c# pdf viewer wpf : Change page order in pdf file software SDK cloud windows wpf html class v18n111-part443

Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
106
worth exploring whether lower-level students benefit more from the teacher-edited corpus materials.  
Although high-level students analyzed errors successfully with pre-selected examples in indirect corpus 
use, we observed that they were not easily convinced if it conflicted with what they thought was a 
standard grammatical rule. In these cases, a rule was overapplied to a special case that required a different 
answer. The learner’s prior knowledge required the teacher’s assistance to make new generalizations to 
teach new knowledge. An example is Young’s error and what she described: 
English as the second language: “According to the concordance data, it tells me 'as the' should be 
corrected to 'as a', right? But while writing, after I had thought of selecting the usage "as a", I 
came up with an idea that I have to put "the" to the left side of the ordinal number. That’s the 
reason I wrote 'as the' instead of ‘as a’. I need your explanation rather than these examples.” 
(Young, first composition) 
Young was not persuaded when the teacher gave her seven examples including an idiomatic expression, 
‘as a.’ Young needed the teacher's protracted and insistent explanation why it was wrong. The teacher’s 
persistence finally convinced Young to correct the error. This case reflects why the rate of Pattern A for 
high-level students was lower in indirect corpus use. High-level students tended to defer to their prior 
knowledge even when it conflicted with the concordance examples. In contrast, a lower-level student, 
Min, satisfactorily corrected her errors based on the examples. This case is hard to generalize, but it is 
worth further investigation about the effectiveness of indirect corpus materials for lower-level students 
relative to higher-level students. This can be related to the previous finding that not all users adopted data-
driven strategies in concordance-based investigation (Sripicharn, 2004). The present study found a similar 
pattern in high-level learners as did Sripicharn, i.e. native speakers tended to rely upon their existing 
knowledge.  
Interestingly, high-level students only exhibited their resistance to corrections (Pattern C) for lexical 
errors in the indirect corpus use. All learners corrected grammatical errors after receiving the concordance 
feedback and the teacher’s help, but some learners wanted to leave lexical errors as they chose. Joon 
especially was not afraid of creating words. He deliberately left 33 percent lexical errors thus resisting the 
teacher’s explanation: 
*not-well planned building arrangements: “According to the data and your explanation, it is more 
natural to change from ‘not-well’ to 'poorly,' right? But I want to emphasize the negative 
meaning. 'Poorly' doesn't fully cover my intention. It is not grammatically wrong, so I want to put 
it this way.” (Joon, fifth composition) 
Although Joon analyzed the error successfully, he stuck to his original expression. He commented in the 
post-interview: 
I like creative expressions or using brilliant words. The concordance just has expressions many 
people use, so there is no way to find creative uses of words. Different expressions are not wrong 
usage, I think. (Joon, 5/31/2011) 
Joon was upset that his novel expressions were found to be incorrect according to the concordance data. 
In contrast, students who directly accessed the concordancer were agreeable to the usage as a result of 
their own search through the data. Given the few numbers of participants, it is difficult to draw a firm 
conclusion from this study. But in this particular case, the proficient students rather easily changed their 
preconceived errant knowledge when they pursued the data through direct corpus access, implying the 
effectiveness of direct corpus consultation for high-level students with conflicting errant knowledge. 
Change page order in pdf file - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages within a pdf document; reordering pdf pages
Change page order in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reordering pages in pdf document; reorder pdf pages reader
Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
107
Finally, although most participants were more successful in correcting errors for themselves in the 
indirect use, they overall preferred the direct use of corpora. The participants were much interested in 
finding the right answers with their own efforts, and they were very delighted that they could actually 
discovered the rules. Below are excerpts from the interviews in the post-meeting. 
Although it takes long to find examples, I prefer the direct use of Lextutor. As there is not only 
one way to express ideas in language use, I can find a variety of different answers during the 
process of searching this and that. Also I want to use it in writing later. (Young, 5/31/2011) 
When I started directly using the concordancer, I fumbled around. But with the teacher’s little 
help, I could have fun learning English and not be bored by using the computer. I prefer the direct 
way. (Min, 5/31/2011) 
This section demonstrated different error correction patterns and effects in corpus-based revisions 
between the indirect and direct corpus uses. While the ratio of self-correction was higher in the indirect 
use, most learners were more interested in the direct use as they liked to be a “language detective.” This 
implies that students’ interest and motivation are not always reinforced by positive learning experiences. 
While cautious in making generalizations from this case study, we found that direct corpus use seemed to 
suit high-level students; they willingly changed their knowledge only when checking data on their own 
efforts. On the other hand, indirect corpus use was satisfactory enough for lower-level students even when 
the limited number of examples conflicted with their knowledge.  
Learning Strategies in Indirect and Direct Corpus Use  
As mentioned, we employed think-aloud protocols, learning journals, and observation notes to collect 
qualitative data on student learning strategies through corpus use. Each learning strategy was identified, 
classified into four main categories, and further sub-categorized. We identified different learning strategy 
use patterns relative to the corpus use techniques and the participant’s English proficiency levels. Table 5 
shows the frequency of learning strategies for each category.  
Table 5. Classification of Learning Strategies Used in the Two Corpus Use Contexts  
Category 
Detailed strategy 
Indirect use  
Direct use   
Frequency   (%) 
Frequency  (%) 
Metacognitive strategy 
Self-evaluation/monitoring  28 
(4.9) 
21 
(2.5) 
Cognitive strategy 
Making use of materials 
217 
(38.1) 
378 
(45.5) 
Association 
112 
(19.7) 
61 
(7.3) 
Grouping 
41 
(7.2) 
64 
(7.7) 
Translation 
57 
(10.0) 
78 
(9.4) 
Note-taking 
(.4) 
(.7) 
Affective strategy 
Lowering anxiety 
(1.2) 
16 
(1.9) 
Self-encouragement 
12 
(2.1) 
12 
(1.4) 
Social strategy 
Question for clarification 
78 
(13.7) 
187 
(22.5) 
Others 
15 
(2.6) 
(.8) 
Total 
569 
(100) 
830 
(100) 
Learners adopted learning strategies appropriate for the particular task in the new learning situation. This 
is a very personal experience to the learner who finds novel and individual ways to improvise strategies, 
fortunately giving us an intimate “insider’s” window to how the learner adjusts to the material. The total 
frequency of strategy use, depicted in Table 5, is much higher in the direct corpus use, implying that 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages
pdf reverse page order preview; change pdf page order
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing the position, orientation and order of PDF
reorder pages in pdf document; how to rearrange pdf pages
Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
108
learners used an array of cognitive and affective skills to solve problems while engaging them in self-
directed activity.  
Table 5 shows that cognitive strategy was the most frequently used main category, in both corpus 
settings, which is not surprising given the nature of corpus activities. In indirect use, students used more 
metacognitive strategy (4.9 percent) than in the direct use (2.5 percent), which seems be related to their 
handling of novel type of learning. This appears to be evidence that participants seemed to “coordinate 
their own learning process” (Oxford, 1990, p.136) more consciously at the first five weeks when faced 
with a new type of learning, i.e. concordancing. But once they adjusted to the type of learning, they 
moved to use other substantial strategies such as cognitive strategy. Of particular interest is that social 
strategy was the second most frequently used learning strategy in both the corpus use settings. Clearly the 
students needed the teacher’s guidance and mediation to continue their corpus analysis to solve their 
language problems. This also conflicts with popular ideas that computer use reduces, and may even 
eliminate, the need for teacher support in the classroom. If other studies uphold our finding, the evidence 
will weigh in favor of a continued, active presence of teachers trained in corpus methodologies. 
Now let us compare the use of the four sub-categories of strategy: making use of materials, association, 
question for clarification, and translation. All of these, except for translation, were chosen because they 
show the largest differences (over 5 percent) between the rates relative to the two corpus contexts. The 
translation strategy was an unexpected result, because it was only a 0.7-percent difference. We had 
anticipated a higher rate in the direct use where there are many more examples to translate from the 
concordance outputs. The anomalous result was determined to be worth additional investigation.  
Resourcing: Making use of materials  
The adage, “if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” describes the “making use of materials” strategy. 
In this strategy, the learners applied additional steps after their initial search process was unable to secure 
answer. The frequency of this strategy varied between the direct (45.5 percent) and indirect (38.1 percent) 
corpus use, which seems to be natural given the type of materials available in each setting. Indirect use 
only made five to 15 corpus examples available. If the students were unsuccessful with this resource, they 
moved on to other strategies to solve problems. In other words, they may or may not have been able to 
solve the problem. In direct corpus use, if the learners failed to find appropriate examples, they returned 
to the corpus start-up screen and typed another word to solve problems, rather than trying other strategies. 
This is evidence that the resource itself is significantly important in the direct corpus use, and it implies 
that the teacher can strengthen students’ learning skills by taking time to train them in concordancer 
operations. It again exemplifies that the teacher’s role is critical to student’s successful corpus use. 
Application of prior knowledge 
When students could not correct errors using the initial resourcing strategies, they shifted to acquired 
knowledge and logical reasoning. However, the frequencies and types of association with prior 
knowledge differed between the two techniques. In the direct use (7.3 percent), the learners used the 
concordancer until finding relevant data, rather than revert to their own knowledge. However, in the 
indirect use (19.7 percent), students resorted to their prior knowledge because the data was too limited for 
them to find answers. 
Concurring with Sun (2003), we observed three manners of applying prior knowledge. First, when 
learners produced the apt prior knowledge, they easily corrected mistakes and moved to the self-
evaluation strategy (metacognitive strategy), while cogitating “Why did I get it wrong?” or “I will never 
make the same mistake next time.” In this case, just a few examples persuaded them to correct errors, as 
illustrated in the following writing example: 
*..they live in the city, where is the center of the culture...(Young, 3
rd 
composition) 
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
For example, you may change your Word document order from 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 to 3, 5, 4, 2,1 with C# coding. C#.NET: Extracting Page(s) from Word.
move pdf pages in preview; move pdf pages
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
Note: if you are trying to change the order of a you want to see other VB.NET Word document editing controls, please read this Word reading page which has
rearrange pdf pages in preview; reorder pages in pdf
Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
109
Young said she already knew the grammatical difference between 'where' and 'which.' After using the 
given example to satisfactorily correct the error, she said: 
If I have a chance to produce a sentence including 'where' or 'which is' next time, I will 
never make the same mistake. I already knew this grammar and I got it right on a multiple-
choice exam before. Once making this mistake, I feel I didn't fully understand it before I 
actually produced it. 
Second, when the learners have incorrect prior knowledge, they could not correct errors for themselves, 
so they tended to ask for the teacher’s intervention or for more examples to re-generalize. Here is an 
example based on a writing sample:  
* Less densed population will also remove stress… (Joon, 3
rd 
composition) 
The teacher gave Joon eight examples where the word 'dense' is used as an adjective. While correcting the 
error, he said: 
In the data, every 'dense' word is used as an adjective. But I think it is used not only as an 
adjective but also as a verb. I remember I wrote 'densed' before. I need more examples. 
Can I look it up in the dictionary? Or can you give me an explanation? 
Joon’s knowledge had become fossilized, i.e. solidified and impervious to change, even though the 
concordancer supplied eight examples. It took the authority of a teacher's explanation to persuade him of 
his errant knowledge.  
The third case was when the learners had no relevant knowledge to the issue at hand. This 
instance only occurred in direct corpus use. In this case, the teacher's intervention was necessary 
to find the right examples:  
* These phenomenons are dangerous...(Hyun,8
th 
composition) 
Hyun did not realize that ‘phenomena’ is the plural form of ‘phenomenon.’ Without the teacher's 
intervention, the right examples would have eluded him because the concordancer feature would have 
required him to type ‘phenomena’ to access the correct usage. Or the learner could have found the plural 
form ‘phenomena’ by typing ‘phenomen’ with the search option “starts” selected instead of “equals” in 
the concordancer.  
With limited data in the indirect use of corpora, the learners had to apply their prior knowledge when they 
were not satisfied. This suggests that the number of examples can be a powerful attribute to compel 
students to amend their errant knowledge in corpus-based contexts. Student’s fossilized knowledge defied 
the influence of only a few examples. For indirect corpus use, then, it appears the teacher should consider 
providing profuse examples when adopting the materials into classroom activities. 
Translation strategy 
The rate of translation strategy use differed little between direct (9.4 percent) and indirect (10.0 percent) 
corpus use. This defied the researchers’ initial assumption that more differences would be apparent 
because there were significant differences in the number of examples between the indirect (five to 15 
examples) and direct method (maximum of 5,000 examples). Learners tended to first skim the data to 
choose sentences they could easily understand or thought were most relevant to their errors regardless of 
the number produced in the data. In both sorts of corpus use thus the number of translation strategy uses 
was about the same.  
A consequence of the indirect use was that learners lost interest in translation because the corpus cut off 
the beginnings and ends of example sentences. Learners were confounded by the context because they 
were forced to concentrate only on the target word without the whole sentence to convey meaning. 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Embedded page thumbnails. In order to run the sample code, the following ops.MonochromeImageOptions.TargetResolution = 150F; // to change image compression
rearrange pdf pages reader; how to reorder pdf pages
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position PPTXDocument(filepath); // Swap page 0 and page 1. doc PowerPoint Pages with a Certain Order in C#
how to move pages around in a pdf document; change page order pdf preview
Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
110
However, the direct use presented a different challenge that resulted in similar student indifference. 
Learners were frustrated by the pressure to sort through the sheer volume of examples to translate. These 
are technical issues in corpus presentation that need to be addressed for effective deployment of either 
corpus type in the classroom. If corpus advocates seek to replicate a naturalistic learning environment, 
then certainly the indirect use should reflect the natural written language that is likely to be produced in 
full sentences. As for the direct use, it defies comprehension that a foreign speaker would ever need to 
confront every form of language use in a native setting. On the other hand, perhaps more vigilant teacher 
preparation is required to winnow through relevant corpus materials to select those appropriate to the 
learning context that students would expect to face in the particular exercise.    
Questions for clarification 
The types and frequency of questions that students posed varied between the two corpus use settings. In 
indirect corpus use, most learners corrected errors after using various strategies. It was only after they 
failed to properly analyze the errors that they would finally ask for the teacher's explanation. Here is an 
example:  
To achieve be satisfied life: “Looking in the right pattern of ‘achieve,’ there is always a 
noun form. Isn't ‘be satisfied life’ a noun?” (Min, 5
th 
composition) 
After analyzing the data, Min did not recognize her errant knowledge. She then consulted the teacher who 
explained the difference between the passive form and the noun form, which helped to repair Min’s 
knowledge. 
On the other hand, the learners asked many questions in direct corpus use because they often needed the 
teacher's simple scaffolding to search for right examples relevant to their errors. Once they found the 
examples, they could solve most of their errors. Here is Joon’s error and what he described: 
I have lived in the metropolitan in Korea: “Is it the error of grammar or the word 
‘metropolitan’? …Do I look at the right or left pattern?” (Joon, 9
th 
composition) 
In the process of finding relevant examples, students propounded many questions such as 'What type of 
error is it?,' 'Do I have to look at the right side of the word or left side?,' but they did not tend to ask for 
explanations about the answer.  
The frequency of questions in indirect corpus use is less than in direct use because the questions are the 
final method of correction, whereas the frequency is higher in direct corpus use as it occurred in the 
process of finding examples (Figure 2). 
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
or several Word document pages, or just change the position DOCXDocument(filepath); // Swap page 0 and page 1. doc Multiple Word Pages with a Certain Order in C#
how to reorder pages in pdf reader; how to reorder pages in pdf preview
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via Change PDF original password. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be
move pages in pdf reader; how to move pages around in pdf file
Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
111
Figure 2. The patterns of questions for clarification in corpus analysis  
As the teacher was in charge of the steps to ‘detect’ and ‘find relevant examples’ in indirect use, the 
students asked for explanations only when answers confounded them. In contrast, students had more 
control over the data in direct use, so many questions arose while detecting examples. In the process, they 
realized the nature of their mistake and how to correct it. Through this process they acquired language 
information, and once they found relevant examples, they corrected most errors. This exemplifies that 
direct use can engage learners more actively in the language searching, which in turn can lead to 
development of learners’ cognitive skills and self-directed learning.  
In addition to the findings regarding the application of corpus to the different contexts, the study also 
found that the learners reacted differently in corpus analysis according to their English levels. The high-
level students, Young and Joon, occasionally defended their mistakes and explained their convictions for 
writing that way. Joon was extremely strong-willed, so it was hard to reform his prior knowledge. 
Whenever Joon realized he was wrong, he self-evaluated his prior knowledge by commenting “Why did I 
make this kind of mistake?”  
On the other hand, middle-level students Hyun and Min used question strategies as a way to trim their 
anxiety and to elevate their confidence. They trusted the concordance data more than their preset 
knowledge, so their questions were not defensive, but rather concerned their understanding about how to 
find examples or to confirm the correction. Many researchers found that high-level students are more 
prone to question and seek help from the teacher and their peers (Newman, 1991; Newman & Goldin, 
1990; Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1986). This single case study is difficult to generalize across the 
board, but it does support the literature that middle-level learners tend to seek help from the teacher in 
similar small-scale corpus classes, while high-level students were more willing to solve problems for 
themselves with corpus materials.  
In summary, this section demonstrated that learners had many opportunities to use a wide range of 
learning strategies in concordancing activities. When their deployment of a certain strategy turned 
fruitless, they appropriated other types of learning strategies as active language learners. Through the 
process, they learned how to monitor their knowledge and to modify learning strategies to the situation. 
Accordingly, the corpus consultation developed their metacognitive, cognitive, and socio-affective 
strategy skills to a positive effect.  
Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
112
CONCLUSION 
This case study investigated how learners corrected errors, and the strategies they employed, in L2 
writing relative to indirect and direct access to concordance software. The indirect use involved teacher-
prepared concordance handouts supplied to students, while the direct approach gave students actual 
access to the corpora. By integrating the corpus work into the revision stage of writing, students actively 
found answers to correct their errors while testing out their linguistic hypotheses. This needs-based 
approach (Aston, 1997; Braun, 2007) was especially effective for learners who made frequent linguistic 
mistakes because the concordance data gave them instant feedback, which reinforced their learning.  
Concordancing also served to develop students’ cognitive and metacognitive abilities by motivating 
discovery learning, which enhanced autonomous learning (Johns, 1991; O’Sullivan, 2007). As O’Sullivan 
(2007) argued, process-oriented corpus activities lead learners to monitor and regulate their cognitive 
work by using a variety of learning strategies. As our study showed, learners can rework their writing and 
process the linguistic input from corpora. To this effect, students acquired rules of language use and 
restructured their prior, erroneous knowledge, which facilitated their acquisition of linguistic knowledge. 
Consequently, corpus-based writing feedback can open a new way of learning language in a writing class 
(Sun, 2003; Gilmore, 2009), especially in the revision stage of a process-oriented writing.  
We concede our findings are tentative due to the exploratory nature and small sample size of this study. 
Yet, our unique design--comparing indirect to direct corpus use--provided meaningful findings, so it may 
well serve as a worthy model to emulate for future studies. This contrasts to the usual method that 
examines only one corpus method in the classroom. While previous studies have been inconsistent about 
the relationship between proficiency levels and the effect of corpus use (e.g. Kennedy & Miceli, 2001; 
Gaskell & Cobb, 2004; McCay, 1980; Tribble, 1991; Tribble & Jones, 1990; Yoon & Hirvela, 2004), this 
study revealed that corpus-based instruction can benefit different levels of students if we consider their 
different patterns and strategies relative to the two corpus applications. Again, the small numbers 
involved in this study may prejudice a firm conclusion, but the indirect use of corpora appeared to have 
greater effectiveness in error correction for most learners. Still, the learners preferred the interactive 
aspect of direct corpora use, which also raised their learning awareness. If these findings are replicated, 
then it can reassure teachers with less-endowed technological infrastructures--particularly in developing 
countries-- that indirect use can still benefit students’ linguistic acquisition in L2 writing.  
Our study may have pedagogical implications because we identified specific ways that teachers can 
regulate the classroom environment to enhance the learning experience of either direct or indirect corpus 
use. Future studies may want to address: accuracy of students’ prior knowledge, levels of student 
proficiency, level of research skills, students’ learning styles, the degree of teacher’s intervention, and 
accessibility to corpus resources, to name a few. Our findings suggest that indirect deployment of corpus 
requires the teachers to consider intrinsic factors such as students’ prior knowledge, language proficiency 
and learning styles. The direct deployment of corpus requires evaluation of not only intrinsic factors but 
also extrinsic factors such as the teacher’s intervention and accessibility to corpus resources. Limited 
accessibility to the resources and corpus programs may impede direct use of corpora, but we mitigated 
this drawback by employing a free online corpus, which may be readily accessed on the World Wide 
Web. The Lextutor Web site not only enabled students’ easy access to corpora, but they easily handled 
the data with minimal training. We argue that the use of Web resources can minimize the effects of the 
digital divide that particularly confronts developing countries (and even in some economically depressed 
areas within advanced economies) whose educators are tasked to prepare students for a hyper-competitive 
world economy in which English is the lingua franca. Furthermore, indirect corpus is still available to 
teachers, even if students lack the individual concordance resources due to fewer computer resources. Use 
of either approach makes for a win-win situation for teachers and students wherever corpus-based 
instruction is employed. 
Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
113
The literature shows that corpus size can be a considerable matter in terms of teachers’ time management 
(St. John, 2001) in using indirect corpus. A teacher can spend substantial time selecting appropriate 
outputs from an immense number of examples based on the target errors and students’ levels. Frequency 
of occurrence may not be generalizable when the amount of examples is relatively small. However, small-
size corpora may not only be valuable for learners’ language discovery but can also familiarize learners to 
use larger corpora appropriately (Aston, 1997). It is not possible to claim conclusively on the basis of our 
small-scale study, but we were struck by how a relatively few examples were able to satisfy learners if the 
error was simple or inadvertent. However, it was apparent that more examples are needed to correct 
fossilized erroneous knowledge especially for high-level students who resisted corrections. To manage 
this situation, the teacher must determine the levels of students’ proficiencies and the linguistic items in 
the inquiry in order to select the amount of data for concordance examples. On the other hand, while 
indirect corpus use is often recommended as a transitional step to moving to direct corpus use or to 
independent concordance usage (Gaskell & Cobb, 2004; Johns, 1997), this study showed that indirect 
corpus use can be a great learning method for lower-level students in its own right, thus assuaging any 
deleterious effects of the digital divide where direct access may not be easily available in less-developed 
countries. In any event, indirect use can also prepare these students for direct use if they should transfer to 
a country with more advanced facilities, or if their institution’s facilities should be eventually upgraded. 
A more crucial issue for direct corpus use is training students about how to utilize the concordancer. In 
light of the results on the frequency of strategy use, the learners used almost 50 percent of “making use of 
materials” strategy in the direct corpus use context, which means that students rely on the material the 
most. Students well-trained for using online corpora are likely to engage in “autonomous browsing” 
(Bernardini, 2002), leading to discovery learning. This supplants the teacher as the subsequent mediator 
of corpus materials and leads to student-directed learning as a “true linguistic researcher” and as an 
independent L2 writer. This method can be rewarding for the teacher who finds it difficult to teach highly 
confident students who resist correction of erroneous knowledge. Since they access concordance 
resources with their own effort, they may be more likely to repair their knowledge. Our observation 
comports to Chambers and O’Sullivan (2004), who argued that corpus consultation is “good for 
unlearning errors” (p.168). 
Regardless of the type of corpus use, the study found that teacher’s guidance and scaffolding was crucial 
in helping to lead learners to successful experiences in corpus analysis. In this sense, we stress that 
teachers must receive basic training in accessing corpora and evaluating concordancers in order to foster a 
DDL-friendly environment. As Sinclair (2004) noted, “a corpus is not a simple object, and it is just as 
easy to derive nonsensical conclusions from the evidence as insightful ones” (p.2). When training 
familiarizes teachers with the corpus-based environment, they can facilitate students’ autonomous 
learning and make them become active language detectives. 
In conclusion, this study provides an in-depth but preliminary understanding of EFL students' learning 
processes and strategies they will likely apply in two different uses of corpora. At the very least, we hope 
our research design will be a useful model for future inquiry into this area, and that our observations may 
be useful in interpreting the experiences so obtained. Corpus applications have great potential as a 
learning tool as well as a linguistic resource to improve learners’ knowledge of language use and to 
enhance discovery learning. The findings from our small sample should be carried over to a study of a 
larger number of students to confirm its implications. In future studies, the teacher could select typical 
types of linguistic errors most students make after essay writing and give corpus-based feedback to the 
class. In this way, students can experience inductive learner-centered error correction with their own or 
classmates' errors. This study introduced the indirect approach and moved to the direct approach to make 
students familiar with the corpus approach. We suggest that future studies should alternate the approaches 
weekly to investigate the effects. Learning from the indirect approach might accelerate the learning in the 
direct approach in this study, so future studies should verify any extent, if at all, of this possible effect. 
Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
114
Finally, other studies may wish to emulate our design by expanding beyond Lexitutor as a concordance 
resource. There will be other Web-based resources which may be more easily accessed with less-
advanced computing facilities in developing countries. In this way, an effective language-teaching tool 
can enhance the learning of those who seek it. 
NOTE 
1. Pseudonyms were assigned to each participant in order to protect their confidentiality.   
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
This work was supported by Hankuk University of Foreign Studies Research Fund. The authors are very 
grateful to the editors and anonymous reviewers for their valuable insights and constructive comments on 
an earlier draft. 
ABOUT THE AUTHORS 
Hyunsook Yoon is Associate Professor in the Department of English Education at Hankuk University of 
Foreign Studies. Her primary research interests include corpus linguistics, second language writing, and 
ESP/EAP. 
E-mail: hsyoon3@hufs.ac.kr 
Jung Won Jo received her M.Ed. degree from the Graduate School of Education at Hankuk University of 
Foreign Studies. Her research interests include corpus linguistics and learning strategies.  
E-mail: jazzlove83@gmail.com  
REFERENCES 
Aston, G. (1997). Enriching the learning environment: Corpora in ELT. In A. Wichmann, S. Fligestone, 
T. McEnery, & G. Knowles (Eds.), Teaching and Language Corpora (pp. 51–64). New York, NY: 
Longman.  
Bernardini, S. (2000). Systematising serendipity: Proposals for concordancing large corpora with 
language learners. In L. Burnard, & T. McEnery (Eds.), Rethinking language pedagogy from a corpus 
perspective: Papers from the Third International Conference on Teaching and Language Corpora 
(pp.225–234). Frankfurt, Germany: Peter Lang. 
Bernardini, S. (2002). Exploring new directions for discovery learning. In B. Kettemann & G. Marko 
(Eds.), Teaching and learning by doing corpus analysis. Proceedings from the Fourth International 
Conference on Teaching and Language Corpora, Graz 19-24 July, 2000 (pp. 165–182). Amsterdam: 
Rodopi.  
Bernardini, S. (2004). Corpora in the classroom: An overview and some reflections on future 
developments. In J. Sinclair (Ed.), How to use corpora in language teaching (pp.15–36). Amsterdam: 
Benjamins. 
Boulton, A. (2008). Looking for empirical evidence of data-driven learning at lower levels. In B. 
Hyunsook Yoon and Jung Won Jo 
Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora 
Language Learning & Technology 
115
Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk (Ed.), Corpus linguistics, computer tools, and applications: State of the art 
(pp. 581–598). Frankfurt: Peter Lang.  
Boulton, A. (2009). Testing the limits of data-driven learning: Language proficiency and training. 
ReCALL, 21(1), 37–51.  
Boulton, A. (2010a). Data-driven learning: On paper, in practice. In T. Harris, & M. Jaén (eds), Corpus 
linguistics in language teaching (pp.17–52). Frankfurt: Peter Lang. 
Boulton, A. (2010b). Data-driven learning: Taking the computer out of the equation. Language Learning, 
60(3), 534–572.   
Braun, S. (2007). Integrating corpus work into secondary education: From data-driven learning to needs-
driven corpora. ReCALL, 19(3), 307–328.  
Chambers, A. (2005). Integrating corpus consultation in language studies. Language Learning & 
Technology, 9(2), 111–125. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol9num2/chambers/default.html 
Chambers, A. (2007). Popularising corpus consultation by language learners and teachers. In E. Hidalgo, 
L. Quereda & J. Santana (Eds), Corpora in the foreign language classroom (pp.3-16). Amsterdam, The 
Netherlands: Rodopi.  
Chambers, A., & O’Sullivan, Í. (2004). Corpus consultation and advanced learners’ writing skills in 
French. ReCALL16(1), 158–172. 
Chandler, J. (2003). The efficacy of various kinds of error feedback for improvement in the accuracy and 
fluency of L2 students writing. Journal of Second Language Writing12, 267–296. 
Charles, M. (2007). Reconciling top-down and bottom-up approaches to graduate writing: Using a corpus 
to teach rhetorical functions. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 6, 289–302. 
Cheng, W., Warren, M., & Xun-feng, X. (2003). The language learner as language research: Putting 
corpus linguistics on the timetable. System, 31(2), 173–186.  
Cobb, T. (1997). Is there any measurable learning from hands-on concordancing? System , 25(3), 301–315 
Creswell, A. (2007). Getting to ‘know’ connectors? Evaluating data-driven learning in a writing skills 
course. In E. Hidalgo, L. Quereda & J. Santana (eds), Corpora in the foreign language classroom 
(pp.267–287). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Rodopi.  
Gaskell., D., & Cobb, T (2004). Can learners use concordance feedback for writing errors? System, 32
301–319. 
Gabrielatos, C. (2005). Corpora and language teaching: Just a fling, or wedding bells? TESL-EJ, 8(4), AL, 
1–37. 
Gilmore, A. (2009). Using online corpora to develop students’ writing skills. ELT Journal64(3), 363–
372. 
Johns, T. (1991). From printout to handout: Grammar and vocabulary teaching in the context of data-
driven learning. English Language Research Journal, 4, 27–45.  
Johns, T. (1997). Contexts: the background, development and trialing of a concordance-based CALL 
program. In A. Wichmann, S. Fligelstone, T. McEnery & G. Knowles (Eds.), Teaching and language 
corpora, pp.100–115. London and New York: Longman. 
Kennedy, C., & Miceli, T. (2001). An evaluation of intermediate student’ approaches to corpus 
investigation. Language Learning & Technology5(3), 77–90. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/vol5num3/kennedy/default.html 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested