c# pdf viewer windows form : How to move pages in pdf reader software control project winforms web page html UWP WWGF-Readers-Digest-feature-Feb-20110-part2023

110
readersdigest.com
2/1 1
IN T E R V I E W   B Y   L I S A   D A V I S
IS THIS  
ANY WAY 
TO LOSE 
WEIGHT?
Actually, yes. Award-winning 
science journalist Gary Taubes 
explains (finally!) why conventional 
diets don’t work—and what you  
can do to lose weight.
f obesity researchers are so smart, why are we so large? 
That’s the question at the heart of Gary Taubes’s new book, 
Why We Get Fat—and What to Do About It. After all, public 
health authorities have been hammering home a very simple 
message for the past 40 years: If you don’t want to be fat, 
cut the fat from your diet. And in those years, obesity rates 
have gone from 13 percent to 22 percent to, in the last  
national survey, 33 percent. 
I
How to move pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages around in a pdf document; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
How to move pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
move pages in a pdf; move pdf pages
PH OTO GR AP H E D  BY  E RI K  RAN K;  F OO D  S TY L IN G  B Y  M ARG ARE T TE  AD AM S / MA RN I E  ROS E  A GE N C Y
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
pdf change page order acrobat; how to move pages within a pdf document
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
how to rearrange pdf pages reader; how to move pages in pdf acrobat
112
re a de r sd ig e st . c om
2/1 1
most assuredly true.” Taubes sat down 
with our health editor, Lisa Davis, to 
share the Reader’s Digest Version of 
his theory. Here’s what he wants you 
to know.
THE OBESITY 
EXPERTS ARE WRONG. 
“Th ere’s this absolutely fundamen-
tal idea when it comes to weight and 
obesity—that  the way we get  fat is 
th at  we  take in  more  calories  th an 
we expend. It’s the gluttony and sloth 
hypothesis: We eat too much and ex-
ercise too little. It sounds undeniable, 
as commonsensical as can be, and it’s 
actually nonsense—it doesn’t tell us 
anyth ing meaningful about why we 
get fat. If I get fatter, it’s obvious that 
I must have overeaten. But if you ask 
the question, Why did you overeat? 
Well, that question I can’t answer—
not with the calories-in/calories-out 
theory of weight gain. 
“People  react  to  this  as  th ough 
I’m questioning the laws of thermo-
dynamics. I’m not questioning them; 
I’m saying they’re not relevant. Yes, if 
you’re getting fatter, you’re taking in 
more calories than you’re burning—
the question is why. There’s a ridicu-
lously simple alternative hypothesis, 
which is that you don’t get fat because 
you’re  overeating.  You overeat be-
cause you’ve developed a disorder in 
the way your fat tissue is regulated.”
DIETS 
DON’T WORK. 
“Over the past 40 years, studies have 
shown that you can’t get a clinically 
Taubes thinks he knows why: Obe-
sity  experts have gotten things  just 
about co mpletely  backward.  If you 
look carefully at the research, he says, 
fat isn’t  th e enemy;  easily  digested 
carbohydrates  are. Th e  very  foods 
that we’ve been sold as diet staples—
fat-free yogurt, plain baked potatoes 
(hold the butter), and plain pasta (hold 
the olive oil, sauce, and cheese)—actu-
ally reset our physiology to make us 
pack on  the pounds. And the foods 
that we’ve been told to shun—steak, 
burgers, cheese, even the sour cream 
so carefully scraped from that potato—
can help us finally lose the weight and 
keep our hearts healthy. 
As you might imagine, Taubes has 
stirred controversy with his conten-
tions. Though he’s known as an obses-
sive reporter and a science nerd (he 
studied applied physics at Harvard and 
aerospace engineering at Stanford and 
has won numerous  science-writing 
awards), he’s been called a dangerous 
cherry picker of data—someone who 
searches through decades of studies to 
weave together the bits he likes. But a 
series of studies in the past five years 
has compelled researchers to rethink 
their long-held prejudices against low-
carb diets. These days, scientists like 
Mitchell Lazar, MD, who directs the 
diabetes institute at the University of 
Pennsylvania, and cardiologist Allan 
Sniderman, MD, at McGill University, 
take Taubes’s argument very seriously.
Taubes calls his ideas just an alter-
native hypothesis for why we get fat. 
Then, with trademark confidence, he 
adds that this radical rethinking is “al-
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
rearrange pdf pages online; how to move pages in a pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including
move pages in pdf online; how to move pages in pdf files
113
you  to eat less—h ow much good is 
that going to do?
“If you cut calories, you’ll be hun-
gry all the time—that’s a given. But 
what also happens is that you adjust 
your energy  expenditure  to  match 
your reduced intake. Studies in ani-
mals show that if you restrict energy 
intake, their cells actually burn less 
energy, which is one reason that obe-
sity researchers, in their honest mo-
ments, acknowledge that restricting 
calories is ineffective.” 
IT’S IMPOSSIBLE 
TO COUNT CALORIES.
“Public health authorities want us to 
practice ‘energy balance,’ which is a 
new way to say that you shouldn’t take 
in more calories than you expend. So 
what does energy balance entail? 
significant effect from cutting calo-
ries. At the same time that experts are 
saying that gluttony and sloth are re-
sponsible for weight gain, they’ll tell 
you that we know no diet works, and 
that’s why we have to come up with 
some anti-obesity drug th at’ll  make 
bil lions.  T hat’ s  why  th e  medical 
community considers bariatric su r-
gery—actually altering your digestive 
system—a reasonable solution. 
“It shouldn’t be a su rprise that di-
ets don’t w ork. Obese  peo ple h ave 
spent  their lives  trying  to  eat  less. 
There are probably a few people who 
gave up early and said, This is hope-
less  and I’m  going  to  have  a  good 
time. But for the most part, you can 
define an obese person as someone 
for  whom  eating less  didn’t  work. 
So the simple fact th at a doctor tells 
What we  
tell people to  
do to lose 
weight— 
eat less and 
exercise—is 
exactly what 
you’d do if 
you wanted to 
make yourself 
hungry.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save
rearrange pages in pdf document; move pages in pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
PDF in preview without adobe reader component installed. Dim pageIndex As Integer = 0 ' Move cursor to String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
how to reorder pages in pdf online; pdf reorder pages
114
re a de r sd ig e st . c om
2/1 1
“If you consume about 2,700 calo-
ries a day, which is typical if you aver-
age men and women together, that’s a 
million calories a year, or ten million 
calories in a decade. Over the course 
of a decade, you’re eating roughly ten 
tons of food. How accurately do you 
have to match calories-in to calories-
out so that you don’t gain more than 
20  pounds over  the  course of a de-
cade? Because if you gain 20 pounds 
every decade, you’ll go from being 
lean in your 20s to obese in your 40s, 
which many of us do. And the answer 
is:  20  calories  a day.  If you  take in 
an extra 20 calories a day and put it 
into your fat tissue, you will gain 20 
pounds every decade.
“Th e point is, nobody can match 
calories-in to calories-ou t with that 
kind  of  precisio n.  Twenty calories 
is like a single bite of a McDonald’s 
hamburger.  It’s a  cou ple  of  sips  of 
Coca-Cola  or a few bites of an ap-
ple. No matter how good you are at 
counting calories, you can’t do it. So 
if practicing energy balance is really 
the way to keep from getting fat, the 
question is, Why aren’t we all fat?”
EXERCISING WON’T 
KEEP YOU THIN.
“People in nutrition are so keen on 
making us lose weight by exercising 
th at  they’ve forgotten  the fact  th at 
the  more  energy  you   expend,  th e 
hungrier  you  get.  Imagine  I  asked 
Alice  Waters,  th e  great  chef  from 
Chez Panisse, to my house to make 
a 12-course feast, and you’re invited. 
And I’ve got a pastry chef coming and 
a gourmet butcher—in Berkeley they 
The low-fat  
diet that  
people  
have been
eating in  
hopes of  
protecting 
their heart  
is actually  
bad for their 
heart.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
reorder pdf pages in preview; how to move pages around in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
rearrange pdf pages in reader; reorder pdf page
115
(BUTTER) MICHAEL ROSENFELD/GETTY IMAGES; (PASTA) DAVIES AND STARR/GETTY IMAGES; (BRUSSELS SPROUT) JUSTIN LIGHTLEY/GETTY IMAGES; 
(ORANGE) EVGENIE IVANOV/GETTY IMAGES; (BACON) JAMES AND JAMES/GETTY IMAGES
5 WAYS TO GET STARTED
Eric Westman, MD, who directs the Duke Lifestyle Medicine Clinic in Durham, 
North Carolina, and who cowrote The New Atkins for a New You, has been 
studying low-carb diets for 12 years. His five guidelines: 
1
DON’T TRY TO LIMIT FAT. “Eating high-fat foods 
keeps you from feeling deprived,” says Dr. Westman. 
Bacon, cheese, heavy cream, sour cream, cream 
cheese, mayonnaise, butter, and oil are all healthy parts  
of a low-carb diet. 
2
SAY GOODBYE TO PASTA, BREAD, AND RICE. 
To lose weight, most people have to stay under 20 
grams of “net” carbs per day (net carbs refers to the 
number of grams of carbs minus grams of fiber, because  
fiber doesn’t send blood sugar spiking). That rules out  bread 
(two slices contain about 24 grams of net carbs), rice (over 
40 grams in a cup), and pasta (about 40 grams per cup). 
Once you hit your goal, you can slowly add in more carbs that 
don’t have a big impact on blood sugar. 
3
BE PICKY ABOUT VEGETABLES. Starchy (carb-
heavy) vegetables—most of the  ones that grow  
underground, as well as corn—are off-limits. But you 
can have up to four cups daily of  leafy greens such as lettuce, 
spinach, and collard greens. Limit broccoli, cauliflower, green 
peppers, okra, and Brussels sprouts to two cups per day. 
4
SAY NO TO HIDDEN SUGARS. Fruit, that legend-
arily healthful food, is packed with sugar, aka carbohy-
drates. So are fruit juices. Other concentrated sources 
include soda, cakes, and candy. You may be able to keep diet 
sodas, light beer, dry wine, and sugar-free sweets on the 
menu and still lose weight.
5
EAT AS MUCH AS YOU WANT. When it comes to 
protein and fat, “you don’t have to use portion con-
trol,” says Dr. Westman. “Your hunger will go down 
automatically when you start eating this way—all you  
have to  do is stop eating when you’re full.”  
Beth  Dreher
O EAT 
T KEEP  
of fish I can buy, 
at what you want 
—you just don’t 
Not everyone 
gets fat from 
eating carbs, 
and getting 
rid of carbs 
might not 
make you 
lean. But it 
will make you 
the leanest  
you can be.
118
re a de r sd ig e st . c om
2/1 1
1,200 to  1,80 0 calories per  day with 
a low-carbohydrate diet where you 
could eat as much as you wanted. The 
researchers kind of buried this part of 
it, by the way. They barely touched on 
the fact that this is a severely calorie-
restricted diet compared with an all-
you-can-eat diet. But what they found 
was that the low-carb diet did just as 
well. To me, this has been the most 
important observation in the field of 
obesity  research: that you can have 
an effective diet that doesn’t restrict 
calories.  But  the establishment has 
ignored that aspect of it. And in most 
of the stu dies  that have been done, 
a low-carb diet actu ally does better 
than a low-fat, low-calorie diet.”
HIGH FAT IS BETTER 
FOR YOUR HEART.
“The idea that dietary fat causes heart 
disease  is deeply,  deeply ingrained. 
We all know the Atkins diet kills peo-
ple—that’s what we’ve been told, any-
way. When I started eating this way, 
my wife made me get a life insurance 
policy. But over the past decade, doz-
ens of studies have finally looked at 
the Atkins  diet, and they  show that 
heart  disease  risk  facto rs  improve 
more  on  this kind  of  low-carb diet 
than  on  th e  low -fat,  l ow-cal orie 
diet that doctors  and the American 
Heart Association want you to eat. 
Your 
HDL
goes up, which is the most 
meaningful number in terms of heart 
health. Small, dense 
LDL
—which  is 
particularl y  dangero us—b ecomes 
large, fluffy 
LDL
. And not only does 
your  cho lesterol profile  get better, 
your insulin goes down, and your in-
sulin resistance goes away, and your 
blood pressure goes down. 
“The low-fat diet that people have 
been  eating in  hopes of protecting 
th eir heart is  actually  bad for their 
heart, because it’s high in carbohy-
drates.  Th e  public  health  effort to 
get everyone to eat that way is one of 
the fundamental reasons that we now 
have obesity and diabetes epidemics.”
WHAT A  
LOW-CARB DAY 
LOOKS LIKE
A typical menu for Eric Westman, 
MD, who directs the Duke Lifestyle 
Medicine Clinic in Durham, North 
Carolina:
BREAKFAST
2-egg ham-and-cheese omelet  
Diet cranberry juice  
Coffee with cream and sugar-free  
sweetener
LUNCH
Salmon salad (2 cups lettuce and  
1 cup salad vegetables)  
Water or diet soda
DINNER 
8-ounce rib eye steak with  
blue cheese  
1 cup of “mock mashed potatoes” 
(cauliflower with butter, cream, 
and bacon) 
DESSERT 
Sugar-free gelatin or sugar-free  
gelatin chocolate pudding  
(made with heavy cream) 
119
IF YOU HAVE A 
WEIGHT PROBLEM,  
IT’S NOT YOUR FAULT.
“The past 40 or 50 years, obesity re-
search has basically been an attempt 
to explain why obese people just don’t 
have the moral rectitude of lean peo-
ple, without actually saying that. It’s 
terribly damaging. It’s inexcusable, but 
it’s still the conventional wisdom. Most 
doctors don’t want to deal with obese 
patients because they think they’re 
dealing  with  someone  who  simply 
doesn’t care enough to do what they 
do: Eat in moderation, and exercise.
“I’ll walk down the street and see 
somebody who’s obese, and I can’t see 
it as anything but a hormonal disor-
der. Not everyone gets fat from eat-
ing carbohydrates—it has to do with 
how sensitive your cells are to insulin 
and specifically how sensitive your fat 
cells are versus your muscle cells. But 
some huge percentage of the people 
who do get fat got that way because of 
the carbs in their diet. If you’ve been 
fat for a long time, getting rid of car-
bohydrates might not make you lean. 
But the leanest you can be is on the 
diet with the fewest carbohydrates.
“Are  there  some  cautions? Yes—
some  people feel low energy while 
their  bodies  adju st  to  this  way  of 
eating, though adding a little salt or 
bouillon to your diet can take care of 
that. A low-carb diet can reduce your 
blood pressure, too, so you might have 
to  adju st  your  medication—if  you 
have a medical condition, you should 
talk to your doctor first. But basically, 
I’m  ju st  saying,  Eat  w hat  h umans 
evolved to eat. Highly refined grains 
and sugars were not part of our diet 
for 99.999 percent of human history. 
Back when we were hunter-gatherers, 
we ate meat as often as we could get 
it, and when we ate plants, they were 
much  tougher  and  higher  in  fiber 
than they are today—much lower in 
digestible carbs, in other words. This 
isn’t a diet. The fundamental idea is, 
Don’t eat the foods that make you fat. 
Beyond that, you can eat as much as 
you want.”  
“Say something  funny!” That’s what  people say when they find  out  I’m 
a comedian.  But  how  would they feel  if  I  found  out they were  a plumber 
and  said,  “Fix  my  sink!”? So  when  someone  asks  me  to  say  something 
funny,  I  reply, “You’re  good-looking!”  And  they  laugh.  Usually.
Once  at  JFK  airport, the  customs  guy looked  at  my paperwork  and 
saw  that  I  was a comedian.  “Say  something funny,” he  commanded. 
“You’re good-looking,” I  shot  back. 
There  was  a  pause,  followed  by  a smile.  Then he  pulled me aside  and 
went  through  all  my luggage. 
Eddie  B ril l, comedian and comic booker for Late Show with David Letterman
TH E   C U S T O M S   L I N E 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested