MON:PM -13- 
assign a mixed state to it, in which you give equal probabilities to 
all possible values of the spin component, because there is no reason 
to give anything but equal probabilities to them. Here one appeals 
to the principle of insufficient reason in precisely the same way that 
one does in classical probability theory.  And, in fact, all the 
reasoning about these w
n
's is precisely the reasoning of the classical 
probability theory. 
But here we have two different things coming ins  something which 
is just classical theory, just the classical theory of the Gibbs 
ensemble; and something else which is not at all classical theory.  
We have two sources of dispersion, two sources of what the 
statisticians call variance, but what the physicists call dispersion. 
The dispersion in the values — that is, the spread in the values 
of a variable — can come from the mixing of the state, from this Gibbs 
ensemble situation.  It comes from the fact that the various w
n
's give 
various contributions, that we have not prepared all the systems alike, 
or that we don't know exactly how to say in just what way the system 
was prepared. This has a classical analog.  In fact, it's precisely 
like the classical case in every respect.  All the calculations are 
just the classical ones.  The analogy is extremely close. 
In fact, it's identical in the way you calculate. 
Then it has another source of dispersion.  It comes from 
the dispersion in the individual state or in the pure state, the 
Pdf reverse page order preview - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pages in pdf; how to rearrange pages in a pdf file
Pdf reverse page order preview - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to move pages in a pdf document; how to move pages in pdf reader
MON:PM -14- 
various pure states.  Each of those certainly gives dispersion to 
certain quantities.  If for instance, I measure the momentum pretty 
carefully in each of these pure states 
n
F
' then I'll have a sizable 
dispersion for the coordinate. 
Thus there is another source of dispersion in quantum mechanics 
and it has no classical analog.  In the early days of quantum mechanics 
some people, who were struggling to understand what in the world this 
statistical theory could be about, comforted themselves by saying, 
"Well, it's just a sort of Gibbs ensemble".  It isn't
 It's something 
entirely
different. When you work in the usual way that elementary 
quantum mechanics does work with a wave function, you are working with 
something that has nothing whatever
to do with the Gibbs ensemble.  
But it is true, that if you work in the most general possible way, 
you can build the Gibbs ensemble on top of 
the quantum mechanical 
situation.  And for some purposes, in discussing some situations, 
it's quite important to do that. 
Let's note one more thing.  It's a famous result and somebody 
might, in the next few days even, find it useful to use in an argument.  
It takes only a moment to mention.  If I have a pure state of this 
situation — a pure state, where only one of the w's is different from 
zero — then you see R (always working in the representation where 
R is diagonal), then R
mn
is  
mn
d
because R is diagonal, and then it 
has to be 
multiplied by w
n
, and w
n
is 
0
nn
d
This is a neat little product of delta functions, you see, and 
you can put in another one, 
mn
d
It doesn't cost you anything, but all three letters have got 
to be the same.  If they are the same, it's 1, and now you can 
readily believe that when one works out the algebra for R
2
mn
it will turn out in a line or two of writing that this is the 
same as R
mn
.  In other words, they just have to be equal, and 
if they are equal it's 1.  Of course, when you square the 
matrix you have to use a summation.  The summation drops down 
to one term because of all these delta functions.  So R
2
mn
is 
the same as Rmn.
This is now an algebraic relation between R
2
and R.  And it 
holds in this representation, so it holds in every representation. 
Algebraic relations between matrices have that property.  The 
condition for a pure state is the so-called idempotent 
condition, R
2
is equal to R. 
I shall not go through any argument in which this comes up.  I'll 
just mention a famous argument in which this criterion 
MON:PM -16-
for a pure state is used.  That is, von Newmann's famous argument 
against hidden parameters, which has something to do with our thinking 
these days.  Namely, this argument in which this criterion is used 
proves that if the formalism of quantum mechanics holds exactly — 
that is, within this formalism of quantum mechanics — it is not 
possible to ascribe this second form of dispersion to unknown but 
varying values
of some sort of parameters which have not yet been 
discovered (which are, so to speak, hidden in the system).  This is 
not a consistent way to describe the situation, provided one stays 
within the context of quantum mechanics.  This, of course, doesn't 
mean that people who like — you know, it's been proved mathematically 
that when you prove something mathematically you always start with 
assumptions.  For instance, I started with these assumptions (a), (b), 
etc., some of which are rather strong.  And, of course, this proof 
of von Neumann's is based on the assumption that quantum mechanics 
is the exact and complete description of the situation.  So if you 
don't choose to believe that, you can believe in hidden parameters.  
I don't say that I'm recommending this.  I have normally been pretty 
orthodox in
my own views, but I think it's only proper to say what 
the
limitations are on a mathematical proof.  In mathematics you
prove something from assumptions.  You don't prove it in the 
absolute.
MON:PM -17- 
Now I want to mention how this idea of mixed state comes in.  This 
is the situation in the sort of thing which is really one of the key 
things with which we are confronted — the sort of problem that I 
conceive of us as undertaking to discuss this week — that's the problem 
of measuring some quantity.   Now when you make a measurement in quantum 
mechanics, you do something.  When you measure in quantum mechanics, 
the usual postulate is that when you measure a quantity you will get 
one of the eigenvalues as a result of the measurement. The probability 
that you will get a particular eigenvalue is the square of the absolute 
value of the inner product of the eigenfunction of that eigenvalue 
and the wave function. Of course, we now generalize it and say that 
the probability that you will get that eigenvalue is the square of 
the inner product multiplied by the w
n
and summed — that is a loaded 
average of such calculated results.  The important thing is the 
statement simply that when you measure, this is what you get. There 
is no statement made as to what happens in the actual measuring process.  
Two statements are made that you have these various probabilities of 
getting the various eigenvalues, and that after the measurement has 
been made — if it's what is called a predictive or preparative 
measurement —  the system will be in a state which can be calculated 
in a suitable way from its previous state and from, the result of the 
measurement. 
If the quantity measured has only one eigenfunction for the 
eigenvalue in question, then the state after measurement is a pure 
state with that function as the wave function.  If it has many 
eigenfunctions, if the situation is degenerate, then you will also 
have to appeal to the previous state for evidence about the w's in 
your new mixed state.  At any rate, there is only a statement of these 
results.  There is no statement as to what happens in the measuring. 
This is what various people, Bohr, Aharonov, and Bohm, and 
other people called the "cut".  It is where something happens 
which the theory does not describe mathematically. 
Classical theory didn't have to describe how you measure things.  
That was self-evident to all.  Why, you just looked and there it is.  
The moon goes around its orbit, the planets do their stuff, and we 
observe them.  And we don't have to say what happens exactly when 
we observe them.  If we do try to say what happens, let's say in a 
theory of the telescope, or a theory of the physiology of the retina, 
why we're just having some fun with more science.  We are not really 
saying anything about what happens in the measuring process as such. 
In quantum mechanics, however, we agree that the measurement 
can affect the state of the thing measured — we agree that 
MON:PM -18- 
In particular, suppose its previous state was a pure state: 
MON:PM -19- 
there is some sort of uncontrolled interaction between whatever we use 
to measure and the system measured.  That's necessary because the 
measurement performed with a system prepared in precisely the same way 
may sometimes give a different result; and the system afterwards will 
then be in an eigenstate for the one result, or an entirely different 
eigenstate for the other result.  So there was an interaction with the 
means used to make the measurement.  So that in quantum theory we have 
something not really worse than we had in classical theory. In both 
theories you don't say what you do when you make a measurement, what 
the process is.  But in quantum theory we have our attention focused 
on this situation.  And we do become uncomfortable about it, because 
we have to talk about the effects of the measurement on the systems. 
Now this discomfort can be allayed somewhat.  In fact, 
many people live long and fruitful lives without ever worrying about 
the problems that we are distressing ourselves with right now.  But 
it can be allayed by noting that we can describe what is happening 
quantum mechanically, in principle, up to any particular point we 
please. We can change the position of this cut, this place where we 
suddenly say "Well, at this point we made the measurement and we 
applied the rules for what happens when you make a measurement, and 
we're not talking about how the measurement itself occurs." 
MON:PM -20- 
I can do this, if I want to, if I have an object system which 
I'll call 
q
, if we can distinguish that from zero. This object system 
q
has coordinates, q say, and it has a wave function originally 
(q)
F
.  
And if I want to, I can simply say, well, I measure the observable 
A on that, and I get the result, and let's take a case of a 
non-degenerate spectrum, so that the eigenvalue A
n
has only one wave 
function, belonging to it.  Then, of course, the probability of getting 
A
n
will be the square of the absolute value of the inner product of  
n
F
with the original wave function 
After the measurement has been made, the wave function of the 
can say, "I will not perform this mysterious and undescribed operation 
on this object. I will instead, couple to the object 
q
another system, 
another quantum mechanical system which has coordinates x and which 
has a wave function before I start the game, of u(x), and to which 
I've given the letter I, so that I mean it's the instrument.  And I 
will couple this instrument to the object, let them interact a while, 
then I will de-couple them, and then anything mysterious and 
undescribed I do will be done to the instrument".  All that happens 
to the 
MON:PM -21- 
object will be described by the laws of quantum mechanics. Except 
that, of course, if I obtain incontrovertible information about 
the object, in the course of my perhaps obscene dealings with the 
instrument, I will, of course, make use of it, in future 
predictions about the object.  This is all I have to do. 
Of course, in making the general theory, we assume that the 
experimentalists are intelligent people.  This is one of the 
assumptions for which we have excellent evidence.  And we simply 
assume that they are able to devise — let's first note one more 
step before I say what they're able to devise. We have now the wave 
function of object and instrument before we begin our operations.  
The wave function for them is a function of both q and x and it 
is, of course, just the product of 
(q)
F
and u(x). 
One readily verifies that this gives all the predictions about the 
separate systems that could be gotten from these wave functions.  
Now we assume that the experimentalist is intelligent enough, and 
ingenious enough, to provide an interaction Hamiltonian, that is, 
to provide a piece of apparatus whose use corresponds in the 
mathematics to the presence of an interaction Hamiltonian H
int
which is a function of q and x, which will be different from zero 
during 
MON:PM -22- 
a certain period of time, namely from zero to T, and after that 
will subside again, so that there no longer will be any coupling 
between object and instrument. 
Almost anybody could get them coupled somehow, you know, and 
manage to shut if off.  I might, if you gave me a few weeks to bone 
up in the laboratory.  But now he must also pick this thing so that 
it does just the right thing. You see, during the presence of that 
interaction, of course, this wave function 
Y
is at all times 
obeying this precise, and if you please, causal formula of quantum 
mechanics, wave mechanics. 
During this time interval, from zero to T, the Hamiltonian 
includes not only the Hamiltonians for the separate systems, 
whatever they are, depending on their nature, but it also will 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested