion/fact-abortion-unsafe.xml
Sadler J. 2004. “UNIFEM’s Experiences in Mainstreaming for
Gender Equality.” Online at
http://www
.unifem.org/index.php?f_page_pid=188
Sen, A. 1999. Development as Freedom.Oxford University Press.
Summers, L. 1992. “Investing in All the People.” Policy Research
Working Paper No. 905. Washington: World Bank.
UNIFEM. 2000. Progress of the World’s Women 2000. Biennial
Report. Online at http://www
.unpac.ca/wagegap4.html
United Nations. 2001. “Supporting Gender Mainstreaming.” Office
of the Special Advisor on Gender Issues and the Advancement of
Women. New York. March.
United Nations Development Program. 2004. Human
Development Report. New York.
United Nations Office of the Special Advisor on Gender Issues,
“Gender Mainstreaming.” Online at
http://www.un.org/womenwatch/osagi/gendermainstreaming.htm
United Nations Millennium Project Task Force on Gender Equality.
2004. “From Promises to Action: Recommendations for Gender
Equality and the Empowerment of Women.” New York: United
Nations. 
United Nations Women Watch. 2005.
http://www
.un.org/womenwatch/daw/followup/session/pr
esskit/fs
1.htm
USAID. 2001. “Gender, Information Technology and Developing
Countries: An Analytic Study. Washington, DC.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested