c# pdf viewer winforms : Reorder pages in pdf document application software cloud html windows winforms class UNSD_Brochure5-part27

Statistical Classifications 
Classifications form the basis for data collection and data dissemination in every area of statistics. They provide 
standardized concepts to describe phenomena such as economic activity, products, expenditures, occupation or 
health. They are necessary to consistently measure these phenomena within and across countries and geographical 
regions. International statistical classifications serve as models for the development of national, multinational and 
regional classifications and form the basis for internationally comparable data. They are tools that are used by national 
statistical organizations, international agencies, academia, the legal community and other users. 
Classifications in UNSD 
The  development  of  international  standard 
classifications has  always been an  integral part of 
UNSD’s work programme. Already the first session of 
the Statistical Commission, after its inaugural meeting, 
elected a Committee on Industrial Classifications to 
formulate  proposals  for  an  international  standard 
classification of industries. The Statistical Commission 
has  accorded  constant  attention  to  this  area, 
recognizing that an “essential requisite for any real 
comparability  is  the  greatest  possible  extent  of 
uniformity  of  definitions  and  classifications”.  The 
Expert 
Group 
on 
International 
Statistical 
Classifications, with UNSD functioning as secretariat, 
provides global leadership in this area of statistics. 
Why adopt standard classifications? 
International  statistical  classifications  function  as 
“international languages” for communicating in statistics. 
If  you  wish  your  national  data  to  be  understood, 
appreciated,  used  or  quoted  widely,  international 
statistical classifications are an important tool. 
They facilitate international comparability by providing 
standardized  sets  of  categories  which  can  be 
assigned  to  specific  variables.  These  categories’ 
definitions are widely accepted and understood. 
International statistical classifications for which UNSD 
is  custodian,  such  as  the  International  Standard 
Industrial  Classification  of  All  Economic  Activities 
(ISIC) and the Central Product Classification (CPC) 
are updated  or revised periodically to ensure their 
relevance to current economic structures.  
Attention  is  paid to new  trends in  technology  and 
differing economic structures over time. For example, 
a new section on Information and communication has 
been introduced into the latest version of ISIC that 
includes: the production and distribution of information 
and cultural products; the provisions and  means to 
transmit  these  products;  as  well  as  information 
technology,  data  processing  and  other  information 
service  activities.  Additionally,  since  services  are 
absorbing an ever larger share of economic activity, 
this has been reflected in ISIC and the CPC through 
increasing their visibility - a larger part of the structure 
and more detailed categories have been committed to 
their representation. 
International standard classifications are designed to be 
used in their original state or can be adapted to national 
specifics. Using them, instead of developing a national 
classification  from  scratch,  saves  national  statistical 
offices financial and technical resources and facilitates 
international comparability of definitions and data. 
National adaptation of classifications 
Classifications  are  an  essential  mechanism  for 
harmonization and coordination of data compilations. 
As a  result,  they  facilitate a  country’s  inclusion in 
global  statistical  datasets.  When  international 
statistical  standards  are  not  employed,  national 
statistical offices risk their data not being comparable 
with  those  of  other  countries  and  miss  out  on 
opportunities  to  see  how  their  statistical  indicators 
compare with overall world development.  
In preparing national statistics, the best possible tools 
should be used for describing the economy. This often 
means  that  the  international  standards  must  be 
adapted  to  national  economic  conditions for  better 
relevance and applicability. This will facilitate the use 
of the classification as an appropriate tool for policy 
development  and  policy  analysis.  The  majority  of 
countries  make  use  of  the  international  statistical 
classifications in this manner. 
However, the use of national adaptations should still 
consider  requirements  of  international  comparability, 
such  as  the  recommendation  by  the  Statistical 
Commission that all Member States adapt their national 
activity classifications in a way to be able to report data 
at least at the two-digit level of ISIC, Rev. 4 without 
loss of information. 
While international classifications serve as models for 
national classifications, national expertise also drives 
the  development  of  international  classifications. 
Recently revised classifications such  as ISIC,  CPC, 
ISCO  (International  Standard  Classification  of 
Occupations)  or  ISCED  (International  Standard 
Classification of Education) have been developed after 
extensive  collaboration  and  consultation  with 
counterpart  classifications  developers.  Stakeholders 
such  as  national  statistical  offices,  international 
agencies, national ministries and a cross section of 
45
Reorder pages in pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pages within pdf; pdf page order reverse
Reorder pages in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reverse page order in pdf; reorder pages in pdf reader
users  have  been  involved  in  all  phases  of  their 
development. This included multiple series of regional 
workshops where stakeholders provided input into the 
discussion regarding concepts, structure and detail of 
the  classifications.  The  resulting  structures  and 
organization of the classifications are therefore truly 
global in nature.  
Technical cooperation
UNSD provides technical assistance to countries in 
the form of regional workshops and targeted country 
visits. The workshops focus on a variety of topics, 
based on the state of progress of classifications work 
in participating countries.  These  topics  include: (a) 
training  of  countries  on  the  concepts  of  the 
international  standard  classifications  and  on  new 
concepts introduced in recent revisions (such as for 
ISIC or CPC); (b) the interpretation and application of 
these  classifications;  (c)  the  adaptation  of 
international  standard  classifications  to  national 
purposes;  and  (d)  the  implementation  of  revised 
classifications in statistical programmes, including the 
changeover of business registers, change of survey 
procedures and backcasting of data. The workshops 
can  be  tailored  to  specific  regional  needs,  also 
addressing the development of regional classifications.  
Technical  assistance  for  classifications  is  also 
available in other forms, namely: 
Website: 
A United Nations Classifications website is 
maintained  as  part  of  the  UNSD  website  at 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/class/
The 
website 
provides information on meetings and workshops on 
classifications,  updated  classification  structures 
(including corrections), indices  and correspondence 
tables  for  a  variety  of  classifications,  as  well  as 
information 
on 
classifications 
interpretations 
maintained in the 
Registry
.
Classifications Newsletter: 
A newsletter is published 
bi-annually,  providing  information  on  the  latest 
developments in the area of international statistical 
classifications.  The  Newsletter  is  available  on  the 
UNSD Classifications website.
Classifications Hotline: 
An e-mail hotline is available at 
CHL@un.org to provide assistance with regard to the 
interpretation, structure and use of classifications under 
custodianship of UNSD, such as ISIC, CPC and the 
Classifications of Expenditure According to Purpose.
Similar tools are available from other custodians for 
their respective classifications. 
Coordination 
International standard classifications exist for different 
fields  of statistics,  often  maintained  by  specialized 
agencies in these fields, such as education or health. 
To apply common principles, to establish and maintain 
linkages between classifications, to ensure that new 
concepts are introduced consistently across different 
classifications, and to generally ensure a coordinated 
approach  to  the  revision  of  classifications,  a 
coordinating mechanism in form of an Expert Group 
has been created by the Statistical Commission.  
The 
Expert  Group  on  International  Statistical 
Classifications
meets  biennially  to  set  guidelines, 
review progress and coordinate international work in 
the  development  and  implementation  of  statistical 
classifications. While in particular the Expert Group 
advises UNSD on the work related to revisions and 
updates of ISIC and CPC, the group also provides 
guidance  to  other  custodians  of  classifications  to 
facilitate an overall coordinated approach. 
The  work  of  the  Expert  Group  is  focused  on 
classifications  within  the  Family  of  International 
Statistical  Classifications.  The  Group  carries  out 
reviews  of  classifications  within  the  Family  on  a 
regular basis to assess the need for classifications 
revisions or updates. 
Publications 
The  classifications  and  supporting  materials  are 
published  in  various  ways.  The  standard 
classifications themselves are published in print form 
and are available from the UN Publications website 
(http://unp.un.org). They include, among others: 
 International  Standard  Classification  of  All 
Economic Activities (ISIC); 
 Central Product Classification (CPC); 
 Classifications  of  Expenditure  According  to 
Purpose (COFOG, COICOP, COPNI, COPP); 
 Standard  International  Trade  Classification 
(SITC); 
 Classification by Broad Economic Activities (BEC). 
These  classifications  are  also  published  in  various 
electronic formats on the UNSD Classifications website. 
Correspondence  tables  and  similar  supporting 
documents are no longer published in print form and 
are distributed exclusively in electronic form through 
the UNSD Classifications website.  
Contact  the  Industrial  and  Energy  Statistics 
Section
for enquiries at CHL@un.org. 
Website:
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/class 
46
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
reorder pages of pdf; how to reorder pages in pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB.NET amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf rearrange pages online; reorder pdf pages online
Tourism statistics 
Tourism is a social, cultural and economic phenomenon related to the movement of people to places outside 
their usual place of residence, pleasure being the usual motivation. The activities carried out by a visitor may 
or may not involve a market transaction, and may be different from or similar to those normally carried out in 
his/ her regular routine of life. If they are similar, their frequency or intensity is different when the person is 
travelling. These activities represent the actions and behaviours of people in preparation for and during a trip 
in their capacity as consumers. Tourism has an impact on the economy, the natural and built environment, the 
local population at the places visited and the visitors themselves. Only with sufficient and adequate data that 
generate credible statistics is it possible to undertake different types of analysis of tourism. This is essential in 
order to evaluate the different aspects of tourism and to support and improve policy and decision-making. To 
properly reflect the size and international comparability of tourism, the United Nations Statistical Commission 
adopted international recommendations for tourism statistics in 1993, which were revised in 2008. 
History in a Nutshell 
The first step towards the development of international 
definitions on tourism for statistical purposes was taken 
in 1937 by the Council of the League of Nations which 
was  slightly  amended  by  the  International  Union  of 
Official Travel Organizations in 1950 and finally, in 1953, 
the Statistical Commission established the concept of 
“international visitor”. Given this evolution in terminology 
and the need  to produce  more timely and coherent 
tourism  statistics,  a  manual  was  adopted  by  the 
Statistical Commission at its twenty-seventh session, in 
1993, and were thereafter revised in 2008. 
International recommendations 
The concepts, definitions, classifications and indicators 
set forth in 
International Recommendations for Tourism 
Statistics 2008
(IRTS 2008)   should be consistent with 
definitions and classifications used 
in national  accounts,  balance of 
payments, 
statistics 
of 
international trade in services, and 
household and migration statistics. 
Additionally,  the  classifications 
used should refer, when relevant, 
to  the  two  main  international 
economic  classifications:  the 
Central  Product  Classification 
(CPC)  and  the  International  Standard  Industrial 
Classification of All Economic Activities (ISIC). 
Although the development of national tourism statistics 
is uneven and the resources (both human and financial) 
vary  from  country  to  country,  it  is  nevertheless 
necessary  to  strengthen  international  comparability. 
Consequently,  countries  are  encouraged  to  compile 
both demand and supply side tourism statistics in line 
with IRTS 2008 in order to ensure a better information 
base  for  analysis  of  tourism  and  its  economic 
contributions.  
To facilitate the implementation of the recommendations 
the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) together with 
UNSD, other agencies and national experts, drafted a 
Compilers Guide for IRTS 2008 
which is  available in electronic 
format  on  the  websites  of 
UNWTO  and  UNSD,  and  will 
appear in print during 2015. 
Concepts, 
definitions, 
classifications  and  indicators 
presented in IRTS 2008 should 
be  viewed  as  an  important 
foundation of the system of tourism statistics, which is 
closely linked to the compilation of Tourism Satellite 
Accounts  (TSA).  In  fact,  the  TSA  provides  the 
conceptual framework and the organizational structure 
for the reconciliation of most tourism statistics internally 
within  the  sector,  as  well  as  with  other  economic 
statistics. From this perspective, it should be seen as an 
instrument to assist countries in the identification of data 
gaps and to guide them during the revision of existing 
data sources, as well as in the development of new 
sources. 
Working for and with the countries 
UNSD and UNWTO jointly undertake capacity building 
activities  to  improve  tourism  statistics  and  TSA  in 
developing countries. Information on recent workshops 
is available at the website of UNSD. 
For  enquiries  regarding  Tourism  statistics  please 
contact tradeserv@un.org
47
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Sort PDF Pages - online C#.NET tutorial page for how to reorder, sort, reorganize or re-arrange PDF document files using C#.NET code.
how to reorder pdf pages in; reorder pdf pages
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split PDF document in both
pdf change page order acrobat; rearrange pages in pdf document
Dissemination of Global Statistics 
While the other four branches of the Statistics Division focus their data collection and dissemination activities on one or 
a few specific areas of statistics, the scope of the dissemination work of the Statistical Services Branch covers the full 
range of statistical themes. 
Most Recent Developments 
The  Statistical  Services  Branch  continuously  aims  to 
modernize  and  improve  the  Statistics  Division’s 
dissemination methods. To that  end, the Branch recently 
reviewed the Division’s mailing lists and undertook a survey 
of a sample of the current clients who receive complimentary 
copies  of  its publications by mail.  The  objectives  of the 
survey were to learn about the habits of known users and 
their preferred mode (print versus electronic) of utilizing the 
Statistics Division’s publications. Further details about the 
publications  survey  can  be  found  in  the  Report  of  the 
Secretary-General, E/CN.3/2014/12. 
Another effort to improve data dissemination across the UN 
System was the  Data  Managers Meeting  held  at United 
Nations Headquarters in New  York,  22-24 January 2014. 
Data dissemination specialists from various UN agencies, 
funds and programmes gathered for discussions on the data 
revolution and official statistics, implementing standards in 
data dissemination and exchange, and bridging national and 
international statistics. 
One important objective of the meeting was to review and 
improve UNdata - UNSD’s internet-based data service for the 
global user community, which was launched in early 2008. 
UNdata is equipped with all the functionalities for data access, 
and  its  development  team  is  continuously  adding  new 
databases and features to further enhance user experience.  
UNdata brings numerous statistical databases within easy 
reach of users, free of charge, through a single entry point 
(http://data.un.org/).  Some  of  the  tools  provided  to  aid 
research  include  Country  Profiles,  Advanced  Search, 
Glossaries,  and  the  recently  introduced  SDMX-based 
Application Programming Interface (API). Also, users can 
easily access, through related links, the data resources of 
national statistical offices. Currently, there are 34 databases 
and six glossaries containing over 60 million data points and 
covering  a  wide  range  of  themes  including  Agriculture, 
Education,  Employment,  Energy,  Environment,  Health, 
Human 
Development, 
Industry, 
Information 
and 
Communication Technology, National Accounts, Population, 
Refugees,  Tourism,  Trade,  as  well  as  the  Millennium 
Development Goals indicators.  
Another  data  service  for  nationally-produced  statistics, 
CountryData (http://data.un.org/countrydata), was  launched 
in  April 2012 and contains the development indicators of 
Burundi,  Cambodia,  Ghana,  Liberia,  Lao  PDR,  Morocco, 
Rwanda, Uganda, Thailand and Viet Nam, as well as the 
State  of  Palestine.  Development  indicators  as  well  as 
metadata are exchanged from national repositories to the 
database via nationally managed SDMX registries. Once in 
the  database,  discrepancies  between  data  from  national 
sources  and  international  agencies  are  identified  and 
analyzed. 
Additionally, the Statistics Division has been implementing a 
series of capacity-building projects in this area. So far three 
Regional  Workshops  on  Data  Dissemination  and 
Communication have been held in Manila, the Philippines, 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Amman, Jordan. The workshops 
were attended by dozens of participants from countries, sub-
regional  organizations,  regional  organizations  and 
international originations.  
Keeping with Tradition 
The United Nations 
Monthly Bulletin of Statistics
(MBS) and 
the United Nations 
Statistical Yearbook
(SYB) were two of 
the original pillars of the Statistics  Division’s  publications 
programme  and  the  global  statistical  system.  Originally 
prepared by and released as publications of the League of 
Nations in Geneva – the 
Monthly Bulletin of Statistics
in 1919 
and the then-titled 
International Statistical Year-Book
in 1927 
– these statistical compendiums began being produced and 
issued on a regular basis by the United Nations Statistical 
Office in New York in 1947 and 1949 respectively.  By the 
time the United Nations Statistical Commission meets for its 
45
th
session, over 800 editions of the 
Monthly Bulletin of 
Statistics 
and the 
Statistical Yearbook
will have already gone 
to  press.  These  two  bilingual  (English  and  French) 
publications have consistently figured at or near the top of the 
list of the “best sellers” of United Nations sales publications.  
48
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; detailed information for reading and editing PDF in RasterEdge Web Document Viewer
rearrange pdf pages online; move pages in pdf file
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf rearrange pages; rearrange pages in pdf file
Data Compilation and Dissemination 
These statistical products of the Branch aim at presenting, in 
 consistent  way,  the  most  essential  components  of 
comparable statistical  information  so as  to give  a  broad 
picture of economic and social processes. The data have 
been  drawn not only from in-house sources such as the 
databases of the various branches of the Statistics Division 
which are responsible for compiling demographic and social, 
energy, environment, industry, national accounts and trade 
statistics, but also from numerous other sources including 
national  statistical  offices,  UN  agencies,  and  other 
international and specialized organizations.  
Monthly Bulletin of Statistics 
The 
Monthly Bulletin of Statistics 
(MBS)  presents current 
monthly and/or annual and quarterly statistics for more than 
200 countries and areas of the world. The statistics, which 
are received from national statistical offices and collected 
from  additional  international  sources,  cover  the  following 
topics: 
construction, 
earnings, 
employment,  energy,  finance,  industrial 
production,  international  merchandise 
trade, manufacturing, mining, population, 
prices, transport and unemployment. The 
MBS
is freely available in pdf and in an 
online 
database 
at 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/mbs/. The print 
version  is  available  for  sale  at 
https://unp.un.org/. In general, the 
available data covers the latest 18 months, along with annual 
averages or annual totals for the last six years, and are 
presented in over 50 tables in the print version. The online 
database contains several additional data series (i.e. hours of 
work in manufacturing and non-agricultural activities, retail 
trade indices and world food price indices) and slightly longer 
time series. The most popular statistical  series  consulted 
online are the industrial production indices, consumer price 
indices, and total imports and exports. 
Statistical Yearbook
The 
Statistical  Yearbook 
contains  an 
overview of the statistics compiled by the 
international 
community   
in about 60 tables from 25 sources with 
most tables providing a historical series 
for  
over  200  countries,  territories  and 
statistical 
areas 
of  
the  world.  The  topics  covered  
include:  agriculture,  demography,  development  assistance, 
education, energy, environment, external debt, finance, gender, 
health,  ICT,  industrial  production,  labour  market, national 
accounts (economy), science & culture, tourism and trade. . 
The 
Statistical  Yearbook
is  available  in  hard  copy  for 
purchase. PDF files of the latest 
Yearbook
, as well as other 
recent editions, are available free of charge on the 
Statistical 
Yearbook
website at http://unstats.un.org/unsd/syb.  
World Statistics Pocketbook 
The 
World Statistics Pocketbook
is an annual 
compilation of over 50 key economic, social and 
environmental indicators covering several years, 
presented in one-page profiles for more than 
200  countries  and  areas  of  the  world.  The 
following  topics  are  covered:  balance  of 
payments,  communication  and  information, 
education,  energy,  environment,  food  and 
agriculture, gender, health, industrial production, international 
finance,  international  tourism,  international  trade,  labour, 
national accounts, population and migration and prices. This 
popular  product  is  available  in  hard  copy,  and  can  be 
accessed  free  of  charge  online  as  “Country  Profiles”  in 
UNdata  and  in  PDF  format  on  the 
World  Statistics 
Pocketbook
website at http://unstats.un.org/unsd/pocketbook/.  
Adapted  from  the  print  version  of  the 
World  Statistics 
Pocketbook
, the UN CountryStats app for 
iPhones  and  iPads  is  available  for 
download free of charge from the App 
store. This data visualisation tool offers 
portable access to key indicators for more 
than 200 countries and areas.  Its easy-
to-use interface enables users to: view 
complete  country  profiles;  compare 
indicators for several countries and years 
at a time; display them as bar graphs; 
and  save  them  as  favourites.    The  app  is  available  to 
download 
from 
the 
Pocketbook
website 
at  
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/pocketbook/ and also found in the 
App store. 
Quality Assurance Frameworks 
The Statistical Services Branch participates in the ongoing 
work of the Expert Group on National Quality Assurance 
Frameworks which was established at the request of the 
United Nations Statistical Commission. The Expert Group 
developed a generic national quality assurance framework 
(NQAF) template based on several of the already existing 
quality frameworks, and established a mapping to them.  The 
Group continues its efforts to enhance the guidelines it drew 
up to accompany the template, to build upon the a glossary it 
compiled of the main quality-related terms, and to update and 
maintain  the  NQAF  quality  assurance  website  on  which 
documents  and  links  to  nationally  and  internationally 
developed quality tools and references are posted to provide 
a platform for the exchange of information and experiences 
on quality assurance work.  
For more information on the work of the Expert Group on 
National 
Quality 
Assurance 
Frameworks, 
see 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/dnss/QualityNQAF/nqaf.aspx.  
Contact the Statistical Services Branch for enquiries about 
its work at statistics@un.org
49
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
rearrange pdf pages in preview; how to change page order in pdf document
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents. View, edit, insert, delete and mark up pages in multi Easily add, modify, reorder and delete TIFF tags; Perfectly
rearrange pdf pages reader; change page order in pdf file
Geospatial Information  
Since 1948, the United Nations has been promoting better understanding of cartography, geographical names and 
geospatial information through the organization of international and regional conferences, publications, training courses, 
and technical projects (the UN Statistics Division is the substantive office responsible for organizing and servicing 
these activities). There is a general  recognition that the enhanced availability  of reliable  and trusted  geospatial 
information is critical to address global issues such as climate change, food crisis, and humanitarian assistance, and to 
help design and implement effective development projects
The United Nations Committee of Experts 
on  Global  Geospatial  Information 
Management (UN-GGIM)  
Following  the  recommendations made by the 18
th
United 
Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Asia and the 
Pacific (UNRCC-AP) and the 41
st
session of the Statistical 
Commission,  a  comprehensive  report  of  the  Secretary 
General  on  Global  Geospatial  Information  Management 
(E/2011/89)  was  prepared  and  presented  to  the  United 
Nations  Economic  and 
Social Council (ECOSOC) 
at its substantive session 
in July 2011. This report 
had benefited from wide-
ranging consultations with 
Member  States  and 
relevant  stakeholders.  In  recognition  of  the  growing 
importance  of  geospatial  information  globally,  ECOSOC 
established  the United Nations Committee  of Experts on 
Global Geospatial Information Management (UN-GGIM) on 
27 July 2011 (see ECOSOC resolution 2011/24). UN-GGIM 
is a formal inter-governmental body tasked with making joint 
decisions and setting directions on the production and use of 
geospatial  information  within  national  and  global  policy 
frameworks. This includes consulting on the rapidly changing 
field of geospatial information, holding regular high-level and 
multi-stakeholder  discussions  on  global  geospatial 
information,  and  promoting  national,  regional  and  global 
efforts in order to foster the exchange of knowledge and 
expertise and to assist developing countries in building and 
strengthening their national capacities in this field. 
The  United  Nations  Committee  of  Experts  on  GGIM 
convened its inaugural session on Wednesday 26 October 
2011 in Seoul (Republic of Korea), which was attended by 
representatives 
from 
90 
countries 
and 
major 
international/regional organizations. The substantive work of 
the session discussed the contribution of this professional 
community  to  the  UN  Conference  on  Sustainable 
Development (Rio+20, June 2012) and decided to create a 
task  force  to  prepare  a  document  for  the  summit.  The 
Committee  also  established  a  working  group  that  has 
prepared an inventory of major issues to be addressed by the 
Committee,  and  devised  a  work  plan  of  actions  to  be 
implemented over five years.  
The Committee, in advancing its mandate has been focusing 
on over 10 
work items
covering critical topics such as:- 
  A global geodetic reference frame, 
  A global map for sustainable development 
  Adoption and implementation of standards  
  Determining global fundamental data sets 
  Geospatial information supporting  Sustainable 
Development and the post 2015 development agenda 
  The development of a knowledge base 
  Identification of trends in national institutional 
arrangements in geospatial information management 
  Integrating geospatial, statistics and other information 
  Legal and policy frameworks 
  Development of a statement of shared guiding principles  
  The creation of regional committees on global geospatial 
information management. 
Four  sessions  of  the  Committee  of  Experts  and  three 
interactive High Level Forums, have now been convened, 
which brought together government experts from over 100 
Member  States,  relevant  international  organizations  and 
other  major  global  stakeholders  from  the  geospatial 
information industry and civil society.  
Over the past four years the Committee of Experts has made 
 significant  impact  across  the  globe  in  the  geospatial 
information management arena. This has been reflected in 
increased levels of participation on work items, the feedback 
and  interventions  from  discussion  with  Member  State 
representatives  and  from the comments  received  on  the 
meeting  evaluation  questionnaires.    The  following  table 
details the number of Member States and participants who 
have attended the four sessions of the Committee of Experts. 
Session 
Location 
Member 
States 
Attendees 
1
st
- October  2011 
Seoul, Korea 
90 
350 
2nd - August 2012  New York 
61 
148 
3rd  - July 2013 
United Kingdom 
66 
238 
4
th
-  August 2014 
New York 
87 
280 
50
In general, over 90% of the participants said that the content 
and conduct of the meetings were good.  They also indicated 
that substantial knowledge was gained on the building of 
national GIS, developing core data sets and developing a 
global geodetic network.  Participants also shared that some 
of the most useful elements of the meetings were, networking, 
making new contacts and learning from others, sharing and 
discussing  best  practices  and  the  passing  of  important 
resolutions. 
 major  achievement  of  the  Committee  has  been  the 
endorsement  of  the  resolution  “
 Global  Geodetic 
Reference frame for sustainable development
 in August 
2014 by over 40 Member States at its 3
rd
session, and its 
subsequent adoption in November 2014 by the Economic 
and Social Council.   
Clause 3 in the resolution 
Urges Member States to implement 
open  sharing  of  geodetic  data,  standards  and  conventions  to 
contribute to the global reference frame and regional densifications 
through  relevant  national  mechanisms  and  intergovernmental 
cooperation, and in coordination with the International Association of 
Geodesy”.  
 more sustainable  global geodetic  reference  frame will 
ensure  that more  consistent  locational  positioning  will be 
available across the globe. This is especially important as 
precise positioning is being applied in virtually every aspect 
of people’s lives, from civil engineering and transportation, 
climate  change  and  sea  level  monitoring,  to  sustainable 
development and emergency management.  The Permanent 
Mission of Fiji to the United Nations has indicated its intention 
to sponsor the move to have the resolution endorsed in the 
General Assembly in 2015. 
In  furthering  its  mandate  to 
provide  information  and 
knowledge,
the GGIM Secretariat with the support of the 
Committee continues to improve the content on the GGIM 
website, http://ggim.un.org/default.html,  inclusive  of  the 
knowledge base  
http://gg
im.un.org/knowledgebase/Knowledgebase.aspx .  
Additionally at its third session in 
2013,  the  document  “
Future 
Trends 
in 
Geospatial 
Information  Management:  the 
five  to  ten  year  vision” was 
endorsed and is now available in 
hardcopy and digital format in all 
six United Nations languages and Korean.  It provides a 
detailed analysis of the main themes and trends that will 
impact the geospatial information management industry and 
also serves as a technical guide for Member States in the 
preparation  of  their  geospatial  information strategies  and 
plans. 
Another major area of work and achievement has been the 
forging  and  strengthening  of  partnerships
within  the 
United Nations and with international bodies such as the 
Group  on  Earth  Observation  Systems  (GEOS)  the 
International Federation of Surveyors (FIG) and the Open 
Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The Committee has partnered 
with these entities to prepare a number of important technical 
papers  such  as  “A  Guide  to  the  Role  of  Standards  in 
Geospatial Information Management” and “A Guide to the 
Role of Standards in Geospatial Information Management”, 
which have been discussed and endorsed as methodological 
guidelines  to  assist  Member States in implementing  and 
adopting  geospatial  standards  within  their  national 
frameworks.   
Work is ongoing in 
strengthening geospatial information 
management capacities in Member States
.  This has been 
afforded with the support of the China trust fund and UNSD 
development  account,  where  participants  have  been 
supported to attend technical forums, workshops and expert 
group meetings such as the Chengdu Forum in October 2013 
in China. Convened by the UNSD in collaboration with the 
National  Administration  of  Surveying,  Mapping  and 
Geoinformation  (NASG)  of  China,  under  the  theme 
“Development and Applications in Urban Hazard Mapping”, 
participants met and shared experiences and methodologies 
in  the  production,  management,  analysis,  modeling  and 
dissemination of hazard related geospatial information.   
The work of the Committee of Experts is underpinned by a 
global coordination mechanism
consisting of five regional 
committees in Asia-Pacific, the Americas, the Arab States 
Europe and Africa.  UN-GGIM Americas http://www.un-ggim-
americas.org/ and UN-GGIM for Asia and the Pacific 
http://www.un-ggim-ap.org/ were outgrowths from existing 
regional entities, (Permanent Committee for geospatial Data 
Infrastructure for the Americas - PCIDEA and Permanent 
Committee for Geospatial Information for Asia and the Pacific 
-PCGIAP respectively), connected with the United Nations 
regional  cartographic  conferences.  UN-GGIM  Europe 
http://un-ggim-europe.org/, UN-GGIM for Arab States and 
UN-GGIM  Africa  were  created  over  the  period  2014  to 
January 2015. The UN-GGIM Regional Committees play a 
vital role liaising with the UN-GGIM Secretariat on topics of 
interest and major developments in the intervening periods 
between Sessions of the Committee of Experts. They also 
facilitate regional development and discussion, and formally 
report back to the Committee of Experts. 
Increasingly member states are recognising the critical role of 
geospatial  information  management  and  the  need  for 
strengthened collaboration and joined initiatives, to advance 
its development and use to support sustainable development 
and related global agendas. 
51
Integration of Statistical and Geospatial 
Information  
In making decision 44/101 (see E/2010/24, chapter I.C) at its 
forty-fourth  session,  the  United  Nations  Statistical 
Commission  “strongly  supported  the  linking  of  socio-
economic and environmental data to a location in order to 
enrich and maximize the potential of statistical information”, 
and “welcomed the proposal of an international conference 
as a way of outreach and best practices, bringing together 
both statistical and geospatial professional communities” as 
well as “the proposal to develop an international statistical 
geospatial framework”.  
At its third session, held in the United Kingdom in July 2013, 
the  United  Nations  Committee  of  Experts  on  Global 
Geospatial  Information  Management  (UN-GGIM)  adopted 
decision  3/107  (see  E/C.20/2013/17)  and  “supported  the 
decision by the Statistical Commission to create an Expert 
Group  on  the  integration  of  geospatial  information  and 
statistical  information,  comprising  members  of  both  the 
statistical and geospatial communities”. 
In pursuance of Statistical Commission decision 44/101 and 
UN-GGIM decision 3/107 as described above, UNSD has 
established the Expert Group on the Integration of Statistical 
and Geospatial Information, composed of experts with an 
even professional mix of statistical and geospatial expertise, 
and with good geographical representation, to carry the work 
on developing a statistical spatial framework as a global 
standard  for  the  integration  of  statistical  and  geospatial 
information.. The first meeting of the Expert Group was held 
in New York, from 30 October to 1 November 2013, and was 
attended by 34 experts from the statistical and geospatial 
communities, and international organizations. 
UNSD convened the first Global Forum on the Integration of 
Statistical  and  Geospatial  Information  in  New  York,  4-5 
August 2104, in conjunction with the 4th session of UN-GGIM. 
The  Global  Forum  brought  together  more  than  200 
participants from 73 countries to discuss the strategic vision 
and goals for the integration of statistical and geospatial 
information,  continuing  the  global  consultation  on  the 
development  of  a  global  statistical-geospatial  framework 
initiated by the Expert Group.  
Prior  to  the  Global  Forum,  UNSD  and  the  National 
Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geo-information 
(NASG) of China jointly organized an International Workshop 
on  Integrating Geospatial and Statistical Information,  held 
from  9  to  12 June  2014 in Beijing.  The Workshop was 
attended by more than 147 participants from 40 countries, 25 
among them (all of them from developing countries) were 
financially supported by the host country. 
Supporting Geospatial Activities 
UNSD  promotes  the  concept  of  National  Spatial  Data 
Infrastructure, stresses the use of geospatial information in 
developing countries, organizes training courses, seminars, 
and expert group meetings on GIS, particularly in support of 
census and statistical activities, and collaborates with the UN 
Geographic Information Working Group. 
Regional Cartographic Conferences 
Following the  recommendation of  ECOSOC in 1948 that 
Governments  of  Member  States  stimulate  surveying  and 
mapping  of  their  national  territories,  the  first  regional 
cartographic conference was hosted by the Government of 
India from 15 to 25 February 1955. Since then, the United 
Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Asia and the 
Pacific (UNRCC-AP) has convened every three years (the 
19
th
UNRCC-AP was held in Bangkok from 29 October to 1 
November 2012). The United Nations Regional Cartographic 
Conference for the Americas (UNRCC-A) started meeting 
every four years in 1976 (the 10
th
UNRCC-A was held in New 
York 
from 
19 
to 
23 
August 
2013), 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/geoinfo/RCC/unrcca10.html.  
The next regional cartographic conference will be for Asia 
and the Pacific, 5-9 October, in the Republic of Korea.  
Group of Experts on Geographical Names 
In 1959, ECOSOC Resolution 715A (XXVII) paved the way 
for a small group of experts to meet and provide technical 
recommendations on standardizing geographical names at 
the national and international levels. This meeting gave rise 
to the United Nations Conferences on the Standardization of 
Geographical Names which is held every five years, and the 
United Nations Group of Experts on Geographical Names 
(UNGEGN),
meets twice between Conferences to follow up 
the  implementation  of  resolutions  adopted  by  the 
Conferences.  
Today, UNGEGN functions through 24 geographical/linguistic 
divisions, 10 working groups and two task teams, addressing 
issues  of  the  standardization  of  geographical  names, 
capacity building in the management of national toponymic 
organizations, the creation and maintenance of gazetteers, 
romanization systems, and  the  protection of  geographical 
names as cultural heritage.   
UNGEGN Sessions provide the global forum where these 
experts  are  able  to  learn  of  and  share  best  practices, 
52
cooperative  ventures,  new  developments  in  geographical 
names  administration  and  practical  outcomes  of  names 
standardization.  The 29th Session of UNGEGN is scheduled 
to be held from 25 - 29 April 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand.   
UNGEGN Methodological work 
 key  area  of  work  is  the  preparation  of 
training  and 
educational  material
to  support  toponymic  training 
programmes.  On-line  self-paced  toponymic  training  is 
available 
at 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/geoinfo/UNGEGN/docs/_data_ICA
courses/index.html 
The following are manuals that are available in hard copy and 
on-line.   
 Multilingual
Glossary of Terms for the Standardization of 
Geographical Names
.  
 
Handbook  on  GIS  and  digital  mapping  for 
population and housing censuses
 
 
Handbook on  Geospatial  Infrastructure in Support  of 
Census Activities
.  
 
Manual for the national standardization of geographical 
names 
(2006).  
 
Technical reference manual for the standardization of 
geographical names 
(2007), available in English only. 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/geoinfo/UNGEGN/publications.html 
The  United  Nations  Statistics  Division  has  continued  to 
provide support for the planning and delivery of 
toponymy 
training courses.
From 17 to 21 June 2013, an UNGEGN 
training workshop was held in Antananarivo, Madagascar.  
Three  experts  and  participants  from  five  countries  were 
provided travel support; and training material for the course 
was shipped.   
Publicity Material 
 The UNGEGN brochure, “Consistent use of place 
names”
(2001). 
 The UNGEGN brochure,
“Geographical name
s as vital 
keys  for accessing  information in our globalized  and 
digital world”, (2007). 
 A media kit is available at: 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/geoinfo/UNGEGN/mediakit.html 
Four issues of the 
UNGEGN Information Bulletin
(Nos. 43 
to 46) were prepared, circulated to the UNGEGN mailing list 
and published on the website1 in March 2014, October 2013, 
May 2013 and December 2012.   An attempt was made to 
improve the look and appeal of the Bulletin, beginning with 
the October 2013, issue number 45. 
The UNSD  continues to  maintain  the 
UNGEGN website
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/geoinfo/UNGEGN/default.html 
which is a comprehensive repository of over 1,600 technical 
documents related to early meetings of the UNGEGN Expert 
Group and UNGEGN Sessions, and some 1,800 Conference 
documents. It is recognized by toponymic experts as the only 
place in the world with this knowledge base. 
World Geographical Names Database 
The UNGEGN Secretariat continues to maintain and support 
the 
Geographical Names Database
that was developed in 
2004, in pursuance of resolution IX/6 of the ninth Conference 
on the standardization of geographical names.  
Users are able to access short and full names of countries 
(193 United Nations Member States), their capitals, and the 
major  cities  (population  over  100,000)  via  the  World 
Geographical  Names  Database  web  application.  
Authoritative city endonyms are provided mainly by national 
name authorities and sound files are being added to assist 
users with pronunciation of city names. 
The database is currently updated quarterly, and has 5,876 
geographical names, consisting of 193 countries and 3,343 
cities.   There are also  974  sound  files.  The  Secretariat 
appreciates  all past  submissions and  greatly  encourages 
experts to send additional material or corrections. 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/geoinfo/geonames/ 
Standard Country or Area Codes and 
geographical regions for Statistical Use 
(M49) 
The M49 is a list of numerical and alphabetical codes for 
statistical use.  As an aid to statistical data processing, a 
unique standard three-digit numerical code is assigned to 
each country or area and to each geographical region and 
grouping of countries or areas by the Statistics Division.  
Two-  and  three-  digit  alphabetical  codes  for  the 
representation of names of countries or areas are assigned 
by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).   
This  list 
of  codes 
can 
be 
accessed 
at: 
http://unstats.un.org/unsd/methods/m49/m49alpha.htm. 
Contact address: 
For further information on geospatial information activities, 
please contact the UN-GGIM/UNGEGN Secretariat:  
United Nations Statistics Division 
Two UN Plaza DC2-1676, New York, NY 10017 
Tel: (212) 963-3042/4297, Fax: (212) 963-4569 
E-mail: laaribi@un.org  or blake1@un.org 
53
Information Technology 
The history of computerization of UN statistics started in 1965 when the United Nations New York Computing 
Section (NYCS) received the first IBM 7044/1401 mainframe computer system. Prior to this date mechanical 
punched card tabulators were used for tabulating and computing summary statistics. The UN Statistical Office 
soon realized the opportunity and by establishing the Computer Systems Development and Programming 
Section started to process data from reporting countries, most of which was received in magnetic tape or 
punched card format. 
The Mainframe era 
In 1971 the International Computing Centre (ICC) was 
created by a Memorandum of Agreement among the 
United Nations (UN), the United Nations Development 
Programme (UNDP) and the World Health Organization 
(WHO), pursuant to resolution 2741 (XXV) of the United 
Nations General Assembly.  
ICC  was  created  as  an  inter-organization  facility  to 
provide  electronic  data  processing  services  for  UN 
agencies and other users.  UNSD become an active user 
on the ICC mainframe using SPSS Statistical Package 
for Social Sciences, SAS Statistical Analysis System, 
MAGACALC  On-line  spreadsheet,  TAB68  Cross 
Tabulation  System  of  National  Bureau  of  Statistics, 
Sweden and the TPL Table Producing Language of US 
Bureau of Labor Statistics to process statistical data and 
produce yearbooks. 
The era of UNSIS 
By  the  1980s  UNSD  created  a  complex  mainframe 
system called the United Nations Statistical Information 
System (UNSIS) where all separated data records with 
different structures were converted to one standard fix 
length character time series databases. As well as the 
system produced publishing ready tables for practically 
all publications of the Statistical Office using the Table 
Producing Language(TPL) UNSIS was developed using 
PL1, but one of the modules – conversion different type 
of measurement was written with FORTRAN and part of 
the photocomposition module with ASSEMBLER. 
In 1986 the UNSIS data retrieval part was redesigned 
and further developed to allow users, outside of the 
Statistical Office to access the stored information. At the  
same time a mail function was added to UNSIS and 
enabled users to communicate with each other. 
The PC era 
Starting  with  the  advent  of  IBM  PCs  in  1984  UNSD 
purchased the first PCs for processing statistical data and 
publishing  statistical  publications  and a  slow transition 
started from the mainframe to new paradigm of computing. 
In the early 1990’s UNSD got its connection to the UNHQ 
computer network and from that moment all users got 
easy access to the mainframe from their own computers 
as well as at the same time email was introduced which 
created new opportunities  for  communication  and data 
collection. 
In 1996 UNSD established it’s presence on the Internet 
and started to disseminate statistical data from the very 
moment. 
In May 1997 at an expert group meeting on applying new 
methods and technologies for statistical databases UNSD 
used Internet dissemination of meeting documents in PDF.  
54
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested