c# pdf viewer wpf : How to change page order in pdf document application Library cloud windows .net wpf class v18n12-part450

Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
16 
preference, to allow participants to discuss their experience using the course.  The research assistant had a 
BA in anthropology and was familiar with collecting and analyzing qualitative data.  The interview guide 
included 13 open-ended questions about the participants’ experience in the course and covered topics 
such as what they found most useful and anything they would like to see added.  Participants were then 
mailed a payment of $75 for a total of $125 for their participation in the study.  Notes taken during phone 
interviews and the content of e-mail responses were analyzed for similarities and differences in content. 
FINDINGS 
Participants 
All participants (N = 19) were women, ranging in age from 22 to 67 years (M = 39.2, SD = 12.3).  
Additional participant characteristics are summarized in Table 3, including education, native languages, 
current employment, the reported percentage of time spent in English-only communication.  More than 
one-third (39%) of participants reported previous training in language/grammar improvement and one-
third (33%) reported cross-cultural training. 
Table 3
Characteristics of Study Participants
Native Language 
Degrees Held* 
Employment Position 
English-Only 
Communication (% of day) 
Tagalog / Ilocano  6  BSN 
 Staff Nurse 
 <20% 
Chinese 
 RN 
 Student 
 20%-40% 
Thai 
 MSN 
 Project Director 
 40%-80% 
Russian 
 CNA 
 Research Technician  1  80%-100% 
Danish 
 LPN 
 Research Assistant 
  
Korean 
 Other 
  
[None reported] 
  
Note.
*Some participants held multiple degrees.
Table 4
TEPL-ONLINE Scores
TEPL Scores  Structure Subscale  Reading Comprehension Subscale 
Missing 
As anticipated, participating nurses scored in the mid to upper ranges of the 
TEPL-Online
placement tool 
(Table 4). The 
TEPL-Online
is scored on a 7-level scale (A = Survival English – G = Advanced English) 
with results shown for each skill area.  Scores for the 
TEPL-Online
correspond to the seven-level system 
used to place ESL students in classes according to their English proficiency.  Upon review of the 
TEPL-
Online’s
Seven Instructional Level Scoring system, the authors chose Level E (Intermediate) as the 
Participant Placement minimum.  This placement level matches the Readability Index (vocabulary 
How to change page order in pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to reorder pdf pages; reorder pages pdf
How to change page order in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to move pages in a pdf; reorder pdf pages online
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
17 
sophistication, sentence structure, etc.) of the course content.  Additionally, the authors felt that 
intermediate English skills would minimally impact participants’ speed and comprehension of the 
information presented, allowing them to move through the course at an appropriate pace. 
Participants reported communication challenges in the following five areas: difficulties with 
dictation/reporting (n=6), problems understanding clinical lectures (n=5), problems communicating with 
patients and family members (n=4), difficulties with rapport building (n=3), and problems communicating 
with colleagues (n=3).  Nearly three-quarters (71%) of the participants indicated that they had been in 
clinical situations where their English language affected patient care, and 58% felt that they had been 
perceived or treated differently by patients, colleagues, family members, or others because of 
language/accent or cultural differences. 
Main Analyses Quantitative Data 
Outcome Results: The Knowledge Test and the 
POEC-S
were administered before and after completion 
of the online workshop. Paired t-tests were conducted to evaluate within-subject effects of the course.   
As shown in Table 5, participants made significant gains from pretest to posttest in several domains. The 
largest effect (d = 1.27) was observed for the Knowledge Test, suggesting that users were learning the 
rules which govern American English.  Participants also showed significant gains on all subscales of the 
POEC-S
Verbal Performance Test with a medium-to-high effect size for the overall verbal performance 
scale score (d = 0.66).  These gains are particularly remarkable given the relatively short duration of the 
course. No significant gains were observed for the 
POEC-S
Auditory Discrimination Performance Test. 
Table 5
Means, Paired 
t
-tests, and Effect Sizes for the Pre-Post Study Measures
Pretest 
Posttest 
Mean  SD 
Mean  SD 
df 
Knowledge Test 
16.2  3.2 
20.4  3.5  -5.33 
14  <.001  1.27 
Proficiency in Oral English  
112.1  36.5 
121.9  39.9  -1.64 
18 
.118  0.26 
Communication Screen Total 
Auditory Discrimination 
24.1  2.7 
23.6  2.6 
0.80 
17 
.433  -0.19 
Performance Test Total 
Single Word Discrimination 
5.7  0.7 
5.4  0.9 
0.72 
17 
.481  -0.29 
Word Discrimination within Sentences* 
6.6  1.0 
6.5  1.0 
-- 
-- 
--  -0.08 
Sentence Completion Discrimination 
7.6  1.8 
7.6  1.6 
0.14 
17 
.889  -0.01 
Word Stress Discrimination 
4.2  0.9 
4.1  0.7 
0.90 
17 
.381  -0.20 
Verbal Performance Test Total 
98.3  18.7 
111.3  20.5  -4.77 
15  <.001  0.66 
Vowel Survey 
49.9  13.8 
56.9  8.9  -2.53 
15 
.023  0.60 
Intonation Survey 
13.7  2.4 
15.1  3.0  -2.35 
13 
.035  0.52 
Articulation Variations Survey Total 
36.3  7.2 
41.1  8.6  -4.13 
15 
.001  0.60 
Note. *
All variables were normally distributed, with the exception of Word Discrimination within Sentences, which was skewed 
and kurtotic. Pre and post scores on this measure were compared using a Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, which was not significant.
User Experience  
Usage Data: Participants varied in their use of the ICW.  Most logged into the course every 2 to 5 days for 
approximately 20 minutes to 1 hour while others participated every 1 to 2 weeks for 1- to 3-hour sessions.  
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
various Word document processing implementations using C# demo codes, such as add or delete Word document page, change Word document pages order, merge or
move pages in a pdf; reorder pdf page
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
Note: if you are trying to change the order of a you want to see other VB.NET Word document editing controls, please read this Word reading page which has
change page order pdf preview; move pages in pdf acrobat
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
18 
Some used the course twice in a single day in short, 15- to 30-minute intervals.  The majority of users 
proceeded linearly through the course, although several returned to previously finished sections for 
additional practice.  One user repeated the course in its entirety. 
Exit Interviews:  Participants (N = 10; 3 by email and 7 by phone) reported generally positive experiences 
with the course, and several noted that they had already recommended the course to their friends and/or 
colleagues.  The majority of respondents found the ability to play back their own recorded voice for 
comparison with a model speaker a helpful tool.  While one participant had difficulty using the LRC, 
seven found it instructive and said that it provided a unique opportunity to hear specific features of their 
own speech that needed improvement.  Typically, these participants found that it was helpful, “Being able 
to hear yourself right away.  You know, being able to hear your voice recorded and compared.” 
Ten participants emphasized the benefits of instruction in the mechanics of speech while nine commented 
on the usefulness of the cultural information.  They reported improvement in stressing syllables and 
sentence elements with some stating that they were able to correct the pronunciation of words that had 
long been stumbling blocks.  The following comments reflect the features participants found most useful: 
•  “Everyday talk was the most helpful. Also how 'stress timing' is done.  How to stress certain 
syllables and words in sentences.”  
•  “I really liked the part where, at the end of each page, you were shown how people talk in 
America.  Either how to pronounce things properly or what particular sayings mean.” 
•  “This course in general was helpful to understand why some people don’t understand foreigners 
sometimes.  Although, I am pretty sure that mostly it’s their inability to listen.” 
•  “When I learned how to pronounce things correctly in English (for example, not pronouncing 
every syllable like I would normally do), Filipino nurses saying you are speaking 'fake English'.  
Like you're trying too hard and it doesn't sound right.  But now I know it IS right!” 
Participants described two key benefits from the cultural information: 1) a better understanding of 
common American English idioms and 2) ways to speak in the most professional and inoffensive manner.  
Many acknowledged developing awareness of cultural norms in the United States that they were 
previously unaware of, and several noted that they were already using the tips’ practical advice for 
communicating in a more professional style in their workplaces and daily lives.  Other respondents stated 
that they would have liked more of this information, including a greater focus on terms specific to 
healthcare professionals.  
Participants were enthusiastic about the tip boxes, offering comments, such as the following:  
•  “The cultural information was helpful.  I also liked the parts about informal/formal speaking.” 
•  “I really liked these!  They were very helpful and showed me how to speak 'American.’  I could 
learn new sentences (sayings).” 
•  “I liked learning about how words may have two meanings and what certain phrases mean.” 
•  “I think these are very helpful.  There are things you don't understand unless you understand the 
culture around it.” 
•  “I learned that saying I was assisting a ‘crippled’ patient can be offensive, so I would say 
‘disabled’.” 
Most participants found the quizzes and tests helpful and motivating, and used the feedback to identify 
areas where they needed more practice.  One participant offered the following recommendation, “Also, I 
found the quizzes very helpful.  I think you should have more quizzes.” 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C#
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; change page order in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
and Files, adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing the position, orientation and order of PDF document pages with
moving pages in pdf; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
19 
Participants noted that it would be very useful for healthcare workers to complete the course 
before
coming to the United States.  Several noted the absence of any similar educational programs in their 
countries of origin.  Many participants thought the course would also serve as a useful “refresher” for 
foreign-born healthcare workers who are currently in the United States.    
Asked what they would like to see added to the course, participants offered a number of recommendations 
such as these: 
•  “It should be required because if it is optional, people won't do it.  Not because they are lazy 
but because they are so busy in school!” 
•  “I think you should have more practice with consonants.  I am from Taiwan, not the Philippines, 
and we have more trouble with consonants like 'L'.” 
•  “More practice on communication.  If you could add short stories about the habits and culture 
in America, I think we'd find that useful.”   
•  “More video!  This is more helpful than the graphs and descriptions that show people how to 
speak.  I would rather see someone's tongue placement, jaw movement, etc. than have it 
described or just listen to it.”   
DISCUSSION 
Scores on the 
TEPL-Online
screening measure confirmed that the study population had the written 
fluency needed to benefit from an Internet-based course. 
Changing an accent is a slow and difficult process (Corrigan, 2010), and we did not expect to see 
improvements on the 
POEC-S
over the short duration of the study period.  As expected, participants’ 
scores on the 
POEC-S
for auditory discrimination did not improve significantly but were relatively high 
at pretest.  On the other hand, participants’ scores on the 
POEC-S
for verbal performance improved 
significantly, suggesting that the practice presented in this early version of the course was beneficial.  
Moreover, participants made significant gains on the Knowledge Test from pretest to posttest, suggesting 
that they were learning the rules that native speakers of American English employ unconsciously. 
There are several limitations to this study.  First, the study sample was small and lacked a control group.  
Second, 8 hours of practice time over a 3-month period is not sufficient for most speakers to show major 
improvement.  Third, users received telephone calls or emails to support their participation in the course, 
a procedure that will not always be possible outside a research environment.  Fourth, as mentioned earlier 
in this paper, there may be some would not find computer-based practice an acceptable substitute for in-
person instruction.  Additionally, the LRC exercises will not be helpful for participants who do not hear 
the difference between their own recordings and the model speaker’s.  However, in the exit interviews, 
participants frequently reported that the comparison with a model speaker was most helpful for 
identifying areas for improving their own speech intelligibility. 
In the next phase of development, we will add several features to support users, including a personalized 
homepage where they will set personal goals and view an automated record of their progress in the course.  
Content will be presented in small units suited to 20 minutes of practice in one sitting, and the personal 
progress report will encourage daily practice.  We will also incorporate social network support, including 
automatically generated emails offering tips and encouragement and a discussion forum where learners 
can share their experiences with other foreign-born nurses.  We will evaluate the effectiveness of the 
complete ICW in a two-group randomized controlled trial in which participants have access to the course 
for 6 months.  We will attempt to recruit nurses who are preparing to emigrate while they are still in their 
native countries as well as newly arrived and recently employed nurses in the United States. 
When complete, the ICW will address several of the challenges presented in developing web-based 
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
pdf reorder pages online; rearrange pages in pdf reader
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
reorder pages in a pdf; move pdf pages online
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
20 
training for adult learners, particularly those working in healthcare.  Highly contextualized for nursing 
and other healthcare professionals, the course is immediately relevant and useful, two crucial criteria for 
adult learners. With automatic feedback, learners can readily see the areas where they need improvement 
and are reinforced for their effort and progress.  Learning strategies that generally work for adult learners, 
visual memorization or self-tutoring, won’t improve speech intelligibility.  A self-directed course with 
ample opportunities to practice speaking can be effective and should be worthwhile and engaging for 
busy adults. 
Healthcare professionals work under tremendous time constraints, making speech improvement classes at 
community colleges, for example, unattractive.  Speech trainers are often reluctant to offer courses at 
hospitals because absenteeism is such a chronic problem.  Yet the stakes are high for ineffective 
communication in the stressful healthcare environment.  Web-based training will appeal to healthcare 
professionals who are already savvy with computers and who appreciate the convenience and flexibility 
of working online at their own pace.  Furthermore, technology that makes it possible to record speech to a 
remote server and receive immediate feedback offers learners a dynamic practice environment free of 
embarrassment in front of colleagues or burden on patients. 
The ICW is a self-directed, rather than instructor-driven, course and is dependent on how self-directed 
users are.  It could be integrated into instructor-driven courses, either classroom or web-based, where it 
would provide opportunities for review and practice with guidance from an instructor who is not always 
present. Busy professionals could benefit from the structure and interaction provided in an instructor-
driven course and take advantage of the flexible practice time and the anonymity of a virtual community 
of learners in the ICW. 
CONCLUSION 
This early field test of the ICW demonstrated that it is feasible to deliver speech intelligibility training 
over the web.  While computer-based speech intelligibility instruction is no substitute for in-person, 
human feedback, an online course can provide a low-stakes environment for learners who wish to work 
on the “readability” of their speech at their own pace. 
In the next phase of development of the course, we intend to: 
•  Expand the speech intelligibility content to meet the training needs of native speakers of the 
major language groups represented in the nursing work force; 
•  Develop additional content on vocabulary, communication practices, and culture in the U.S. 
healthcare workplace, including interactive role play simulations; 
•  Restructure the navigation to simplify the learning process for users and increase the length of 
time users spend in the course; and 
•  Add social networking features to promote learners’ commitment and deepen their engagement 
by participating in a learning community. 
ABOUT THE AUTHORS 
Eileen Van Schaik is a Senior Research Scientist at Talaria, Inc. and a Clinical Assistant Professor, 
Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems at the University of Washington. She is a medical 
anthropologist and develops e-learning on culture and communication for healthcare professionals. 
Additional research interests include healthcare disparities and end-of-life care. 
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Enable C#.NET developers to change the page order of source PDF document file; Allow C#.NET developers to add image to specified area of source PDF document
pdf change page order online; how to move pages within a pdf document
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C#.NET. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve In order to run the sample code, the following steps
pdf reorder pages; move pdf pages in preview
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
21 
Emily Lynch has degrees in linguistics, cultural anthropology and library and information science. She is 
a freelance writer and consultant as well as an on-call librarian for the Seattle Public Library. 
Susan Stoner is a clinical psychologist with expertise in research design and broad interests related to 
health psychology and healthcare provision. She holds current appointments as a Research Scientist at 
Talaria, Inc., and Affiliate Instructor in Anesthesiology & Pain Medicine at the University of Washington. 
Lorna Sikorski is a speech pathologist and founder of LDS & Associates, which conducts research, 
authors products and offers communication programs for adult English learners. She has authored 
products, published and presented on: intonation, accent assessment/instruction, communication/learning 
style. LDS Online Learning Center delivers professional education and client training. 
REFERENCES 
Abriam-Yago, K., Yoder, M., & Kataoka-Yahiro, M. (1999). The Cummins model: A framework for 
teaching nursing students for whom English is a second language. 
Journal of Transcultural Nursing
10
143–149. 
Brooke, J. (1996). SUS: A quick and dirty usability scale. In Jordan, P.W., Thomas, B., Weerdmeester, B. 
A., & McClelland, A.L. (eds.) 
Usability evaluation in industry
. London, UK: Taylor and Francis. 
Brush, B. L., Sochalski, J., & Berger, A. M. (2004). Imported care: Recruiting foreign nurses to U.S. 
health care facilities. 
Nurse Migration
23
, 78–87. 
Buchan, J., & Aiken, L. (2008). Solving nursing shortages: A common priority. 
Journal of Clinical 
Nursing
17
, 3362–3268. 
Buerhaus, P. I., Auerbach, D. I., & Staiger, D. O. (2009). The recent surge in nurse employment: Causes 
and implications. 
Health Affairs
28(4)
, w657–w668. 
Clearfield, E., & Batalova, J. (2007, February 1). Foreign-born health-care workers in the United States. 
Migration Policy Institute
. Retrieved from http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/foreign-born-health-
care-workers-united-states-0/ 
Corrigan, P. (2010). What’s that you said? Sometimes it’s not the words, it’s the accent. 
Health Progress
91(4)
, 34–37. 
Davis, C. R., & Nichols, B. L. (2002). Foreign-educated nurses and the changing U.S. nursing workforce. 
Nursing Administration Quarterly
26
, 43–51. 
Derwing, T. M., & Munro, M. J. (2005). Second language accent and pronunciation teaching: A research-
based approach. 
TESOL Quarterly
39(3)
, 379–397. 
Doutrich, D. (2001). Experiences of Japanese nurse scholars: Insights for U.S. faculty. 
Journal of Nursing 
Education
40
, 210–216. 
Ellenbecker, C. H. (2010). Preparing the nursing workforce of the future. 
Policy, Politics, & Nursing 
Practice
11(2)
, 115–125.  
Gamble, D. (2002). Filipino nurse recruitment as a staffing strategy. 
Journal of Nursing Administration
32
, 175–177. 
Guttman, M. S. (2004). Increasing the linguistic competence of the nurse with limited English proficiency. 
The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing
35
, 265–269. 
Hiep, P. H. (2007). Communicative language teaching: unity within diversity. 
ELT Journal
61(3)
, 193–
201. 
Levis, J. M. (2005). Changing contexts and shifting paradigms in pronunciation teaching. 
TESOL 
Eileen Van Schaik, Emily M. Lynch, Susan A. Stoner, & Lorna D. Sikorski
Communicative Competence of Foreign-born Nurses 
Nurses 
Language Learning & Technology
22 
Quarterly
39(3)
, 369–378. 
McMahon, G. T. (2004). Coming to America: International medical graduates in the United States. 
New 
England Journal of Medicine
350
, 2435–2437. 
Morton, E. S., Brundage, S. B., & Hancock, A. B. (2010). Validity of the proficiency in oral English 
communication screening. 
Contemporary Issues in Communication Science and Disorders
37
, 153–166. 
Neal, S. L. (2002). Hiring foreign nurses in the U.S.A. 
International Journal of Nursing Practice
8
, 173–
174.   
Nunan, D. (1991). Communicative tasks and the language curriculum. 
TESOL Quarterly
25(2)
, 279–295. 
Spry, C. (2009). Between two cultures: Foreign nurses in the United States. 
Global Perspectives
89
, 593–
595. 
Rathmell, G. & Sikorski, L.D. (2006). 
Test of English Proficiency Level (TEPL) 
(Electronic ed.). Santa 
Ana: LDS & Associates, LLC. 
Sikorski, L.D. (2004). 
Mastering effective English communication CD series
(5
th
Ed.). Santa Ana: LDS & 
Associates. 
Sikorski, L.D. (2005a). Foreign accents: Suggested competencies for improving communicative 
pronunciation. 
Seminars in Speech and Language
26
, 126–131. 
Sikorski, L.D. (2005b). 
POEC Screen, Electronic Edition (Proficiency in Oral English Communication – 
Screen)
(3
rd
ed.). Santa Ana: LDS & Associates, LLC. 
Trossman, S. (2002). The global reach of the nursing shortage: The ANA questions the ethics of luring 
foreign-educated nurses to the United States. 
American Journal of Nursing
102
, 85–87. 
Xu, Y. (2003). Are Chinese nurses a viable source to relieve the U.S. nurse shortage? 
Nursing Economics
21
, 269–274. 
Xu, Y., Bolstad, A. L., Shen, J., Colosimo, R., Covelli, M., Torpey, M., & Jorgenson, M. (2010). Speak 
for success: A pilot intervention study on communication competence of post-hire international nurses. 
Journal of Nursing Regulation
1(2)
, 42–48. 
Xu, Y., & Davidhizar, R. (2004). Conflict management styles of Asian and Asian American nurses—
implications for the nurse manager. 
The Health Care Manager
23
, 4653. 
Yi, M., & Jezewski, Y. M. (2000). Korean nurses' adjustments to hospitals in the United States of 
America. 
Journal of Advanced Nursing
32
, 721729. 
Language Learning & Technology 
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/action2.pdf 
February 2014, Volume 18, Number 1 
pp. 23–37 
Copyright © 2014, ISSN 1094-3501 
23
EXPLORING HOW COLLABORATIVE DIALOGUES FACILITATE 
SYNCHRONOUS COLLABORATIVE WRITING 
Hui-Chin YehNational Yunlin University of Science and Technology 
Collaborative writing (CW) research has gained prevalence in recent years. However, the 
ways in which students interact socially to produce written texts through synchronous 
collaborative writing (SCW) is rarely studied. This study aims to investigate the effects of 
SCW on students’ writing products and how co
l
laborative dialogues facilitate SCW. 
Following an initial analysis, 54 students were divided into 18 groups; six groups with 
higher proportions of collaborative dialogue (HCD), six groups with median proportions 
of collaborative dialogue (MCD), and six groups with lower proportions of collaborative 
dialogue (LCD). The data collected includes the students’ three reaction essays, their 
transcripts of text-based collaborative dialogues, and their writing process logs. The results 
showed that there were significant differences between the LCD, MCD, and HCD groups 
in terms of fluency and accuracy of their reaction essays. Through collaborative dialogues, 
students benefitted from text-based synchronous communications, such as clarifying their 
linguistic misconceptions, and receiving immediate feedback to help resolve their writing 
problems. The findings suggest that students could be provided with more opportunities 
for collaborative dialogues during the entire writing process, including the stages of 
generating ideas, writing reaction essays, and editing. 
Keywords: Collaborative Learning, Writing, Collaborative Dialogues 
APA Citation: Yeh, H.-C. Exploring how collaborative dialogues facilitate synchronous 
collaborative writing. Language Learning & Technology 18(1), 23–37. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/action2.pdf 
Received: April 9, 2013; Accepted: August 30, 2013; Published: February 1, 2014 
Copyright: © Hui-Chin Yeh 
INTRODUCTION 
Writing is an important skill for college students, as “professional and academic success in all disciplines 
depends, at least in part, upon writing skills” (Cho & Schunn, 2007, p.409). For many English as a 
Foreign Language (EFL) teachers, developing students’ writing skills has proved challenging. Teachers 
often have a limited understanding of students’ writing processes. An understanding of this process is 
necessary for them to help students develop into proficient writers (Florio-Ruane & Lensmire, 1990). EFL 
teachers’ writing pedagogy is often derived from their own learning experiences as a pupil, rather than 
from the evaluation and observation of students’ actual writing processes (Florio-Ruane, 1989). For many 
teachers, understanding the difficulties that students have in writing is influenced by personal experience 
and may not address the specific needs of every student. These problems are often exacerbated by too 
much emphasis on corrections of grammatical errors in students’ writing. While this is often common 
practice in L2 writing instruction, these teaching approaches neglect the global view of writing, such as 
the incorporation of brainstorming ideas and organizing writing into logical paragraphs (Lee, 2004; 
Sotillo, 2000). As a consequence, in recent years many researchers and educators have been looking for 
an effective approach to enhance students’ writing (e.g. Elola & Oskoz, 2010; Kessler & Bikowski, 2010) 
Collaborative Writing 
The prevalence of collaborative writing (CW) research in recent years attests to the potential contributions 
of CW in different aspects, such as higher quality of writing (Beck, 1993; Storch, 1999; Storch, 2005), a 
better understanding of the reader-writer relationship (Leki, 1993), and the acquisition of writing 
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
24 
knowledge, including grammar, vocabulary usage, and text structures (Kowal & Swain, 1994; Swain & 
Lapkin 1998). CW is defined as “collaborators producing a shared document, engaging in substantive 
interaction about that document, and sharing decision-making power and responsibility for it” (Allen, 
Atkinson, Morgan, Moore, & Snow, 1987, p. 70). CW focuses on the social interaction process, where 
two or more people, through discussion, work together to construct written documents, reach consensus 
on resolutions of questions and quality of work, and coordinate individual contributions on various 
aspects of writing (e.g. Elola & Oskoz, 2010; Kessler & Bikowski, 2010; Storch, 1999; Storch, 2005). In 
the social interaction process, students contribute their particular ideas or expertise, while taking into 
account others’ perspectives, in order to collaboratively complete a writing task (Speck, Johnson, Dice, & 
Heaton, 1999).  
Some potential Web 2.0 technologies for CW include Wiki and Google Docs. Wiki refers to an 
asynchronous networking tool where users have equal opportunities to asynchronously organize, 
compose, and revise content (Kessler, 2009; Lee, 2010;  Elola & Oskoz, 2010) at any time. One potential 
use of Wiki is its tracking tool, “History.” It documents the collaborative writing processes so that 
teachers can recognize the changes students have made on texts, and trace who makes the changes. 
Google Docs refers to a synchronous and asynchronous networking tool that allows writers to share and 
access written documents over the internet in real time. Students can either synchronously or 
asynchronously create, edit, or revise written documents, with synchronous communication supported by 
chat rooms. The tracking tool is provided in Google Docs to manage different versions of written 
documents, as well as record the time and date they are modified. While asynchronous communication 
provides a useful method of communicating with peers, synchronous methods permit the immediate 
addressing of key topics across a potentially wide audience.  
Researchers have recognized some of the benefits of text-based synchronous communication, which (a) 
focuses on meaning rather than on form (Kessler, 2009), (b) improves fluency and accuracy of 
communication (Elora & Oskoz, 2010; Lee, 2001), (c) values the chance to share ideas and provide 
feedback (Ware & O’Dowd, 2008) and (d) enhances language learning motivation in general (Cononelos 
& Oliva, 1993; Oliva & Pollastrini, 1995). Students also benefit from text-based synchronous 
communication by immediately having their linguistic misconceptions and writing problems addressed. 
They receive timely constructive feedback from peers which helps them make their writing more 
meaningful and comprehensible to others (Lee, 2002; Webb, 1989). For example, Lee (2002) designed 
collaborative writing activities to enhance students’ writing proficiency through a synchronous discussion 
forum in Blackboard, which acts as an online communication tool allowing students to have synchronous 
interactions and consultations with others, in order to collaboratively accomplish writing tasks. In 
observing real-time synchronous collaborative writing processes, students are exposed to linguistic input 
alongside the vocabulary or sentence structures from written documents that they can co-construct and co-
edit (Lee, 2002). As a result, students may apply collective linguistic input to self-correct or edit texts. A 
SCW tool offers a text-based synchronous forum for students to carry out collaborative dialogues and 
obtain immediate feedback in congruence with face-to-face (F2F) collaborative dialogues (Blake, 2000; 
Kessler & Bikowski, 2010; Smith, 2003). Swain and Lapkin (2002) perceive collaborative dialogues as an 
externalization of thoughts which can be “scrutinized, questioned, reflected upon, disagreed with, 
changed, or disregarded” (p. 286). Since text chats provide an avenue for students to reflect and negotiate 
meanings with peers on the basis of collaborative dialogues in written forms, they also allow students to 
elaborate on their ideas more clearly and attend to linguistic output so that students can better understand 
the comments and feedback that lead to L2 improvements (Koschmann, Kelson, Feltovich, & Barrows, 
1996; O’Sullivan, Mulligan & Dooley, 2007). For example, Wells and Chang-Wells (1992) explored the 
effectiveness of text-based synchronous collaborative dialogues upon argumentative writing. Their results 
showed that the text-based synchronous collaborative dialogues fostered literate thinking development. 
That is, students performed much better when elaborating their ideas in written argumentative essays, 
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
25 
while given the opportunity to perform text-based synchronous collaborative dialogues.  
Research Gap in CW Research 
The social interaction process, namely how students produce written texts through CW, is difficult to 
conceptualize and observe empirically, and so it is not well understood (Swain, 2000). According to 
sociocultural theory, the social interaction process cannot be disregarded, since language learning always 
occurs in the process of social interaction rather than in writing products (Donato, 1994; Lee, 2004b). 
Studies have shown that the social interaction process can provide valuable information which may not be 
directly observed from writing products (Masoodian & Luz, 2001). Understanding what factors may 
affect the quality of the social interaction process when incorporating Web 2.0 tools is valuable. For 
example, Lee (2004a) examined the social processes of networked collaborative interaction by using 
Blackboard. The results showed that students’ language proficiency, computer skills, and ages, are the 
core factors that determined the success of online negotiation and influenced students’ learning 
motivation. Brodahl, Hadjerrouit, and Hansen (2011) also pointed out key factors, such as learning tasks, 
course content, perceptions toward tools, and prerequisite knowledge, which may result in different levels 
of collaboration and learning outcomes in CW.  
Currently, the effectiveness of SCW remains relatively unexplored. Many scholars (e.g. Lowry, Curtis, & 
Lowry, 2004; Storch, 2005) have addressed compelling needs for more studies to look into social 
interaction processes in synchronous modes. Only a few L2 studies have attempted to investigate 
collaborative dialogues in SCW (e.g., Digiovanni & Nagaswami, 2001; Jones, Garralda, Li, & Lock, 
2006). Among these attempts, collaborative dialogues have been limited to the co-editing stage, where 
students edit and provide feedback on peers’ texts in order to produce a final writing product (Storch, 
2005). Nixon (2007) similarly argues that “most of the conditions under which students are given 
opportunities in the classroom to engage in dialogues are concerned with only one part of the entire 
writing process,” (p. 6) namely co-editing. Jones, Garralda, Li, and Lock (2006) also examined 
collaborative dialogues of L2 students in both online and F2F in co-editing, based on two types: initiating 
moves (e.g., offer, directive, statement, and question) and responding moves (e.g., clarification, 
confirmation, acceptance, rejection, and acknowledge). Results showed that students raised more 
questions and made more comments online than through F2F in the co-editing process. They also 
reported that collaborative dialogues in co-editing focus much more on the micro-level feedback (e.g., 
vocabulary and grammar) in the F2F session, and are more concerned with the macro-level feedback 
(e.g., content, organization, and topic) in online co-editing.  
Collaborative dialogues in co-editing seemed to result in superficial levels of writing in which students 
only concentrated on identifying either micro-level or macro-level writing problems (Jones et al., 2006). 
When students are only engaged in the final stage of writing, namely co-editing, they might lose sight of 
the entire writing process for generating insights into the deeper meaning of the writing (Hirvela, 1999). 
To discourage the collaborative dialogues from centering on superficial CW processes of simply finding 
and fixing errors, and raising the process to a comprehensive level for the total extent of writing, L2 
instructors and researchers are encouraged to design the tasks which involve the entire process of CW. 
Research Questions: 
The core objectives of the current study, scheduled to run for one semester, were to investigate the effects 
of SCW upon writing products and how collaborative dialogues facilitated SCW. Based on the research 
purposes, the research questions included:  
1.
Do highly collaborative groups produce higher quality writing products? 
2.
How do the collaborative dialogues facilitate SCW? 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested