Language Learning & Technology
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/review2.pdf 
df 
February 2014, Volume 18, Number 1 
pp. 46–48 
Copyright © 2014, ISSN 1094-3501 
46
REVIEW OF LANGUAGE LEARNING WITH TECHNOLOGY: IDEAS FOR 
INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM 
Language Learning with Technology:  
Ideas for Integrating Technology in the 
Classroom 
Graham Stanley 
2013 
ISBN:  9781107628809 
215 pp. 
Cambridge University Press 
Cambridge, UK 
Review by
Nancy MontgomerySouthern Methodist University
Language Learning with Technology: Ideas for Integrating Technology in the Classroom
by Graham 
Stanley is a handbook designed for both new and veteran teachers who wish to improve their knowledge 
of how to integrate technology in the curriculum. One of the many strengths of this handbook is its 
centralizing of learning goals, rather than of specific technologies. Each chapter has a specific learning 
goal around which the discussion of technologies takes place. This useful organizational strategy 
emphasizes a sequence of presentation that begins with the learning focus, moves through to lesson 
preparation, and finally suggests technical requirements and pedagogical possibilities. The overall effect 
of the handbook thereby provides useful and interesting activities in which technology provides added 
value to language learning activities across all language levels that are outlined by goals, level, and time 
estimates. 
Chapter 1 outlines activities that help students become acquainted with the use of technology in the 
classroom. Each activity includes an explanation of the exact procedure teachers can follow to create 
successful exercises for their students, including ideas for variations of each activity to meet the needs of 
learners across a variety of language levels. Examples from this chapter include several suggestions for 
simple and efficient diagnostic tools that teachers can use to understand their students’ attitudes about 
using technology in the classroom. For example, the activities of 
Technological Survey
and 
Favorite 
Website
both elicit information about general attitudes and Internet use patterns that can provide teachers 
with class profiles of student background interests with technology.  
Chapter 2 focuses on activities that help foster a classroom learning community. Stanley anchors his view 
of community as "a group of people with shared values, a common purpose, and similar goals" (p.25). 
Since language is constructed within such social contexts, the building of a community in language 
Pdf reorder pages online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages of pdf; how to reorder pages in pdf preview
Pdf reorder pages online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pdf pages in; how to move pages in a pdf file
Nancy Montgomery 
Review of 
Language Learning with Technology
Language Learning & Technology
47 
learning classrooms is extremely important. Technology offers the additional advantage of extending the 
classroom community even beyond the physical classroom. Through the use of various communication 
tools such as blogs, email, and threaded forum discussions, the results can become a 
community of 
practice
(Lave & Wagner, 1991, p. 98) that occurs when people with a common interest regularly interact 
to learn with each other over an extended period of time.  There are several community-building 
strategies in chapter 2, many of which are geared for a wide range of language levels, and they involve a 
range of technologies including blogs, wikis, Facebook, and Twitter that can be used to support 
independent learning and also keep a social presence after the class has ended.   Also of importance in this 
chapter are activities that explicitly focus on online safety. 
The next seven chapters are organized in a conventional way familiar to language teachers, as each 
chapter is devoted to a particular language skill area. Chapters 3 and 4 focus on vocabulary and grammar, 
respectively. For vocabulary, Stanley emphasizes extending word fields by exposure to and participation 
in rich contexts, and he offers ideas for fostering learner autonomy. The activities in this chapter are 
arranged according to the language level of the students, from simple word games for the beginning 
language learner to more advanced techniques for advanced learners that draw on a range of technologies. 
The focus of Chapter 4 is on grammar and how technology can support teachers in helping their students 
gain a greater understanding of underlying language structures. The activities are organized according to 
the different levels of language, and most are relatively brief, taking between 20 and 30 minutes. Many of 
the activities focus on authentic grammar in use, rather than on contrived grammatical constructions, as 
illustrated by an activity called 
Authentic Word Clouds, 
which is designed to increase the awareness of 
authentic written text that contains complex sentences. One weakness of this chapter is the paucity of 
activities for the beginner level, although skilled teachers can modify many of those aimed at higher 
language levels.  
The role of technology, as Stanley explains in Chapter 5, is to help students achieve better listening skills 
through activities that teach them various aspects, including discerning the gist of text, listening for 
details, and developing inference skills. Many activities in this chapter make use of authentic listening 
materials available on the web
that expand the types of registers and accents beyond the packaged voices 
of curricular materials. Many ideas in this chapter also rely on basic technology tools, which allow 
teachers easy integration without having to invest too much time learning new tools.    
Chapters 6 and 7 are dedicated to developing stronger reading and writing skills, and Stanley’s view of 
reading involves being proficient in a range of information and communication literacies.  Some of the 
sub skills targeted are skimming, scanning, reading for the gist, activating schema, summarizing, and 
developing writing fluency. Many activities integrate reading and writing, such as 
Word-Cloud Warmer
which taps into prior knowledge about a topic. Students can make predictions about what is in the text 
and share through reconstruction of the text what they have learned with another student through a blog or 
email to bring together the reciprocal skills of reading and writing.  Although the chapters are named 
specifically reading and writing, the author gives activities that involve the use of both skills. 
Technology has offered several tools to support speaking, from early computer-mediated communication 
(CMC) to the more current use of Skype and voice recognition software that allow students to have 
authentic speaking experiences when collaborating with other students and when practicing their 
speaking. Learners can record themselves speaking and develop more autonomy in determining areas in 
need of improvements. Activities for speaking in this chapter focus on fluency, accuracy, pronunciation, 
and learner autonomy and include technology tools such as voice recorders, audio websites, audio 
journals, and mobile learning tools. The chapter includes activities that encourage speaking in and out of 
class, scripted and unscripted dialogue, as well as interactive speaking. The activities are easy to modify 
across language levels and offer students the chance to take speaking out of the classroom into real-world 
experiences through cell phones, audio websites, computer-based simulated environments, and audio-
voice forums.  
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
pdf reverse page order preview; pdf rearrange pages
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
move pages in pdf; move pages in pdf file
Nancy Montgomery 
Review of 
Language Learning with Technology
Language Learning & Technology
48 
The activities in Chapter 9 center on raising awareness of phonetics, common pronunciation errors, 
connected speech features, minimal errors, stress, and intonation. Some of the activities in this chapter 
help students understand how they can use recorders, head phones, podcasting, and mobile phones to 
extend pronunciation practice outside the classroom.  An example of an interesting activity is 
Re-
recording Speeches and Scenes
, an activity that raises awareness of the intonation of connected speech 
and gives students opportunities to record their speech to see how well their pronunciation and intonation 
match those of the speaker’s pre-recording. Many of the activities in this chapter leverage the use of 
integrating more than one technology, such as the use of podcasts with wikis in the development of a 
class vocabulary audio notebook.  
One of the most powerful chapters of this book is Chapter 10, 
Project Work, 
because it offers 
collaborative activities and illustrates many specific ways to use technology for group work. Learners 
become active participants in doing meaningful tasks within authentic settings. In this chapter, Stanley 
focuses on collaboration through activities such as the creation of e-books, online magazines, recipe 
books, and filmmaking. These activities can motivate students to become more aware of how they are 
developing integrated skills. Students can conduct these projects in and out of class both on their own and 
in collaboration with others.  The skill levels in this chapter span all levels of proficiency.   
In Chapter 11, 
Assessment and Evaluation
, many activities help the teacher using technology to diagnose 
and evaluate what the student has learned and where they are in the learning process.  The activity of 
E-
Portfolio Archive and Showcase
, for example, is focused on formative assessment and is for all levels of 
learners.  It helps the learner understand how portfolios work and gives them ownership for determining 
their best work to showcase.  
Comparing Placement Tests
is another assessment activity that encourages 
learners to reflect on their development. Through web-based organizational archives, including blogs and 
course management systems, teachers and students can collect documents or artifacts that are text-based 
and multimodal. In this way, through technology integration teachers are shown a wide range of options 
for both formative as well as summative assessments. 
This book is an excellent tool for any teacher who wants to integrate technology in the curriculum to 
support student learning. The activities place pedagogy firmly over technology. The appendices also 
provide explicit definitions of the technologies in the book and suggested software tools. Teachers do not 
have to be technology gurus in order to use this book effectively and efficiently in a classroom, and as 
such, the book is particularly useful to those who are new to technology integration. 
ABOUT THE REVIEWER 
Dr. Nancy Montgomery is an Assistant Clinical Professor at Southern Methodist University and has 
taught all ages of English language learners, from elementary students to adults, in public and private 
institutions in the United States and in Indonesia. She has also served as an administrator and has 
presented at many state, national, and international conferences on the topic of supporting refugee 
learners from Southeast Asia and Africa.  
E-mail
nmontgomery@smu.edu 
REFERENCE 
Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). 
Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation
. Cambridge, UK: 
Cambridge University Press. 
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
"This online guide content is Out Dated! Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; Save and print PDF as you wish;
change pdf page order online; how to move pages in a pdf document
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Sort PDF Pages - online C#.NET tutorial page for how to reorder, sort, reorganize or re-arrange PDF document files using C#.NET code.
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; pdf reverse page order online
Language Learning & Technology
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/review3.pdf 
February 2014, Volume 18, Number 1 
pp. 49–52 
Copyright © 2014, ISSN 1094-3501 
49
REVIEW OF ENCOUNTERS: CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE  
Encounters: Chinese Language and Culture (Student Book 1) 
Encounters: Chinese Language and Culture (Character 
Writing Workbook 1) 
Cynthia Y. Ning; John S. Montanaro 
2012 
ISBN: 978-0-300-16162-5 
978-0-300-16170-0 
US $94.99; US $29.99 
336 pp.; 256 pp. 
Yale University Press; China International Publishing Group 
New Haven and London 
Review by
Yaqiong CuiMichigan State University 
In the past two decades, great value has been placed on communicative and cultural competency in 
language classrooms. This has led to a burgeoning of textbooks focusing on learners’ communicative 
skills and their ability to use the language in the target culture. However, Chinese textbooks often lack 
key communicative criteria and often do not require learners to be able to use Chinese in authentic, real-
life settings. Some Chinese textbooks on the market,
such as 
Chinese Link 
(Wu, Yu & Zhang, 2007)
and
Integrated Chinese 
(Liu, 2008),
seem to
place great emphasis on learners’ reading and writing skills and 
introduce a large amount of vocabulary and grammar rules in each chapter. Few activities are devoted to 
learners’ communicative skills, and instructions are sometimes unclear, which require teachers to invest 
much time preparing for class. Culture might only be presented as facts within limited space at the end of 
each chapter. Thus, teachers of Chinese might be intrigued by 
Encounters: Chinese Language and 
Culture,
because it is promoted as a truly communicative and task-based textbook. I am glad to report that 
it is highly communicative, has authentic materials, and most importantly, is, as it is promoted, “culturally 
rich and delightfully engaging” (p. xvii). However, teachers who use it will still need to supplement parts 
of the book to enhance its potential to promote task-based learning. 
Integrated, Authentic, Practical, and Engaging 
The 
Encounters
program provides an integrated series of learning materials: student books, character 
writing workbooks, companion website, CD-ROMs (dramatic video episodes, instructional videos on 
Chinese culture, information about class testing and sample exams, etc.), and annotated instructor editions. 
One of the most distinctive features of the 
Encounters
program is that it includes a dramatic storyline that 
was filmed in six different locations across China with a cast of nine characters from different areas and 
with different cultural and social backgrounds. These characters discover themselves and others as they 
explore the language and culture of China. This is very similar to 
Sol Viente 
(VanPatten, Lesser & 
Keating, 2011), a Spanish textbook, in that it also provides a video series particularly made for the 
textbook. This genre of textbook has been gaining popularity in language education in the United States. 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pdf pages in preview; rearrange pages in pdf online
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Online C# class source codes enable the ability to rotate single NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
how to reorder pdf pages in reader; how to reorder pdf pages
Yaqiong Cui  
Review of 
Encounters: Chinese Language and Culture
Language Learning & Technology
50 
An additional bonus is a series of video culture notes. For example, people on the street talk about their 
views on topics such as different forms of greetings in Chinese and different methods of bargaining in 
street markets. For the culture notes, the videographers recorded a mix of non-actors (passers-by), actors 
tasked with certain communicative speech acts (these appear to be mainly unscripted), and teachers, who 
comment on the speech acts and explain them through a Chinese cultural lens. Learners thereby become 
engaged in both urban and rural settings in China. Also importantly, through watching these videos, 
learners get a chance to hear a range of native speakers’ accents. 
The title of each unit is written in English, Pinyin, and Chinese characters. Interestingly, unlike the other 
textbooks in which the titles are simply “Lesson X”, specific expressions that are related to the topics in 
the unit are presented as the titles. These are often four-character Chinese idioms or widely used proverbs. 
For example, Unit Five concerns family and friends, with title “亲朋好友” (qīnpénghǎoyǒu, “family and 
friends”); Unit Nine deals with shopping and bargaining; the title is, then, “一分价钱一分货” (yì fēn 
jiàqián yì fēn
huò
, “you get what you pay for”). In addition, on each unit’s introductory page, students can 
garner a clear idea of what they will learn in the unit from a list of skills and topics that will be covered in 
each lesson. Introducing a unit in this way is not only appealing to learners but also culturally rich and 
authentic. It corresponds with the authors’ idea that students should be immersed in the target language 
and culture immediately, from the start of Chinese learning. When overviewing the complete table of 
contents, I sensed that this textbook might be task-based, in that the chapter topics are based on what 
students will need to know to communicate in Chinese.  
The units in the textbook contain supplementary or additional information through three types of colored 
“boxes”: “Grammar Bits” (blue), “FYI” (green), and “Cultural Bits” (red). Vocabulary, grammar, culture, 
and other information are, in this way, not presented as isolated sections as seen in many other textbooks. 
Rather, they are interspersed throughout the units, interwoven with the storyline, and embedded in the 
audio and video materials. “Grammar Bits” boxes explicitly instruct the grammar needed to convey 
meaning related to the unit topics and activities. The authors created these grammar lessons as 
“incidental”; however, one might contextualize them better as reflecting a planned focus on form, as the 
grammar forms highlighted anticipate the language needed to complete the communicative tasks at the 
heart of the lessons. The grammar explanations in these boxes are presented in English, which might 
negate the need for teachers to focus precious in-class time explaining sometimes complicated grammar 
points, which further allows teachers to only talk in Chinese during class. “FYI” boxes provide factual 
information (for example, that China has only one time zone) and study tips. The “Cultural Bits” boxes 
often have questions for discussion related to the cultural aspects of the video and only provide, as the 
authors note, a “jumping-off point” (p. xxvii) for investigations into Chinese society and culture. In other 
words, teachers have plenty of room to supplement the instruction with their own culturally-focused tasks 
here. But the authors should be commended for not leaving culture to the very end of each unit and for 
not simply listing cultural facts. With this textbook the Chinese teaching field is closer to the notion that 
culture is inseparable from language. It helps students explore how Chinese culture is different from or 
similar to their own by providing thought-provoking questions. 
With a great emphasis on practicality, lessons in 
Encounters
deal with up-to-date topics. For instance, 
when studying Unit Six, in which professions and careers are discussed, students learn about the changes 
taking place in workplaces in modern China, which leads to a further discussion of the relationship 
between education and careers in contemporary Chinese society. Another example is Unit Nine, which 
deals with shopping and bargaining. Different from other textbooks in which students only learn about 
some expressions used when shopping, this unit embeds language learning within the art of bargaining 
and offers useful tips for bargaining in China. Another enjoyable aspect about 
Encounters
is that 
numerous authentic texts are presented throughout. By incorporating authentic materials—business cards, 
advertisements, newspapers, signs, and hand-written notes—the lessons provide practical information that 
enables students to better understand Chinese culture. 
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; (Directly see online document viewer demo here.).
how to move pdf pages around; change page order pdf acrobat
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to move pages in pdf converter professional; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
Yaqiong Cui  
Review of 
Encounters: Chinese Language and Culture
Language Learning & Technology
51 
Unlike some other Chinese textbooks, which can be monotonous in design, 
Encounters
features a colorful 
layout. It has authentic photographs, attractive illustrations, and organizing icons. These bells and 
whistles likely keep learners motivated because they are visually pleasing. To encourage students to learn 
Chinese, entertaining rap songs are presented to review the core vocabulary and expressions in each unit. 
A “Recap” (wrap-up) section appears at the end of each unit. Each of these sections includes a summary 
of grammar points, a list of vocabulary, and a checklist of “can-do” skills that students should have 
mastered after learning the unit. Those skills span listening, speaking, reading, writing, and particularly, 
understanding culture. The “Recap,” which corresponds to the preview section on the introductory page 
of that unit, also helps students monitor their progress, identify gaps in their learning, and appreciate their 
accomplishments. All of these features may help deepen learners’ understanding of the language, the 
culture, and the people of China, and also make the learning process more organized and enjoyable. This 
is particularly important to help build self-regulating and autonomous learners, ones who will be more 
likely to continue to learn Chinese to the advanced level.  
A Variety of Activities 
Another characteristic of 
Encounters
is the provision of a wide range of activities. Each unit is comprised 
of several “Encounters” in which real-life topics are presented, and activities are designed in such a way 
that students start from more form-focused practices and then progress to more meaning-based 
communicative exercises. For example, in Unit Four in which nationalities are discussed, the first 
encounter
is “expressing nationality.” To begin, students are introduced to vocabulary concerning 
nationalities through various form-focused exercises. Once they become familiar with the expressions, 
they start doing communicative activities. For example, students are asked to take notes on short 
conversations with classmates about their home cultures. The next 
encounter
focuses on talking about 
places students have lived, in which students, again, learn vocabulary and expressions through exercises, 
and then move to a “mingling” communicative activity, in which they are instructed to ask several 
classmates where they were born, where they grew up and where they live now. The following 
encounters
follow a similar pattern. The last 
encounter
of each unit is always Reading and Writing, in which the 
focus shifts to reading and writing skills so that students can develop a range of communication abilities. 
However, within this variety, I found the various activities to be somewhat unrelated at times. For 
example, in Unit Four, students first read various window signs from China and a postcard from Taiwan, 
all of which they then translate into English, and then they are instructed to write an introductory note to a 
new friend, explaining a bit about oneself. It is perhaps a shame that the various activities are not 
integrated more, with, for example, the post-card writing example being extended into a postcard writing 
task. The content of the postcards could have also been related to the text presented in the window signs. 
These missed opportunities are unfortunate and would be worth revisiting in a subsequent edition. While 
the speaking and writing activities often provide a nice shell for the communicative activities, teachers 
will need to thoughtfully consider how to make the activities more meaningful and more developed into 
complex 
tasks
with outcomes that can be assessed. The annotated instructor’s edition provides useful tips 
and suggestions on how to use the materials. Teachers may want to take those tips a step further and 
create links between the activities in order to design more robust and meaningful speaking and writing 
task. 
Use of Multimedia and Technology 
An outstanding feature of 
Encounters
is that the program has a companion website which offers an array 
of materials and activities, including interactive exercises, streaming video and audio content, and other 
resources for practicing speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Chinese. Online media enhances 
learning and teaching by providing a powerful yet intuitive tool to engage language learners and 
instructors (Cairncross & Mannion, 2001; Evans & Gibbons, 2007). The use of music also provides 
Yaqiong Cui  
Review of 
Encounters: Chinese Language and Culture
Language Learning & Technology
52 
students a lighthearted and friendly environment to engage in Chinese learning.  
Other Notes 
What I also like about the 
Encounters
program is that the character writing workbook presents the stroke 
order of each character and contextualizes each character to help learners’ understanding. Strategies for 
remembering the characters are also suggested. In addition, the workbook shows the evolution of 
characters from ancient to modern Chinese in both traditional and simplified forms. Indeed, the inclusion 
of both traditional and simplified characters may help learners who have different learning purposes; 
however, for beginning learners with no previous experience with the Chinese writing system, it might be 
confusing. Also, unlike many other textbooks in which the exercises are written solely in characters, 
Encounters
provides both Pinyin and character forms, with instructions in English. This may help 
beginning learners better recognize Chinese characters; however, it also involves the potential problem 
that learners may overly rely on Pinyin as they go through the units.  
Despite those minor flaws, 
Encounters
provides learners with meaningful, authentic, and engaging 
contexts. More importantly, the use of multimedia and technology helps learners explore China and 
Chinese culture. As the authors claim, 
Encounters
“masterfully guides learners along a well-prepared path 
toward intercultural communication and understanding, a path that also leads to fuller participation in the 
modern global community” (p. xvii). There is no doubt that this textbook can bring significant 
contributions to the field of Chinese language teaching and inspire new innovations in the development of 
Chinese teaching materials. 
ABOUT THE REVIEWER 
Yaqiong Cui is a doctoral student and research assistant in the Second Language Studies Ph.D. Program 
at Michigan State University. Her primary research interest is second language acquisition and the 
processing of Chinese from a psycholinguistic perspective. She has taught Chinese for three years in the 
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She 
is now working as a language facilitator at the Center for Language Teaching Advancement at MSU.    
E-mail
cuiyaqio@msu.edu 
REFERENCES 
Cairncross, S., & Mannion, M. (2001). Interactive multimedia and learning: Realizing the benefits. 
Innovations in Education and Teaching, 38
(2), 156–164. 
Evans, C., & Gibbons, N. J. (2007). The interactivity effect in multimedia learning. 
Computer & 
Education, 49
(4), 1147–1160. 
Liu, Y. (2008). 
Integrated Chinese
(3
rd
ed.). Boston, MA: Cheng & Tsui.  
VanPatten, B., Lesser, M. J., & Keating, G. D. (2011).
Sol Viente 
(3
rd
ed.)
Columbus, OH:
McGraw-Hill. 
Wu, S., Yu, Y., & Zhang, Y. (2007). 
Chinese link: Zhongwen Tiandi. 
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice 
Hall. 
Language Learning & Technology
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/review4.pdf 
February 2014, Volume 18, Number 1 
pp. 53–56 
Copyright © 2014, ISSN 1094-3501 
53
REVIEW OF TECHNOLOGY IN INTERLANGUAGE PRAGMATICS 
RESEARCH AND TEACHING 
Technology in Interlanguage Pragmatics Research and 
Teaching 
Edited by Naoko Taguchi & Julie M. Sykes 
2013 
ISBN: 978-90-272-13136 
US $143.00 (hardcover), $54.00 (paperback) 
276 pp. 
John Benjamins (North America) 
Philadelphia, PA  
Review by 
Feng Xiao
Carnegie Mellon University 
This book is a collective endeavor of exploring the role of technology in interlanguage pragmatics (ILP) 
research, instruction, and assessment. It starts with an introduction (Chapter 1) and ends with a 
commentary and a prologue, both of which envision future directions of using technology in the field of 
ILP. The included studies are divided into two parts: Part I (Chapters 2 to 6) which addresses issues in 
ILP research, and Part II (Chapters 7 to 10) which addresses issues in ILP instruction and assessment.   
In Chapter 1, Naoko Taguchi and Julie Sykes (both editors) first give a brief review of the field of ILP 
and then highlight four major ways that technology has advanced ILP studies: (a) expanding the construct 
of pragmatic competence (the processing speed); (b) digitizing learners’ online performance for analysis 
(e.g., speed rates, pauses); (c) creating digital spaces where pragmatic functions are frequently performed; 
and (d) quantifying and visualizing textual data (e.g., learners’ writing corpora) through concordancing 
programs and grammatical tagging. In addition, the authors provide brief summaries of studies included 
in this book. 
In Chapter 2, Naoko Taguchi synthesizes the findings of her previous studies on comprehending 
implicatures in second language (L2) English. Using a computerized pragmatic listening task, she 
measures L2 learners’ pragmatic comprehension at two different levels: accurate understanding of 
implied intentions and the speed of processing pragmatic information (measured by response time). 
Findings showed that when conventionality increased, learners increased their comprehension speed and 
even gained more of it over time compared with their comprehension accuracy, Taguchi attributes to 
conventional implicates relying on fixed linguistic forms to deliver implied intentions. Other findings 
showed that learners in the target language country (taking ESL classes) had gained more in 
comprehension speed than in accuracy, while their counterparts in the domestic instructional context 
(EFL), on the other hand, experienced the opposite and gained more accuracy.  
In the following chapter, Shuai Li investigates the effects of different types of practice on American 
learners’ levels of accuracy and speed in their recognition and production of requests in L2 Chinese. 
During four consecutive days, the two experimental groups (the input-based and output-based groups) 
Feng Xiao  
Review of 
Technology in Interlanguage Pragmatics Research and Teaching
Language Learning & Technology
54 
received input-based and output-based practices separately after receiving the same metapragmatic 
instruction on target request forms, while the control group received instruction and practice in L2 
Chinese reading comprehension. The data of the computerized pragmatic recognition and production 
tasks showed that the two experimental groups outperformed the control group at both levels of accuracy 
and speed in their pragmatic recognition and production. The magnitude of gain at the level of speed, 
however, was smaller than at the level of accuracy, regardless of the types of practice.  
In Chapter 4, Julie Sykes investigates how multiuser virtual environments (MUVEs) affect the production 
of apologies in L2 Spanish. Learners were engaged in 
Croquelandia, 
the first MUVE developed for 
learning requests and apologies in L2 Spanish. In 
Croquelandia
, learners interacted with non-player 
characters (NPCs) by choosing appropriate utterances according to situations. The data of pre- and post-
discourse completion tasks (DCTs) showed a moderate shift from using speaker-oriented to hearer-
oriented apology strategies. In addition, pre-and post-surveys and interviews showed a self-perceived 
increase in using appropriate apology strategies. These findings suggest a positive role of MUVEs in 
pragmatic instruction. In the next chapter, Adrienne Gonzales examines an L2 Spanish learner’s use of 
conversation closings in a text-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (CMC). The data 
consisted of learners’ text-based conversations with native speakers in a digital space (i.e., 
Livemocha
). 
Conversation analysis revealed a tendency to use closing sequences as rapport management strategies, 
suggesting that digital spaces such as 
Livemocha
can mediate L2 pragmatic development. In addition, the 
interview data showed a positive orientation towards using digital spaces to learn pragmatics.  
In the last chapter of Part I (Chapter 6), Alfredo Urzúa uses automated corpus-based techniques (e.g., 
concordancing programs and grammatical tagging) to investigate the use of subjective pronouns and 
possessives (self-positioning strategies) in L2 English writing. The corpus consisted of essays written by 
two groups of ESL learners who took sequential writing courses over two semesters. Longitudinal 
analysis of the corpus showed that as time passed, learners tended to avoid using 
you
and 
I
, but favored 
we 
in terms of normed frequency. In addition, the essays from four randomly selected learners in each 
group were analyzed separately, showing differences in choosing self-positioning devices between the 
two groups. The study showed the advantage of using corpus-based techniques to seek patterns of using 
different linguistic devices in order to convey pragmatic information.  
In Part II, four pedagogically-oriented studies focused on technology-based feedback (Chapter 7), 
assessment (Chapter 8), learning (Chapter 9) and analysis (Chapter 10) of pragmatic features. In Chapter 
7, Christopher Holden and Julie Sykes investigate four types of feedback on L2 pragmatics via 
Mentira
, a 
place-based mobile game of learning Spanish. In 
Mentira
, learners interacted with NPCs by choosing 
appropriate utterances to seek information in order to profess their innocence over a murder in a local 
Spanish community. As a part of a curriculum of a college-level Spanish class, 
Mentira 
required
learners 
to visit the real local community where the game was situated in order to find clues for game playing. The 
authors found that in the three iterations of 
Mentira
, learners received implicit feedback on L2 pragmatics 
via interactions with NPCs, and what they learned in the game was enhanced through environmental 
feedback (communicating with people in the real local community). Peer and instructor feedback, 
however, was lacking in terms of pragmatic information. In Chapter 8, Yumi Takamiya and Noriko 
Ishihara examine the role of blogging in improving pragmatic awareness and production. The study 
documented how blogging mediated learning of refusals in L2 Japanese from a sociocultural perspective. 
Three learners wrote blogs reflecting on taught speech acts. In addition, they were asked to add a short 
open-ended questionnaire consisting of DCTs to collect speech act data from their native speaker 
partners. The data also included their background surveys and audio-recordings of all classes, individual 
meetings and course evaluations. One case was extensively discussed to show that asynchronous 
interaction via posting and responding to blog entries can gradually increase L2 learners’ pragmatic 
awareness and in turn, facilitate their pragmatic production (e.g., refusals in this study).  
In Chapter 9, Carsten Roever discusses issues on practicality and reliability of a computer-based test of 
Feng Xiao  
Review of 
Technology in Interlanguage Pragmatics Research and Teaching
Language Learning & Technology
55 
L2 pragmatics in English. Roever’s test includes three sections: a multiple-choice section of 
comprehending implicatures, (N=12) a multiple-choice section of situation-bound routines, (N=12) and a 
brief DCT section for requests, apologies, and refusals. The data of 335 test takers were subject to 
statistical analysis. Findings revealed that degrees of computer familiarity did not have a significant effect 
on scores, and the overall use of vocabulary aids decreased with increasing proficiency. Moreover, the 
computer-based test showed strengths in practicality and improving reliability because of the instant 
digitization of score information.   
In the last Chapter, Helen Zhao and David Kaufer introduce the potential of DocuScope to facilitate L2 
pragmatic analysis. DocuScope is text-visualization and genre analysis software. The prescribed codes 
used by this software can analyze texts according to the appropriateness of pragmatic functional clusters 
of each genre. The study used DocuScope to analyze Chinese EFL learners’ written text in three genres: 
descriptive, narrative, and informative. Their writing was analyzed by the software based on pragmatic 
functions specified by each of the three genres. Findings showed that, overall, learners were able to write 
different types of essays even with no training in English genres. These findings showed the possibility of 
using this type of technology to examine pragmatic functions at the discourse level.  
Following Chapter 10, a commentary by Andrew Cohen presents detailed comments on each study. In his 
closing words, he confirms the significance of studies included in this book and emphasizes the 
importance of implementing technology in general L2 instruction. In the prologue, the two editors share 
their thoughts on the possible role of technology in future ILP research and instruction. For ILP research, 
they talk about how more advanced technology can provide various digitized data of L2 learners’ 
pragmatic performance such as texts generated from telecollaboration (e.g., asynchronous and 
synchronous CMC). Moreover, it can provide more behavioral information when learners are completing 
real-time tasks (e.g., eye-tracking and using backend database software). For ILP instruction, they discuss 
how online authorship, social networking, mobile learning, and digital game playing offer venues for 
teaching L2 pragmatics. The editors argue that technology is not just a tool that can help researchers 
collect and analyze data, but also a mediating artifact that can expand the area of inquiry in the field of 
ILP.  
The volume has revealed the status quo of the interface between technology and ILP studies. The nine 
core studies use various technologies in their research design, data analysis and context of pragmatic 
learning; (e.g., digital spaces) for example, experimental lab software was used to measure response time 
in pragmatic tasks such as PsyScope, SuperLab Pro in Chapter 2 and Revolution in Chapter 3. Text-based 
tools with built-in linguistic codes were used to analyze pragmatic features in learners’ writing corpora 
(Chapters 6 and 10). Web-development software was used to design web-based pragmatic tests (Chapter 
9). These types of technology served as tools to expand the construct of pragmatic competence (Chapters 
2 and 3), to analyze data (Chapters 6 and 10), and to change the interface of a standardized test (Chapter 
9). They all showed strengths of technology-enhanced studies and practical reports; however, the specific 
knowledge of these types of technology use is required in its implementation, which limits the 
applications of these tools. Four other studies, on the other hand, explored the benefits of interactions 
supported by technology in pragmatic teaching and learning (Chapters 4, 5, 7, and 8). With supporting 
technology, L2 learners can interact with NPCs to learn pragmatic features such as with 
Croquelandia
in 
Chapter 4 and 
Mentira
in Chapter 7. They can also develop their pragmatic competence through 
synchronous (e.g., 
Livemocha
in Chapter 5) and asynchronous CMC (e.g., blogging in Chapter 8). The 
major function of CMC is to provide interactions that may involve pragmatic performance; however, the 
pragmatic functions performed in daily face-to-face communication may be different from those 
performed in text-based CMC. A tool that can provide face-to-face conversations, therefore, may be 
beneficial for L2 learners, specifically in a domestic instructional context. The current Web 2.0 tools such 
as videoconferencing software (e.g. Skype) can be used to conduct face-to-face communications. But no 
such studies were included in this volume, showing paucity in existing literature on pragmatic 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested