c# pdf viewer wpf : Reorder pdf page SDK software service wpf winforms asp.net dnn v18n115-part447

Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
146
In the study, one student commented, “I still cannot speak in English very fluently, but at least do not feel 
the anxiety towards speaking English that much” (p. 137). Although this study demonstrates at some level 
that voiceboards facilitate feelings of lower FLA, it neither includes a direct measure of FLA nor offers 
leads as to which affordance mediated these feelings.  
The studies above provide smatterings of evidence to suggest a relationship between FLA and student 
activity on voiceboards. Aside from Sun’s (2009) study, however, it is still not known how and to what 
extent certain affordances are perceived in these contexts. Additionally, Baralt and Gurzynski-Weiss 
(2011) make the point that FLA is rarely measured directly. In their study they found that learners 
experience comparable levels of state anxiety when completing face-to-face (F2F) and synchronous CMC 
tasks. Since the focus of the study was state anxiety in synchronous CMC, there are obvious differences 
between their study and the current one. However, their observation regarding the limited number of 
studies assessing anxiety holds for most of the voiceboard studies, although one voiceboard study has 
measured FLA.     
Poza (2011) aimed to compare anxiety in F2F and voiceboard contexts utilizing adapted versions of the 
foreign language classroom anxiety scale (FLCAS, Horwitz et al., 1986) that reflected both environments. 
English L1 speakers enrolled in two sections (
n
= 48) of the same Spanish course participated in the 
study. For six weeks, students completed discussion-based assignments that required them to respond to 
the instructor’s questions and reply to a classmate’s post. From the FLCAS data, Poza found that there 
were few differences between anxiety in the classroom and anxiety on the voiceboard. Interview data 
from four students, however, showed that they felt more relaxed in the online environment than the F2F 
classroom due to the extra time to construct and edit their responses. In regards to negative evaluation, the 
results showed that students perceived the two environments as mostly equal concerning anxiety related 
to making mistakes. There were some differences in favor of the voiceboard environment for items 
measuring anxiousness and feedback from the teacher and anxiety from comparisons to classmates’ L2 
abilities. This study is important in that it directly measures FLA in an ACMC context and explores 
qualitatively the students’ perceived affordances. However, this qualitative data came from only four 
students, which may not accurately show how the voiceboard was used by most students. Additionally, 
the study compared F2F to CMC environments, which often raises questions about validity due to the 
difficulties in controlling a wide range of variables (Blake, 2009; Garrett, 2009). Indeed, the study does 
not adequately detail the F2F tasks that were being compared to the voiceboard task. Instead of making 
comparisons between the two settings, we need to understand anxiety in the voiceboard context itself.  
Studies in F2F contexts have explored the classroom environment to uncover the sources and causes of 
FLA. For example, Young (1991) identified six main causes of FLA. First, personal and interpersonal 
aspects strongly influence anxiety. This category includes low self-esteem, competitiveness among 
classmates, and social anxiety resulting from prospects of being evaluated by others during performance. 
Second, FLA is caused by learner beliefs about language learning. This involves the contrast between 
unrealistic language learning goals and the realities of language attainment within given timeframes 
(Horwitz, 1988). In addition, the instructor’s beliefs about language can increase anxiety. Here, 
intimidating students, not allowing them to work in smaller groups or pairs, and providing error 
correction in a strict manner heighten student tension. In a similar vein, classroom procedures that 
commonly require students to perform in front of the class or large groups of people facilitate 
anxiousness. Finally, language testing, particularly tests that fail to create a close relationship between 
what was taught in the course and what is included on tests, is a source of FLA. Yan and Horwitz’s 
(2008) study extends this list. They carried out a qualitative study that aimed to develop a grounded-
theory model of the relationships among FLA and multiple factors. After interviewing 21 Chinese 
university EFL participants with differing levels of anxiety, Yan and Horwitz found that although anxiety 
is peripherally intertwined with a range of factors, such as parental influence, regional differences among 
students, teacher characteristics, and class arrangement, three directly influenced FLA: (a) learning 
Reorder pdf page - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages in pdf online; how to change page order in pdf document
Reorder pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
move pages within pdf; reorder pages in pdf preview
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
147
strategies, (b) comparison with peers, and (c)language learning motivation and interest. These studies 
raise questions regarding whether, how, and to what extent these sources operate in voiceboard contexts. 
Understanding how these situational causes of FLA function in ACMC is important for teachers and 
researchers in order to better structure CMC tasks. 
The voiceboard literature seems to suggest that this tool holds potential for lessening anxiety. Yet we still 
do not know the sources of anxiety in these contexts, what affordances learners’ perceive, or how the 
affordances perceived directly relate to FLA. The current study aimed to address these issues, and it was 
guided by the following research questions: 
1.
How and from what sources do students experience FLA in a voiceboard  environment? 
2.
What is the relationship between the affordances perceived in a voiceboard environment and 
FLA? 
METHODS 
Participants and Data Site 
The participants in this study were second-semester university students enrolled in a required English 
communication course at a mid-sized university in Seoul, South Korea. The class consisted of 15 (nine 
female; six male) Korean EFL learners from different majors. These students had already completed one 
required English course the previous semester. The final exam from that course is used by the university 
to group students for second-semester English classes. This ‘phone-pass’ test is administered by an 
outside institution. To complete the test, students go to a computer lab on campus and participate in four 
activities: reading sentences, repeating sentences, responding to questions, and organizing groups of 
words into sentences. Responses are assessed for situation appropriateness, fluency, and grammatical 
accuracy. After the university compiles the results for all participants, the scores are rank-ordered, and 
students that score within 10 points of each other are assigned to groups and courses. In total, 219 
students were assigned to 14 separate classes. The maximum score for the test is 80 and scores on the test 
ranged from 20 to 78. The scores for the participants in the current study ranged from 43 to 51. 
The teacher of this course, Mr. O, has taught at the university for 12 years and described the students’ 
English proficiency as “low-intermediate.” The main goal of the course was to develop student 
conversational abilities. To accomplish this, the department selects a textbook, and instructors are 
required to follow the tasks in the textbook. According to Mr. O, these tasks consisted of both individual 
listening activities and conversational pair work such as structuring and performing dialogues and asking 
each other scripted questions. 
The class met for two 75-minute sessions per week; one on Monday and one on Friday. There were two 
different types of homework assignments. The first was a department-required online assignment that 
consisted of listening comprehension and worksheet activities. These assignments were graded for course 
points. The second type of assignment was completed on a class voiceboard outside of class, which was 
integrated into the curriculum the last eight weeks of the semester. The voiceboard assignments were 
implemented by Mr. O to provide additional conversational activities for students in the course. Due to 
rigid structuring of the course syllabus at the institutional level, the completion of the voiceboard 
assignments could not be assessed for points.  
Using the Voice Board 
During the seventh week of the semester, Mr. O introduced the voiceboard, Voxopop 
(http://www.Voxopop.com/), in class. He demonstrated for students how to set up individual accounts 
that they would later use outside of class and how to connect to the class’ private talk group. Voxopop 
allows users to record audio directly to the website with a microphone. Users first record their speech and 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET is powerful enough to enable C# users to reorder and rearrange multi-page Tiff file flexibly.
how to reorder pdf pages in; how to rearrange pdf pages in preview
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Sort PDF Pages - online C#.NET tutorial page for how to reorder, sort, reorganize or re-arrange PDF document files using C#.NET code.
how to reverse pages in pdf; move pages in a pdf file
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
148
then have the option of reviewing it. When users are satisfied with the product, they publish the post. 
Thus, the affordances of Voxopop include time to replay posts to enhance comprehension and to monitor 
and revise language production, both of which can be supported by outside resources, such as dictionaries, 
thesauruses, and textbooks. Additionally, since posts are comprised of spoken language, users are 
afforded opportunities to utilize acoustic information (e.g., intonation, stress) to construct meaning. 
Voxopop posts are displayed linearly in the discussion thread (see Figure 1, which has been edited to 
protect participants’ identities). The teacher modeled the process of recording, reviewing, publishing, and 
listening to other posts several times during class. After introducing the voiceboard, students were 
assigned a homework task (i.e., self-introduction) to demonstrate that they could use the technology. All 
students completed this assignment and reported no problems. 
Figure 1
. Screenshot of the Voxopop interface. 
For the remaining eight weeks of the semester, students were assigned one weekly voiceboard 
assignment. The homework assignments followed a similar structure. For example, each encouraged 
students to state an opinion about a topic that was related to the one introduced in class. In-class and 
homework topics came from the course textbook. Units in the textbook were thematically organized and 
consisted of a main topic (e.g., changes in the modern workforce) and several related sub-topics (e.g., 
stay-at-home dads). The main topics and some sub-topics were discussed in the classroom. Sub-topics 
that were not discussed in class were considered for use as homework. The instructor then selected from 
the remaining sub-topics those that he felt would appeal to student interests. The homework assignments, 
then, were thematically similar, but not exactly the same, as those that took place earlier in the physical 
classroom. In addition to providing their own opinions, students were instructed to respond to a 
classmate’s opinion. Commenting was an important part of the assignment because it supported some of 
the instructional goals of the course, such as constructing utterances for specific audiences and making 
contextually appropriate responses. There were no length requirements for the posts. However, the 
average length of student posts was 1 minute 14 seconds. 
VB.NET PDF: VB.NET Guide to Process PDF Document in .NET Project
It can be used to add or delete PDF document page(s), sort the order of PDF pages, add image to PDF document page and extract page(s) from PDF document in VB
rearrange pdf pages; how to reorder pdf pages in reader
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
are easily to access, extract, swap, reorder, insert, mark up and delete pages in any multi-page TIFF images upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents
change pdf page order preview; reorder pages pdf file
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
149
Data Collection and Analysis 
Two sources of data were used in the study. The first was an adapted version of the FLCAS (Horwitz et 
al., 1986). The FLCAS is considered by many as “the standard measure of language anxiety” (Horwitz, 
2010, p. 158), with valid and reliable psychometric properties (Horwitz, 1986). It includes 33 items with 
5-point Likert-type response options for each item, and it is comprised of three sub-components: 
communication apprehension, fear of negative evaluation, and test anxiety. An adapted FLCAS 
(AFLCAS, see Appendix A ) was employed in order to reflect the context and goals of the current study. 
The final nine items on the AFLCAS were the result of a two-step selection process, which began with 
eliminating items dealing with test anxiety since this was not related to the focus of the study. Then, 
among the remaining items pertaining to communication apprehension and fear of negative evaluation, 
those that were not responsive to either the speaking task the participants completed or the oral ACMC 
environment were eliminated. For example, excluded items were those that were too general (e.g., 
It 
wouldn’t bother me at all to take more language classes; I worry about the consequences of failing my 
foreign language class
), related only to in-class environments (e.g., 
When I am on my way to language 
class I feel very sure and relaxed; During language class, I find myself thinking about things that have 
nothing to do with the course
), and did not reflect the situational use of the voiceboard (e.g.,  
I feel that 
my language teacher is ready to correct every language mistake I make; I would probably feel 
comfortable around native speakers of the foreign language
). The remaining items were then 
operationalized by changing the setting referred to within each item from “in class” to “on Voxopop.” All 
items were translated into Korean, and the AFLCAS was given to the students during the last week of the 
semester, immediately after students completed the eight voiceboard assignments.  
The AFLCAS was scored by assigning a value to each of the five response options (e.g., 5 points for 
Strongly Agree
; 1 point for 
Strongly Disagree
). One statement, item 4, was reversed scored because it is 
stated in positive terms whereas the other items are negatively stated. Scores for each item were then 
input into SPSS 17. Mean scores for each AFLCAS item served as one data source to answer research 
question one. Additionally, AFLCAS data were used to compute a Spearman’s rho (
r
s
) correlation 
coefficient to answer research question two—the relationship between affordances perceived and FLA. 
Spearman’s rho is a non-parametric test that is recommend when data are at the ordinal level (Larson-
Hall, 2010), such as the AFLCAS data in this study. Cronbach’s alpha for the AFLCAS was .89.  
The second data source was the voiceboard anxiety and affordance questionnaire (VAAQ, see Appendix 
B), which was given two days after the AFLCAS. The questionnaire consisted of nine open-ended 
questions and aimed to tap student perceptions of FLA in voiceboard environments (items 1, 9), and 
affordances perceived (items 2 - 8). Since initial analyses of the AFLCAS showed that each participant 
indicated elevated levels of FLA for at least one item (i.e., responses of 
agree
or 
strongly agree
), 
questions 1 and 9 invited students to elaborate and characterize these feelings. The affordances of 
voiceboards discussed in the literature (e.g., Lamy & Hampel, 2007; Sun, 2009) were consulted to create 
questions related to the affordances perceived. The resulting questions asked students how many times 
they used each affordance. While wording the questions in this way might give students the impression 
that using affordances frequently was expected of them, it is important to note that participants responded 
to the questions on the VAAQ anonymously. Responding anonymously provided at least some freedom to 
state that they did not use an affordance. Such responses were not uncommon, a point that is reflected in 
the relatively low use of some affordances which are presented and discussed later in the study. The 
VAAQ was provided to the students in Korean and they were allowed to write their answers in Korean. 
All responses were translated separately into English by two Korean-English bilinguals. 
The VAAQ was analyzed in two ways. First, responses that elicited numbers from students (e.g., 
On 
average, how many times per assignment did you use a dictionary or other source to help you understand 
a classmate’s Voxopop post?
) were copied directly from the VAAQ to SPSS 17 for correlation analyses. 
On some occasions, students responded to these questions by providing a range of numbers, for example, 
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
Support navigating to the previous or next page of the PDF document; Able to insert, delete or reorder PDF document page in VB.NET document viewer;
how to reorder pages in pdf preview; reorder pages in pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB.NET PPT PPT Page Extracting. dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reorder pages in pdf; how to rearrange pdf pages
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
150
2-3
. In these instances, the average of the two numbers was recorded (e.g., 2.5). The remaining items on 
the on the VAAQ were analyzed following Bogdan and Biklen’s (2006) coding method in order to answer 
research question one. First, responses for each item on the questionnaire were read for open-coding, 
which produced salient categories that served as a primary framework for initial coding. These initial 
categories were revised during subsequent rounds of analyses so that they reliably accounted for the data. 
Once all responses could be codified, a final round of coding was completed. 
RESULTS  
Research Question 1—How and from what sources do students experience FLA in a voiceboard 
environment?  
Data from the AFLCAS and VAAQ were collected to answer this question. Data from the AFLCAS show 
that, overall, the participants responded that they felt moderate levels of FLA in the ACMC environment. 
The highest possible AFLCAS score is 45, and the mean score on the AFLCAS for the participants was 
22.85 (
SD
= 4.14). Dividing the mean score by the total number of items on the AFLCAS indicates that 
most responses fell between the options of 
Disagree
and 
Neutral
. The precise means for each AFLCAS 
item were calculated and are presented in Figure 2. The results show that responses for two items moved 
towards responses of 
Agree
. Students felt most anxious when comparing themselves to other students 
(item 5), and they did not feel too confident when speaking English on the voiceboard (item 4).  
Figure 2
. Mean scores for each AFLCAS item.  
On the VAAQ, students responded to two questions that asked them about anxiety in the oral ACMC 
environment. The results for each question are shown in Table 1, which includes three columns. The first 
identifies the question to which students responded and the second presents the qualitative categories 
most frequently applied. The third column shows the number of responses coded for each category.  
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
PDF document page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF
reorder pdf pages in preview; how to rearrange pages in a pdf file
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages from VB.NET programming, this TIFF page processing control powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
rearrange pdf pages online; reordering pages in pdf
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
151
Table 1
Qualitative Responses of Anxiety on the Voiceboard 
The results for these questions indicate that pronunciation and grammar are sources of anxiety for 
students in the oral ACMC environment. For example, comments such as, “I am constantly concerned 
about grammar” and “I always worry about my non-native pronunciation” were common. 
Other responses suggest that concerns about pronunciation relate to fears of being evaluated by 
classmates. Some students explicitly referenced anxiety related to pronunciation: 
On Voxopop, I record after I hear others’ recordings—their pronunciation is superior to 
mine and this makes me feel uncomfortable. 
Others can listen to my recordings over and over. They probably don’t care about the 
contents but care more about pronunciation just like I do
These results support the finding from the AFLCAS that anxiety can result from students comparing 
themselves to each other (item 5). Although some participants did not specify precisely why they worried 
about what peers thought of their performance—“I always wonder what my classmates think of my 
recordings”—the statements above suggest that pronunciation was a key concern.   
Additionally, responses to both questions on the VAAQ show that the lack of non-verbal cues was 
perceived as anxiety-inducing. Participants commented about the absence of non-verbal cues generally, “I 
feel more comfortable when speaking in class because non-verbal cues such as facial expressions or 
gestures help me understand the communication,” and when producing the target language: 
In class I get facial expression clues to know whether they [classmates] are following what 
I am saying or not.  
In class I can at least use gestures as an aid to make others understand what I attempt to 
say! 
In sum, the results for research question 1 show that grammar, the absence of non-verbal cues, 
comparisons of oneself to other classmates, and pronunciation can be sources of anxiety. Data also 
suggest that pronunciation concerns are related to comparisons with classmates.  
Question 
Categories 
Similar 
responses 
What made you feel nervous / anxious / 
uncomfortable speaking English on Voxopop? 
Pronunciation 
Lack of immediate 
feedback/non-verbal cues 
Classmate’s negative evaluations  5 
Grammar 
In what ways are the feelings of nervousness / 
anxiousness different between speaking English 
in class and speaking English on Voxopop? 
Voxopop did not provide non-
verbal cues 
Voxopop offered more chances 
to be negatively evaluated by 
classmates 
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
152
Research Question 2—What is the relationship between affordances perceived and FLA? 
This question was answered by correlating data from the AFLCAS and data from the participants 
regarding the ways they used the affordances of the voiceboard. Table 2 presents the average number of 
times each affordance was used by the participants when completing one voiceboard task, with the 
exception of writing the response. For this question, students provided the number of times they wrote 
responses for the eight assignments. 
The results in Table 2 show that students rarely used other sources to understand classmates’ posts. On 
the other hand, using dictionaries or outside resources to construct responses was the affordance 
perceived most frequently, with students consulting these sources four times per assignment on average. 
Around three times per assignment, students re-recorded their responses before publishing them to the 
class discussion. When asked in what ways their post was revised when re-recording it (VAAQ question 
7), the overwhelming response was pronunciation (10), followed by grammar (6), and fluency (5).    
Table 2
The Average Frequency of Affordances Perceived
Affordance 
Mean 
SD 
Replay to understand 
2.54 
1.32 
Use source to understand  
.54 
.90 
Use source for response 
4.00 
1.97 
Re-record response 
3.33 
1.78 
Write response  
4.63 
1.14 
The frequencies of affordances perceived were then paired with the AFLCAS scores to compute 
correlation coefficients. Table 3 presents the correlation between FLA in the oral ACMC environment 
and the total affordances perceived, and FLA and each individual affordance. There exists a moderate 
(
r
s
= -.380,
p
= .223) inverse relationship between the total affordances perceived and FLA. This suggests 
that as the use of affordances increased, FLA decreased to a limited degree. Among the individual 
affordances perceived, the strongest relationship (
r
s
= .550, 
p
= .051) is between using outside sources to 
understand classmates’ posts and FLA. The positive direction of this relationship suggests that the more 
students used sources to help them understand, the higher their FLA was. Replaying to understand 
classmates’ postings and using sources to produce responses had the strongest relationships associated 
with decreases in FLA, although these were moderate and not statistically significant. 
Table 3
Correlations Between FLA and Affordances Perceived
Total 
Affordances 
Replay to 
Understand 
Sources to 
Understand 
Sources for 
Response 
Re-record 
Response 
Write 
Response 
FLA   -.380 
-.461 
.550 
-.359 
-.008 
-.061 
Sig.  
.223 
.113 
.051 
.252 
.979 
.851 
DISCUSSION, LIMITATIONS, AND IMPLICATIONS   
The main goals of this study were to explore anxiety in an oral ACMC environment and to investigate the 
relationship between affordances perceived and FLA. In regards to anxiety-related experiences, data from 
the AFLCAS suggests, in a general way, that the students were not overly anxious when completing 
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
153
voiceboard assignments. This finding supports previous oral ACMC studies that found that students 
performing in voiceboard environments experience low levels of FLA (Poza, 2011; Song, 2009; Sun, 
2009). However, while this finding could be interpreted to suggest that voiceboards offer more relaxed 
environments than F2F classrooms, this interpretation is not warranted in the context of the current study. 
For instance, the voiceboard was integrated into the curriculum as an extension of the classroom, where 
the topics discussed were related to those already introduced in class. Furthermore, F2F data were not 
collected and the voiceboard task differed from many of the F2F tasks in marked ways; the online posts 
were not tied to course credit, which likely influenced both motivation and anxiety, and teacher feedback 
was not provided. Moreover, a closer look at the AFLCAS and VAAQ data provided evidence that 
students experienced FLA in particular ways. Data showed that pronunciation, grammar, the absence of 
non-verbal cues, and comparisons to, and evaluations of, classmates were sources of FLA.  
Studies in F2F contexts have also found many of these sources of anxiety and primarily explain them as 
properties of the individual. For example, Yan and Horwitz (2008) and Young (1991) found that personal 
and interpersonal characteristics such as competitiveness among classmates and nervousness associated 
with evaluations from peers resulted in anxiety. Additionally, Young’s finding that learners’ beliefs about 
language and unrealistic language learning goals produce anxiety could explain the participants’ 
preoccupation with pronunciation in the current study. Indeed, recent views of English pronunciation hold 
native-like models as an unrealistic language learning goal (e.g., Jenkins, 2002). Without dismissing the 
relevance of individual characteristics, ecological perspectives examine the relations between the learner 
and the context (Greeno, 1994), and the oral ACMC context in general, and its affordances in particular, 
help explain the findings of anxiety in this study.  
The voiceboard context that students worked within to complete the discussions lacked non-verbal cues. 
These cues include facial expressions, gestures, and back-channels, and for lower proficiency students, 
such as the ones in this study, these are likely valuable compensatory resources commonly employed 
during the meaning making process. The absence of these resources in this environment led to feelings of 
anxiousness, which may also relate to the other ways participants in this study experienced anxiety. For 
instance, the lack of non-verbal communication cues may have further intensified the focus on 
pronunciation and grammar. While Lamy and Hampel (2007) explain that voice modalities offer the 
possibilities for intonation and inflection to amplify meaning, without the aid of non-verbal cues, this 
modality alone may have placed even greater emphasis on the articulatory aspects of speech and syntactic 
processing. In other words, without the broader semiotic resources of non-verbal cues to offer semantic 
support, learners operated in scenarios that required them to closely examine pronunciation and grammar. 
This explanation may be one reason why the participants used the replay function as often as they did. 
Replaying the posts helped to understand classmates, but it also provided multiple opportunities to make 
comparisons to others’ language abilities. The implications of this finding extend to both research and 
practice. Researchers and teachers need to consider integrating and examining asynchronous video blogs 
(vlogs), which offer many of the same affordances as voiceboards, but with the added feature of non-
verbal cues. Additionally, as Yan and Horwitz (2008) suggested, creating small, similar-ability groups 
may reduce anxieties related to comparisons to others, which could be done in online environments by 
making separate discussion threads for each small group.   
The finding that students experienced anxiety when comparing themselves to others contrasts the findings 
in Poza (2011). In that study, students did not place importance on the fact that classmates would listen to 
their posts, a point illustrated by a student during an interview, “I didn’t even think about it, honestly” (p. 
50). The contrast in student perceptions between that study and the current one could be explained in a 
number of ways, such as differences in sociopolitical contexts. For example, since English often functions 
in Korea as a factor in determining university acceptance and job attainment, classmates in this context 
might view each others’ L2 performances differently than native English speakers in the United States 
learning Spanish. Another explanation centers on the order in which the voiceboard tasks were completed 
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
154
in conjunction with the classroom tasks. In Poza’s study, students finished the voiceboard assignments 
before having similar discussions in class, whereas in the current study these were completed in the 
reverse order. While having the online discussions after the F2F in-class discussions offers students 
opportunities to incorporate language that might have been learned during class, it might also place more 
emphasis on this language. Future studies might address how the ordering of topically similar F2F and 
voiceboard tasks relate to anxiety. 
The findings from the correlation results further illustrate the complex interplay between the environment 
and FLA. While anecdotal evidence reported in other studies links FLA with the ACMC environment, the 
current study established an empirical one by directly investigating the affordances perceived in these 
contexts. This study found that the relationship between the overall frequency of affordance use and FLA 
was moderate, and many of the correlations for particular affordances were moderate or weak. These 
findings can be explained in a number of ways.   
First, it is important to recall that affordance includes both the good or ill offered by the environment 
(Gibson, 1979), or as van Lier (2004) explains, “the opportunity for or inhibition of action” (p. 4). 
Understanding this premise helps to explain the overall moderate correlation between FLA and the total 
affordances perceived, and the extremely weak correlation between FLA and re-recording posts. The 
environment afforded students a way to attend to pronunciation by revising their recordings, which they 
did often in comparison to other aspects, but, as mentioned earlier, the replay affordance enabled 
participants to make comparisons among each other. Likewise, although replaying classmates’ postings 
provided opportunities for these comparisons, it also allowed students in this reduced cue context a way 
of understanding each other, which is why we see a stronger correlation for this affordance and FLA. 
These findings show that the affordances of oral ACMC environments relate to FLA in both positive and 
negative ways.       
Additionally, the co-dependency between individual abilities and affordance explain how some 
affordances in this study related more strongly with FLA than others. As Greeno (1994) makes clear, the 
concept of affordance cannot be understood without accounting for both. He argues that an affordance 
“relates attributes of something in the environment to an interactive activity by an agent who has some 
ability, and an ability relates attributes of an agent to an interactive activity with something in the 
environment that has some affordance” (p. 338). Revisiting the perceived affordance of replaying others’ 
posts demonstrates how affordance is intricately tied to ability. This affordance was moderately related 
with lower levels of FLA, while, conversely, the use of outside sources to understand classmates’ 
postings corresponded strongly with higher levels of anxiety. When considering individual ability, it 
could be that the possibility for action provided by the environment—replaying others’ posts—
sufficiently melded with the students’ comprehension abilities, thus leaving the option of using outside 
sources to understand unnecessary. This explanation is supported by a student’s comment. After 
indicating that she never used outside resources when listening to her classmates, she explained that, “I 
just use my own knowledge to understand what they say.” On the other hand, the affordance of using 
outside resources to construct responses seems to have benefited FLA. In light of the voiceboard task in 
this study, which prompted students to state their opinion to a question and respond to one classmate’s 
opinion, participants relied upon their own abilities and replay to understand classmates. In order to 
respond, however, the affordance of using outside resources was needed, and this explains the moderate 
relationship between this affordance and decreases in FLA.  
The findings are further accounted for in light of the methodological limitations of this study. For 
example, the overall moderate correlation between FLA and the total affordances perceived could be due 
to the difficulties in capturing a wide range of affordances. Some students noted that time and the physical 
absence of others when performing helped ease FLA: 
I felt more confident using it [voice board] because I didn’t have to do speaking in real-
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
155
time situations because I’m not good at improvising and correcting grammar and 
vocabulary.  
I am not too nervous on Voxopop because I don’t have an audience that is present right in 
front of me.  
These affordances are challenging to capture quantitatively and underscore the importance of qualitative 
data in examining affordance, while also demonstrating the need for further research in this area.    
Using items from the literature to present affordances to participants in a fixed way also limited this 
study. For example, the VAAQ did not illuminate how the environment where the technology was 
accessed related to FLA. Additionally, while studies have suggested that preparing written scripts eases 
FLA, which served as the basis for VAAQ item 8, it was not strongly correlated to FLA, and the question 
may not accurately reflect how scripts function to lower anxiety. Students noted, for example, that it was 
not writing the script that reduced FLA but 
reading
it—“I don’t feel nervous because I usually have a 
script that I can simply read off of.” Opening the response format would help uncover more of the 
affordances perceived by the learners in these contexts and allow researchers to more accurately relate 
this use to FLA. In a similar vein, collecting self-reported questionnaire data operationalizing perceived 
affordances as the affordances used raises the question as to whether participants perceived certain 
affordances and chose not to use them, or if they did not recognize certain possibilities in the ACMC 
environment. Future studies collecting screen-capture and think-aloud data might help address this issue 
by showing which affordances were signaled from the environment, which were acted upon, and why. 
Findings from such data would assist teachers in knowing which functions of a tool need to be explicitly 
taught, and which can be perceived directly from the environment. 
CONCLUSION 
Previous studies show that FLA can disrupt cognitive processing (MacIntyre & Gardner, 1994) and limit 
social interaction (Baker & MacIntyre, 2000). Oral ACMC research has provided some evidence that this 
environment might play a role in reducing FLA (Poza, 2011; Song, 2009; Sun, 2009). The current study 
adopted the notion of affordance within ecological linguistics in order to examine in greater detail the 
interplay between FLA and the potential for action signaled within the ACMC context. In line with 
previous ACMC research, this study found that students are not overly anxious when completing 
speaking tasks in this environment. Importantly, however, this study also found that integrating 
voiceboards does not automatically eliminate foreign language anxiety. Instead, the environment and its 
affordances are related with decreased 
and
increased FLA. To explain this finding, it was posited that the 
students’ abilities, the task, and the environment worked in consort to produce or ease anxiety. If this 
explanation is accurate, it complicates the literature by suggesting that simply completing voiceboard 
tasks does not entirely rid all foreign language anxiety and underscores the need for more research framed 
by ecological perspectives. This study has pointed-out methodological concerns regarding how to more 
accurately elicit and capture affordance data, which might assist future researchers examining the 
affordances perceived by students in oral ACMC environments. Reliably accounting for the affordances 
perceived in voiceboard contexts will allow us to investigate how they relate to FLA and, ultimately, the 
ways in which they promote and impede language learning.    
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested