c# pdf viewer without adobe : How to move pages in pdf reader Library application class asp.net html azure ajax v18n11-part441

Robert Godwin-Jones 
Towards Transparent Computing 
ng 
Language Learning & Technology
6
unfortunately, they do not have any script debugging. Scripted interactivity is normally created using 
JavaScript and embedded in the HTML or included in external .js files -- in other words in the same way 
as it would be for Web browser delivery. Typically, textbooks in EPUB 3 format include assessments at 
the end of each chapter. A sample EPUB 3 (EPUB 3 file) from Infogridpacific illustrates a variety of 
scripted activities similar to what one finds in electronic textbooks. Although e-texts formatted in EPUB 3 
allow scripted interactions, connecting to external Web resources, although permitted, can be problematic. 
In such situations, one is better off using straight HTML in a Web browser. This is also the case for 
integration of social media, which is also limited within EPUB 3. 
OUTLOOK  
For a project constructed in HTML5, it is not a major extra effort to create an EPUB 3 version as well. 
Doing so adds some potential book-related features, but the greater benefit is the additional delivery 
options it provides. This could be of particular interest in schools with tablet initiatives, that are looking to 
distribute content that will be usable at home without Internet access. Creating an EPUB 3 for use in 
iBooks on an iPad or iPhone (or now on Mac OS computers as well) allows creators to bypass the lengthy 
iBookstore approval process. In contrast, if one were to use Apple's e-book creation tool, iBooks Author, 
the resulting product would be in a proprietary format, displayable only on Apple devices. Standard 
EPUB 3s, on the other hand, can be shared easily with students in a variety of ways, including a simple 
download link on a Web page. 
There are some features missing from the EPUB spec that would be helpful in an educational setting. One 
such feature is a standard way to create annotations and glosses, obviously an important feature for 
language learners. Although it is possible to integrate into EPUB 3 look-ups from dictionaries or other 
reference sources, there is as yet no widely supported method for annotations, despite the presence in the 
specification of tags for glosses. Some e-readers have developed a means for achieving this function 
while staying within the EPUB 3 specs. Apple iBooks, for example, relies on the footnote tag to create 
pop-up overlays to display footnotes or annotations, rather than taking the reader to the end of the 
document. For a true seamless e-book experience across devices, annotations should  -- as is not the case 
now -- transfer across reading apps and platforms, as should bookmarks and notes.  Ideally, sharing such 
data with others should be possible as well.  The EDUPUB initiative is looking to deliver a way to do that. 
Another important area for educational use is a robust and compatible scripting environment. Despite the 
fact that most of the popular e-readers are based on WebKit, Apple's open Web browser engine, they 
differ markedly in JavaScript execution. The IDPF has recognized this issue and is making its own 
JavaScript engine (ReadiumJS) which will be made freely available to e-reader producers. IDPF is also 
working with IMS Global, the education standards body, to support both the QTI specification (Question 
and Testing Interoperability), widely used by publishers for creating test banks, and LTI (Learning Tools 
Interoperability), which would allow for better integration of EPUB 3 into an LMS (Learning 
Management System). A sample LTI and QTI integration demonstrates how that might be done. That 
particular prototype is of interest as well in that it demonstrates how to create fallbacks should network 
connections be unavailable, or should the connection be lost. An additional consideration in using EPUB 
3 for content delivery is that revising content requires creating a new EPUB 3 file for downloading. In 
contrast, with HTML, a text editor can be used to do revisions to a single page, without the necessity of 
redistributing the entire unit of content in a package. 
Following the development strategy and roadmap I have outlined here is not likely to appeal universally 
to developers, particularly those targeting mobile delivery. Mark Zuckerberg famously announced in 2012 
that his biggest mistake in developing mobile apps for Facebook was the decision to use HTML5, citing 
slow performance and design constraints. These are common complaints from developers, particularly 
those working on large-scale projects such as the mobile Facebook app. As one developer discusses, 
development in such cases using a native development environment might be preferable. That necessitates, 
How to move pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reverse page order pdf; how to move pages in a pdf document
How to move pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; how to move pages in a pdf file
Robert Godwin-Jones 
Towards Transparent Computing 
ng 
Language Learning & Technology
7
however, creating compiled applications in different programming languages (for iOS, Android, 
Windows 8), not a task to be undertaken lightly. A possibility for creating native apps is to port the 
HTML5 code using a tool such as PhoneGap or Intel's XDK. It's also possible to create hybrid apps, 
written in HTML5 with some native code integrated. Another concern for developers is the perceived 
inability of Web apps to integrate deeply into mobile device hardware. It's not the case that creating an 
HTML5-based Web app necessarily denies access to particular device features, but that access may be 
different from device to device. In recognition of this issue, the W3C System Applications Working 
Group is working to develop standards and methodologies for accessing such typical device features as 
GPS, accelerometers, Bluetooth and NFC (Near Field Communication). 
One of the other issues in developing EPUB 3 is the degree of support in e-readers for the EPUB 3 
specification. Not all features are supported in all e-readers, so that developers need to proceed cautiously 
in implementing advanced features such as scripted interactions or the recently developed fixed-layout 
option. It's important to provide adequate fallbacks for features not supported.  O'Reilly Media, one of the 
first publishers to move to EPUB 3 for its publications, offers concrete examples of how that can be 
achieved. The Book Industry Support Group offers a helpful EPUB 3 support grid for developers. 
Currently the desktop e-readers which support the greatest number of features are iBooks (Mac), Azardi 
(Linux, Mac, Windows), and Readium, an extension of the Chrome browser (Linux, Mac, Windows). For 
mobile devices, iBooks (iOS) and Helicon Books EPUB3 reader (Android) are recommended. 
At VCU this year I am serving on a university e-text task force, and I suspect many institutions have such 
groups operating, looking at textbook affordability, the open access e-text movement, and the integration 
of electronic texts into the rest of the university's digital infrastructure, especially its LMS. In fact, a 
number of U.S. universities have engaged in pilot e-text initiatives, including a major collaborative 
project sponsored by Educause and Internet2. That project is using Courseload for delivery of e-texts, 
which formats commercial textbooks with proprietary DRM which is then distributed to authenticated 
users from its servers. Similar services are available from VitalSource and Inkling. The project has gotten 
mixed reviews, with a major problem being that Courseload did not until recently support use of portable 
devices. The e-text distribution services currently in use in the U.S. tend to start with HTML5 or EPUB 3 
content, then add proprietary elements. Inkling, for example, uses its own markup system, S9ML, for 
interactive elements. 
Many faculty members are seeking more open options for implementing e-texts and are looking to freely 
available e-texts from sources such as Wikibooks or the Internet Archive. This bypasses the need for any 
server authentication handshake, and makes it more likely that a wide number of devices and 
environments can be supported. A number of open access language e-texts are available (see reference 
list), which range from full textbooks to lessons or simple activities. As is always the case with open 
education resources (OER), it's not always easy to find appropriate materials and, if found, they may not 
meet specific needs. Usually OER come with a Creative Commons share-alike license, enabling content 
to be tailored to need and to be combined with other materials, not something possible with traditional 
commercial textbooks, even if they are available in a digital format. Another concern in OER materials is 
quality. Examining the language e-texts available from OER Commons, for example, shows a wide range 
of quality and scope. Using repositories which encourage peer review of content submissions, such as 
Merlot, can be helpful in finding reliable content. For course-related open materials, the Open 
Courseware Consortium is a good resource. There is likely to be considerably more activity in the near 
future in this area, given U.S. federal funding for OER development for community colleges as well as 
state initiatives in CaliforniaFlorida, and Utah and in the Canadian province of British Columbia South 
Korea is transitioning to use electronic books exclusively in its schools by 2015. 
The long-sought developer nirvana is "write once, run anywhere," enabling true interoperability and 
transparent computing. It's too early to say whether HTML5 will fit this bill. Not long ago, it seemed that 
Java would hold the keys to the kingdom, but that has not panned out, due to problems like slow 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
how to change page order in pdf document; pdf reorder pages online
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
pdf change page order online; rearrange pages in pdf document
Robert Godwin-Jones 
Towards Transparent Computing 
ng 
Language Learning & Technology
8
performance, memory issues, and significant platform and plug-in differences. Java applets running in a 
browser also, like Flash, require a plug-in. In contrast, HTML5 is the native environment of the Web 
browser and, unlike Java, does not need to be compiled into an executable program. While there are 
plenty of arguments in favor of open standards, there are also powerful forces working in the opposite 
direction. Many companies have a strategic and financial interest in exclusivity and in preventing 
interoperability. Both Apple and Amazon, for example, use proprietary versions of EPUB 3 for their e-
books. For educational institutions, interoperability through open standards is crucial, so that the ability to 
change institutional software platforms (such as the LMS) is maintained. HTML5 development is also 
less costly with a shallower learning curve, important considerations in educational settings. Additionally, 
HTML5 is the most likely development platform to be compatible with future OS's or devices, such as the 
upcoming Firefox OS or Tizen. No one can see into the future, but it does seem a reasonable bet that the 
mobile environment will continue to be fragmented, hence the added importance of interoperable 
standards in developing learning materials to be accessed from tablets and phones. 
REFERENCES 
Garrish, M. and Gylling, M. (2013). 
EPUB 3 best practices: Optimize your digital books.
Sebastopol, 
CA: O'Reilly Media. 
Godwin-Jones, R. (2011). Mobile apps for language learning
Language Learning & Technology 15
(2), 2–
11. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/issues/june2011/emerging.pdf 
RESOURCE LIST  
HTML5 Info  
• HTML 5 Official specs from W3C  
• HTML5 Introduction - What is HTML5 Capable of From WebDesigner  
• HTML 5 Doctor Helpful site on HTML 5 compatibility issues  
HTML5 Demos  
• HTML 5 Demos and Examples Includes browser support info  
• HTML5 Website Showcase: 48 Potential Flash-Killing Demos HTML5 Canvas demos By 
Kevin Roast  
• 9 Mind-Blowing Canvas Demos  
• Gaming your way to language learning Example of an HTML5 language learning game (from 
Shai Shapira)  
• HTML5 Hackathon - building a Language Learning App YouTube video  
• BlahBlahLearning takes the winning prize at Onswipe's HTML5 Hackathon  
Mobile Development: HTML5 versus Native Apps  
• HTML5 rocketing in popularity, finds Developer Economics report From Telefónica Digital  
• Debunking five big HTML5 myths From Telefónica Digital  
• Intel commits to "fabulous" HTML5 From PCPro  
• Developing a Cross-Platform HTML5 Offline App From Grinning Gecko  
• To HTML5 or not to HTML5, that is the mobile question From Webdesignerdepot  
• HTML5 Vs. Native Mobile Apps: Myths and Misconceptions From Forbes  
• Here's why HTML-based apps don't work Argument in the developer debate  
• Native vs. HTML5 -- looked at objectively, the debate is over Another argument in favor of 
native apps  
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
how to rearrange pdf pages reader; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including
how to reorder pages in pdf file; pdf move pages
Robert Godwin-Jones 
Towards Transparent Computing 
ng 
Language Learning & Technology
9
• Best Of Both Worlds: Mixing HTML5 And Native Code  
EPUB 3 Info  
• EPUB 3 Overview From International Digital Publishing Forum  
• EPUB 3 links Nice list from epubtest.com  
• PIGS, GOURDS, AND WIKIS Liz Castro's blog, excellent source for information  
• EPUB Resources and Guides From O'Reilly Media  
• Digital Publishing and the Web From A List Apart  
E-reader Applications with Support for EPUB 3 
• Comparison of e-book readers Wikipedia 
• EPUB 3 Support Grid Good reference for updated information on e-readers 
• iBooks Mac only 
• Readium Plug-in Google Chrome browser (Linux, OS X, Windows) 
• Azardi Linux, Mac, Windows 
• Calibre Linux, Mac, Windows, clunky interface & limited EPUB 3, but able to convert from 
and to many formats 
Mobile E-reader Apps with Support for EPUB 3 
• Apple iBooks iOS  
• Helicon Books EPUB3 reader Android 
Sample E-books  
• EPUB 3 Sample Documents  
• Sample ePub 3 books From Azardi  
• EPUB 3 Samples From Infogrid Pacific  
• EPUB3 with embedded QTI assessments  
• eBooks: A Language Learner's Best From Langology  
• Language Learning eBooks  
• Two examples of EPUB3 Manga  
• Dante's Comedy as EPUB 3 Sample w. Media Overlays From Smuuks 
• 300 Enhanced eBooks Published for Language Learning From the Samsung Learning Hub  
• Language e-books List for over 400 languages  
EPUB 3 Development  
• Epub Validator From idpf  
• EPUB 3 Best Practices Book from O'Reilly Media  
• Create Your Own eBooks Review of different tools by Richard Byrne  
• Build a digital book with EPUB How to create an epub 3 by hand  
• Adobe InDesign Windows/Mac  
• Apple iWork Pages Mac only  
• oXygen XML Editor Windows/Mac/Linux  
EPUB 3 Language Info  
• Requirements for Japanese Text Layout W3C Working Group  
• Richer Internationalization for eBooks Workshop from W3C  
• Suprasegmental Phonological representation of Tone in Kikuyu Example of ruby markup  
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save
reorder pdf pages in preview; rearrange pdf pages
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
PDF in preview without adobe reader component installed. Dim pageIndex As Integer = 0 ' Move cursor to String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
move pages in a pdf file; rearrange pages in pdf
Robert Godwin-Jones 
Towards Transparent Computing 
ng 
Language Learning & Technology
10
• What are situations with western languages where you'd use HTML 5's Ruby element? From 
stackoverflow  
Acessibility Info 
• Sample accessible (test) books in EPUB 3 format LIA Project  
• Accessibility and eBooks: International Endorsement  
• Tips for Creating Accessible EPUB 3 Files DIAGRAM Center website  
• EPUB 3: Accessibility Guidelines IDPF  
• Accessible EPUB 3 free publication on O'Reilly site  
• EPUB 3 Accessibility forum IDPF website 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
reordering pages in pdf; reorder pages in a pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
switch page order pdf; pdf page order reverse
Language Learning & Technology
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/action1.pdf 
February 2014, Volume 18, Number 1 
pp. 11–22 
Copyright © 2014, ISSN 1094-3501 
11 
CAN A WEB-BASED COURSE IMPROVE  
COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE OF FOREIGN-BORN NURSES? 
Eileen Van SchaikTalaria, Inc. 
Emily M. Lynch, Talaria, Inc. 
Susan A. StonerTalaria, Inc. 
Lorna D. SikorskiLDS & Associates 
Key words: Web-Based Instruction, Second Language Acquisition, Speaking, 
Pronunciation, Online Teaching & Learning, Culture, Language For Special 
Purposes
APA Citation: 
Van Schaik, E., Lynch, E. M., Stoner, S. A., & Sikorski, L. D, (2014). Can 
a web-based course improve communicative competence of foreign-born nurses? 
Language Learning & Technology, 18
(1), 11–22. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/action1.pdf 
Received:
January 25, 2013; 
Accepted: 
May 18, 2013; 
Published: 
February 1, 2014 
Copyright:
© Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski 
INTRODUCTION 
In the years since World War II, the United States has grown increasingly dependent on foreign-born 
healthcare personnel at all levels of the healthcare system.  Currently, 1.46 million immigrants account for 
15% of all healthcare providers in the United States. (Clearfield & Batalova, 2007). Current estimates 
indicate that 17% of the total U.S. nursing workforce are foreign-born, a dramatic increase from 1998 
when they were approximately 4.5% of the total (Brush, Sochalski, & Berger, 2004; Spry, 2009).  
Recruiting foreign-born nurses has been recommended as a solution to the U.S. shortage of nurses (Xu, 
2003; Gamble, 2002; Neal, 2002) and as a means of diversifying the nursing work force to meet the needs 
of an increasingly multicultural patient population (Abriam-Yago, Yoder, & Kataoka-Yahiro, 1999).  The 
American Nurses Association (ANA), however, questions the ethics of recruiting nurses for immigration 
to the United States. The ANA objects to the resulting “brain drains” in less wealthy nations as well as the 
failure to remedy the root causes of the nursing shortage in the United States (Trossman, 2002; Buchan & 
Aiken, 2008).  Nevertheless, shortages in the U.S. health-care labor force are not expected to disappear 
anytime soon (McMahon, 2004; Buerhaus, Auerbach, & Staiger, 2009; Ellenbecker, 2010) and reliance 
on immigrant professionals is likely to continue. 
Foreign-born professionals, whether educated in the United States or abroad, face tremendous challenges 
adjusting to differences in language, culture, and healthcare practices in the United States (Doutrich, 
2001; McMahon, 2004; Yi & Jezewski, 2000; Xu & Davidhizar, 2004).  Foreign-born nurses report that 
while they may feel clinically competent, they often feel unprepared for the use of English in the 
healthcare setting (Davis & Nichols, 2002; Guttman, 2004).  Immigrant health professionals experience 
communication difficulties with patients and coworkers that are easily exacerbated in a healthcare setting 
where situations can quickly become emotionally charged and stressful.  Their U.S.-born peers identify a 
number of difficulties in working with foreign-born nurses, including lack of communication skills and 
differences in decision making, behavioral norms, role expectations, and attitudes (Yi & Jezewski, 2000).  
Patients may express distress at being unable to understand physicians who are not native English 
speakers, and, whether their complaints reflect prejudices or not, they are undermining for the immigrant 
practitioner (McMahon, 2004).  
The Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) conducted focus groups with 
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
12 
foreign-born nurses, identifying major challenges around language, culture, and the practice of nursing 
(Davis & Nichols, 2002).  These challenges point to the need for competencies in four aspects of 
language use: 1) intelligibility (phonology and syntactic patterns), 2) vocabulary, 3) conversation, and 4) 
context-dependent speech (discourse).  
Participants in CGFNS focus groups report feeling unprepared for using English in the healthcare setting.  
They had difficulty with colloquial expressions and abbreviated medical terms and found using the phone 
especially problematic.  Participants identified difficulties with medical and pharmacological terminology, 
the U.S. system of weights and measures, and the variety of medications U.S. patients take. Participants 
were too embarrassed to ask about procedures they did not understand.  Additionally, they felt that 
patients and coworkers perceived them as unskilled rather than as professionals.  Participants suggested 
that instruction would be helpful in basic communication techniques in the healthcare setting and in 
conversational English.  Nurses from more homogenous countries also reported that they were 
unaccustomed to the cultural diversity among U.S. patients.  They lacked knowledge of diverse dietary 
and religious needs and communication styles.  They also found aspects of U.S culture challenging, 
including exposure to substance abuse, unfamiliar sexual orientations, and religious customs.  
Maintaining a nonjudgmental stance was a challenge for them in many situations (Davis & Nichols, 
2002). 
Growing numbers of educators and employers are providing orientation courses for newly immigrated 
healthcare workers, incorporating content on American English and culture (McMahon, 2004; Guttman, 
2004; Xu et al, 2010).  It may, however, take years for foreign-born healthcare professionals to feel fully 
comfortable with American English, culture, and healthcare (Yi & Jezewski, 2000) and “the initial 
measures must be continued and reinforced to ensure that cultural and linguistic competence are 
consistently implemented in the healthcare setting” (Guttman, 2004, p. 265). 
The communicative approach has been dominant in the field of second language instruction in the U.S. 
and abroad since the 1970s (Nunan, 1991; Hiep, 2007).  This approach emphasizes the importance of 
meaningful dialogue and frequent interaction for second language acquisition in the belief that the 
individual will become fluent in English if provided with sufficient meaningful communication 
opportunities.  While the communicative approach encourages conversations in naturalistic settings, it 
does not provide a framework for the improvement of pronunciation and grammar, nor does the 
communicative approach promote the mastery of specific vocabulary sets (Levis, 2005; Sikorski, 2005a).  
Many foreign-born adults who have learned English using the communicative approach acknowledge 
gaps in their grasp of English and further indicate that these gaps frequently put them at a disadvantage in 
the workplace (Sikorski, 2005a).  Specifically, these adults experience difficulties with speech 
intelligibility, or the amount of information a listener can obtain from a spoken message. Derwing & 
Munro argue that mutual intelligibility is the “paramount concern” for second language learners who must 
be understood in a context where native speakers are the majority and when they wish to integrate 
socially in the native culture (2005, p. 380). 
To address the need of foreign-born nurses for continued language and cultural support, we developed 
and evaluated the first phase of a multimedia, Internet-based educational tool, the Intercultural 
Communication Workshop (ICW), designed to improve the overall communicative competence of 
foreign-born nurses.  The ICW is not designed to “erase” accents.  Rather, it expands the user’s 
knowledge of intonation (appropriate stress and pitch) and phonological rules specific to American 
English, enhancing their oral communication skills and improving listener understanding (Sikorski, 
2005a; Derwing & Munro, 2005).  Participants in the ICW learn a three-fold set of rules for improving 
their speech intelligibility: consonant clarity, vowel accuracy, and appropriate intonation (Sikorski, 
2005a).  Instruction in the ICW is tailored to the healthcare workplace whenever possible and includes 
contextual information about communication, culture, and healthcare in the United States, thereby 
avoiding the “one size fits all” approach to second language instruction rejected by Derwing & Munro 
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
13 
(2005). 
The Intercultural Communication Workshop is designed as a supplement to formal in-person instruction 
and orientation programs.  When such programs are lacking, this e-learning course can stand alone as 
self-paced instruction.  While some may argue that the ICW cannot take the place of face-to-face 
interactions in a well-designed and executed ESL course, the e-learning environment offers several 
advantages: it is self-paced, private (thus less threatening), and provides continuous opportunities for 
practice and reinforcement. 
RESEARCH METHODS 
The Course  
The first version of the ICW is a web-based course that integrates instruction in speech intelligibility with 
contextual information on communication and culture in U.S. healthcare, along with instruction on 
common idioms and figures of speech relevant in the healthcare setting.  Instruction in the ICW is 
centered on multimedia recording exercises that encourage learners to apply "insider information" about 
the phonological and prosodic rules that govern American English pronunciation and intonation.  This 
distinctive approach enables users to progress quickly by making patterned changes to their speech.  
Whenever feasible, exercises are built on words and phrases that are likely to occur in conversations 
nurses have with patients and their families and with other members of the healthcare team. 
The core instruction in speech intelligibility was adapted from an established curriculum (Sikorski, 2004) 
in collaboration with the author.  Lessons in the ICW are grouped into three chapters—intonation, vowels, 
and consonants—corresponding to the most important components of speech intelligibility.  The 
intonation chapter explains that English requires stress timing (at odds with the syllable-timing rules of 
many FBNs’ native languages).  The focus is on typical intonation patterns at the word, phrase, and 
sentence level and the unique ways that intonation patterns change meaning.  The vowels chapter teaches 
the vowel inventory of American English, where and how to make these sounds, and common changes in 
vowel sounds based on word stress.  The final chapter on consonants teaches the consonant inventory of 
American English, how and where to make these sounds, and common changes to consonant sounds that 
must occur in conversational English.  Additional examples of speech intelligibility topics included in 
ICW are provided in Table 1
Table 1
Examples of Topics Included in ICW Speech Intelligibility Lessons
Intonation 
Vowels 
Consonants 
Pitch 
Typical patterns for words   and 
phrases 
Special patterns for words and 
phrases 
Stress 
Word reductions 
Inflection 
Falling inflection 
Statements 
WH-questions 
Front vowels 
Similar sounds (minimal pairs, 
e.g. “cot” v. “cat”) 
Vowel length 
Vowel reductions in unstressed 
syllables 
Vowel additions 
Linking 
/t/ variations (such as the /t/ 
sound in “butter”) 
Initial aspiration 
/p/ v. /b/ and /k/ v. /g/ (e.g. 
minimal pairs “pin” v. “bin”) 
Unreleased stops 
Linking 
Consonant voicing 
Endings with “–s” and “–ed”  
Consonant reductions 
Throughout the course, users also view hundreds of tips about American English communication, 
language practice strategies, and idiomatic healthcare expressions.  “Tip” boxes are inset on most pages in 
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
14 
the course and allow users to read succinct information with examples on the social and cultural context 
of healthcare in the United States.  Examples of the types of tips included in ICW are provided in Table 2
Table 2
Examples of “Tips” for Speaking and Practicing Provided in ICW
Healthcare 
“Medical talk is a new language, too / Medical terminology is a new language 
for everyone.  Your patients may not know the meanings of many medical words 
that you use every day!” 
Everyday Talk 
(idioms) 
“‘A frog in one’s throat’ / Meaning: Hoarseness or phlegm in the throat; unable 
to speak clearly until you give a slight cough. / ‘Ahem, excuse me, I seem to 
have had a frog in my throat!’” 
Mr. Formal vs. 
Informal Guy 
“Offering Help / Formal & Polite: How may I help you? / Informal: What do you 
need?” 
U.S. English 
“Are you bored? / If you don't use a significant pitch rise, listeners may think 
you are bored or want to get away!” 
Mirror 
“You may want to use a mirror as you practice the contrasts in this section.” 
Providing immediate, tailored feedback to learners is one of the most significant challenges in the web 
environment.  To meet the need for feedback, we designed the “listen-record-compare object” (hereafter 
LRC), which allows users to listen to a model speaker, record their own speech, and then compare their 
recorded utterances to the model.  The ICW presents learners with 86 LRC lessons (with 10 to 20 target 
utterances each) for a total of 1,932 opportunities to compare their speech with a native speaker. The 
usefulness of the LRC is limited for those users who cannot distinguish between their utterances and the 
model’s; however, it is expected to aid intonation and pronunciation of U.S. vowels and consonants for 
the majority of learners.  
Research Design 
We evaluated the feasibility and usability of the ICW and used a single-group, pre- post-test design to 
conduct a preliminary evaluation of usefulness of the ICW in improving speech intelligibility.  All 
procedures were reviewed by the Western Institutional Review Board, in accordance with requirements 
for the protection of human subjects in all research funded by the National Institutes of Health.  
Participants received an incentive of $125 for participation in the study. 
Measures 
The following screening and testing measures were completed online by all study participants: 
• 
Demographic Questionnaire:
includes questions about participants’ age, gender, education, 
native language, and employment, as well as questions about their use of American English. 
• 
Test of English Proficiency Level - Online (TEPL-Online):
a placement tool challenging the full 
range of American English language skills—listening comprehension, oral expression, reading 
of correct structures, reading comprehension, and writing—that is scored on a 7-level scale (A 
= Survival English – G = Advanced English) with results shown for each skill area.  Field tests 
with adult students have shown it to be an appropriate placement and proficiency instrument.  
The 
TEPL-Online
was administered at baseline (Rathmell & Sikorski, 2006). 
• 
Knowledge Test
: a test consisting of 30 items, 15 true/false and 15 multiple choice questions 
based on information presented in the course (e.g., “Your best clues for how to pronounce 
words comes from American English spelling.”; “The word ‘comfortable’ is typically 
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
15 
pronounced as a three-syllable word.”; “Saying the words below aloud, which word contains 
the /ae/ vowel: a) Last b) Calm c) Mammogram”). 
• 
Proficiency in Oral English Communication Screen (POEC-S):
a two-part screen of auditory 
discrimination and verbal production of key vowel, consonant, and intonation variations unique 
to American English (Sikorski, 2005b).  
POEC-S
scores have been strongly correlated to 
perceptual ratings made by Speech Language Pathologists (SLPs) and SLP graduate students on 
accent, articulation, intonation, naturalness, and intelligibility (Morton, Brundage, & Hancock, 
2010). 
• 
Satisfaction and Usability Questionnaire:
a 22-item questionnaire using a 5-point Likert scale 
on which participants rated their agreement. 
Active, unencumbered participation in an online training program demands good visual language skills.  
For this pilot study, we used the written (nonverbal) portions of the 
TEPL-Online
to determine examinees' 
ability to actively participate in an online language learning program.  The two written portions of the 
TEPL-Online
, "reading of correct structures" and "reading comprehension," are multiple choice and can 
be scored automatically in the web environment.  All components of the current 
POEC-S
were adapted to 
the web environment.  Cuing and prompts were adapted for the multimedia environment, but no changes 
in content were necessary.  The Demographic Questionnaire and Knowledge Test were created 
specifically for this project.  The Satisfaction and Usability Questionnaire was adapted from the System 
Usability Scale (SUS) (Brooke, 1996) with items tailored for the ICW. 
Participants 
The participants were 22 foreign-born nurses and nursing students recruited from nine institutions, 
including schools of nursing, nursing associations, and websites for nurses via fliers (hard copies and 
online) and e-mail announcements distributed by directors and staff at the sites.  All individuals who 
expressed interest in the study were eligible for participation.  Twenty-two participants enrolled in the 
study and received practice tools (described below).  Due to time constraints, 3 individuals did not 
continue with the course, leaving 19 participants who were invited to complete follow-up measures. 
Procedures 
The entire study took place online.  Participants completed all screening measures and the written 
components of the baseline measures.  Participants were then sent a mirror and a headset with a 
microphone for use in the study, along with a letter instructing them how to return to the website.  Upon 
receiving their practice tools, participants logged in and completed the auditory components of the 
baseline measures.  Auditory discrimination sections were automatically scored by the software, and 
scores were included in the participant database for later analysis.  Participants’ verbal answers were 
recorded and stored on a secure server for scoring by trained 
POEC-S
coders.  When the baseline 
measures were complete, participants were mailed a payment of $50. 
Participants were given 3 months to complete 8 hours of practice time in the online course.  They were 
asked to practice a minimum of three times a week for 15-20 minutes and no more than 20 minutes at a 
time for a total time of 1 hour per week (for a minimum of 8 weeks).  During the study period, study 
personnel contacted participants by telephone and/or emails, according to the participant’s preference, at 
least every 3 weeks.  These “check-ins” were intended to provide support to participants and to learn 
about their experiences in the course.  The “check-ins” also provided an opportunity to answer 
participants’ questions and solve any technical difficulties. 
After 8 weeks, participants completed the follow-up measures.  When these were completed, the study 
research assistant conducted an exit interview by telephone or e-mail, depending on the participant’s 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested