c# pdf viewer winforms : Reorder pages in pdf preview SDK software service wpf winforms asp.net dnn XavierConf1962Transcript24-part2066

FRI:AM-2 
presupposes some sort of ontology and vice versa.  That is, I 
think that one isn't going to have a complete ontology without 
understanding the conditions of knowledge.  There is a sort of 
mutual pre- 
I find passages in Bohr in which he speaks as if these two 
investigations are complementary in some generalized sense; that 
one can look into human beings as knowers (and that's one 
investigation) or one can look into them as physical creatures in 
the world (and that's another investigation) and they can't be 
done simultaneously; there's complementarity between them. A sort 
of fanciful historical note is that complementarity in this sense 
can be found in Kant, who has a Critique of Pure Reason
and a 
Critique of Practical Reason
.  In the Critique of Pure Reason
there's epistemology without ontology.  In the Critique of 
Practical Reason
there is a consideration of human beings as real 
entities. 
Well, with this general point of view, what I am interested 
in, in my own work, is to explore the various possibilities of 
quantum mechanics as it is now formulated, and to see if any of 
them are in principle capable of being understood, not just as 
epistemological theories, but also as ontologies. 
mechanics of the sort that Professor Wigner was talking about, the 
sort proposed by von Neumann, in which an observer plays an 
essential 
Reorder pages in pdf preview - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
rearrange pages in pdf document; rearrange pages in pdf file
Reorder pages in pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to rearrange pdf pages in preview; pdf reverse page order
FRI:AM-3 
which one understands the role of the observer? That is, can one 
have a kind of generalized psychology, if you will, which 
incorporates the data we now have about the psychological behavior 
of human beings, and also the attributions of the power of an 
observer to 
interpretations.  But I won't try that; I leave it to anyone else 
who wishes to do it. 
tation, the one that Professor Wigner was suggesting, the one which 
takes quantum mechanics absolutely literally, which says that even when 
one is dealing with macroscopic physical objects the formalism 
that the reduction of the wave packet does not come at the time of 
the interaction of the physical instrument with a system, but at the 
time that the observer intervenes. 
Now, let's ask, can one sketch out in general terms an ontology in 
which one understands physical things, and also the observer as 
two different points of view.  One, what we know about single 
observers. Do we know anything about the ordinary activity of the 
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
thumbnail preview for accurate Word page navigation and location in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in
move pages in pdf acrobat; how to reorder pdf pages in reader
VB.NET Image: Web Image and Document Viewer Creation & Design
can rotate, redact & annotate images and add, delete & reorder document pages with zero It is a powerful toolkit to print bitonal images, PDF, and so
how to reorder pages in pdf; rearrange pages in pdf
FRI:AM-4 
human mind which makes it reasonable to think that it can perform 
of mind can one think of that one might refer to? Well, one thing 
that one might think of is the fact that under certain conditions 
human perceptions are vague, and under other conditions they are 
distinct.  And one might suppose that vagueness is roughly 
comparable to a superposition in which there are eigenstates 
corresponding to different values of macroscopic observables. And 
precision in per- 
only one eigenstate of a macroscopic observer. 
for precision of perception are conditions like having the lights 
turned on, being attentive, being in a fairly good emotional 
state, etc., and conditions for vagueness are just those in which 
these conditions, or one or the other, is missing. 
of sharp perceptions if the ordinary conditions for perception are 
good, and a vague perception if the ordinary conditions are 
bad.*(see footnote) 
Addition to page 4 
FRI:AM-5 
of, appears between the first input and vagueness, and the second 
input and precision.  Nothing at all. 
So let's try another possibility.  This is even more fanciful. 
ditions? Well, I'll mention Freud's theory of the dream world.  In 
in which both are present, both are clear, there is no blurring, 
there is no contradiction.  But somehow, they are both present. 
hold at all.  For one thing, the order is all wrong.  Take a case 
in which presumably the input was of the second sort.  The input 
And so here are two possibilities.  Now, let us mention a third,  
which is of a quite a different sort.  Various philosophers and some 
physicists in speculative moods, Schrodinger, for example, in his book, 
Mind and Matter
, and Bergson, Creative Evolution
, and others, suggested 
that, mind is precisely that aspect of nature in which there is 
spontaneity. 
We wish to say, there is a stochastic element.  And certain 
FRI:AM-6 
our circulation has become mechanical beyond our control.  
Therefore, for the most part we have no consciousness connected 
with the operation of circulation.  Our musculature is pretty 
much under our control.  There is a certain amount of 
spontaneity, and therefore, consciousness is connected with it.  
Some processes are somewhere in between.  Breathing, for 
example, is somewhere in between these; presumably if breathing 
became more mechanical, it would lapse 
is acquiring a new skill, one has to concentrate on it; one is 
conscious of what one is doing at the beginning, and after the 
skill has become very deeply ingrained, it has left 
consciousness. 
troubles of two sorts. One is the difficulty that maybe there is 
depth of our mind, introspection reveals no more spontaneity, 
no more chance elements, no more creativity, when our input is 
of the 
introspection is often very deceptive.  And the other is a 
biological argument, namely, we have evidence which is mounting 
and mounting, that the properties of large scale entities and 
large scale organisms can be explained in terms of properties of 
small scale 
FRI:AM-7 
Recent progress in microbiology, of course, is marvelous in this 
way.  Now suppose that creativity, or a spontaneous element, or a 
stochastic element is a characteristic of large scale organisms; how 
could this be the case if it weren't already in some minor way 
characteristic of small scale things? It could be if this creativity 
were a structural property. When one builds a television set out of 
condensers and so on, to say that the characteristic of being a 
television set isn't to be attributed to the components, is trivial. 
This is because the characteristic of being a television set is 
structural, whereas a stochastic element, the property of behaving 
somewhat spontaneously in no way appears to be structural.  So if one 
expects to find this property in large organisms, there is no reason 
for expecting not to find it in their very small components. 
If this is so, then one would guess that the Schrodinger 
equation, which is a deterministic equation for the evolution of a 
And this in turn leads me beyond the theories which I am considering. 
That is, I am considering only interpretations of quantum mechanics 
which leave the formalism intact, which don't say that the formalism 
have you, which modify the content. 
we have no present account of the nature of mind which in any way 
incorporates known psychological evidence, plus the extra character- 
FRI:AM-8 
istic of reducing wave packets.  Now, let me mention just one 
other type of consideration, namely, what happens when you ask, not 
about a single observer but, about a community of them.  That is, 
we would be very unhappy if the formalism of quantum mechanics did 
lead us to solipsism or to something bizarre like a society of 
solipsists.  I think there is a kind of gregariousness in human 
beings, but, carrying gregariousness to the point of forming a 
society of solipsists would be something which I wouldn't understand 
very well.
Dirac:
What are solipsists? I don't know what you mean. 
Shimony:
Well, a solipsist is one who believes that there is 
nothing in the universe but himself and his own perceptions? a 
society of them would be a rare thing. 
Podolsky:
(to Dirac)  If I were a solipsist I would think you are 
only a product of my imagination. 
Aharonov:
Therefore, you wouldn't mind destroying him, because it's 
only an effect on the imagination? 
Podolsky:
That doesn't follow. 
Aharonov:
No?  (Chuckling) 
Furry:
I have some times thought the traffic in Harvard Square 
seems to be made up of solipsists in the background, driving all 
the cars.  (laughter) 
Shimony:
Well, let each one of us try to wish away the others. 
Guth:
We consider a solipsist to be extremely egocentric. 
Shimony:
Very well, let's think about the problems that come up. 
FRI:AM-9 
If we don't assume solipsism, there are, I think, some rather severe 
ones.  I'll now mention a kind of gedanken experiment which 
Professor Wigner has talked about.  Some of you may have heard it 
before, but I hoped he would talk about it here.  Suppose there is 
nothing in the formalism of quantum mechanics which says the 
instrument you use has to be a particular kind of electronic or a 
physical device. Why not use a friend as an instrument? Namely, you 
suppose that a photon if it's right circularly polarized passes 
through an analyzer, and that if it's left circular it does not. If 
it's in a state of linear polarization, it half does and half 
is initially in a linear polarized state.  Fine.  Now, how do you 
use your instrument? You use your instrument in the way you 
use any macroscopic instrument; you look at it or you ask the right 
questions, and in particular in the case of a friend, you ask him 
the question, "did you or did you not see the flash?" If he says, 
"yes," then there is such a transition.  For you, the wave packet—or 
if you prefer it, the state—which was a superposition of 
polarization states of the photon plus correlated states of the 
apparatus including analyzer and friend, is now reduced by this 
answer.  Fine.  Now you might ask one further question, "Did you see 
it before I asked you?"  The friend says, "But don't you believe 
me? I told you I saw the flash!"  But, you insist.  He says, "Of 
course I did see the flash long before you asked me." Now how are 
you to interpret 
FRI:AM-10 
his answer? There are a number of possibilities, all of them trouble-
some, all of them leading to some sort of doubt as to whether we have an 
adequate sketch of an ontological theory which incorporates observers.  
One possibility is, no matter what answers the friend gives to you, you 
simply treat them behavioristically, you merely treat him as an 
apparatus.  You don't endow him with any feelings. 
him, he had already made up his mind; that your asking was not what 
reduced the wave packet.  Now, if this is so, then we have something 
which, prior to the ultimate reduction of the wave packet in the 
ultimate observer, there would be a reduction of the wave packet in 
the apparatus.  Well, this seems to indicate that somewhere or 
another, a non-linearity has crept into the quantum mechanics... 
either there is a non-linearity in the sense of a limitation on the 
superposition principle, or there is a non-linearity in the 
Schrodinger equations which governs the propagation of states. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested