c# pdf viewer wpf : Rearrange pdf pages in reader software control cloud windows azure .net class v18n13-part451

Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
26 
Research Background 
In this current study, 18 groups, comprised of three students each, were required to write three reaction 
essays synchronously and collaboratively. The researcher, in the role of instructor, assisted the 54 EFL 
students in writing the reaction essays using EtherPad (EP). Like Google Docs, EP is a word processing 
software application that includes similar functionalities to support synchronous writing, editing, and text 
chatting, and documents historical records of writing processes and different versions of written products. 
EP is free open-source software that users can use without license restrictions. Writers can collaboratively 
write and edit a shared document in real time with text chats embedded in the same page (see Figure 1). 
Each author in EP is provided with a unique text highlighting color and authors can save the different 
versions of drafts or edit them at any time. Periodically saved documents are historically recorded for 
writers to visualize the developmental process using a flash form in Time Slider (see Figure 2). To date, 
EP has yet to be examined as a potential venue for SCW in L2 writing classrooms (Chu, Kennedy, & 
Mak, 2009). 
Figure 1Real time collaborative writing in EtherPad 
In writing the reaction essay, the students were required to read an article assigned to them by the 
instructor. After reading, the students collaborated with their group members to write down how they 
reacted to the assigned reading. The students were given one-hour out of a two-hour class on three 
occasions during a semester, to complete the writing of three reaction essays. The students were also 
required to continue to complete the SCW tasks after class in their own time. Through collaborative 
writing, students could exchange their understanding and knowledge about writing conventions, the 
reader-writer relationship, and genre rules to produce high quality reaction essays (Kowal & Swain, 1994; 
Leki, 1993; Swain & Lapkin, 1998).  
While writing the reaction essay, the students were encouraged to use text chats in the right column of EP 
to negotiate meanings with each other throughout the entire SCW process. After completing and saving 
the reaction essay in the EP system, the students obtained a hyperlink to their written text, which was 
generated automatically by the EP system. Each group then posted the hyperlink in an online course 
management system, E-Campus, for the instructor and other students to read.  
Betty’s editing 
ng 
with color coded 
Written texts 
Records of 
collaborative dialogues 
Rearrange pdf pages in reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
rearrange pdf pages reader; move pages in pdf reader
Rearrange pdf pages in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf rearrange pages; how to rearrange pages in a pdf document
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
27 
Figure 2. Time Slider as the tracking tool to view different saved versions 
METHODOLOGY 
Participants 
The 18 groups consisted of 54 non-English major students registered in a two-credit college course, 
“Vocabulary and Reading”, at a university in central Taiwan. These non-English majors were first-year 
students from the Colleges of Management, Design, and Engineering. The 54 students had been learning 
EFL for more than 10 years and were not proficient in English writing, which required higher cognitive 
levels in application, organization, and integration of existing English writing knowledge. Individual 
students from the 18 groups took the writing section of TOEFL to measure their writing proficiency 
during the first week of the semester. Their writing proficiency scores ranged from 11 to 22 on a 30-point 
scale (M = 15.9).  
The students confirmed their willingness to participate by signing a consent form informing them of the 
research scope and data to be collected. They were also informed that they could withdraw from the study 
at any time. All names were displayed as pseudonyms in written communications to ensure the 
participants’ anonymity. 
Data Collection and Analysis 
Data sources included (a) the students’ three reaction essays, (b) the transcripts of text-based collaborative 
dialogues, and (c) the students’ writing action logs from Time Slider, the system function providing 
historical records of the student writing processes using EP. The three essays and collaborative dialogues 
were analyzed to examine the effects of the SCW upon the fluency and accuracy of the writing products 
and how collaborative dialogues facilitated SCW.  
Save different 
written versions 
View saved different 
versions of text 
developments 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
pdf reverse page order preview; how to move pages in pdf reader
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
move pages in a pdf file; reverse pdf page order online
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
28 
At the initial analysis stage, the 18 groups were classified into groups with high proportions of 
collaborative dialogue (HCD groups), median proportions of collaborative dialogue (MCD groups), and 
low proportions of collaborative dialogue (LCD groups). To determine the HCD, MCD and LCD groups, 
the researcher first counted the frequency of collaborative dialogues in each of the 18 groups. The 
minimal analytical unit to count the frequency of the collaborative dialogue was turns. Each time a person 
typed some text in a text chat counted as one turn. The HCD groups were in the top 33% of the collective 
mean of the 18 groups’ collaborative dialogue frequency, the MCD groups were in the median 34%, and 
the LCD groups were in the bottom 33%.  
The English writing proficiency of the HCD groups ranged from TOEFL writing scores of 13 to 22 (M = 
16.5). The range of the MCD groups’ writing proficiency was 13 to 20 (M = 16.1). The LCD groups’ 
writing proficiency was 11 to 19 (M = 15). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed no-
significant differences (F = 0.398, p >.05) between the HCD, MCD, and LCD groups in terms of 
students’ writing proficiency. In other words, the HCD, MCD, and LCD groups were evaluated as having 
equivalent writing proficiency. 
The rubrics, which include the major generic elements for reaction essays, were used to rate the three 
essays. The T-units as “one main clause plus whatever subordinate clauses happen to be attached to or 
embedded within it’’ (Hunt, 1966, p. 735) served as the references to measure the text quality of student 
essays in terms of fluency (Frequency of T-unit use), and accuracy (the percentage of error-free T units) 
(Polio, 1997; Spelman Miller, 2006). Meetings were held regularly between the researcher and the 
research assistant to cross-examine the reliability of the analysis of fluency and accuracy. The inter-rater 
reliability of the text fluency and accuracy were determined as .88 and .84 respectively. 
A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted to investigate whether the proportions of 
collaborative dialogues had any effect on Essay 1, Essay 2, and Essay 3 in terms of fluency and accuracy 
respectively. The researcher selected one HCD group’s reaction essay and one LCD group’s reaction 
essay to serve as sample texts to more closely analyze whether highly collaborative groups produced 
higher quality writing products. The selection strategy was typical case sampling (Patton, 1990), as it is 
often used to describe and illustrate “a program or a participant to people not familiar with the program” 
(p. 173). As Patton indicates, cases could be selected from “a demographic analysis of averages or other 
programmatic data that provide a normal distribution of characteristics from which to identify "average" 
examples” (p. 174). The sample essays of the HCD and LCD groups were selected from essays where 
fluency and accuracy scores were close to the LCD and HCD groups collective mean scores. 
The collaborative dialogues
were analyzed using content analysis (Weber, 1990; Patton, 1990) to explore 
how the collaborative dialogues facilitated SCW. The researcher and the research assistant first coded the 
transcripts of the dialogues into 627 meaningful turns. Then, the researcher and assistant categorized the 
meaningful statements into different thematic units for the three writing stages. The collaborative 
dialogues, centering on the stages of (a) generating ideas, (b) writing reaction essays, and (c) editing the 
reaction essays, were analyzed. The inter-rater reliability of the coding for the three stages was 
determined as .86, .82, and .87. The examples of collaborative dialogues were illustrated for different 
stages. The main ideas were interpreted by offering examples, drawing conclusions, and making 
inferences. One of the HCD groups was selected by the typical case sampling method to explain how the 
students used the collaborative dialogues to help (a) generate ideas, (b) write the reaction essays, and (c) 
edit the reaction essays during the entire SCW process. The action logs served as the supplementary 
source of information that triangulates the research findings. 
RESULTS 
RQ1: Do highly collaborative groups produce higher quality writing products? 
A MANOVA was conducted to determine whether the proportions of collaborative dialogues had any 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
how to move pages within a pdf document; pdf reorder pages online
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
pages simply with a few lines of C# code. C# Codes to Sort Slides Order. If you want to use a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange
move pages in pdf online; how to move pages around in pdf file
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
29 
effect on the three reaction essays in terms of fluency and accuracy respectively. The results showed that 
the proportions of collaborative dialogue in the different groups had a significant effect on Essay 1, Essay 
2, and Essay 3 (Pillai’s Trace = 1.73, F = 12.14
***
) in terms of fluency and accuracy. The post hoc 
analysis with Sheffé Test showed that there were significant differences between the LCD, MCD, and 
HCD groups in the three essays in terms of fluency and accuracy (Table 1). The results showed that 
highly collaborative groups can produce high quality reaction essays. 
Table 1MANOVA analysis of the LCD, MCD and HCD groups’ essays in terms of fluency and accuracy 
MANOVA 
A                        ANOVA 
DV 
Pillai’s Trace F 
Post hoc 
Essay 1-fluency 
1.73 
12.14
***
19.40
0
***
MCD>LCD 
MCD<HCD 
Essay 2-fluency 
18.38
***
MCD>LCD 
MCD<HCD 
Essay 3-fluency 
17.48
***
MCD>LCD 
MCD<HCD 
Essay 1-accuracy 
14.74
***
MCD>LCD 
MCD<HCD 
Essay 2-accuracy 
13.29
***
MCD>LCD 
MCD<HCD 
Essay 3-accuracy 
19.23
***
MCD>LCD 
MCD<HCD 
Note: ***<0.01 
To examine how the collaborative dialogues facilitated students’ writing performance, one HCD group’s 
reaction essay and one LCD group’s reaction essay were selected as sampling texts to explain how their 
collaborative dialogues helped improve their writing products to different extents (see Table 2 & 3).  
Table 2Examples of the Reaction Essays Selected from the HCD Group and the LCD Group 
Group  Examples of the main idea  Examples of supporting ideas  Fluency 
Scores  
Analysis of reaction 
essays 
LCD  
We do not think it is fair. 
Because his prosthetic legs 
are less flexible and 
cooperative than normal. 
So, we think disabled athletes 
should not compete with able-
bodied athletes at same time. 
41 
No supporting ideas 
are used to support 
the main idea 
HCD 
Although it is difficult to 
make the competition fair 
in the official game, here 
are some methods to aid 
you on how to be fair in 
the competition. 
First, you can find a 
prestigious person to preside 
over the game. Second, it is 
also good to make some rules 
in advance. Each player would 
be required to follow them to 
make the competition fair. 
Finally, no un-sportsman like 
conduct, every player should 
have fun.  
90 
Three concrete 
supporting ideas are 
used to strengthen 
the main idea 
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages in extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pdf pages online; reorder pages in pdf reader
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
how to change page order in pdf acrobat; pdf reverse page order
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
30 
The MCD groups’ reaction essays were not presented, as the essays displayed similar findings to the ones 
produced by the HCD groups. As shown in Table 3, the HCD group’s main idea was presented in the first 
sentence of the reaction essay, noting “Although it is difficult to make the competition fair in the official 
game, here are some methods to aid you on how to be fair in the competition.” To support this main idea, 
the HCD group proposed three supporting ideas, marked by the transition words first, second, and finally.  
Table 3Examples of the Reaction Essays Selected from the HCD Group and the LCD Group 
Group  An excerpt from the reaction essays  
Analysis of reaction essays 
LCD  
We do not think that it is fair. Although his story makes us feel 
impressive. Overall, we believe that the normal person would 
have more advantages. Because his prosthetic legs are less 
flexible and cooperative than normal. So, we think disabled 
athletes should not compete with able-bodied athletes at same 
time.
Incorrect use of 
subordinating 
conjunctions
HCD  
Although it is difficult to make the competition fair in an 
unofficial game, here are some methods to make the official 
game fair. First, you can find a prestigious person to preside over 
the game. Second, it is also good to make some rules for each 
player to follow to make the competition fair. Finally, no un-
sportsman like conduct, every player should have fun 
Correct use of 
subordinating 
conjunctions and 
transition words 
The LCD group, however, wrote their reaction essays without providing supporting ideas and examples in 
the reaction essays. Table 2 shows that, in a selective reaction essay from one of the LCD groups, the 
supporting ideas of the topic sentence were not elaborated upon before reaching the conclusion. As a 
result, the reaction essays of the LCD groups were rated less fluent (a score of 41), when compared with 
the essays submitted by the HCD groups (a score of 90).  
The results suggest that students’ active engagement in collaborative dialogue with their peers could have 
had a positive impact on the fluency and accuracy of the essays. The HCD groups made fewer 
grammatical errors compared with the LCD groups when writing the reaction essays (see Table 2, 3, and 
4), the LCD groups’ work often contained grammatical errors such as when using pronouns and 
subordinating conjunctions. In the LCD groups it was often hard to locate the antecedent of the pronoun. 
For example, the LCD group started writing the reaction essay with the passage “We do not think that it is 
fair. Although his story makes us feel impressive. Overall, we believe that the normal person would have 
more advantages. Because his prosthetic legs are less flexible and cooperative than normal” in which the 
antecedent of the possessive pronoun his remains unclear and may refer to either the noun phrase normal 
person or the disabled person in the textThis example also shows that the LCD group had difficulty 
using conjunctions correctly.  
Table 4Proportions of the Collaborative Dialogues During SCW 
Group 
Generating Ideas 
Writing reaction essays 
Editing reaction essays 
Total 
HCD  
241   (28%) 
537   (61%) 
96   (11%) 
874 
MCD 
201  (28%) 
434   (60%) 
87   (12%) 
722 
LCD  
152  (29%) 
304   (58%) 
66  (13%) 
522 
Total 
594  (28%) 
1275  (60%) 
249   (12%) 
2118 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to move pages in pdf files; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
31 
RQ2: How do the collaborative dialogues facilitate SCW? 
All of the students were encouraged to employ collaborative dialogues to discuss how to (a) generate 
ideas, (b) write reaction essays, and (c) edit the reaction essays. The results showed that collaborative 
dialogues often took place during the process of writing reaction essays. Sixty per cent of the 
collaborative dialogues centered on how to write the reaction essays, 28% of the collaborative dialogues 
centered on how to generate ideas, and 12% centered on how to edit the reaction essays (see Table 4). The 
proportion of collaborative dialogues that centered on how to write reaction essays was about twice the 
proportion of collaborative dialogues that centered on how to generate ideas and about five times that 
centered on editing the reaction essays. The collaborative dialogues from one of the HCD groups were 
selected as an example to demonstrate how collaborative dialogues facilitated students to (a) generate 
ideas, (b) write the reaction essays, and (c) edit the reaction essays during the entire SCW process.  
The students began writing the reaction essays collaboratively by using collaborative dialogues to 
generate writing ideas, as shown in Table 5. The students initiated the conversations by addressing their 
concerns on the writing topic.  
Table 5Examples of how collaborative dialogues facilitate the HCD group to generate ideas 
Interaction process  Collaborative dialogues  
Formulating the 
writing topic 
Tim: There are many directions we may go about for this essay. Our 
reading is about “the handicapped should not compete against able-bodied 
athletes”  
Amy: What do we want to write about? 
Tim: Maybe we can write about fairness. 
John: Our topic could be “In an informal competition, how to judge 
whether it is fair or not?” 
Eliciting ideas 
Amy: Do you have any ideas? 
Tim: Yes. We can discuss our ideas first. We may start with main ideas 
and supporting ideas first. 
Contributing ideas Amy: First, enjoy the competition without cheating. Second, look for a 
prestigious person to host the competition. 
John: Third, set up the rules. Anything else? 
Tim: But these came from our reading. We should have our own opinions.  
Amy: I am still thinking…How about cultivate good sportsmanlike 
conduct? Is that appropriate? 
Iterative seeking 
clarification 
John: I am not sure. Is there any relation between good sportsman like 
conduct and holding a fair competition? 
Explaining 
Amy: Yes, if you have good sportsmanlike conduct, you will enjoy 
yourself at the game. You do not care about the contest results 
John: I don’t quite understand. 
Iterative clarifying 
Amy: By “good sportsmanlike conduct”, I mean joining in the contest for 
self-accomplishment not for competition with others.   
Tim: O.K. it will be a direction for us to write about. To discuss the 
purpose of being in a competition.  
As shown in Table 5, Tim proposed that, “There are many directions we may go about for this essay” and 
they started to discuss how to write and organize their ideas in an essay. Cognitive conflicts occurred 
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
32 
when John was confused with Amy’s statements and asked Amy to provide further elaborations to clarify 
the relation between ideas. Through constant meaning negotiations, the group members and Amy 
resolved emerging confusion, reached a consensus on how to use the main and supporting ideas to 
strengthen their reaction essays, and determined a writing topic together.  
After generating ideas, the students used the proposed ideas to write their reaction essays. When writing 
the reaction essays, the collaborative dialogues assisted the students in clarifying any misunderstanding of 
English vocabulary and helped them understand how to write and develop ideas. John and Amy started 
the writing task by listing the developed writing ideas they had generated in English. As shown in Table 6, 
while constructing the English sentences, John was hindered by his limited English vocabulary and asked 
Amy about the meaning of competition by saying “Does competition mean the person who joins in the 
contest?” Based on Amy’s responses, John recognized competition as the noun of the verb to compete, 
and used player to identify people who compete with each other in contests. However, the other group 
member Tim did not agree with John’s English translation of the word player, as people who join in a 
contest, and provided the noun competitor, as the other English translation of people who compete in a 
contest. By receiving feedback from Tim, John expanded his vocabulary and usage of player and 
competitor. 
After listing the developed writing ideas in English, Amy discussed with Tim and John about how to 
integrate the developed writing ideas into a passage by noting “We could first discuss how to integrate the 
content.” Tim then responded, “We can write down the main idea, followed by providing examples.” 
John also suggested that some transition words (such as first, second, and finally) could be used to help 
connect the ideas between sentences for readers to follow the arguments.  
Table 6Examples of how collaborative dialogues facilitate the HCD group to write the reaction essay 
Interaction process 
Collaborative dialogues 
Seeking clarification 
John: Does the word “competition” refer to people who enter a contest? 
Providing feedback 
Amy: Probably not. It is the noun for the verb to “compete”. 
John: Fine, then we can use the word “player”. 
Providing alternate 
feedback 
Tim: It is not appropriate at all. I looked it up in the dictionary, and it 
shows that “competitor” is more suitable. 
Clarifying/formulating 
response 
John: Is “player” inappropriate? 
Tim: It is fine, but it seems that the word “competitor” is more correct 
than “ player” 
Proposing alternatives 
Amy: Then, shall we start writing our summary? We could first discuss 
how to integrate the content. 
Providing solution 
direction 
Tim: We can write down the main idea, followed by providing 
examples. 
Providing concrete 
example 
John: We can connect the sentence with a sequence marker like “First,” 
“Second,” and “Finally.” By doing so, we can clarify each statement. 
Once the students finished their writing, they collaboratively edited the reaction essays. In editing the 
reaction essays, the collaborative dialogues not only allowed students to expand their knowledge of 
grammar and vocabulary, but also exerted collaborative efforts to correct incorrect grammatical sentences 
and revise semantically incorrect sentences. As shown in Table 7, Tim found a grammatical error in the 
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
33 
sentence “With these rules, everyone has to follow it” written by Amy. Then, Tim negotiated with Amy 
about the grammatical use of pronouns – them . Through the collaborative dialogues with Tim, Amy 
reconstructed her understanding of the pronoun them. They thus expanded their grammatical knowledge 
through collaborative dialogues. Another example is how they negotiated meanings with each other to 
edit an appropriate phrase that reflected their intended meaning. Through collaborative dialogues, they 
changed the word “solemn” into “take more care at the game.” They explored the possibilities for using 
different words or phrases to express their meanings.  
Table 7Examples of how the collaborative dialogues facilitate the HCD group to edit a reaction essay 
Original writing 
texts 
Collaborative dialogues 
Revised 
writing texts 
Analysis of 
collaborative 
dialogues  
With these rules, 
everyone has to 
follow it.  
Tim: “Rules” is the plural form, isn’t it? We 
should use “it”, rather than “them 
Amy: But, “them” only represents humans, 
doesn’t it? 
Tim: “Them” also can stand for the “object”.  
Amy: Well…Let’s revise it. 
With these 
rules, 
everyone has 
to follow 
them.  
Expanding 
grammatical 
knowledge 
about pronouns 
Because it can let 
player more 
solemn.  
Tim: I think it is 
not appropriate 
to put the 
word “solemn” here.  
John: solemn…means take something 
seriously? 
Tim: Right, any other word that we can alter? 
John: How about substituting the “solemn” 
with “care”  
Tim: I think it is somehow weird. Let me think 
twice. 
John: How about revising it to be “take care at 
the game”? 
Tim: Fine. 
John: Ok, I revise it. 
Because it 
can let player 
take more 
care at the 
game. 
Expanding   
knowledge 
about 
vocabulary and 
phrases 
CONCLUSIONS 
When engaged in collaborative dialogue in SCW, students are exposed to bountiful linguistic sources of 
exposure to language input and output which in turn contribute to L2 writing development. Students can 
exchange their understanding and knowledge about vocabulary, sentence structures, and idea organization 
to collaboratively produce written texts. The findings suggest that highly collaborative groups can 
produce high quality reaction essays in terms of fluency and accuracy. It was suggested that students 
should be provided with more opportunities to exchange information or ideas during the entire writing 
stages, including generating ideas, writing reaction essays, and editing. The findings responded to 
previous research, in that students benefitted from text-based synchronous communications, realized their 
linguistic misconceptions, and received immediate feedback to help resolve their writing problems (Lee, 
2002; Webb, 1989). The results also showed that students often centered collaborative dialogues on how 
to write the essays more than how to generate ideas and edit the texts to complete reaction essays. Such 
findings echo some previous studies, in that students participating in the entire SCW process often placed 
more emphasis on the meaning negotiation of the content than on the language forms (Kessler, 2009).  
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
34 
In the social interaction process, collaborative dialogues provide an avenue for students to use language 
and reflect on their language use. Collaborative dialogues can be regarded as a form of mediation for 
facilitating L2 writing, particularly when students work together with peers to co-construct a written 
document. Collaborative dialogues often occur when students notice linguistic problems and work 
together to solve them, leading to L2 knowledge construction. As a result, Swain (2000) specially referred 
this concept to “dialogues with which speakers are engaged in problem solving and knowledge building, 
and dialogues heighten the potential for exploration of the product” (p. 102). In other words, through 
collaborative dialogues, students can construct new or half-developed ideas, since students in a group 
collaboratively generate and refine the ideas. Students may elicit challenging questions and provide 
constructive feedback to promote knowledge development. The feedback in turn often motivates students 
to monitor and evaluate their learning processes. Through monitoring and evaluating in the social 
interaction process, students can obtain a broader scope of their own problems to adjust their writing. 
Using EP, teachers could save different versions of students’ written documents, and then use the Time 
Slider feature, to monitor students’ writing processes and examine students’ developmental processes of 
text quality. Moreover, EP also historically recorded all the transcripts of students’ collaborative 
dialogues in the chat room. By observing the transcripts of students’ collaborative dialogues, teachers can 
understand how students develop writing products, negotiate meanings, and resolve any 
misunderstandings with peers during the SCW process.  
While this research contributed to the effectiveness of SCW in EFL students’ writing products, limitations 
remain. Because this research was conducted in an EFL context to investigate the effects of SCW and 
collaborative dialogues on writing, the results might not be generalized for other English teaching 
contexts, such as ESL. In addition, the research is limited in its one-semester implementation timeline. 
Longitudinal studies could be conducted to investigate whether time is a key factor for successful SCW. 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
This research was partially supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan under grant 
NSC 101-2410-H-224-021 and NSC 102-2410-H-224-011. 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR 
Hui-chin Yeh is currently an associate professor in the Graduate School of Applied Foreign Languages at 
National Yunlin University of Science and Technology in Taiwan. She received her Ph.D. in Language 
Education at Indiana University-Bloomington. Her research interests center on EFL teacher education, 
computer-assisted language learning, and EFL reading and writing. She has published many articles on 
these topics in Language Learning & Technology, Computer Assisted Language Learning, Teaching and 
Teacher EducationBritish Journal of Educational TechnologyEducational Technology Research & 
DevelopmentReCALLEducational Technology & SocietyAustralasian Journal of Educational 
TechnologyAsia-Pacific Education Researcher, and Asia Pacific Education Review. She has received 
several awards for her work, among them a distinguished young researcher award from the Ministry of 
Science and Technology, a 2010 teaching excellence award, and a 2011 excellence in mentoring award. 
Her “Multimedia English” course has been certified as a quality e-learning course from the Ministry of 
Education in Taiwan. She hopes that her efforts in different aspects of her work can make significant 
contributions to her academic field of study. 
Hui-Chin Yeh 
How Collaborative Dialogues Facilitate Collaborative Writing 
Language Learning & Technology 
35 
REFERENCES 
Allen, N. J., Atkinson, D., Morgan, M., Moore, T., & Snow, C. (1987). What experienced collaborators 
say about collaborative writing? Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 1 (2), 70–90. 
Beck, E. E. (1993). A survey of experiences of collaborative writing. In M. Sharples (Ed.): Computer 
supported collaborative writing (pp. 87-112). London: Springer-Verlag. 
Blake, R. (2000). Computer mediated communication: A window on L2 Spanish interlanguage. Language 
Learning & Technology, 4(1), 120–136. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol4num1/blake/default.html 
Brodahl, C., Hadjerrouit, S., & Hansen, N.K. (2011). Collaborative writing with Web 2.0 technologies: 
Education students’ perceptions. Journal of Information Technology Education: Innovations in Practice
10, 73–103. 
Cho, K. & Schunn, C. D. (2007). Scaffolded writing and rewriting in the discipline: A web-based 
reciprocal peer review system. Computers & Education , 48 , 409–426. 
Chu, S., Kennedy, D., & Mak, M. (2009). MediaWiki and Google Docs as online collaboration tools for 
group project co-construction. Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Knowledge 
Management. Hong Kong, Dec 3-4, 2009. 
Cononelos, T., & Oliva, M. (1993). Using computer networks to enhance foreign language/culture 
education. Foreign Language Annals, 26 (4), 527-534. 
DiGiovanni, E., & Nagaswami, G. (2001). Online peer review: an alternative to face-to-face? ELT 
Journal, 55(3), 263–272. 
Donato, R. (1994). Collective scaffolding in second language learning. In J. P. Lantolf & G. Appel (Eds.), 
Vygotskian approaches to second language research (pp. 33-56). Norwood, NJ: Ablex. 
Elola, I., & Oskoz, A. (2010). Collaborative writing: Fostering foreign language and writing conventions 
development. Language Learning & Technology14(3), 51–71. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/october2010/elolaoskoz.pdf 
Florio-Ruane, S. (1989). Social organization of classes and schools. In M. C. Reynolds (Ed.), Knowledge 
base for the beginning teacher (pp.163-172). Oxford: Pergamon. 
Florio-Ruane, S. & Lensmire, T. (1990). Transforming future teachers' ideas about writing instruction. 
Journal of Curriculum Studies, 22(3), 277–289. 
Hirvela, A. (1999). Collaborative writing: Instruction and communities of readers and writers. TESOL 
Journal8(2), 7–12. 
Hunt, K. (1966). Recent measures in syntactic development. Elementary English43, 732–739. 
Jones, R. H., Garralda, A., Li, D. C. S., & Lock, G. (2006). Interactional dynamics in on-line and face-to-
face peer-tutoring sessions for second language writers. Journal of Second Language Writing, 15 , 1–23. 
Kessler, G. (2009). Student-initiated attention to form in wiki-based collaborative writing. Language 
Learning & Technology, 13(1), 79–95. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol13num1/kessler.pdf 
Kessler, G., & Bikowski, D. (2010). Developing collaborative autonomous learning abilities in computer 
mediated language learning: attention to meaning among students in wiki space. Computer Assisted 
Language Learning, 23(1), 41–58. 
Koschmann, T., Kelson, A. C., Feltovich, P. J., & Barrows, H. S. (1996). Computer-supported problem-
based learning: A principled approach to the use of computers in collaborative learning (pp.83–124). In T. 
Koschmann (Ed.), CSCL: Theory and practice of an emerging paradigm . Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested