c# pdf viewer wpf : How to move pdf pages around control software platform web page windows azure web browser v18n114-part446

Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
136
enhanced by adding access to the target words’ meaning, such as a gloss containing the L1 translation 
(Sydorenko, 2010; Webb, 2010). Research questions could focus on the use of such glosses and their 
effectiveness for comprehension and vocabulary learning. Second, current research on captioning has 
almost exclusively measured the value of short clips, by means of isolated experiments. As one reviewer 
suggested, it may be interesting to look at the potential of captioning when used with full-length TV 
programs (Rodgers & Webb, 2011). We should also encourage longitudinal research in order to 
investigate whether systematic and long-term exposure to captioned video affects learners’ use of 
captions and the effectiveness of these captions in terms of improved listening comprehension. Third, the 
availability of on-line measures such as eye-tracking might shed more light on the time learners spend on 
the captioning line (Winke, Gass, & Sydorenko, 2013) and provide an objectified measure to study the 
role of attention in vocabulary learning (Godfroid, Housen, & Boers, 2010). Further research on the topics 
mentioned above will undoubtedly allow us to gain a greater insight into how and when captioning can 
help language learning.  
APPENDIX A. List of 20 Target Words 
Target word 
Type of word 
Clip 
# encounters in 
clip 
Larguer 
verb 
Lego (2) 
faire un tabac 
multiword 
Lego (2) 
Assaut 
noun 
Lego (1) 
fermentation 
noun 
Bénifontaine 
ça cartonne 
multiword 
Lego (1) 
*berceau  
noun 
Lego (2) 
amertume 
noun 
Bénifontaine 
Houblon 
noun 
Bénifontaine 
*solidifier 
verb 
Lego (2) 
gravir les échelons 
multiword 
Lego (2) 
Mûrir 
verb 
Bénifontaine 
Malt 
noun 
Bénifontaine 
être à fond 
multiword 
Lego (1) 
se disperser 
verb 
Lego (2) 
*récompenser 
verb 
Lego (1) 
doper les ventes 
multiword 
Lego (2) 
frôler le naufrage 
multiword 
Lego (1) 
Brasser 
verb 
Bénifontaine 
divertissement 
noun 
Lego (1) 
Levure 
noun 
Bénifontaine 
Note. Words marked with * were not included in the analysis because too many participants were already familiar with the word 
before the experiment (as measured by the vocabulary prior knowledge test). 
How to move pdf pages around - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages in pdf file; pdf rearrange pages online
How to move pdf pages around - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf change page order acrobat; change page order in pdf online
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
137
NOTES 
1. Because a formal learning context differs from normal viewing situations, a number of practical 
limitations such as time constraints inevitably played a role in the selection of clips. In Flemish high 
schools for example, one learning session lasts only between 50 and 60 minutes, which would make it 
difficult to use long clips and exploit them in a meaningful way. In this context, short clips present 
ecologically valid L2 viewing and practicing opportunities. The length of the clips in this study was also 
similar to the clips used in previous studies on captioning effects (e.g. Park, 2004; Sydorenko, 2010; 
Winke et al., 2010).  
2. “Video” and “clip” are used interchangeably.  
3. The differences in occurrences of the TWs may be considered a limitation of the clips used. Although 
frequency of the TWs may have played a role for vocabulary learning in this study, as suggested by 
previous research (Webb, 2007), results show that learners were able to recognize more than the four 
TWs with higher occurrence (see Table 10). Nonetheless, results do not imply that they necessarily 
noticed the four TWs with higher occurrence correctly. A detailed analysis of the aspects that induced 
form recognition and vocabulary learning might clarify this aspect but was beyond the scope of the 
present study. 
4. The initial vocabulary size test consisted of 53 items. As the reliability test indicated that three items 
correlated negatively, these items were left out of the analysis. 
5. The concepts of meaning recognition and meaning recall are not clearly defined. We adopt the 
distinction made by Laufer et al. (2004) between active and passive recognition and recall, whereby 
passive recognition consists in “choosing the meaning of the target word from the four options provided” 
(p. 207) and passive recall consists in translating the target form. 
6. This study did not include delayed post-testing. Hulstijn (2003) argued that a study measuring the 
effectiveness “during a learning session in which words are presented for the first time, requires only an 
immediate posttest” (p. 372) because it is difficult to ascertain whether learners’ scores on the delayed 
posttest should be ascribed to the experimental treatment or to other learning opportunities which 
occurred in the period between the learning session and the delayed test (Hulstijn, 2003; Nation & Webb, 
2011). Nation and Webb pointed out that this problem could be avoided by using nonsense words instead 
of real TWs. Yet, the use of nonsense words in a study based on authentic video seems inconvenient as it 
would considerably affect the original speech stream.  
7. We used the VKS to measure meaning recall rather than the progress made. Using the VKS as 
described in Nation and Webb (2011) might have offered more precise data concerning learners’ 
progress. 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
We are grateful to the LLT reviewers for their insightful comments and suggestions. All remaining errors 
are our own. We would also like to thank Dr. Carmen Eggermont for allowing us to conduct this study in 
her classes (KU Leuven Kulak) and the team of Roeland (Saint-Dizier 4, 2011) for their help in 
organizing the pilot study for this experiment. Finally, we would also like to thank the Media and 
Learning Unit (KU Leuven) and Dr. Hans Paulussen for developing the video player. 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. View PDF document in continuous pages display mode. 10. Zoom out.
how to rearrange pdf pages reader; rearrange pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. View PDF document in continuous pages display mode.
how to reorder pages in pdf file; reordering pages in pdf document
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
138
ABOUT THE AUTHORS 
Maribel Montero Perez obtained her PhD in 2013 and works within the iMinds - ITEC research group at 
the KU Leuven Kulak. Her research interests concern the effectiveness of video for L2 listening and 
vocabulary acquisition and the use of eye-tracking for investigating vocabulary learning from watching 
captioned video.  
E-Mail
: maribel.monteroperez@kuleuven-kulak.be 
Elke Peters is an assistant professor of English at the Department of Language and Communication at the 
KU Leuven. Her research interests include educational language policy and instructed second language 
acquisition, particularly vocabulary acquisition and learning of collocations. 
E-Mail
: elke.peters@arts.kuleuven.be 
Geraldine Clarebout is head of the Center for Medical Education of the faculty of medicine, KU Leuven. 
Her PhD research focused on the use of tools in learning environments and the optimization of tool use. 
She is currently involved in quality assurances processes in education. 
E-Mail
: geraldine.clarebout@med.kuleuven.be 
Piet Desmet is full professor of French and Applied Linguistics and Foreign Language Methodology at 
KU Leuven Kulak and coordinator of the iMinds - ITEC (Interactive Technologies) research group. His 
research takes a particular interest in adaptive learning environments, mobile language learning, serious 
gaming, parallel corpora for CALL and writing aids. 
E-Mail
: piet.desmet@kuleuven-kulak.be 
REFERENCES 
Baltova, I. (1999). 
The effect of subtitled and staged video input on the learning and retention of content 
and vocabulary in a second language
. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of Toronto, Toronto, 
Canada.  
Bird, S. A., & Williams, J. N. (2002). The effect of bimodal input on implicit and explicit memory: An 
investigation into the benefits of within-language subtitling. 
Applied Psycholinguistics
23
(4), 509–533.  
Brett, P. (1995). Multimedia for listening comprehension: The design of a multimedia-based resource for 
developing listening skills. 
System
23
(1), 77–85. 
Brett, P. (1998). Using multimedia: A descriptive investigation of incidental language learning. 
Computer 
Assisted Language Learning
11
(2), 179–200.  
Bruton, A. (2009). The vocabulary knowledge scale: A critical analysis. 
Language Assessment Quarterly
6
(4), 37–41.  
Buck, G. (2001). Assessing Listening. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 
Chung, J. (1999). The effects of using video texts supported with advance organizers and captions on 
Chinese college students’ listening comprehension: An empirical study. 
Foreign Language Annals
32
(3), 
295–308.  
Cohen, J. (1988). 
Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences
. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. 
Council of Europe. (2011). 
Common European framework of reference for languages: Learning, 
teaching, assessment (CEFR)
. Retrieved from 
http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/linguistic/Source/Framework_FR.pdf 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET document on RasterEdge C#.NET WPF PDF Viewer
change pdf page order reader; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET document on RasterEdge VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer.
reorder pdf pages; change pdf page order online
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
139
Danan, M. (1992). Reversed subtitling and Dual Coding Theory: New directions for foreign language 
instruction. 
Language Learning
42
(4), 497–527. 
Danan, M. (2004). Captioning and subtitling: Undervalued language learning strategies. 
META
49
(1), 
67–77. 
Gaddy, M. L., van den Broeck, P., & Sung, Y.C. (2001). The influence of text cues on the allocation of 
attention during reading.  In T. Sanders, J. Schimperoord, & W. Spooren (Eds.), 
Text representation: 
Linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects
(pp. 89–110). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 
Garza, T. J. (1991). Evaluating the use of captioned video materials in advanced foreign language 
learning. 
Foreign Language Annals
24
(3), 239–258. 
Gass, S. M. (1997). 
Input, interaction, and the second language learner
. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum 
Associates. 
Gass, S. M. (1999). Discussion: Incidental vocabulary learning. 
Studies in Second Language Acquisition
21
, 319–333. 
Godfroid, A., Housen, A., & Boers, F. (2010). A procedure for testing the Noticing Hypothesis in the 
context of vocabulary acquisition. In M. Pütz & L. Sicola (Eds.), 
Cognitive processing in second 
language acquisition 
(pp. 169–197). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 
Goh, C. C. (2000). A cognitive perspective on language learners’ listening comprehension problems. 
System
28
(1), 55–75.  
Grgurović, M., & Hegelheimer, V. (2007). Help options and multimedia listening: Students’ use of 
subtitles and the transcript. 
Language Learning & Technology
11
(1), 45–66. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/vol11num1/pdf/grgurovic.pdf  
Guillory, H. G. (1998). The effects of keyword captions to authentic French video on learner 
comprehension. 
CALICO Journal
15
(1–3), 89–108. 
Horst, M., Cobb, T., & Meara, P. (1998). Beyond a Clockwork Orange: Acquiring second language 
vocabulary through reading. 
Reading in a Foreign Language
, 11, 207–223. 
Huang, H.-C., & Eskey, D. E. (1999–2000). The effects of closed-captioned television on the listening 
comprehension of intermediate English as a second language (ESL) students. 
Journal of Educational 
Technology Systems
28
(1), 75–96. 
Huckin, T., & Coady, J. (1999). Incidental vocabulary acquisition in a second language. 
Studies in Second 
Language Acquisition
21
(2), 181–193. 
Hulstijn, J. H. (2001). Intentional and incidental second language vocabulary learning: A reappraisal of 
elaboration, rehearsal and automaticity. In P. Robinson (Ed.), 
Cognition and second language instruction
(pp. 258–286). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
Hulstijn, J. H. (2003). Incidental and intentional learning. In C. Doughty, & M. H. Long (Eds.), 
Handbook of second language acquisition
(pp. 349–381). Malden, MA: Blackwell. 
King, J. (2002). Using DVD feature films in the EFL classroom. 
Computer Assisted Language Learning
15
(5), 509–523.  
Laufer, B., Elder, C., Hill, K., & Congdon, P. (2004). Size and strength: Do we need both to measure 
vocabulary knowledge. 
Language Testing
21
(2), 202–226. 
Laufer, B. (2005). Focus on form in second language vocabulary learning. 
EUROSLA Yearbook
5
(1), 
223–250.  
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
140
Lee, J. F., & Van Patten, B. (2003). 
Making communicative language teaching happen
. New York, NY: 
McGraw Hill. 
Liu, N., & Nation, I. S. P. (1985). Factors affecting guessing vocabulary in context. 
RELC Journal
16
(1), 
33–42. 
Lonsdale, D., & Le Bras, Y. (2009). 
A frequency dictionary of French core vocabulary for learners
London, UK: Routledge. 
Markham, P. (1999). Captioned videotapes and second-language listening word recognition. 
Foreign 
Language Annals
32
(3), 321–328. 
Markham, P. (2001). The influence of culture-specific background knowledge and captions on second 
language comprehension. 
Journal of Educational Technology Systems
29
(4), 331–343. 
Milton, J., Wade, J., & Hopkins, N. (2010). Aural word recognition and oral competence in English as a 
foreign language. In R. Chacón-Beltrán, C. Abello-Contesse, & M. del Mar Torreblanca-López (Eds.), 
Insights into non-native vocabulary teaching and learning
(pp. 83–98). Clevedon, UK: Multilingual 
Matters.  
Nation, I.S.P. (2001). 
Learning vocabulary in another language.
Cambridge: Cambridge University 
Press. 
Nation, I. S. P. (2006). How large a vocabulary is needed for reading and listening? 
The Canadian 
Modern Language Review
63
(1), 59–82.  
Nation, I. S. P., & Webb, S. (2011). 
Researching and analyzing vocabulary
. Boston, MA: Heinle. 
Neuman, S. B., & Koskinen, P. (1992). Captioned television as comprehensible input: Effects of 
incidental word learning from context for language minority students. 
Reading Research Quarterly
27
(1), 95–106. 
Park, M. (2004). 
The effects of partial captions on Korean EFL learners’ listening comprehension
Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.  
Paulussen, H., Macken, L., Trushkina, J., Desmet, P., & Vandeweghe, W. (2006). Dutch parallel corpus: 
A multifunctional and multilingual corpus. 
Cahiers de l’Institut de Linguistique de Louvain
32
(1–4), 
269–285. 
Peters, E. (2006). Learning second language vocabulary through reading: Three empirical studies into the 
effect of enhancement techniques. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of Leuven, Leuven, 
Belgium.  
Prince, P. (1996). Second language vocabulary learning: The role of context versus translations as a 
function of proficiency. 
The Modern Language Journal
80
, 478–493. 
Pujolá, J.T. (2002). CALLing for help: Researching language learning strategies using help facilities in a 
web-based multimedia program. 
ReCALL
14
(2), 235–262. 
Pulido, D. (2007). The relationship between text comprehension and second language incidental 
vocabulary acquisition: A matter of topic familiarity? 
Language Learning
57
(1), 155–199. 
Richardson, J. (2011). Eta squared and partial eta squared as measures of effect size in educational 
research. 
Educational Research Review
6
, 135–147. 
Robin, R. (2007). Commentary: Learner-based listening and technological authenticity. 
Language 
Learning & Technology
11
(1), 109–115. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol11num1/pdf/robin.pdf  
Rodgers, M.P.H., & Webb, S. (2011). Narrow viewing: The vocabulary in related television programs. 
Maribel Montero Perez, Elke Peters, Geraldine Clarebout, & Piet Desmet 
Effects of Captioning 
Language Learning & Technology
141
TESOL Quarterly
45
(4), 689–717. 
Rost, M. (2002). 
Teaching and researching listening
. London, UK: Longman.  
Selva, T., Verlinde, S., & Binon, J. (2002). Le Dafles, un nouveau dictionnaire électronique pour 
apprenants du français. In A. Braasch (Ed.), 
Proceedings of the Tenth EURALEX International Congress
(pp. 199–208). Copenhagen, Denmark: CST. 
Staehr, L. S. (2009). Vocabulary knowledge and advanced listening comprehension in English as a 
foreign language. 
Studies in Second Language Acquisition
31
, 577–607. 
Sydorenko, T. (2010). Modality of input and vocabulary acquisition. 
Language Learning & Technology
14
(2), 50–73. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol14num2/sydorenko.pdf 
Tacq, J. (1997). 
Multivariate analysis techniques in social science research: From problem to analysis
London, UK: Sage. 
Van Patten, B. (1990). Attending to form and content in the input: An experiment in consciousness. 
Studies in Second Language Acquisition
12
, 287–301. 
Van Patten, B., Williams, J., & Rott, S. (2004). Form-meaning connections in second language 
acquisition. In B. Van Patten, J. Williams, S. Rott, & M. Overstreet (Eds.), 
Form-meaning connections in 
second language acquisition
(pp. 1–26). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. 
van Zeeland, H., & Schmitt, N. (2012). Lexical coverage in L1 and L2 listening comprehension: The 
same or different from reading comprehension? 
Applied Linguistics
33
(5), 1–24. 
Vandergrift, L. (2011). Second language listening: Presage, process, product, and pedagogy. In E. Hinkel 
(Ed.), 
Handbook of research in second language teaching and learning
(pp. 455–471). New York, NY: 
Routledge. 
Vanderplank, R. (1988). The value of teletext sub-titles in language learning. 
English Language Teaching 
Journal
42
(4), 272–281. 
Vanderplank, R. (1990). Paying attention to the words: Practical and theoretical problems in watching 
television programmes with unilingual (CEEFAX) sub-titles. 
System
18
(2), 221–234. 
Vanderplank, R. (2010). Déjà vu? A decade of research on language laboratories, television, and video in 
language learning. 
Language Teaching
43
(1), 1–37.  
Webb, S. (2007). The effects of repetition on vocabulary knowledge. 
Applied Linguistics
28
(1), 46–65. 
Webb, S. (2010). Using glossaries to increase the lexical coverage of television programs. 
Reading in a 
Foreign Language
22
(1), 201–221. 
Webb, S. (2011). Selecting television programs for language learning: Investigating television programs 
from the same genre. 
International Journal of English Studies
11
(1), 117–136. 
Webb, S., & Rodgers, M. P. H. (2009). Vocabulary demands of television programs. 
Language Learning
59
(2), 335–366. 
Wesche, M., & Paribakht, T. S. (1996). Assessing second language vocabulary knowledge: Depth vs. 
breadth. 
The Canadian Modern Language Review
53
, 13–40. 
Winke, P., Gass, S., & Sydorenko, T. (2010). The effects of captioning videos used for foreign language 
listening activities. 
Language Learning & Technology
14
(1), 65–86. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/vol14num1/winkegasssydorenko.pdf 
Winke, P., Gass, S., & Sydorenko, T. (2013). Factors influencing the use of captions by foreign language 
learners: An eye-tracking study. 
The Modern Language Journal
97
(1), 254–275. 
Language Learning & Technology
y
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/mcneil.pdf 
February 2014, Volume 18, Number 1 
pp. 142–159 
Copyright © 2014, ISSN 1094-3501 
142
ECOLOGICAL AFFORDANCE AND ANXIETY IN AN ORAL 
ASYNCHRONOUS COMPUTER-MEDIATED ENVIRONMENT 
Levi McNeilSookmyung Women’s University 
Previous research suggests that the affordances (van Lier, 2000) of asynchronous 
computer-mediated communication (ACMC) environments help reduce foreign language 
anxiety (FLA). However, FLA is rarely the focus of these studies and research has not 
adequately addressed the relationship between FLA and the affordances that students use. 
This study explored sources of FLA in an oral ACMC environment, and how the 
affordances perceived by students in this environment correlated with FLA. One class of 
Korean EFL university students (
n
= 15) completed voiceboard tasks for eight weeks. 
Affordance data were collected with a questionnaire, and FLA was measured qualitatively 
and by employing an adapted version of the foreign language classroom anxiety scale 
(Horwitz, Horwitz, & Cope, 1986). The results suggest that students experience FLA in 
particular ways using the voice board, and that some sources of anxiety are similar to 
those reported in face-to-face contexts and others are unique to ACMC contexts. 
Additionally, this study found a moderate correlation between the total use of affordances 
and FLA, with some affordances being associated with reduced anxiety and some 
associated with higher anxiety. The study discusses these findings and identifies avenues 
for future research examining the interplay between the ACMC environment and FLA. 
Key words: 
Affordance; Foreign Language Anxiety; Asynchronous CMC; Voiceboards; 
Ecological Linguistics. 
APA Citation: 
McNeil, L. (2014). Ecological affordance and anxiety in an oral 
asynchronous computer-mediated environment. 
Language Learning & Technology 18
(1), 
142–159. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/mcneil.pdf 
Received:
December 27, 2012; 
Accepted: 
June 20, 2013; 
Published: 
February 1, 2014 
Copyright:
© Levi McNeil 
INTRODUCTION 
Research from the past 20 years has consistently demonstrated an inverse relationship between foreign 
language anxiety (FLA) and second language (L2) achievement (see Horwitz, 2001 for an overview). 
Although anxiety can be conceptualized as a general personality trait exhibited across many situations 
(i.e., 
trait anxiety
), or related to a particular moment in time (i.e., 
state anxiety
)
,
many view FLA as a 
situation specific anxiety
, which occurs consistently over time within a well-defined situation (MacIntyre 
& Gardner, 1991). In this regard, FLA is the “feeling of tension and apprehension specifically associated 
with second language contexts” (MacIntyre & Gardner, 1994, p. 284) that some liken to public speaking 
(Horwitz, 2001), stage fright, or test anxiety (Horwitz, 2010). As a situation specific construct, FLA can 
be explored from ecological perspectives of language learning (van Lier, 2000, 2004) that examine the 
interconnectedness of human cognition and the environment. 
While FLA disrupts cognitive processing (MacIntyre and Gardner, 1994) and potentially limits one 
meditational tool—oral collaboration with others (Baker & MacIntyre, 2000)—computer-mediated 
communication (CMC) environments are alternative mediating sources. CMC research suggests that these 
contexts play important roles in reducing FLA (e.g., Chun, 1994; Kern, 1995). However, as Baralt and 
Gurzynski-Weiss (2011) correctly point-out, many CMC studies fail to directly measure FLA. 
Additionally, studies examining voiceboards—asynchronous platforms that allow learners to record and 
review audio files and post them for private or group viewing and commenting—offer anecdotal evidence 
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
143
that students experience decreased levels of FLA while communicating with them (Poza, 2011; Song, 
2009; Sun, 2009). Yet, in these contexts we still know little about how anxiety functions and how aspects 
of these contexts perceived by learners relate to FLA. 
The current descriptive study addressed these gaps by exploring student perceptions of anxiety and, by 
drawing from the concept of affordance within ecological linguistics, the relationship between student use 
of the asynchronous CMC (ACMC) environment and FLA. Before describing the methodology and 
discussing the results of this study, relevant literature is reviewed examining: (a) FLA, language learning, 
and affordance; and (b) studies of voiceboards in L2 classrooms. 
LITERATURE REVIEW 
FLA, Language Learning, and Affordance 
A number of scholars focus on cognitive processing to illustrate the negative impact of FLA in language 
learning. For example, Krashen (1982) posits that high levels of anxiety block input from reaching “that 
part of the brain responsible for language acquisition” (p. 31). Others, such as MacIntyre and Gardner 
(1994), show that FLA can affect not only input, or encoding, but also language storage and retrieval 
processes. According to MacIntyre (1995), anxiety hinders these processes by creating scenarios in which 
anxious students divide their cognitive resources between the task at hand and worry, whereas “those who 
do not experience anxiety will be able to process the information more quickly, more effectively, or both 
compared to those who are distracted by task-irrelevant cognition” (p. 92). These cognitive views 
describe how FLA might interfere with information processing, but computational metaphors are 
criticized for, among other reasons, overlooking the context in which thinking occurs. 
At this point in the evolution of SLA theory, arguments abound in the literature (e.g., Atkinson, 2011; 
Firth & Wagner, 1997, 2007) detailing the dangers of separating mind from situation. Instead of focusing 
only on the individual, an ecological perspective of language learning examines “the entire situation and 
asks, what is it in this environment that makes things happen as they do? ( ... ) Ecology therefore involves 
the study of context” (van Lier, 2004, p. 11). This approach builds upon the tenets of sociocultural theory 
(Vygotsky, 1978). Sociocultural theory (SCT) explains how “all forms of human mental activity are 
mediated by culturally constructed auxiliary means” (Lantolf & Thorne, 2006, p. 59), which include 
physical, social, and mental forms of mediation (Lantolf, 2011). In SCT, language learning is a process of 
moving from other-regulation to self-regulation that co-occurs with changes in the quality and forms of 
assistance (Aljaafreh & Lantolf, 1994). In this process, dialogue serves as a major mediating source for 
cognitive development (e.g., McNeil, 2012; Swain & Lapkin, 1998). However, as demonstrated by 
studies investigating willingness to communicate, FLA can limit social interaction (Baker & MacIntyre, 
2000; MacIntyre & Charos, 1996). From a SCT perspective, the lack of communication due to anxiety 
confines engagement in the co-construction of linguistic and content knowledge. In short, if students do 
not communicate, there exist limited opportunities to receive the assistance from others that supports 
language development. 
While FLA potentially limits one meditational tool–collaborative dialogue–ecological approaches 
highlight the diverse meaning making sources in the immediate environment that may facilitate 
interaction in the face of FLA. By accounting for both mediated and immediate tools, ecological 
perspectives acknowledge a wider range of contextual supports than traditional SCT. This is 
accomplished by examining, “the totality of relationships of an organism with all other organisms with 
which it comes into contact” (van Lier, 2004, p. 3). These other organisms include not only people but 
also other symbolic and material objects in the physical and social world. In this way, “the linguistic 
environment immediately increases in complexity when we envisage a learner physically, socially, and 
mentally moving around a multidimensional semiotic space” (van Lier, p. 93). Greeno (1994) explains the 
underlying epistemological stance of ecological approaches: 
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
144
The framing assumption of ecological psychology is that cognitive processes are analyzed 
as relations between agents and other systems. This theoretical shift does not imply a 
denial of individual cognition as a theoretically important process. It does, however, 
involve a shift of the level of primary focus of cognitive analyses from processes that can 
be attributed to individual agents to interactive processes in which agents participate, 
cooperatively, with other agents and with the physical systems that they interact with (...) 
Research in ecological psychology has focused mainly on relations of agents with physical 
systems and environments. (p. 337) 
It follows, then, that language learning from an ecological perspective involves the intermixing of an 
individual’s mind 
and
the resources in the environment that support engagement in the learning process. 
As van Lier (2004) explains, language emerges from participation in the social world through a process 
that begins with the learner perceiving and using objects in the environment to create rudimentary 
meaning, which are then rendered into linguistic and symbolic meaning through further action. The 
environmentally available resources form the basis for the concept of 
affordance
, which originated from 
Gibson (1979). He explains that, “affordances of the environment are what it offers the animal, what it 
provides or furnishes, either for good or ill” (p. 127). In terms of language learning, these could include 
gestures, body movement, gaze, or other items in the physical classroom or online environment. Thus, 
affordances might, as van Lier argues, “best be seen as ‘pre-signs,’ that is, they may be the fuel that get 
sign-making going” (p. 93). Recognizing that the physical environment plays a vital role in language 
learning has important implications for CMC research. 
The material affordances of online environments have not escaped the attention of the CMC community. 
For example, Lamy and Hampel (2007) discuss the affordances related to time and mode for different 
ACMC tools. They do not discuss voiceboards explicitly, but since voiceboards share qualities with both 
audio conferencing tools and asynchronous written forums, clear connections to the affordances of 
voiceboards can be made. These affordances include time to reflect, comprehend, construct responses, 
and use outside sources. In regards to mode, voiceboards promote learners’ analytic and metacognitive 
skills and accuracy, while also allowing learners to use intonation, stress patterns, and expressive 
vocalization. 
Situating the learner in an environment with tools at one’s disposal casts FLA into a new light. 
Traditionally, FLA is linked to the struggles of expressing oneself with limited L2 linguistic and cultural 
resources (Horwitz, Horwitz, & Cope, 1986). Ecological approaches, however, extend the meaning 
making resources beyond just the learner’s linguistic and cultural abilities to include resources in the 
context. Considering the potential affordances outlined above, voiceboards may offer students the 
possibilities of using dictionaries and writing scripts. Thus, FLA may be qualitatively different across 
contexts, depending on the potentiality for linguistic action presented by the local environment. 
It is clear that the structural affordances of ACMC hold some potential in reducing FLA. However, the 
physical affordances of ACMC alone are not enough to determine its impact. The affordances of the 
environment must be perceived by the learner. Lamy and Hampel (2007) capture this idea: 
Concerning affordances, user perceptions are more pertinent than the object itself. So it is 
not just the material affordances of CMC that play a role in enhancing or limiting 
communication, but also how people see them and the different practices that result from 
their different perspectives. (p. 43) 
It is the learner’s view that prompts Norman (1999) to offer the term 
perceived affordance
. To him, 
perceived affordance more accurately reflects the notion of affordance. Norman posits that the issue is 
whether the 
user
, not the designer or researcher, envisions the possibility of an action. In regards to the 
ACMC voiceboards then, while they provide particular time and mode affordances, which increase 
linguistic action potential, student perceptions of those affordances and how they are used to support 
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
145
activity play important roles in adding or reducing feelings of anxiety. Studies examining the use of 
voiceboards in L2 classrooms present some evidence that students perceive the affordances available with 
this tool. 
Voiceboard Studies in L2 Classrooms 
Much of the voiceboard research focuses on development of speaking skills, although some data collected 
to measure students’ overall perceptions of voiceboards help demonstrate a possible connection between 
this tool and anxiety.    
Hsu, Wang, and Comac (2008) conducted their study at a university in the United States. The study aimed 
to help an instructor of an advanced English conversation course integrate voiceboards to extend student 
oral practice and to evaluate student listening and speaking skills. The researchers also collected 
qualitative data regarding the 22 students’ perceptions of voiceboards. Each week, the instructor posted 
assignments, such as pronunciation practice and listening exercises with comprehension questions. The 
results showed that the instructor believed that the voiceboard helped meet her needs to evaluate students’ 
oral skills. Additionally, both the instructor and students responded that the voiceboard was easy to use. 
Furthermore, in addition to enjoying voiceboard activities and reporting that their speaking abilities 
improved, students felt that they had more confidence in English after completing the voiceboard tasks. 
Since confidence is defined by some as the absence of anxiety, (i.e. Clement, 1987), this study indirectly 
relates voiceboard use and language anxiety.  
In regards to students’ speaking skills, Choi and Jung (2006) found that participating in voiceboard 
activities enhanced perceived oral competence, but that this effect may not be observed for all learners. In 
the study, nine Korean elementary EFL students were divided into three proficiency levels. Outside of 
class, the students recorded onto voiceboards either dialogues from the course book or created their own 
language output. Choi and Jung found that although the top two proficiency groups felt that they 
improved in their speaking performance, the lower group did not. Furthermore, the lower group 
occasionally avoided posting on the voice board, and when they did post, recorded dialogues directly 
from the book. A question that remains from this study is whether these low-proficiency learners 
perceived that they could use the affordance of extended time and the aid of other outside materials to 
construct responses in addition to the course book. Perhaps perceiving these affordances could have 
helped them complete the speaking tasks.   
Sun (2009) reported more promising results. She investigated 46 Taiwanese university EFL students’ 
processes of creating voiceboard posts and perceptions of voiceboards. Students completed 30 postings 
and 10 responses to classmates throughout the semester. The data showed that students go through a 
number of steps when constructing posts, including planning, rehearsing, and evaluating their potential 
posts. In addition to finding that most students believed that voiceboards helped enhance their 
communication and presentation skills, students expressed the anxiety-lowering potential of voiceboards. 
For example, one student stated that voiceboards, “really help me reduce speaking anxiety,” and another 
participant added that, “unlike the classroom environment, blogs make me feel relaxed and thus speak 
more fluently. I feel that I perform better on the voice blog than in face-to-face situations” (p. 97). While 
the focus of the study was not to investigate anxiety, the findings document how students use the 
affordances of voiceboards and, peripherally, establish a relationship between this use and reduction in 
FLA for some students. 
Song’s (2009) study further suggests that voiceboards may help anxious students. Song investigated the 
impact of voiceboard use on student oral performance and collected data regarding student perceptions of 
voiceboards. Thirty female university EFL learners recorded five minute diary posts six days a week for 
10 weeks. The results showed that students significantly improved their oral performance when post-tests 
were compared to pre-tests. Importantly, qualitative data indicate that these activities lowered anxiety. For 
example, Song stated that “students felt much more comfortable and natural speaking English” (p. 137). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested