c# pdf viewer wpf : How to rearrange pages in a pdf document application software cloud windows html wpf class v18n116-part448

Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
156
APPENDIX A. Adapted FLCAS 
1.  I never feel quite sure of myself when speaking English on Voxopop. 
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
2.  I
start to panic when I have to speak English without preparation on Voxopop. 
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
3.  It embarrasses me to volunteer my answers in English on Voxopop. 
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
 I feel confident when I speak English on Voxopop. 
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
5.  I always feel that other students speak English better than I do on Voxopop. 
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
6.  I feel very self-conscious about speaking English in front of other students on Voxopop. 
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
7.  I get nervous and confused when I am speaking English on Voxopop. 
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
8.  I am afraid that other students will laugh at me when I speak in English on Voxopop. 
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
9.  I get nervous on Voxopop when the English teacher asks questions which I haven’t 
prepared in advance. 
Strongly Disagree
Disagree
Neutral
Agree
Strongly Agree
APPENDIX B. Voiceboard Anxiety and Affordance Questionnaire 
Answers to the questions below will help me make the best possible English activities for students. Your 
honest feedback and suggestions are greatly appreciated. You may answer the questions in Korean. You 
are not required to write your name on this form; your responses will have no bearing for your score in 
this class.  
1.  What made you feel nervous/anxious/uncomfortable speaking English on Voxopop? 
2.  On average, how many classmates’ postings did you listen to per assignment (1 Voxopop 
discussion)? 
3.  On average, how many times per assignment did you replay a classmate’s Voxopop post in order to 
help you understand it? 
4.  On average, how many times per assignment did you use a dictionary or other source to help you 
understand a classmate’s Voxopop post? 
5.  On average, how many times per assignment did you use a dictionary or other source to help you 
make your posting on Voxopop? 
6.  On average, how many times per assignment did you re-record your response on Voxopop before 
you posted it? 
7.  When you re-recorded you response, what aspects of your response did you change? 
8.  For how many of the 8 Voxopop assignments did you write your response before recording it? 
9.  In what ways are the feelings of nervousness/anxiousness different between speaking English in 
class and speaking English on Voxopop?  Why do you think so? 
How to rearrange pages in a pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pdf pages online; move pages in pdf document
How to rearrange pages in a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to move pages in pdf files; pdf reverse page order
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
157
ABOUT THE AUTHORS 
Levi McNeil (PhD Washington State University) is an associate professor in the Graduate School of 
TESOL at Sookmyung Women’s University. His research interests include CALL teacher education, 
(new) literacies, and dialogic interaction.  
E-mail: levi.mcneil@gmail.com  
ACKNOWLEDGMENT 
I thank the reviewers for their valuable comments. This study was supported by Sookmyung Women’s 
University Research Grant 2012. 
REFERENCES   
Aljaafreh, A., & Lantolf, J. P. (1994). Negative feedback as regulation and second language learning in 
the zone of proximal development. 
The
Modern Language Journal, 78
, 465–483. 
Atkinson, D. (2011). Introduction: Cognitivism and second language acquisition. In D. Atkinson (Ed.), 
Alternative approaches to second language acquisition
(pp. 1–23). New York, NY: Routledge. 
Baker, S. C., & MacIntyre, P. D. (2000). The role of gender and immersion in communication and second 
language orientations. 
Language Learning, 50
(2), 311–341. 
Baralt, M., & Gurzynski-Weiss, L. (2011). Comparing learners’ state anxiety during task-based 
interaction in computer-mediated and face-to-face communication. 
Language Teaching Research, 15
(2), 
201–229. 
Blake, R. J. (2009). The use of technology for second language distance learning. 
The Modern Language 
Journal, 93
, 822–835. 
Bogdan, R. C., & Biklen, S. K. (2006). 
Qualitative research for education: An introduction to theories 
and methods
. Boston, MA: Pearson Education Group.  
Choi, H., & Jung, B. (2006). The effects of the use of voice bulletin board on elementary school students’ 
English speaking skills and affective domains: A case study. 
Multimedia-Assisted Language Learning, 
7
(3), 283–311. 
Chun, D. M. (1994). Using computer networking to facilitate the acquisition of interactive competence. 
System
22
(1), 17–31. 
Clement, R. (1987). Second language proficiency and acculturation: An investigation of the effects of 
status and individual characteristics. 
Journal of Language and Social Psychology
, 5, 271–290.  
Firth, A., & Wagner, J. (1997). On discourse, communication and some fundamental concepts in SLA 
research. 
The
Modern Language Journal
81
, 285–300. 
Firth, A., & Wagner, J. (2007). Second/foreign language learning as a social accomplishment: 
Elaborations on a reconceptualized SLA. 
The Modern Language Journal
91
, 798–817. 
Garrett, N. (2009). Computer-assisted language learning trends and issues revisited: Integrating 
innovation. 
The Modern Language Journal, 93
, 719–740.  
Gibson, J. J. (1979). 
The ecological approach to visual perception
. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.  
Greeno, J. G. (1994). Gibson’s affordances. 
Psychological Review, 101, 
336–342. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
how to move pages in pdf; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
move pages in pdf; how to move pages around in pdf file
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
158
Horwitz, E. K. (1986). Preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of a foreign language anxiety 
scale. 
TESOL Quarterly, 20
, 559–562. 
Horwitz, E. K. (1988). The beliefs about language learning of beginning university foreign language 
students. 
The Modern Language Journal, 72
, 182–193.  
Horwitz, E. K. (2001). Language anxiety and achievement. 
Annual Review of Applied Linguistics: 
Language and Psychology, 21
, 112–126. Retrieved from 
http://leighcherry.wikispaces.com/file/view/Anxiety+and+Language+Achievement+--+Horwitz.pdf 
Horwitz, E. K. (2010). Foreign and second language anxiety. 
Language Teaching, 43
(2), 154–167.  
Horwitz, E. K., Horwitz, M. B., & Cope, J. (1986). Foreign language classroom anxiety. 
The Modern 
Language Journal, 70
, 125–132.  
Hsu, H. Y., Wang, S. W., & Comac, L. (2008). Using audio-blogs to assist English-language learning: An 
investigation into student perception. 
Computer Assisted Language Learning
21
(2), 181–198. 
Jenkins, J. (2002). A sociolinguistically based, empirically researched pronunciation syllabus for English 
as an international language. 
Applied Linguistics, 23
(1), 83–103.  
Kern, R. (1995). Restructuring classroom interaction with networked computers: effects on quantity and 
characteristics of language production. 
The Modern Language Journal
79
, 457–476. 
Krashen, S. (1982). 
Principles and practice in second language acquisition
. New York, NY: Pergamon. 
Lamy, M-N., & Hampel, R. (2007). 
Online communication in language learning and teaching
Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. 
Lantolf, J. (2011). The sociocultural approach to second language acquisition: Sociocultural theory, 
second language acquisition, and artificial L2 development. In D. Atkinson (Ed.), 
Alternative approaches 
to second language acquisition
(pp. 24–47). New York, NY: Routledge. 
Lantolf, J., & Thorne, S. (2006). 
Sociocultural theory and the genesis of second language development
New York, NY: Oxford University Press. 
Larson-Hall, J. (2010). 
A guide to doing statistics in second language research using SPSS
. New York, 
NY: Routledge. 
MacIntyre, P. D. (1995). How does anxiety affect second language learning? A reply to Sparks and 
Ganschow. 
The Modern Language Journal
79
, 90–99. 
MacIntyre, P. D., & Charos, C. (1996). Personality, attitudes, and affect as predictors of second language 
communication. 
Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 15
, 3–26. 
MacIntyre, P. D., & Gardner, R. (1991). Methods and results in the study of anxiety in language learning: 
A review of the literature. 
Language Learning
41
, 85–117. 
MacIntyre, P. D., & Gardner, R. (1994). The effects of induced anxiety on three stages of cognitive 
processing in second language learning. 
Studies in Second Language Acquisition
16
, 1–17. 
McNeil, L. (2012). Using talk to scaffold referential questions for English language learners. 
Teaching 
and Teacher Education, 28
(3), 396–404.  
Norman, D. A. (1999). Affordances, conventions, and design. 
Interactions
, 38–42. 
Poza, M. I. C. (2011). The effects of asynchronous computer voice conferencing on L2 learners’ speaking 
anxiety. 
The International Association for Language Learning Technology Journal, 41
(1), 33–63. 
Retrieved from 
http://www.iallt.org/iallt_journal/the_effects_of_asynchronous_computer_voice_conferencing_on_l2_lear
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
do if you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
pdf reverse page order online; change page order pdf
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with a few a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides
reverse page order pdf; how to reorder pages in pdf reader
Levi McNeil 
Ecological Affordance and Anxiety 
Language Learning & Technology
159
ners_speaking_anxiet 
Song, J. W. (2009). An investigation into the effects of an oral English diary using a voice bulletin board 
on English spoken performance. 
Multimedia-Assisted Language Learning, 12
(1), 125–150. 
Swain, M., & Lapkin, S. (1998). Interaction and second language learning: Two adolescent French 
immersion students working together. 
The Modern Language Journal, 82
, 320–337. 
Sun, Y. C. (2009). Voice blog: An exploratory study of language learning. 
Language Learning & 
Technology, 13
(2), 88–103. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol13num2/sun.pdf 
van Lier, L. (2000). From input to affordance: Social-interactive learning from an ecological  perspective. 
In J. Lantolf (Ed.), 
Sociocultural theory and second language learning
(pp. 245–259). New York, NY: 
Oxford University Press. 
van Lier, L. (2004). 
The ecology and semiotics of language learning: A sociocultural perspective.
Boston, 
MA: Kluwer Academic Press. 
Vygotsky, L. S. (1978
). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes
. Cambridge, 
MA: Harvard University Press. 
Yan, J. X., & Horwitz, E. K. (2008). Learners’ perceptions of how anxiety interacts with personal and 
instructional factors to influence their achievement in English: A qualitative analysis of EFL learners in 
China. 
Language Learning, 58
(1), 151–183.  
Young, D. J. (1991). Creating a low-anxiety classroom environment: What does language anxiety 
research suggest? 
The Modern Language Journal
75
(4), 426–439. 
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
By dragging your pages in the editor area you can rearrange them or delete single pages. We try to make it as easy as possible to merge your PDF files.
how to move pages around in pdf; move pages in pdf online
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to move pages in a pdf file; how to move pages in pdf acrobat
Language Learning & Technology
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/aydinyildiz.pdf 
February 2014, Volume 18, Number 1 
pp. 160–180 
Copyright © 2014, ISSN 1094-3501 
160
USING WIKIS TO PROMOTE COLLABORATIVE EFL WRITING  
Zeliha Aydı
n
Özyeğin University
Senem Yıldı
z
Boğaziçi University
This study focuses on the use of wikis in collaborative writing projects in foreign language 
learning classrooms. A total of 34 intermediate level university students learning English 
as a foreign language (EFL) were asked to accomplish three different wiki-based 
collaborative writing tasks, (argumentative, informative and decision-making)  working in 
groups of four. Student wiki pages were then analyzed to investigate the role of task type 
in the number of self and peer-corrections as well as form-related and meaning-related 
changes. In addition, focus-group interviews and questionnaires were conducted to find 
out how students would describe their overall experience with the integration of a wiki-
based collaborative writing project in their foreign language learning process. The results 
revealed that the argumentative task promoted more peer-corrections than the informative 
and decision-making tasks. In addition, the informative task yielded more self-corrections 
than the argumentative and decision-making tasks. Furthermore, the use of wiki-based 
collaborative writing tasks led to the accurate use of grammatical structures 94% of the 
time. The results of the study also suggest that students paid more attention to meaning 
rather than form regardless of the task type. Finally, students had positive experiences 
using wikis in foreign language writing, and they believed that their writing performance 
had improved. 
Keywords: 
Online Teaching & Learning, Virtual Environments, Writing, Collaborative 
Learning, CALL, Learners’ Attitudes, Second Language Acquisition 
APA Citation:
Aydin, Z., & Yildiz, S.  (2014). Using wikis to promote collaborative EFL 
writing. 
Language Learning & Technology 18
(1), 160–180. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/aydinyildiz.pdf 
Received:
January 31, 2012; 
Accepted: 
July 31, 2013; 
Published: 
February 1, 2014 
Copyright:
© Zeliha Aydin and Senem Yildiz 
INTRODUCTION 
Writing instruction in foreign language classes is especially important since good writing requires the 
acquisition of a range of linguistic abilities, including grammatical accuracy, lexical knowledge, syntactic 
expression and a range of planning strategies such as organization, style and rhetoric. Writing instructors 
are not only responsible for emphasizing accuracy in formal language but they should also attend to the 
establishment of meaning by providing their learners with meaningful contexts and authentic purposes for 
writing. Although writing is an individual act, it is also a social and interactional process during which the 
writer tries to express a purpose through responding to other people and texts. As Hyland (2003) argues, 
including formal elements into writing instructions to achieve grammatical accuracy and ensuring that 
students use those structures appropriately for specific purposes in a variety of writing contexts can be a 
demanding task for second language writing teachers. Research shows that collaborative writing, both in 
the first language (L1) and second language (L2) during which time learners jointly produce a text, 
creates a sense of community among student writers and requires reflective thinking. The exchange of 
feedback among students during a joint project allows them to notice linguistic and organizational 
problems in their writing and would lead to error correction and grammatical accuracy (Donato, 1988; 
Storch, 2002, 2005; Swain and Lapkin, 1998).  
In the past few decades, the integration of technology in writing instructions, especially the development 
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
move pages in pdf file; rearrange pages in pdf file
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to reorder pages in pdf online; reverse pdf page order online
Zeliha Aydın and Senem Yıldız 
Using Wikis to Promote Collaborative EFL Writing 
Language Learning & Technology
161
of computer-supported social tools such as wikis and blogs, offer new ways of teaching by allowing 
authoring, information sharing, knowledge building and easier collaboration opportunities among 
learners. Previous studies that investigated the revision behaviors of learners during collaborative wiki 
projects reveal that students pay attention to both form and meaning in their writing when writing 
contexts based on carefully-designed collaborative writing assignments are employed (Kost, 2011; Lee, 
2010).  
The present study was conducted to contribute to the existing literature as regards of using wikis for 
collaborative writing purposes by systematically examining the role of three different meaning-focused 
tasks.  These encourage the negotiation of meaning by providing learners with an aim to convey a 
message to an audience, and on the interaction of learners and their revision behaviors in small groups 
from the perspective of form- versus meaning- focused changes and self- versus peer-corrections while 
jointly constructing texts. The research questions include: 
1.
In a wiki-based collaborative writing project, what is the role of task type in the number of 
form-related changes and meaning-related changes? 
2.
What is the role of task type in the number of self-corrections and peer-corrections? 
3.
To what extent will the participants be accurate in making these self- and peer-corrections? 
4.
What are students’ perceptions of using wikis in collaborative projects? 
Literature Review 
Collaboration 
There has been increasing attention in recent years towards a social cognitive perspective, which posits 
that meaningful social interaction is fundamental for language learning since learning a language is 
considered the outcome of a process of co-constructing one’s L2 knowledge with peers rather than as a 
result of an individual’s construction of knowledge (Benson, 2003; Donato, 2000; Hauck & Youngs, 
2008; Lee, 2002; Swain & Lapkin, 1998; van Lier, 1996). These ideas are grounded in Vygotsky’s (1978) 
sociocultural theories of learning of and specifically his notion of the Zone of Proximal Development. 
This theory describes learning as a social process, and emphasizes the fundamental role of social 
interaction among learners in which a more knowledgeable peer provides scaffolding to the less 
knowledgeable peer while completing a shared task. In L2 classrooms, collaborative tasks are expected to 
engage learners and to provide scaffolding on each others’ use of language (Storch, 2002; Swain & 
Lapkin, 1998). It is through this collaborative scaffolding that learners improve their linguistic and 
cognitive capacities. According to Swain (2000), when interlocutors are engaged in a collaborative 
activity, the language they use (whether spoken or written) mediates a process of joint constructive 
interaction. She calls this collaborative dialogue—a dialogue that constructs linguistic knowledge in 
which what learners contribute becomes an object for reflection, receives peer feedback, addresses 
linguistic problems and encourages modified output. However, writing is more than simply linguistic 
accuracy. Swain (2000) also argues that tasks that engage students in collaborative dialogue “might be 
particularly useful for learning strategic processes as well as grammatical aspects of language” (p.12). 
From this perspective, collaborative interaction helps L2 learners in writing, especially when they are 
asked to construct texts jointly and do peer-editing (Storch, 1999; Swain & Lapkin, 1998) by providing 
opportunities for learners to focus on various aspects of writing such as grammatical accuracy, lexis and 
discourse (Donato, 1994; Kim, 2008; Hirvela, 1999; Storch, 2002, 2009; Swain & Lapkin, 1998; 
Wigglesworth & Storch, 2009). While working on a single text by taking group responsibility, learners 
generate ideas, and pay attention to their language use and the organization of their ideas.  Furthermore, 
they become engaged in collaborative scaffolding by giving and receiving feedback, which promotes the 
consideration of alternative uses of language and elaboration of ideas. Therefore, collaborative writing is 
Zeliha Aydın and Senem Yıldız 
Using Wikis to Promote Collaborative EFL Writing 
Language Learning & Technology
162
a powerful method of writing that encourages cooperation, critical thinking, peer learning and active 
participation towards an end product (Hernandez, Hoeksema, Kelm, Jefferies, Lawrence, Lee & Miller, 
2008).  
Role of Tasks in Language Learning  
Nunan (1992) defines task as a “piece of classroom work which involves learners in comprehending, 
manipulating, producing or interacting in the target language while their attention is principally focused 
on meaning rather than on form” (p.10). It is widely accepted that the nature of both oral and written 
interaction is affected by the type of task (Cohen, 1994; Skehan, 1996). Pica, Kanagy, and Falodun (1993) 
present a typology for communicative tasks according to interactional activities and communication 
goals. According to their taxonomy, tasks which promote the greatest opportunities for learners to 
experience the comprehension of input, feedback on production, and interlanguage modification are those 
tasks which require each interactant to hold a different portion of the information to reach the task 
outcome, Both interactants request and supply this information through the same or convergent goal, and 
only one acceptable outcome. Other research shows that open-ended tasks in which learners co-construct 
a piece of discourse, such as essays or reports, tend to encourage an increased amount of lexical and 
morphosyntactic negotiations (Pellettieri, 2000; Storch, 2005; Storch & Wigglesworth, 2007). In 
particular, tasks that require learners to use vocabulary, ideas and concepts that are beyond their 
immediate knowledge are found to increase opportunities for interaction (Blake, 2000; Foster, 1998; 
Pellettieri, 2000; Peterson, 2008; Pica, Kanagy, & Falodun, 1993). A review of task-based research by 
Ellis (2003) reveals that those tasks which are non-familiar, require information exchange, and have two-
way information gap, closed outcome, human/ethical topic, no contextual support, and narrative discourse 
type promote the most meaning negotiation among learners. According to Skehan’s (1998) and Skehan 
and Foster’s (2001) limited attentional capacity model, learners need to prioritize whether to give their 
attention to meaning or form. If a task demands too much attention to its content due to its complexity, 
the learners’ attention will be allocated to its meaning; they will pay less attention to the language since 
humans have a limited capacity to process information. In other words, “tasks which are cognitively 
demanding in their content are likely to draw attentional resources away from language forms, 
encouraging learners to avoid more attention-demanding structures in favour of simpler language” 
(Skehan & Foster, 2001, p.189). In conclusion, the nature and type of task is expected to have an 
influence on the writers’ focus on form versus content, and the amount and type of interaction among 
writers during collaborative writing. This present study aims to further investigate this influence. 
Research on Wikis  
The development of new technologies offers new ways for language teachers to promote and enhance 
collaboration in foreign language education. With the advent of Web 2.0 tools, more potential for 
collaborative writing in the L2 classroom has emerged. Wiki is a web-based collaboration tool which can 
be easily created, viewed and modified using any web browser. The asynchronous online collaboration 
function offers language teachers new opportunities to combine all the essential parts of writing 
instruction such as grammatical accuracy, appropriate use of grammatical forms in different contexts, 
audience awareness, and multiple drafting and revising (Lund, 2008). 
Wikis were found to provide a rewarding experience for students (Arnold, Ducate, & Kost, 2009; Ducate, 
Anderson & Moreno, 2011; Kost, 2011; Lee, 2010; Lund, 2008; Mak & Coniam, 2008), supporting 
learner autonomy (Kessler, 2009; Kessler, Bikowski & Boggs, 2012; Lee, 2010), resulting with an 
aggregated output (Kost, 2011; Mak & Coniam, 2008) and providing more focus on structure and 
organization (Elola & Oskoz, 2010; Mak & Coniam, 2008). Yet, in some studies, the issues of text 
ownership and a reluctance to edit the contributions of peers were raised. The interview responses in 
Lund’s study (2008) revealed students’ concerns about inexpert editing and abuse, while in Kessler’s 
(2009) study, students were more willing to edit their peers’ work than their own. However, those peer 
Zeliha Aydın and Senem Yıldız 
Using Wikis to Promote Collaborative EFL Writing 
Language Learning & Technology
163
edits were found to be focused more on form rather than content as students felt they did not have the 
right to change the content of the contributions of others. Unequal contribution by group members to the 
collective product was another concern raised in Arnold, Ducate and Kost’s 2009 study.  
Several studies that have been conducted specifically investigated the types of revisions students made. In 
most of those studies, topic choice and task type were found to affect the degree to which students engage 
in collaborative writing as well as the degree of focus on form and the amount of writing production. 
Arnold et al. (2009) examined the revision behaviors of intermediate German students in three different 
classes using wikis collaboratively. One of the classes was “structured” and received instructions on how 
to edit their contributions, and revisions focused more on form than meaning. In contrast, in the 
“unstructured” class, revisions focused more on meaning than form. In all three classes, stylistic changes 
came third after form- and meaning-related changes. Kessler’s (2009) analysis of revision behaviors of 40 
non-native English speaking pre-service teachers in a Mexican university as they collaboratively-defined 
and revised the word “culture” using a wiki showed that they were willing to collaborate in this 
autonomous environment, and that they were more willing to edit their peers’ work than their own. The 
task was initiated by the teacher but was completely left to the students to develop: no feedback, revisions 
or elaborations were provided by the teacher. Students focused more on meaning during the production, 
worked on improving content and did not strive for perfect grammatical accuracy as long as errors did not 
impede meaning. These findings are in line with Kessler et al.’s (2012) study, which investigated the 
collaborative writing behaviors during the production of research reports of their own choice by 30 
highly-proficient non-native English speakers using Google Docs. Students focused more on meaning 
than form and the grammatical edits they made were more accurate than inaccurate. However, contrary to 
these findings, Kost (2011), who analyzed the number of formal changes versus meaning-preserving 
(stylistic) changes made by students in a German language class, found that formal changes were much 
more frequent than meaning-preserving (stylistic) changes (89% vs. 11%) and that students were very 
successful in repairing grammatical errors. Similarly, Spanish language learners in Lee’s (2010) study 
attended to language errors at the sentence or word level during meaning-driven activities as they worked 
together. The open-ended tasks and topics that were broad enough and gave freedom to students to 
incorporate their personal interests while at the same time requiring them to focus on form, motivated the 
learners and resulted in a high degree of collaborative exchange in her study. 
Although several studies have sought to address the effects of using tasks in writing instructions, few 
studies have examined the role of tasks on self-corrections and peer-corrections. The current study 
contributes to the literature by examining whether task type has an effect on the number of form-related 
and meaning-related changes, number of self- and peer-corrections, and by investigating the accuracy of 
self- and peer-corrections learners make during wiki-based collaborative writing tasks in an EFL context. 
It further seeks to understand learners’ perceptions towards the use of wikis. 
METHODOLOGY 
Participants 
Data for this study was collected from 16 female and 18 male non-native speakers of English from 
various educational backgrounds studying in a preparatory program at a private university in Istanbul. 
Participants had an average age of 19.2 years, and were studying in two different classes, each class 
consisted of 17 students. Two instructors taught each class. While one of the instructors was one of the 
researchers in both classes, the second instructor varied. All participants in this study shared the same 
native language, Turkish. They had already completed levels A1, A2 and B1 of the Common European 
Framework (CEF) before starting the B2-level module, and had 24 hours of English instruction each 
week. As such, they were considered independent users of the target language. In an interview prior to the 
study, all participants considered themselves to be competent users of Web 1.0 technology, including 
browsing the Internet and using email and text chat. However, none of the students had used a wiki before 
Zeliha Aydın and Senem Yıldız 
Using Wikis to Promote Collaborative EFL Writing 
Language Learning & Technology
164
the study. 
Tasks 
Learners participated in three different meaning-focused tasks (Table 1) that were selected to engage them 
in the collaboration and negotiation of both meaning and form as they produced texts in a wiki-based 
environment. Meaning-focused tasks can be defined as tasks in which students have an aim to convey a 
message to an audience thereby encouraging them to focus on the content of the text they produce. 
However, a form-focused task, such as drills or gap filling exercises, could be described as a task which 
encourages the learners to focus on the formal elements of the language. In line with the suggestions 
given in the literature, learners were immersed in open-ended and authentic tasks which were based on 
real life situations, including a communicative aim that intended to engage them in meaningful interaction 
and collective production through shared decision making, while at the same time allowing them to pay 
attention to form (Lee, 2010; Skehan, 1998; Swain, 2000).  
Table 1
Distribution of the number of MRCs in All Three Tasks
Type of MRC 
Argumentative 
Task 
Informative 
Task 
Decision-making 
Task 
Total 
Clarification / Elaboration of 
Information  
89 
36 
46 
171 
New Information 
33 
51 
14 
98 
Picture 
22 
48 
79 
Deleted Information 
22 
12 
41 
Synthesis of Information 
17 
Reorganizing 
Video 
Link 
While all tasks required the use of higher-order thinking skills in line with Skehan’s (1998) suggestions, 
task topics were selected from among familiar and meaningful topics for students to balance their 
cognitive load. The learners in the current study had just completed the B1 level of the CEF and were 
competent in writing “simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest” and 
writing “personal letters describing experiences and impressions” (Teachers’ Guide to the Common 
European Framework, n.d., p.8). Considering Hess’ (2011) Cognitive Rigor Matrix for reading and 
writing, the argumentative and decision-making tasks were selected to be cognitively and linguistically 
more demanding than the informative task, since the first two required the learners to apply skills such as 
devising an approach among many alternatives, developing a logical argument, and articulating a new 
voice. The informative task, on the other hand, mainly required such skills as recalling or locating basic 
facts, details, definitions and events, and describing the features of a place. All tasks were designed to be 
convergent in terms of goal orientation and required the learners to try to reach a common goal out of 
multiple outcome options. See Appendix A for a description of the tasks used in this study. Participants 
were continuously encouraged to use their own words, and were reminded beforehand that their text 
production would be monitored by the instructor against any form of plagiarism, especially because Tasks 
1 and 2 seemed conducive to copying and pasting from various resources. The non-error-free nature of 
the texts co-constructed by participants in the wiki pages led researchers to assume that plagiarism had 
not been a concern for the results of the study. 
Zeliha Aydın and Senem Yıldız 
Using Wikis to Promote Collaborative EFL Writing 
Language Learning & Technology
165
Data Collection and Analysis 
Procedure 
The study took place during the second semester, which started in February 2010 and continued for seven 
weeks. At the beginning of this nine-week semester, the instructor/researcher set up a class wiki for each 
class and held a training session before learners started to work on their projects. Learners were provided 
with detailed criteria regarding the grading of their wikis, which included an assessment of both 
individual and collaborative working skills. The grade learners received from the project constituted 5% 
of their final course grade. Inıtially, learners worked on a non-graded task in which they collaboratively 
wrote definitions for specific concepts determined together in a class discussion whose aim was to assist 
the students in their familiarity with using the wiki. After the non-graded task, they were asked to 
complete three different tasks in a row. The first and second tasks took two weeks to complete, while the 
final task took one due to time restrictions of the nine-week academic semester.  
Prior to each task, learners were randomly assigned to groups of four prior to each task and therefore they 
worked in a different group for each task. This was done purposefully since in Arnold et al.’s (2009) 
study, some students complained about unequal participation and poor communication within their groups. 
The researchers wanted the learners in this study to have a different group dynamic for each task and have 
a chance to be able to interact with different peers in their class. After the completion of the tasks, the 
content created by the learners in all the wiki pages was analyzed. A questionnaire was given to the 
students and a focus group interview was conducted in the seventh week of the study.  
In order to examine the role of task type in the number of meaning-related and form-related changes, the 
history pages of all tasks were analyzed and the number of meaning-related and form-related changes was 
calculated separately for each task by the researchers. For the argumentative task, there were 31.75 
history pages on average. The average number of history pages for the second task was 17.5. The final 
task generated 13 history pages on average. In the present study, to identify form-related changes, all 
sentences including grammatical corrections were analyzed by using Kessler’s (2009) categorization as a 
starting point. However, only the incidents observed in the data became part of the categorization, and an 
analysis was based on the categories that emerged from the data as shown in Appendix B 
To identify meaning-related changes, all sentences including at least one meaning-related change (MRC) 
were examined. Kessler and Bikowski (2010) define MRC as any meaning-related change a student 
makes such as changing a letter, word, sentence, paragraph or the entire wiki (p.45). Kessler and 
Bikowski’s (2010) coding category was adapted to examine meaning-related changes in the data. 
However, the change of a letter, for example, the change of a misspelled word such as ‘improvment’ to 
‘improvement’, was coded as a form-related change unless it led to a change in the meaning of a sentence. 
The last three categories in Appendix C were added by the researchers as they emerged in the data and 
includes a description of each category. In order to examine the role of task type in the number of self- 
and peer-corrections, all history pages of all tasks were analyzed and the number of self-corrections and 
peer-corrections was calculated separately for each task by one of the researchers and one native English 
speaking teacher (NES) who was also teaching with one of the researchers at the same institute. Both self- 
and peer-corrections were defined as any changes in the form of a grammatical structure and did not 
include any meaning-related changes. Peer-corrections were defined as the corrections made to one 
participant’s contribution by another member of the group that he/she worked with, while self-corrections 
referred to the corrections made to one’s own contributions to the wiki pages. The number of self- and 
peer-corrections was compared to explore which task yielded more self-correction or peer-correction. 
Corrections by the students were judged as “correct” or “incorrect” by the researchers and the 
aforementioned NES teacher. The number of correct and incorrect changes was calculated along with 
their percentages. All correct and incorrect edits were noted and counted separately for each task.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested