c# pdf viewer without adobe : How to rearrange pdf pages in preview software Library cloud windows asp.net .net class using_freehand_216-part387

Working with Color 161
Removing colors
Removing colors from the color list in the Swatches panel retains the colors in any corresponding 
objects as unnamed colors. When you remove multiple colors, a dialog box prompts you either to 
remove all colors or to remove only the unused colors.
Removing spot, Hexachrome, and tint colors does the following:
Spot colors are converted to process colors. Objects containing these spot-to-process converted 
colors may not print separations as intended.
Hexachrome colors are converted to RGB values. The Hexachrome icon appears to the side of 
the name in the Swatches panel.
Removing the base color of a tint also removes any tints of that color.
Note: You can’t remove or replace imported spot or process colors from an unconverted EPS file. To determine 
whether an imported EPS file is unconverted, select the object in your drawing. The Object panel displays “EPS” 
for unconverted EPS files. 
To remove specific colors:
1
Select Edit > Select > None or press Tab to deselect all objects.
2
Click a color name in the Swatches panel. Shift-click to select additional colors that are 
adjacent. Control-click (Windows) or Command-click (Macintosh) to select additional colors 
that are not adjacent.
3
Click the Swatches panel Options menu control and select Remove. 
4
At the prompt, click Remove to remove all selected colors or Cancel to cancel the operation.
To remove all unused named colors:
Select Xtras > Delete > Unused Named Colors to remove unused named colors.
Editing colors
You can edit colors in your artwork by using various techniques in FreeHand: you can brighten or 
dull colors, add or subtract percentages of color values, create grayscale and monochome effects; 
convert colors to grayscale, and globally change color throughout your artwork.
To alter color component values of an existing color, you use the Color Mixer panel (see “Using 
the Color Mixer panel” on page 150).
Brightening and dulling colors
Using the Colors Xtras, you can brighten colors or dull them in a single step. To control colors 
more precisely, use the Color Control Xtra (see “Controlling color values” on page 162). The 
Lighten, Darken, Saturate, and Desaturate Colors Xtras do not affect spot colors.
How to rearrange pdf pages in preview - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reordering pages in pdf document; move pages in pdf document
How to rearrange pdf pages in preview - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
rearrange pdf pages in reader; change page order pdf reader
Chapter 5
162
To brighten or dull colors:
1
Select an object.
2
Select Xtras > Colors and then select an option:
Lighten Colors
makes the color lighter.
Darken Colors
makes the color darker.
Saturate Colors
makes the color more intense.
Desaturate Colors
dulls the color.
The effect increases each time you apply the Xtra until the maximum effect is reached.
Controlling color values
The Color Control Xtra adds or subtracts a percentage of a CMYK, RGB, or HLS color value to 
or from all colors in a selection. If a color already consists of minimum or maximum values, or if 
it is a spot color, the Color Control Xtra has no effect.
Using the Color Control Xtra to modify objects with named colors produces unnamed colors. 
The original named colors remain in the Swatches panel. To add the modified colors to the 
Swatches panel, you must name them (see “Naming colors” on page 155).
To control color values:
1
Select Xtras > Colors > Color Control.
2
In the Color Control dialog box, select a color mode: CMYK, RGB, or HLS.
3
Select Preview to view changes as you make them. 
4
Drag the sliders or enter values to adjust the color components, between -100% and 100%, 
and -360° to 360° for Hue; the default is 0 for no change. 
Creating grayscale effects
You can convert vector objects to grayscale or convert grayscale graphics to another color for a 
monochrome effect using the Convert to Grayscale Xtra. Converting a color also converts any 
tints based on it.
To convert a selected object to grayscale:
Select Xtras > Colors > Convert to Grayscale. 
Objects are converted to tints of black.
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
pages simply with a few lines of C# code. C# Codes to Sort Slides Order. If you want to use a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange
reverse page order pdf; move pages in a pdf file
Working with Color 163
Making global color changes
You can replace all colors of the same name in your artwork by replacing the global process color 
or spot color swatches in the Swatches panel. See “Finding and replacing graphics” on page 126.
You can also randomly change all of the colors in the color list, using the Randomize Named 
Colors Xtra. Experiment with this Xtra to create new color combinations.
You cannot replace the default Black, White, None, or Registration colors.
To replace colors in the color list:
1
In the Swatches panel, select a color name.
2
Click the Swatches panel Options menu control and select Replace.
3
In the Replace Color dialog box, select the source of the replacement color—either a color 
library or the color list in the Swatches panel. 
4
Use the pop-up menus or color swatch to select a new color. All fills and strokes containing the 
original color are redrawn using the new color.
To randomly change all named colors:
Select Xtras > Colors > Randomize Named Colors.
Chapter 5
164
Exporting colors
You can export colors from the color list in the Swatches panel to use as a color library, which you 
can then use in other documents.
When you export artwork to some file formats, you can also choose to convert the colors to RGB 
or CMYK. For more information, see “Saving files” on page 341. 
To create a custom color library by exporting colors:
1
Click the Swatches panel Options menu control and select Export.
2
In the Export Colors dialog box, select the color or colors you want to export. 
3
Click OK.
4
In the Create Color Library dialog box, type a library name and then type a filename. Enter the 
number of rows and columns and any notes.
5
Click Browse (Windows) or Save As (Macintosh) and specify the folder where the colors are to 
be stored.
Note: Color libraries that appear in the Swatches panel are stored in the Macromedia/FreeHand/11/English/
Settings/Colors folder within your user-specific Application Data (Windows) or Application Support (Macintosh) 
folder. The location of your user-specific Application Data or Application Support folder can vary depending 
upon your operating system. For information on how to locate this folder, refer to your operating system’s 
documentation.
6
Click Save.
165
CHAPTER 6
Using Strokes and Fills
You can apply colors to strokes and fills several ways in Macromedia FreeHand MX: by using the 
Object panel, by dragging colors, by choosing colors from the pop-up color palettes on the Tools 
panel, and by using the Eyedropper tool to copy colors from other objects in the document.
In addition to basic colors, you can also apply a variety of advanced stroke and fill effects 
to objects.
Adding strokes and fills to objects
FreeHand MX objects can have multiple properties, such as strokes, fills, and special effects. (For 
more information on special effects, see Chapter 7, “Special Effects,” on page 193.) Use the 
Object panel to add properties to objects and to modify the attributes of the properties you add.
The upper portion of the Object panel displays a Properties list for the current selection in the 
Document window. The bottom portion of the Object panel displays attributes for the current 
selection in the Properties list.
The Properties list is hierarchical, and the order of properties in the list affects the appearance of 
the object. You can change an object’s appearance by dragging to rearrange items in the list.
Properties list
Attributes
Chapter 6
166
To add a stroke to a selected object, do one of the following:
Click the Add Stroke button in the Object panel. 
Click the Object panel Options menu control and select Add Stroke.
To add a fill to a selected object, do one of the following:
Click the Add Fill button in the Object panel. 
Click the Object panel Options menu control and select Add Fill.
To delete a stroke or fill from a selected object:
1
Select the stroke or fill in the Object panel.
2
Click the Remove Item button in the Object panel.
To move a stroke or fill up or down in an object’s hierarchical Properties list:
Drag the stroke or fill within the Properties list in the Object panel.
Applying attributes to strokes
There are six different attributes for stroke styles in the Object panel—Basic, Brush, Calligraphic, 
Custom, Pattern, and PostScript. 
Use the Object panel to apply stroke styles to selected strokes or to set the default stroke attributes 
for new objects in the active document. You can choose from preset stroke widths, or you can 
enter a custom width.
For more information on applying colors to strokes, see Chapter 5, “Working with Color,” on 
page 147.
To set default stroke attributes for new objects:
1
Select Edit > Select > None to deselect all objects in the document.
2
Select Window > Object to display the Object panel.
3
Select a stroke in the Properties list. 
4
Set the stroke attributes you want applied to new objects.
Using Strokes and Fills 167
To edit the list of preset stroke widths:
1
Display object preferences by doing one of the following:
In Windows, press Control+U, then click the Object tab.
On the Macintosh, press Command+U, then click the Object category.
2
In the Default Line Weights text box, enter the values in points. Separate values with a space.
3
Click OK.
4
Relaunch FreeHand for the changes to take effect.
Using basic stroke attributes
Paths that use Basic stroke attributes are simple lines. You can change the stroke width and color. 
You can change how a basic stroke is terminated, or capped, and how it joins other strokes.
You can also apply attributes to basic strokes to make them dashed or to give them arrowheads. 
You can edit the preset dashes and arrowheads, and you can create new ones.
To apply a basic stroke attribute to a selected stroke in the Object panel:
1
In the Object panel, select Basic from the stroke type pop-up menu.
2
To choose a color for the stroke, do one of the following:
Select a color from the stroke color pop-up menu in the Tools panel.
Drag a color swatch to the stroke color in the Properties list.
3
Specify a stroke width by doing one of the following:
Select one of the preset values from the width pop-up menu. Preset values appear in points.
Type a value from 0 to 288 (Windows) or 0 to 16,164 (Macintosh) points in the width text 
box, and press Enter.
4
Select a Cap option to set the style for a path end: Butt, which is flush with the path’s end, 
Round, or Square, which extends beyond the path by half the stroke width.
Butt, Round, and Square caps
5
Select a Join option to define how two path segments meet: Miter, Round, or Beveled. To 
change the corners in an open or closed path, select a path and select another join option.
Miter, Round, and Beveled join
Chapter 6
168
6
To avoid beveling a Miter join, enter a Miter limit from 1 to 57.
Line lengths exceeding this value are squared off instead of pointed. For example, a miter limit 
of 2 for a 3-point stroke means that when the length of the point is twice the stroke weight, 
FreeHand switches to a Bevel join. 
Miter (left) and Beveled (right) joins, with arrows showing the length of the Miter join
7
To apply a dashed stroke, select a style from the dash style pop-up menu. Select No Dash for a 
solid stroke.
8
To apply an arrowhead to an open path, select from the Arrowheads pop-up menus. 
The left pop-up menu applies an arrowhead to the first point (origin) of the selected path, and 
the right pop-up menu applies to the last point. Arrowheads follow the path direction.
To create a new dashed stroke style:
1
In the Object panel, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Macintosh) as you select a dash 
from the dash style pop-up menu.
2
To set dash sizes, enter values in any of the On text boxes in the Dash Editor. To set the space 
sizes between dashes, enter values in any of the Off text boxes.
3
Click OK to add a new dash to the dash style pop-up menu and apply the new dash to any 
selected paths.
Note: The dash style pop-up menu can display up to 255 dashed strokes. You cannot remove styles from 
themenu.
To create a new arrowhead:
1
In the Object panel, select New from one of the Arrowheads pop-up menus to display the 
Arrowhead Editor. 
The Arrowhead Editor provides a subset of FreeHand tools, including the Pen tool, for 
drawing or editing. 
2
Use the tools to draw a new arrowhead.
3
Click New.
Using Strokes and Fills 169
To create an arrowhead from an existing one:
1
In the Object panel, hold down Alt (Windows) or Option (Macintosh) and select an 
arrowhead from the Arrowhead pop-up menus to display the Arrowhead Editor.
The Arrowhead Editor provides a subset of FreeHand tools, including the Pen tool, for 
drawing or editing. 
2
Edit the arrowhead.
3
Click New to add the new arrowhead to the Arrowheads pop-up menu.
Note: The Arrowheads pop-up menus can display up to 255 arrowheads. You cannot remove arrowheads from 
the menus.
Using brush stroke attributes
You can apply symbols to a stroke using the brush feature. You can use the symbols that came 
with FreeHand, or you can import or create your own. For more information on using symbols, 
see “Using the Library panel” on page 297.
You can apply a brush in one of two modes. Spray repeats an instance along the path. Paint 
stretches a specified number of instances along the path.
Spray and Paint modes for a brush 
To apply a brush to a selected stroke in the Object panel:
1
Select Brush from the stroke type pop-up menu.
2
Select the brush you want to apply from the brush pop-up menu.
3
Enter a percentage value in the width text box to set the size of the brush. This value can be 
from 1% to 400%.
To create a brush from a selected object:
1
Select Modify > Brush > Create Brush.
2
Select an option:
Copy
creates a symbol from the selected object, but does not convert the object to a symbol.
Convert
creates a symbol from the object and replaces the object with an instance of 
the symbol.
Chapter 6
170
3
In the Edit Brush dialog box, type a name for this brush in the Brush Name text box.
4
Use the Include Symbol controls to add other symbols to the brush. (The Brush Preview 
window at the bottom of the dialog box shows what the brush will look like.)
Click the Plus (+) button to select from a list of available symbols to add to this brush.
Click the Minus (-) button to remove a symbol from the brush.
Select a symbol in the list and use the arrow buttons to move it up or down in the stack list. 
The stack list determines the stacking order of instances as they are applied to the path.
5
Select Paint or Spray to set the mode for this brush. If you select Paint, enter a value from 1 to 
500 in the Count text box to set the number of instances to appear on this brush.
6
Select Orient on Path if you want this brush to rotate to follow the orientation of the path to 
which it is applied. If you deselect Orient to Path, the brush does not follow the path: when set 
to Paint, the brush stretches between the endpoints of the path, and when set to Spray, the 
brush maintains its original orientation regardless of the path.
7
Select Fold Corners to use the type of brush strokes used by earlier versions of FreeHand.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested