c# pdf viewer wpf : How to change page order in pdf acrobat Library SDK component .net wpf windows mvc v18n113-part445

Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
126
I am sure that this word means:... (provide translation). 
 Meaning recognition 
Amertume 
1. evenwicht (balance) 
2. ontgoocheling (disappointment) 
3. bitterheid (bitterness) 
4. deskundigheid (expertise) 
In addition to the first test, we also administered a multiple choice meaning recognition test that included 
only the 17 TWs in order to check if learners were able to recognize the translation of the TWs among 
four Dutch translation options (see Table 4, Test 4). The tests in Table 4 were all administered 
immediately after the treatment.
6
Questionnaire 
Participants completed a questionnaire, consisting of a five-point Likert scale, including statements on 
video comprehension (research question 1), vocabulary learning (research question 2), and the usefulness 
of captions for both tasks. The questionnaire data were used to help us clarify the findings of our 
quantitative research.  
Procedure 
Three months before the experiment, the materials and procedures were pilot tested with a group of 22 
students in their last year of secondary school who were enrolled in a French summer course. The 
participants completed all the tests used in the present study and evaluated the materials by means of a 
questionnaire. Our main finding was that the comprehension tests were too easy because many 
participants achieved maximum scores. However, the questionnaire results showed that they considered 
the clips challenging. As a result, some questions were rewritten for the present study and extra open-
ended questions were added. The results of the pilot test did not reveal problems with the vocabulary tests 
or the TWs.  
One month prior to the learning session, participants in the present study completed a vocabulary size and 
prior knowledge test (see Figure 2). They were told that such tests are typically administered at the 
beginning of the academic year. However, they were not informed about the aim of the experiment.  
Figure 2.
Overview of procedures. 
The learning session took place in three computer rooms with a PC and headset for each participant. 
Students were told that the exercises were part of a research study on the use of video in the L2 
classroom. We explained that they were going to watch three short clips. Learners completed a 
Pre-learning phase  
e  
- Vocabulary size test 
- Vocabulary prior 
knowledge test 
(1 month before – 30 
minutes)
Clip 1(2x) 
Clip 2(2x) 
Clip 3
(2x)
Comprehension test 1 
Comprehension test 2 
Comprehension test 3 
Vocabulary test 1 
- Noticing 
- Clip association 
- Meaning recall 
Vocabulary test 2
- Meaning 
recognition 
Questionnaire
Experimental phase  -  
90 minutes
How to change page order in pdf acrobat - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pdf pages online; change pdf page order online
How to change page order in pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
moving pages in pdf; pdf reverse page order online
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
127
)
(max
)
(
edge
priorknowl
test
edge
priorknowl
testscore
comprehension test after viewing each clip twice (see Figure 2). Students were prompted to focus on the 
meaning of the clips and were forewarned of the comprehension tests. Participants were informed that 
each comprehension test contained short, open-ended questions, true-false questions, and combination 
tasks. They were not allowed to make notes, either during the clips or in between viewings. In order to be 
able to gauge incidental learning, we did not inform participants about the vocabulary tests, as suggested 
by Hulstijn (2001), who states that the incidental character is ensured at the level of test announcement. 
At the end of the learning session, all participants were debriefed about the aim of the experiment 
We tested all the students in two consecutive sessions of 90 minutes. The supervisors made sure that 
participants involved in the first session did not see participants of the second session and could thus not 
inform them about the procedures, as this might have compromised the incidental nature of the 
vocabulary acquisition this experiment aimed to measure. All the tests were pencil-and-paper tests.  
Scoring 
Comprehension Tests 
Full credit (1 point) was given for exact answers. Partial credit (0.5) was given for partially correct 
answers to open-ended questions. For example, partial credit was given when learners provided only one 
of the two parts of the answer to the question 
Explain why Lego is a classic marketing example
.  
[Lego has an online platform where customers present their creations.]/[The customers provide 
inspiration for new Lego sets.] 
Each true-false item consisted of two tasks -  (a) indicate whether the sentence is true or false and (b) if 
false, correct the sentence - and had a maximum score of 2 points.  
Vocabulary Tests 
One point was given for each correct answer on the form recognition, clip association, and meaning 
recognition tests. The VKS could have been scored in two ways (Bruton, 2009, p. 294): we could have 
either used the level number or recoded answers into known words (i.e., correctly translated words, 1 
point) and unknown words (0 points).  Because we used the VKS to measure meaning recall rather than 
progress in the scale (Nation & Webb, 2011), we chose to recode into binomial scoring (see Table 5).
7
Table 5
Scoring of VKS  
VKS 
Level 
Binomial scoring 
I don’t remember having seen this word before. 
I have seen this word before but I don’t know what it means. 
Or: wrong answer at level 3 or 4. 
I think I know the meaning of the word and correct translation. 
I am sure that this word means … and correct translation. 
Although most TWs were unknown to students, we wanted to account for their minimal prior knowledge. 
We did so by calculating retention scores (Horst, Cobb & Meara, 1998; Peters, 2006, p. 77) for the 
meaning recognition and meaning recall test (see Equation 1):  
(1)  
As shown by the equation, we calculated the difference between the number of correct responses on the 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
pdf change page order acrobat; change page order in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark to PDF file in order to help or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
change page order pdf reader; reorder pages pdf file
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
128
test (meaning recognition and meaning recall) and the number of known words, as measured by the prior 
knowledge test, and then divided this number by the total number of TWs (max test) minus the prior 
knowledge score. Since known words were dismissed from the analysis, the result is a retention score 
representing the percentage of the actual learning gains.  
Analyses 
We conducted a multivariate analysis of covariance (Tacq, 1997) for each of the two research questions. 
The independent variable was type of captioning (NC, KC, FC, and FCHK); the covariate was the score 
on the vocabulary size test. There were two sets of dependent variables: the comprehension tests (research 
question 1) and the vocabulary tests (research question 2). We set the significance level of the 
p-
value at 
.05 in all statistical analyses.  
As an effect size measure, we used partial eta squared (η
p
²), which refers to the proportion of total 
variance explained by an effect “in which the effects of other independent variables and interactions are 
partialled out” (Richardson, 2011, p. 135). Effect size values have the advantage of being independent of 
sample size. We used Cohen’s rules of thumb (1988) for interpretation: small, η
p
² > .0099, medium, η
p
² > 
.0588,  and large, η
p
² > .1379. 
RESULTS 
Vocabulary Size Test 
Table 6 summarizes the test scores for each of the three frequency bands and shows that participants were 
most proficient on the first part, which assessed knowledge of the 2,001 to 4,000 most frequent words. 
Scores decreased as the word frequency level increased (see Table 6). Since vocabulary size is an 
estimate of language proficiency, scores indicate that participants’ proficiency level in the current study 
ranged from intermediate to high intermediate. This is also the required level at the end of high school 
education according to the criteria of the Common European Framework of Reference (Council of 
Europe, 2011). A one-way ANOVA revealed that the participants in the four conditions did not differ 
significantly in terms of vocabulary size, 
F
(3, 129) = 0.01, 
= .998, η
p
²
<
.01. The 50-item size test had 
an acceptable reliability index (
N
= 133, Cronbach’s alpha
= .78) and was used as a covariate in further 
analyses in order to control for learner variables. 
Table 6
Mean Scores and Standard Deviations on Vocabulary Size Test 
All students 
(
N
=133) 
NC 
(
n
= 32) 
FC 
(
n
= 30) 
KC 
(
n
= 34) 
FCHK 
(
n
= 37) 
Word Frequenc I tems  M 
SD 
SD 
SD 
SD 
SD 
2,001–4,000   21 
16.47  2.63  16.81  2.09  16.17  3.12  16.41  2.35  16.46  2.91 
4,001–5,000   15 
9.87  2.20  10.03  2.07  9.83  2.51  9.97  2.10  9.68  2.21 
5,001–7,000   14 
7.83  2.56  7.44  2.99  8.27  2.63  7.68  2.54  7.97  2.12 
Total score  
50 
34.17  6.13  34.28  6.20  34.27  7.12  34.06  5.65  34.11  5.89 
Research Question 1 
We checked the correlations between the three comprehension tests and found that the scores of 
comprehension test 1 correlated significantly with test 2 (
r
= .39, 
p
< .001) and test 3 (
r
= .30, 
p
= .001); 
test 2 correlated significantly with test 3 (
r
= . 35, 
p
< .001). In order to take into account the relationship 
between the dependent variables, we performed a MANCOVA (Tacq, 1997). 
Table 7 summarizes mean scores on the comprehension tests. The results of the MANCOVA contradicted 
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
as easy as printing; Support both single-page and batch Drop image to process GIF to PDF image conversion; Provide filter option to change brightness, color and
rearrange pdf pages in reader; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
rearrange pages in pdf online; how to rearrange pages in a pdf document
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
129
our initial hypotheses and showed type of captioning had no significant effect of on comprehension 
scores, Wilks’s
lambda
, F
(9, 301.93) = 0.40, 
= .935, η
p
²
= .01. 
Table 7
Mean Scores and Standard Deviations on the Comprehension Tests 
All students 
(
= 131) 
NC 
(
= 32) 
FC 
(
= 28) 
KC 
(
= 34) 
FCHK 
(
= 37) 
SD 
SD 
SD 
SD 
SD 
Comprehension 1  
Comprehension 2 
Comprehension 3  
11.21 
4.81 
12.11 
2.63 
1.33 
2.88 
10.95 
4.78 
12.19 
2.76 
1.30 
2.75 
11.70 
5.11 
12.50 
2.32 
1.46 
3.68 
10.79 
4.63 
11.91 
2.28 
1.43 
2.48 
11.43 
4.78 
11.92 
3.02 
1.19 
2.73 
Note. 
The maximum scores of comprehension tests 1, 2, and 3, were 16, 7, and 18, respectively.
The covariate vocabulary size was significantly related to the comprehension scores, Wilks’s
lambda, 
F
(3, 124) = 8.81, 
< .001, and had a large effect: η
p
²
= .18. The positive 
b
-values for each comprehension 
test (see Table 8), indicated a positive relationship between vocabulary size and comprehension: the 
larger one’s vocabulary, the better the comprehension score.  
Table 8
F-statistics for Vocabulary Size
Test 
Source 
df 
η
p
² 
Comprehension 1 
Voc size (covariate)  1 
10.11 
.002
*
.07 
.12 
Comprehension 2 
Voc size (covariate)  1 
5.93 
.016
*
.05 
.05 
Comprehension 3 
Voc size (covariate)  1 
21.59 
<.001
**
.15 
.18 
Error 
126 
Note. * p 
< .05. 
**p 
< .001
.  
Research Question 2 
We checked the correlations between the four dependent variables measuring vocabulary learning (cf. 
procedure research question 1). Table 9 displays significant correlations between all tests. 
Table 9
. Correlations Between the Four Dependent Variables Measuring Vocabulary Learning 
Form  
recognition 
Clip  
association 
Meaning  
recognition 
Meaning  
recall 
Form recognition 
1.00    
.85* 
.46* 
.40* 
Clip association 
.85* 
1.00 
.52* 
.43* 
Meaning recognition 
.46* 
.52* 
1.00 
.45* 
Meaning recall  
.40* 
.43* 
.45* 
1.00 
Note. *p < .001.  
We found the highest mean scores on the form recognition test (see Table 10). The retention scores were 
highest for the meaning recognition test. Results of the MANCOVA in Table 11 indicate that type of 
captioning significantly affected vocabulary learning, Wilks’s
lambda
, F
(12, 301.91) = 4.63, 
< .001, η
p
²
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
change pdf page order preview; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. a few clicks; Ability to convert PDF documents to and upgrade; Easy to convert multi-page PDF files to
rearrange pdf pages in reader; how to move pages within a pdf
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
130
= .14. Vocabulary size was significantly related to vocabulary learning, Wilks’s
lambda
, F
(4, 114) = 
16.64, 
p <
.001, η
p
²
= .37.  
Table 10
. Mean Scores on the Vocabulary Tests 
All students 
(
= 122) 
NC 
(
= 30) 
FC 
(
= 27) 
KC 
(
= 31) 
FCHK 
(
= 34) 
SD 
SD 
SD 
SD 
SD 
Form 
recognition 
9.87 
3.17 
7.13   3.26 
11.07  
2.54  11.16  
2.33  10.15   2.82 
Clip 
association 
7.63   2.90 
5.73   3.17 
8.78  
2.52 
8.23  
2.17  7.85   2.84 
Meaning 
recognition
.59  
.14 
.53  
.14 
.60  
.14 
.62  
.09 
.63  
.17 
Meaning 
recall 
.14 
.20 
.13 
.22 
.16 
.22 
.13 
.17 
.14 
.19 
Note. The smaller number of participants on the vocabulary tests is due to the fact that some participants accidentally skipped 
one or two pages due to double-sided printing of the test, which consisted of 9 pages. The maximum score on the form 
recognition and clip association test was 17. 
The analysis of the between-subjects effects (see Table 11) showed that type of captioning significantly 
affected the first three components of vocabulary knowledge tested, that is, form recognition, clip 
association, and meaning recognition. Vocabulary size scores were significantly related to all four 
vocabulary components, and 
b
-values reported in Table 11 indicate a positive relationship: the larger 
one’s vocabulary, the more vocabulary gains. 
Table 11
. Results of MANCOVA on Vocabulary Acquisition 
Test 
Source 
df 
η
p
² 
Form recognition 
Type of captioning 
14.46 
<.001
**
.27 
Voc size (covariate) 
7.91 
.006
*
.06 
.12 
Clip association 
Type of captioning 
7.51 
<.001
**
.16 
Voc size (covariate) 
14.92 
<.001
**
.11 
.16 
Meaning recognition  Type of captioning 
4.85 
.003
*
.11 
Voc size (covariate) 
46.90 
<.001
**
.29 
.01 
Meaning recall 
Type of captioning 
.03 
.993 
.00 
Voc size (covariate) 
37.27 
<.001
**
.24 
.02 
Error 
117 
Note. * p < .05. **p < .001.  
The results of the post hoc analysis (Bonferroni correction) partially confirmed our hypotheses: captioned 
groups significantly outperformed the control group on form recognition and clip association. However, 
no differences between the captioning groups were found. For meaning recognition, only KC and FCHK 
significantly outperformed NC. No significant differences between KC, FCHK, and FC were found.  
Contrary to our hypothesis, we found no differences between the captioned groups and the control group 
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter. Additionally, high-quality image conversion of DICOM & PDF files in single page
reordering pdf pages; how to move pages in pdf converter professional
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
interface; Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support
rearrange pages in pdf document; move pdf pages
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
131
on the meaning recall test.  
The effect sizes showed a decreasing effect of type of captioning (FC, KC, FHCK, or NC) as the 
vocabulary component tested increased in difficulty. The effect size of type of captioning was largest for 
form recognition (η
p
²
.27
and clip association (η
p
²
.16
)
and smaller for meaning recognition (η
p
²
.11). The opposite pattern was found for the covariate (vocabulary size): the deeper the knowledge 
component tested, the larger the effect size of the covariate (see Table 11).  
Questionnaire 
The descriptive statistics for each questionnaire statement are listed in Table 12. Results of the 
comprehension statements revealed that all conditions gave similar scores regarding the understanding 
and difficulty level of the questions.  
Table 12.
Questionnaire Results  
All students 
(
= 133) 
NC 
(
= 32) 
FC 
(
= 30) 
KC 
(
= 34) 
FCHK 
(
= 37 
SD 
SD 
SD 
 SD 
 SD 
Comprehension (RQ1) 
1. 
I didn’t understand the French 
video clips and I had no idea 
what to answer to the 
comprehension questions. 
2.00 
.86  2.03   .82  1.83 
.87  1.91    .87  2.19    .88 
2.  I think viewing the video twice 
was important to help me 
understand it. 
3.38  1.26  3.53  1.22  2.97  1.33  3.44  1.24  3.51  1.24 
3.  
I would have preferred seeing 
the video three times. 
2.77  1.30  3.12  1.31  2.33  1.24  2.71  1.22  2.86  1.36 
4. 
The comprehension questions 
were easy (1); average (2); 
difficult (3); very difficult (4). 
Video 1 
1.86 
.76  1.97 
.82  1.70    .79  1.79    .85  1.95    .58 
Video 2 
1.79 
.75  1.75 
.72  1.83    .75  1.65    .85  1.92    .68 
Video 3 
2.22 
.87  2.13 
.91  2.13    .86  2.12    .98  2.46    .69 
Vocabulary (RQ 2) 
5.  I was able to infer word 
meaning from the textual 
context. 
3.49 
.88  3.66 
.97  3.37    .96  3.50    .83  3.43    .80 
6.  The video images made it 
possible for me to infer the 
meaning of unknown words. 
3.13 
.99  3.06  1.16  3.27    .94  3.06    .92  3.14    .95 
7.  If I had known that vocabulary 
exercises were to follow, I 
would have paid more attention 
to the words. 
3.82  1.24  3.84  1.08  3.53  1.36  3.94  1.35  3.92  1.16 
Usefulness of  (keyword) captioning  
(RQs 1 & 2) 
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
132
8.  I did not need extra support to 
understand the video. 
2.96  1.16  3.66 
.90  2.60  1.10  2.38    .99  2.22  1.08 
9.  If I had been able to activate 
captioning, I would definitely 
have done that. 
4.25  1.05   
10.  I managed to understand the 
videos because (keyword) 
captioning was available. 
3.60  1.05 
3.90    .89  3.00  1.10  3.92    .89 
11.  I was distracted by the presence 
of captioning. Consequently, I 
focused less on the audio. 
2.23  1.15 
1.73  1.05  2.62  1.02  2.27  1.22 
12.  Captioning helped me to notice 
unknown words. 
3.51  1.19 
3.60  1.28  3.68  1.04  3.30  1.24 
13.  I learned new words thanks to 
the availability of (keyword) 
captioning. 
3.30  1.10 
3.52  1.15  3.18  1.14  3.24  1.01 
Note. 1= I do not agree at all, 5 = I completely agree. 
With regard to the results of the vocabulary statements, we observed that all groups considered the textual 
context and images helpful for word meaning inferences. Moreover, participants would have focused 
more on the words if they had been forewarned of a vocabulary test. Learners in the NC group were most 
confident about not needing extra support, but would activate captions if available.  
When asked about the usefulness of captions, the FC and FCHK groups considered captioning more 
useful than the KC group. The latter also provided the highest, yet still average, mean score for the 
distraction induced by the support. The captioning groups were equally positive about the usefulness of 
captions for recognizing and learning new words.  
DISCUSSION 
This study was motivated by the need to explore variations on captioning, either by providing the learner 
with more salience and/or less textual density. The results suggest that (a) the type of captioning did not 
affect comprehension scores; (b) learners’ vocabulary size positively correlated with comprehension and 
incidental vocabulary learning; (c) the presence of on-screen text supported receptive vocabulary 
learning; and (d) salience induced by KC or FCHK did not result in greater vocabulary gains than 
captioning without salience (FC).  
Research Question 1 
The analyses revealed that participants in all conditions achieved similar scores on the comprehension 
tests, which is at variance with our hypothesis. Thus, our findings only provide limited support for the use 
of captions and keyword captions and therefore contradict previous research (e.g. Baltova, 1999; Chung, 
1999; Markham, 2001). An important explanation for the similar test scores might lie in the information 
targeted by the comprehension questions. First of all, the comprehension questions did not focus on the 
TWs, in order to prevent an effect of the comprehension tests on vocabulary retention. Because learners 
did not need the TWs to answer to the comprehension questions, the differences between the four 
conditions might have been minimized. Perhaps the parts containing the TWs did cause problems for the 
NC group, but this was not reflected in the comprehension test scores as the questions did not require the 
TWs occurring in the captions. Second, because of the nature of the clips, which presented concrete 
factual information, we could only ask literal comprehension questions, rather than a combination of 
literal and inferencing questions (Buck, 2001). Third, it is possible that captioning groups decoded the 
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
133
clips better than the NC group (Bird & Williams, 2002), a hypothesis that is supported by the higher 
scores of the FC, KC, and FCHK groups on the form recognition test (cf. research question 2). Yet, our 
findings suggest that a better decoding does not necessarily result in a better understanding of the 
message.  
It could be hypothesized that the clips were too easy for the participants and therefore minimized the 
comprehension differences between the groups. Yet, what needs to be stressed is that the groups achieved 
only intermediate scores on the comprehension tests, which shows that content understanding was 
challenging for the participants. Although the usefulness of captions was not reflected in higher 
comprehension scores, questionnaire results indicated that participants in the FC and FCHK groups 
considered captions useful for understanding the clips (see Table 12, question 10). While the NC group 
indicated that they did not need extra support to understand the videos, they unambiguously indicated that 
they would use full captions if they had been available (see Table 12, question 9).  
With respect to the keyword captions, we found that salience of the keywords for the KC and FCHK 
groups did not help learners to outperform FC and NC on the comprehension test. Our results are in line 
with Park’s findings for lower intermediate and intermediate learners (2004) and therefore contradict 
research on reading comprehension in which it has been demonstrated that salience and attention 
allocation are important for successful text comprehension (Gaddy, van den Broeck, Sung, 2001). 
Moreover, learners in the KC group reported lower mean scores on the usefulness of keyword captions 
when compared to the FC and FCHK group (see Table 12, question 10). In order to reveal the potential of 
keyword captioning, further research is necessary.    
Finally, learners’ scores on the vocabulary size test were significantly related to their comprehension 
scores, and had a large effect size. Our result provides additional evidence in support of previous research 
on this relationship (e.g., Staehr, 2009; van Zeeland & Schmitt, 2012). 
Research Question 2 
Form Recognition and Clip Association 
The results of our analyses partially confirm our hypothesis and reveal that the captioning groups (FC, 
KC, and FCHK) significantly outperformed the control group on the form recognition test. Although 
mean scores were generally lower for clip association, we found a similar pattern. Overall, our results 
confirm the usefulness of captions at the decoding level and their capacity to help learners to isolate 
words (Winke et al., 2010) and pay sufficient attention to these items. Our results are consistent with 
Vanderplank’s model (1990), in which the role of subtitles was considered crucial to taking out words 
from captioned input. This ties in with previous research that has found positive effects of captions for 
enhancing written form recognition (e.g. Neuman & Koskinen, 1992; Sydorenko, 2010).  On the other 
hand, we did not find evidence for the hypothesis that the salient KC and FCHK groups would 
outperform the FC group on the form recognition and clip association test. Interestingly, the availability 
of on-screen text, rather than salient input, had an overall positive effect on form recognition and clip 
association. This finding was confirmed by our questionnaire results (see Table 12, questions 12 and 13) 
which showed that the FC, KC, and FCHK groups found the availability of captioning equally useful for 
recognition and word learning.  
How can we explain that salience did not enhance noticing? In his model, Vanderplank (1990) claimed 
that the “taking out” of language consists of a combination of attention and adaptation. More particularly, 
he stated that learners might pay attention to words and select “language attended to for own purposes” 
(p. 229). Although keywords were not made salient for the FC group, learners might have noticed these 
words for different reasons.  
One possibility is that unfamiliarity with the TWs drew learners’ attention and produced a “conscious 
focus on form” which occurs “particularly when new or striking expressions are used” (Vanderplank, 
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
134
1988, p. 276). By comparing the language used in the captioned video with their own lexis, learners might 
have noticed gaps in their knowledge (Gass, 1997).  
Another reason may be found at the level of test announcement, that is, the comprehension test might 
have directed the learners’ attention towards particular words even though they were not textually salient. 
Hulstijn (2001, p. 268) suggested that, on the one hand, learners can “serve under an intentional 
condition” when trying to understand the text with the subsequent comprehension test in mind. On the 
other hand, they may “serve under an incidental condition in that they are being exposed to unfamiliar 
words” and are not aware that a vocabulary test will follow (p.268). Because learners were prompted to 
focus on the meaning of the clips and were only forewarned of the comprehension test, learners in the FC 
group might have recognized words as well as the salient groups because they considered them important 
for the test and the meaning of the clips. This explanation seems plausible since the majority of the TWs 
were considered keywords for comprehension by our experienced lecturers. Moreover, this finding 
confirms the claim that learners can simultaneously attend to form and meaning when the form is 
important for the meaning (Baltova, 1999; Van Patten, 1990).  
Meaning Recognition and Recall 
In order to determine the quality of processing, we included a meaning recognition and recall test. 
Although we hypothesized that participants in the FCHK group would outperform participants in the 
other conditions on the meaning recognition test, the group scored only slightly, but not significantly, 
higher than the KC and FC groups. The results of the meaning recognition test differed from the previous 
two vocabulary tests in that KC and FCHK significantly outscored only the NC group and therefore seem 
to have processed the TWs more elaborately than the NC group. The FC group did not differ significantly 
from the NC group. This finding might be explained by the fact that the TWs were better isolated for the 
salient keyword groups. Prince (1996, p. 489) underlined the importance of “isolating the word from the 
context, so that context provides the means to identify the meaning of the new word.”  Yet, since the 
salient keyword groups did not significantly outperform the FC group, this result should be interpreted 
cautiously. 
In order to find out how captioning might have helped word meaning inferences, learners were asked 
about the usefulness of contextual and visual clues. Results revealed that learners in all conditions 
considered the textual context most helpful and reported very similar scores (see Table 12, questions 5 
and 6). A similar appreciation was found for the support of visual clues
although scores were slightly 
lower. Given the rather abstract nature of most TWs,
the audio-video correlation could indeed only 
provide scarce visual clues.  
Generally speaking, we found that participants made initial form-meaning connections for a series of 
TWs. But which conditions fostered the most qualitative vocabulary processing? The results of the 
meaning recall test were low and, contrary to our hypothesis, no differences were found between the 
groups. These findings do not support previous research (e.g. Danan, 1992; Sydorenko, 2010; Winke et 
al., 2010), which showed beneficial effects of captioning on meaning recall. Our study differs, however, 
from the cited articles in that they focused on low intermediate and beginning students respectively.  
Plausible explanations for the low gains might be the following: (a) Since captioning as such does not 
provide concrete information on word meaning, learners are required to construct meaning based on 
inferring processes. Yet, the meaning of difficult words may remain unknown even after two or more 
viewings. (b) Because of the “real-time nature” (Buck, 2001, p. 6) of listening, learners are left with very 
little time to infer word meaning from context, which might prevent them from hearing the rest of the 
video (Goh, 2000). (c) It has been shown that inferring word meaning is a difficult, slow, and often an 
unsuccessful process (Liu & Nation, 1985). Because we wanted to make sure that words were unfamiliar, 
we were forced to focus on low frequency words, which might have a higher “learning burden” (Laufer, 
2005, p. 234). Thus, the meaning recall test was a very demanding test because participants were expected 
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
135
to watch the clips, read the captions, remember the content, derive the meaning of unknown words 
successfully, and finally remember the meaning of a set of TWs after only two viewings of the clips. 
Vocabulary Size 
Our study corroborated the findings of previous research on the importance of vocabulary size for 
successful vocabulary learning (Webb, 2010; Webb & Rodgers, 2009). We found medium and significant 
effect sizes of vocabulary size for form recognition and clip association. The larger one’s vocabulary size, 
the less decoding load a video presents and the more time learners can spend on specific lexical items 
(Goh, 2000; Pulido, 2007). Yet, the effect sizes for vocabulary size were considerably lower than the 
effect size for type of captioning, which suggests that captioning is crucial to form recognition and clip 
association.  
For meaning recognition and recall, we found very large effect sizes for vocabulary size; these effects 
were considerably higher than the effect sizes for type of captioning. Indeed, it is well documented that 
greater lexical knowledge seems to facilitate guessing from context (Liu & Nation, 1985) and it has been 
characterized as “a critical factor” (Nation, 2001, p. 233) for successfully inferring word meaning.  
Pedagogical Implications 
When teachers intend to use video for stimulating vocabulary acquisition, they should be encouraged to 
use captioning because it might facilitate students’ recognition of unknown words and their making initial 
form-meaning connections. Our results provide limited support for the use of on-screen text for 
improving content comprehension. We therefore recommend that teachers adopt a “staged video 
approach” (Danan, 1992) in which they gradually decrease the amount of text. Teachers could show the 
same video first with FCHK or FC, then with KC and finally in a NC mode. By doing so, they might help 
learners to progressively decrease the amount of support while at the same time optimizing word 
recognition and chances for word learning.  
Teachers should also be encouraged to address the importance of vocabulary size as it has a positive 
effect not only on successful comprehension but also on vocabulary learning. Teachers could provide 
opportunities for learners to enlarge their vocabulary size through exposure to captioned video or by 
means of other incidental (e.g., extensive multimedia reading) or intentional (explicit vocabulary 
learning) tasks.  
CONCLUSION AND LIMITATIONS  
Although this study has tried to respond to the need to explore variations on standard captioning, it also 
presents a number of limitations. First of all, we could not assess understanding of the complete clips 
because our comprehension tests had to focus on the parts that did not contain the TWs. Moreover, the 
clips were short, which presents limitations in terms of the type of information targeted by the questions. 
Our results therefore provide only limited insight into how different types of captioning can improve 
comprehension. Second, this study has focused on a set of predefined TWs. Yet, learners might have 
noticed and established form-meaning connections of other words in the videos they were not familiar 
with. Because our vocabulary tests only included predefined TWs, we are unaware of any other learning 
gains (Pulido, 2007). Third, we assessed noticing using an indirect measure (i.e., the form recognition 
test). More accurate data on what exactly induced form recognition, taking into account potentially 
moderating variables such as frequency of occurrence and the part of speech of the TWs (Webb, 2007), 
might reveal when and why learners notice certain items. Finally, the written format of the vocabulary 
posttests may have favored the captioning groups to some extent. Unlike the control group, they also 
encountered the target words in their written form.  
As a conclusion to this paper, we would like to indicate three future research directions. First of all, future 
studies might investigate the extent to which captioning, and keyword captioning in particular, can be 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested