c# pdf viewer winforms : Move pages within pdf SDK control API wpf web page asp.net sharepoint XavierConf1962Transcript27-part2069

FRI:AM-29 
on the formalism of quantum mechanics. 
Furry:
I am asking for something that the formalism doesn't contain, 
finally when you describe a measurement.  Now, classical theory 
doesn't contain any description of measurement.  It doesn't contain 
anywhere near as much theory of measurement as we have here. There is 
a gap in the quantum mechanical theory of measurement. In classical 
theory there is practically no theory of measurement at all, as far 
as I know.  Now, quantum theory does an awful lot more for us than 
classical theory.  And I have a suspicion that this is the point in 
which we should stop making demands on the instruments of classical 
theory, and as Professor Dirac says, "There are other problems too 
hard for us."  They really are the ones we ought to be thinking 
about. 
Podolsky:
There is no way of telling what path we have to take in 
order to get the kind of a theory we want to have.  Possibly by 
examining these difficulties we may get some clues as to what kind of 
a theory. 
Aharonov:
Class one difficulties? 
Podolsky:
Yes, class one difficulties. 
Band:
This thing you wrote up there says something about a mixture 
operator? The result of the operation is a pure state, which is 
another state, that is still a pure state. 
Furry:
Oh, yes, you apply this to a wave function.  You see this 
is not a combination of kets, this is a bra and ket back to back. 
Move pages within pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf reverse page order online; how to reorder pages in pdf preview
Move pages within pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pages pdf; how to move pages in pdf files
FRI:AM-30 
Band:
Yeh, I know this.  It's a quantum mechanical operator, some 
kind of operator.  I wanted to have the concept whereby you say, as 
far as my knowledge is concerned, I don't know what state it is in, 
but I allow it to be in a mixture of states.  This is his condition 
of my knowledge of the system.  I don't represent that con- 
what I mean by a function of the wave function.  It may be something 
that's missing in quantum mechanical descriptions.  It may be the 
conclusions have to be statistical. 
Furry:
Well, it may be that with the restrictions on the postulates. 
Many people, including very distinguished people, have said we really 
ought to make a more general description of what one really means.  
But, no one has ever given it, and if one does use the powerful 
postulates, as many people have used, everyone uses them to derive the 
complete formal theory and in a formal mathematical way uses the 
powerful postulates including that famous one, of 
course, that any Hermitian operator that does not have certain 
pathological characteristics, is an observable, then you prove that 
this 
is the most general theory.  If there could be a more general one, 
somebody somehow or other has to find it. 
Band
 I don't get the connection between the mixture operation and 
the state of the system whose condition is not given. 
Furry:
Oh, this, as I see it, you must realize that this quantum 
argument I gave the other day is, this formal argument I gave the 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF of adding and inserting a new blank page to the existing PDF document within a well
move pages in a pdf; change page order pdf
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with a dealing solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides order within C#.NET
pdf reorder pages; change pdf page order
FRI:AM-31 
other day,is not usually given.  The usual way to introduce the 
mixed state is the way that I have always done it in a class.  It 
is just to say that you ordinarily do not measure a complete set of 
observables.  "The measurement is ordinarily fragmentary concerning 
the ones you haven't measured, you can only make certain guesses, 
that is probabilistic guesses as to what they might have been, what 
the relative probabilities of different values are, and 
one then puts in these estimated probabilities for the different 
wave functions which the system might have, if the complete 
observation had been made, and had come out different ways.  One 
puts those in, these are to be established by the principle of 
insufficient reason, or by whatever other evidence is available, and 
then one goes ahead. 
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Process TIFF, RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .
Our supported image and document formats are: TIFF, JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, PDF, Word and DICOM. It represents a high-level model of the pages within a Tiff file.
pdf page order reverse; how to reorder pdf pages in reader
C# TIFF: How to Delete Page(s) from Multi-page TIFF File Using
Word, Excel, PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PDF to Tiff. Page Edit. Insert Pages into Tiff File. Delete Tiff Pages. Move Tiff Page Position. Rotate a Tiff Page. Extract
change page order pdf preview; move pages in pdf reader
Conference:  October 1-5, 1962 
Friday Afternoon - October 5,1962 
CLOSING REMARKS
Professor Podolsky:
It seems to me that we have exhausted the 
questions that Dr. Schwebel is prepared to answer at the moment. 
Before closing this conference I would like you people 
individually, if you so feel like doing, to express your opinion 
about the desirability of this kind of a conference, a panel 
conference is different from most ordinary conferences. We would 
appreciate expression of opinion. 
Aharonov:
The question is not clear enough, do you mean this type 
of conference from the point of view of topic, or from the point 
of view of the number of people? 
Podolsky:
Prom the point of view of number of people, 
organization and everything else that went into it. Did you like 
the conference?  
Dirac:
I think it's much better to have a small conference like 
this where people can really have time to think about things.  In 
the larger conferences you get a paper every ten minutes.  
Therefore, it's pretty hard to follow after a while. 
Podolsky:
Thank you Dr. Dirac. Well, this is the kind of opinion 
I would like to hear from other people too.  
Carmi
speaks: __________________________________________________. 
Podolsky:
Thank you, Dr. Carmi. Anybody else want to say 
something about it?  
Band:
At this conference, I really learned something, whereas, at 
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
images codec into PDF documents for a better PDF compression; RasterEdge JBIG2 codec SDK controls within C# project Move license text to the new project folder
change pdf page order preview; how to rearrange pdf pages online
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to of high-quality separate JPEG image files within .NET projects
reorder pdf pages in preview; rearrange pdf pages reader
FRI:PM-2 
other conferences I really don't learn much. Here you have plenty of 
opportunities to ask questions and get into discussions.  It's good to 
be able to sleep on it over night, and come back and talk about it the 
next day. 
Aharonov
:  And we are certainly grateful to Mr. Hart for his help he 
gave to all of us in everything we have to do.  (hearty applause) 
Podolsky:
Thank you, gentlemen.  I do believe that Mr. Hart was more 
responsible for this conference than anybody else.  
Aharonov:
I think we should also mention the other people that were 
all the time around here to help us. 
Podolsky:
Oh yes, we had plenty of help from these other people. Would 
you like, Mr. Hart, to mention the names of all the people that helped 
you, just for the record? 
Hart:
Well, for the record I would like to mention the immediate 
people in the room, first of all, starting with Dr. Podolsky. This 
could not have been done without his great help contacting Professor 
Dirac, Professor Wigner and Professor Aharonov.  I would like to thank 
Dr. Werner for his tremendous enthusiasm for this type of conference, 
and for helping to sustain me in some of the effort that we had to go 
through to bring this about.  I would also like to mention in our 
immediate group at this University, Mr. Fisher. I appreciate all the 
work that he has done recording these sessions and I particularly hope 
that he was able to record Professor Dirac's comments as well as Dr. 
Aharonov's, in their mentioning of the fruitfulness of this type of 
conference.  I would like to thank 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract View PDF document in continuous pages display mode Search text within file by using Ignore case or
how to move pages in a pdf file; rearrange pages in pdf reader
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
It enables you to move out useless Word document pages simply with a You are capable of extracting pages from Microsoft Word document within C#.NET
change page order pdf acrobat; reverse pdf page order online
FRI:PM-3 
Mr. Towle for help in handling the cameras, and Mr. Robert Podolsky, who 
is not here at the present time, for helping to record some of the 
material put on the blackboard and taking notes also.  There have been a 
lot of people who may be considered, as Dr. Furry mentioned at one time, 
I believe, our part of the hidden variables of this conference. We have 
Mr. Weber in our development office, who went to a considerable amount 
of trouble in trying to secure and actually obtaining the necessary 
funds for the conference, and also our Public Relations Department, Mr. 
Vonderhaar and Mr. Bocklage.  I know that there are others, and it's 
dangerous to list people by name because, I almost of necessity will 
have forgotten to name people explicitly.  I would like to offer my 
tremendous thanks to the main participants who honored us with their 
presence at this conference.  There is no doubt about it, that without 
them it could not have been put on and would not have been a success at 
all, and without the tremendous enthusiasm that all these people 
manifested during the past week. Wow last but not least, I think we 
should be tremendously appreciative of the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, the Office of Naval Research, and also The Judge 
Robert Marx Foundation for contributing the necessary funds to make this 
possible.  Now I would like to mention, although he is not here now. Dr. 
Jack Soules, of the Office of Naval Research. He was the first man in any 
government agency who, without qualification or hesitation just took it 
upon himself to say,  "This looks like such a good conference, yes, you 
will get the money." He was 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy View PDF document in continuous pages display mode. Search text within file by using Ignore case or
move pages in pdf online; reverse page order pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
NET code. All PDF pages can be converted to separate Word files within a short time in VB.NET class application. In addition, texts
reorder pages in pdf document; how to rearrange pdf pages in preview
FRI:PM-4 
among us here for a time.  He just left last night. Well, I think at 
the present time this is all that I have to say? I do hope that 
perhaps within the next couple of years or so, if you are willing 
and the agencies are willing, we might possibly duplicate this and 
make it much better, because I have learned from mistakes I have made 
this time.  Thank you very much. 
Podolsky:
Anything else anyone wishes to say before we close the 
conference? 
Werner:
I just want to say on behalf of the students of the 
University, and also some of the people of the community, who for a 
while were students at the University here, who came to the lectures, 
that they certainly have indicated a great deal of appreciation for 
the stimulation that has been given here.  All of those who came, 
who came and helped to have this conference go on, the students both 
regularly enrolled and ones who came especially to the conference, 
express their deep appreciation to you who gave so much inspiration.  
I think your work here will continue in ways that perhaps go beyond 
where you may ever see fully in detail how much you have given. 
Podolsky:
Thank you, Dr. Werner.  I now declare this conference 
closed. 
THE FOUNDATIONS OF
QUANTUM MECHANICS
A conference report by F. G. Werner
What are the leading problems of quantum physics 
today? Where does reduction of the wave-packet 
occur? Why single-valued wave functions? To what 
extent have relativity theory and quantum theory 
really been united consistently? Does it make sense 
to speak of "quantum mechanical action at a dis-
tance"? What is the significance of electromagnetic 
potentials in the quantum domain? What does a 
leading quantum physicist have to say about the 
physicist's picture of nature?
Yakir Aharonov, P. A. M. Dirac, Wendell Furry, 
Boris Podolsky, Nathan Rosen, and Eugene Wigner 
engaged in vigorous discussions of these questions 
at a special five-day conference called by Professor 
Podolsky at Xavier University in Cincinnati. The 
Conference on the Foundations of Quantum Me-
chanics was sponsored jointly by the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Office 
of Naval Research, and the Judge Robert S. Marx 
Foundation. Although the meeting took place during 
the week of October 1-5, 1962, the writing of this 
report had to wait until the entire conference 
proceedings could be transcribed and submitted to 
the participants for approval.
Years ago, when the number of physicists at a 
meeting was so small that all could fit easily into a 
single room, the spirit of free discussion so vital for 
the progress of physics was characteristic of most 
conferences.  Today,  with  the  large  meetings 
attended by hundreds of people and with many 
sessions going on simultaneously, it is difficult to 
create an atmosphere conducive to free and thor-
ough discussion. The prime purpose of the Xavier 
conference was to recapture some of that earlier 
spirit of intensity and depth in the exchange of 
ideas.
The heart of the conference was a series of lim-
ited-attendance sessions designed to provide ample 
opportunity for the six participants to discuss 
among themselves questions concerning the foun-
dations of quantum mechanics, and to do so at
F. G. Werner, the author of this account of the proceedings of 
the five-day conference on the foundations of quantum 
mechanics, is associate professor of physics at Xavier Univer-
sity in Cincinnati, where the meeting was held.
sufficient length to establish clearly which issues 
are most in need of further clarification. In order 
that each main participant might feel free to ex-
press himself spontaneously in the spirit of the 
limited portion of the conference, Chairman Podol-
sky adopted the policy that references to remarks 
made by the participants during the conference 
were to be checked with the persons who said them 
for  approval  prior  to  publication.  These 
limited-attendance sessions were also attended by 
about twenty observers, who were expected to speak 
only when called upon by the chairman.
While at Xavier for the conference, four of the 
participants delivered lectures which were open to 
the public. Aharonov spoke on the significance of 
potentials in the quantum domain. Furry lectured 
on the quantum-mechanical description of states 
and measurements. Wigner discussed the concept 
of observation in quantum mechanics. Dirac ad-
dressed visiting physicists and students on evolution 
of the physicist's picture of nature.
Aharonov, in the first part of his public talk, 
summarized  some  previously  treated  effects  of 
potentials in the quantum domain connected with 
interference and energy shift caused by potentials 
in field-free regions. Here he emphasized three gen-
eral points: (a) the effects of potentials are all 
peculiar to quantum theory in that they all dis-
appear in the classical limits; (b) they all make 
themselves evident only in nonsimply connected 
regions, in which freedom from finite field values 
does not ensure that potentials may be gauged to 
zero; (c) all these effects of potentials in quantum 
theory depend on the gauge-invariant line integral 
of the four-vector potentials around a closed loop 
in space-time in a manner not affected by the addition 
of integer multiples of ch/e. Aharonov suggested 
that these results peculiar to quantum theory be taken 
as a hint that we do not yet fully understand all the 
most characteristic consequences of quantization of 
the electromagnetic field theory.
In the. second part of his "talk, Aharonov ques-
tioned whether there might not be some residual 
quantum effects of potentials in simply connected
Reprinted from
PHYSICS TODAY    •    JANUARY 1964     •    53 
regions.  Although  classically  defined  vector 
potentionals may always be gauged away in any 
field-free simply connected region, this may not 
necessarily be the case for q-number potentials. To 
see the difference between the quantum and the 
classical case, said Aharonov, "Remember that both 
theories  distinguish  between  canonical  and 
kinematical momentum. Nevertheless, it is only in 
quantum theory that canonical momentum acquires 
an independent significance, in particular through 
uncertainty  relations  and  the  demands  of 
single-valued-ness of the wave function. Thus in 
the quantum theory we might have a situation in 
which both canonical  momentum  and  vector 
potential are uncertain in such a way that their 
difference, which depends on the kinematical 
velocity,  is  still  certain."  He  illustrated  the 
possibility of observable consequences of this 
distinction in "a possible residual correlation 
between electrons moving in a simply connected 
region  with  a  well-defined  velocity  and  the 
quantum-mechanical source of uncertain vector 
potential"; the attempt to remove such vector 
potentials in a simply connected region through a 
(q-number gauge-transformation, he pointed out, 
would not leave this correlation invariant and 
therefore this will have an observable consequence.
Aharonov went on to discuss the importance of 
this aspect of potentials and of its relationship to 
quantization of magnetic flux in superconductors 
verified in recent experiments. He also discussed the 
state of experimental verification and experimental 
work in progress.
Furry, in his public talk in the afternoon, de-
scribed the regular formulation of the theory of 
measurement in standard quantum mechanics in 
order to provide a background for various further 
discussions. He discussed the generality of the Gibbs 
ensemble and the "realistic interpretation" where 
"we could think of many systems, some prepared 
one way, some prepared another way, and the ex-
periment consists of measuring on a system drawn 
from this ensemble". He emphasized that a mixed 
state, which is the outcome of a measurement, does 
not mean a state which has a wave function formed 
from a linear combination of some other wave func-
tions. "It has no definite wave function at all," 
Furry stated. "It has instead a list of probabilities 
for different wave functions. In applying it, one 
appeals to the principle of insufficient reason in 
precisely the same way that one does in classical 
probability theory. But there is another source of 
dispersion in quantum mechanics—and it has no 
classical analog. It is something entirely different 
from the Gibbs ensemble and has nothing whatever 
to do with the Gibbs ensemble. But it is true that
if you work in the most general possible way, you 
can build the Gibbs ensemble situation on top of 
the quantum-mechanical situation, which is quite 
important for some purposes. Within the context of 
quantum mechanics it is not possible to ascribe 
this second form of dispersion to hidden parame-
ters."
In discussing the description of measurement, 
Furry  showed  that  the  orthodox  theory  of 
quantum-mechanical measuring processes assumes 
choosing the interaction between the microsystem 
and the apparatus so cleverly that after their 
interaction, the system (apparatus plus microsystem) 
has a wave function of the form,
( ) ) ( ( ) ) ( ( )
( , , , , )
q
x
c T
q xT
n
n
n
n
f
m
y
.  
Here, 
(q)
n
f
is an eigenfunction of the dynamical 
variable being measured, 
(x)
n
m
is an eigenfunction 
of the apparatus-pointer position, and 
2
c (T)
n
is 
the probability of obtaining the result numbered 
by n. Thus, by observing the state of the apparatus 
(x)
n
m
, the state of the microsystem can be inferred. 
Furry remarked that in both classical and quantum 
theory we don't say what we do when we make a 
measurement. 
"In the so-called Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen para-
dox," said Furry, "we have a situation which 
theorists cannot ignore, and where the realistic 
interpretation fails completely. It is just not avail-
able. The property of wholeness of the quantum 
state can apply to systems in which the parts be-
come widely separated and in which one deals with 
only one part." This is analogous to the wholeness 
of the quantum state which London has empha-
sized in the theory of superconductivity and super-
fluidity. Furry pointed out that for macroscopic 
systems covering macroscopic distances—and in that 
case with a great many particles in them—one has 
the essential wholeness of the quantum state giving 
special properties to the macroscopic system.
In his public talk, Wigner began by declaring 
most emphatically (three times) that "there is no 
logical flaw in the structure of orthodox quantum 
theory". But in quantum experiments "the instru-
ment may even be in a state having no classical 
analog. . . . How we eventually get the information 
is not described and cannot be described clearly by 
quantum mechanics." He noted that on entering 
science we are filled with idealism concerning the 
wonderful nature of science and how much it will 
accomplish for us; but in quantum mechanics only 
the probability connections between subsequent ob-
servations are meaningful. Questions about the 
process of observation, he said, presently lead to 
answers such as "We learned that as children," 
which brings home the fact that "we cannot make
54    .    JANUARY  1964    .    PHYSICS TODAY 
science without being unscientific. . . . This teaches 
us a little humility in our science."
In discussing the implications of relativistic 
in-variance in quantum  field  theory,  Wigner 
questioned  how  realistic  the  theory  is,  since 
measurements of field strength at points accurate 
enough to detect quantum effects have not been 
accomplished because of "very grave difficulties". He 
also wondered why we almost exclusively measure 
positions,  when  the  theory  says  that  every 
self-adjoint operator can be measured. "Nobody 
really believes that everything is measurable. It is 
absurd to think of it. ... [But] I feel terribly 
uneasy about it. ... A really phenomenological 
theory  would  not  only  say  that  there  is  a 
measurement but would tell how it should be 
carried out." Wigner said that one way to do this 
would be to reduce every physical problem to one of 
collision, and to perform calculations using the 
collision matrix, but, he added, "there are, in this 
world,  other things of  interest  in addition to 
collisions."
In concluding his talk, Wigner returned to the 
question of how knowledge and understanding are 
acquired. Although this question is crucial to physics, 
he indicated that we must also look elsewhere for 
the beginnings of an answer. "Science," he said, "has 
taught us that in order to understand something we 
must devote a great deal of careful and detailed 
thinking to the subject in question." He noted that 
physics has little to say regarding the acquiring of 
knowledge, which "teaches us a great deal of 
humility as to the power of physics itself. It also 
gives us a good deal of interest in the other 
sciences. ... I think that an integration [including] 
more than physics will be needed before we can 
arrive at a balanced and more encompassing view 
of the world, rather than one which we derive from 
the ephemeral necessities of present-day physics."
Rosen took charge of a panel discussion for an 
entire afternoon. The group, which also included 
Wigner, Podolsky, Furry, and Aharonov, discussed 
questions developed that morning at a question 
workshop, to which the public had been invited, 
conducted by William Wright, Dieter Brill, and 
Frederick Werner. The workshop offered those in 
attendance an opportunity to receive technical help 
in formulating their questions. The individuals 
who did so were invited to stay for lunch and to 
join the other observers in the afternoon to hear 
their questions discussed by the panel members.
The first such query asked, "What is meant by 
the statement that an operator is observable? How 
does one distinguish which are observable?" The 
ensuing discussion by the panel participants might 
be paraphrased as follows:
56    .    JANUARY  1964    .    PHYSICS TODAY 
Furry: "As Professor Wigner and I remarked, it's 
nice to have powerful mathematical weapons if you 
are making a mathematical theory. If you're inter-
ested in powerful mathematical assumptions to 
make various deductions easy, you make the assertion 
that every Hermitian operator has a spectrum that 
can be measured. On the other hand, very eminent 
physicists have held strongly to the position that 
one should regard as measurable only things for 
which we can describe, at least in principle, an 
actual  physical  arrangement  for  making  the 
measurement. And  such one  finds in the de-
scriptions that Pauli worked out in the early part of 
his Handbook article. (This adds a little bonus, I 
might say, for the old custom of learning to read 
German, which was universal among graduate stu-
dents when I was one, and is not so universal 
today.) These measurable quantities include, of 
course, position within certain limits, and momen-
tum, energy, and angular momentum. As Professor 
Wigner said, that is just about the end of the list. 
Time, of course, is not an operator in nonrelativistic 
quantum mechanics. Time measurement is just a 
procedure for tagging things with a parameter. 
Now if you arm yourself only with positions, it is 
much more difficult to prove all the theorems." 
Wigner: "How can you measure position?" Furry: 
"Well, with Heisenberg's gamma-ray microscope."
Wigner: "You don't measure position with that! At 
what time do you measure position?" (meaning: 
the measurement took place at what definite time, if 
any?)
Aharonov: "What about separating shutters?" Furry:  
"Yes,  that  is  the  method  Bohr ordinarily used.   
One  can   plan   ahead   but   the  experiment might 
fail."
Aharonov: (referring to the statement above that 
in practice only positions can be measured) "One 
can measure energy jumps and thus—if the energy 
is a sufficiently quantitatively detailed function of 
momentum and position—from the spectrum find 
the value of operators which are, in general, com-
plicated functions of momentum and position. So 
life is not so bad after all."
Furry: "That's right, a single measurement of en-
ergy will get you quite a lot of different operators 
associated with it."
Gideon Carmi, a conference observer, asked: 
"What is a measuring apparatus, and what is the 
relationship between observables and dynamical 
invariants of the system? Some people feel that 
there is much more to this relationship than ap-
pears on the surface." Wigner: "I'm afraid I am one 
of those people. I
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested