c# pdf viewer wpf : How to move pages in pdf software SDK cloud windows wpf winforms class v18n16-part454

Feng Xiao  
Review of 
Technology in Interlanguage Pragmatics Research and Teaching
Language Learning & Technology
56 
performance in oral computer-mediated interactions (Heins, at al., 2007; Yanguas, 2010). These studies 
can shed light on how L2 learners’ pragmatic competence and development can be mediated by oral 
computer-mediated interactions. Another future direction that the volume can take is discussing target 
pragmatic features that are beyond utterances. Technology can allow researchers to analyze discourse 
patterns (Chapter 10); therefore, researchers should take advantage of these tools to analyze pragmatic 
functions at the monologic and dialogic levels (Rover, 2011). 
In summary, the volume is a good collection of research studies that critically discuss the implementation 
of technology in the field of ILP. The book is a timely addition to the growing body of work on the 
interface between technology and L2 pragmatics. To the best of my knowledge, this publication is the 
first book dedicated to this topic and is therefore not only beneficial for researchers interested in this 
topic, but also for practitioners who would like to incorporate technology into the teaching of L2 
pragmatics. 
______________________________________________________________________________ 
ABOUT THE REVIEWER 
Feng Xiao is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Modern Languages at Carnegie Mellon University. His 
research interests include interlanguage pragmatics, interpersonal pragmatics, and second language 
pedagogy. 
E-mail
fxiao@andrew.cmu.edu 
______________________________________________________________________________ 
REFERENCES 
Heins, B., Duensing, A., Stickler, U., & Batstone, C. (2007). Spoken interaction in online and face-to-face 
language tutorials. 
Computer Assisted Language Learning, 20 
(3), 279–295. 
Roever, C. (2011). Testing of second language pragmatics: Past and future. 
Language Testing, 28 
(4), 
463–481. 
Yanguas, Í. (2010). Oral computer-mediated interaction between L2 learners: It’s about time. 
Language 
Learning & Technology, 14 
(3), 72–93. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/issues/october2010/yanguas.pdf 
How to move pages in pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf move pages; rearrange pages in pdf document
How to move pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
change page order in pdf online; pdf rearrange pages online
Language Learning & Technology
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/chenyang.pdf 
February 2014, Volume 18, Number 1 
pp. 57–75 
Copyright © 2014, ISSN 1094-3501 
57
FOSTERING FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING THROUGH 
TECHNOLOGY-ENHANCED INTERCULTURAL PROJECTS 
Jen Jun ChenNational Sun Yat-sen University 
Shu Ching YangNational Sun Yat-sen University 
The main aim of learning English as an international language is to effectively 
communicate with people from other cultures. In Taiwan, learners have few opportunities 
to experience cross-cultural communication in English. To create an authentic EFL 
classroom, this one-year action research study carried out three collaborative intercultural 
projects using web-based tools (online forums, weblogs, Skype, and email) in a 7
th
grade 
EFL class. The projects were designed to improve students’ language skills and 
intercultural communicative competence (ICC). To triangulate the findings, qualitative 
and quantitative methods were used to collect the data; specifically, questionnaires, 
interviews, and document analyses were used to investigate the learners’ responses and 
learning processes. The results revealed that the participants had strong positive attitudes 
towards technology-enhanced intercultural language learning (TEILI), which enabled the 
learners to experience authentic language learning that fostered linguistic competence and 
ICC. The findings suggest that TEILI approximates real-life learning contexts by allowing 
students to use a language for the same purposes that they will use it outside school.  
Keywords: 
Culture; Web-Based Instruction; Video 
APA Citation:
. Chen, J. J., & Yang, S. C. (2014). Fostering foreign language learning 
through technology-enhanced intercultural projects. 
Language Learning & Technology 
18
(1), 57–75. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/chenyang.pdf 
Received: 
December 27, 2012; 
Accepted
: March 7, 2013; 
Published
: February 1, 2014  
Copyright:
© Jen Jun Chen & Shu Ching Yang  
INTRODUCTION 
Globalization and the rapid spread of English have challenged traditional notions of Standard English and 
language education practices (Shomoossi & Ketabi, 2008). Modern English language learners use English 
to communicate with native speakers and, increasingly, with non-native speakers. The main aim of 
learning English as an international language is to effectively communicate with those from other 
cultures. English should therefore be taught as a means of cross-cultural communication (Erling, 2005; 
Jenkins, 2006; Kilickaya, 2009; McKay, 2003).  
One of the fundamental difficulties Taiwanese students of English as a foreign language (EFL) encounter 
is the lack of opportunities to experience interactive cross-cultural communication in English (Liu, 2005; 
Su, 2008). In classroom settings, non-native English-speaking teachers, often teaching in Chinese, 
typically struggle to teach pragmatic competence. Lacking extensive knowledge of the English pragmatic 
system, these teachers often focus their teaching on textbooks to help students perform well on their 
exams. However, content analyses of the English textbooks used in junior high schools revealed that these 
textbooks provide inadequate cultural information about Anglo-American cultures (Chen, 2007). In other 
words, the inauthenticity of Taiwanese English language education cannot fulfill the demands for English 
language competency in a globalized world.  
Studies indicate that technology plays an important role in creating authentic language learning 
environments (Thorne, 2005). O’Dowd provided evidence that “telecollaborative activities have the 
potential to support the development of students’
intercultural communicative competence
(ICC) in a way 
that traditional culture learning materials would not be able to achieve” (2007, p. 146). To address 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
move pages in a pdf; reorder pages in pdf document
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
rearrange pdf pages in preview; reorder pages in pdf file
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
58
language-learning problems in the Taiwanese context, this action research study carried out three 
technology-enhanced, collaborative intercultural projects. The aim of the projects was to demonstrate that 
technology-enhanced, cross-cultural tasks could provide a larger and more realistic context of 
communication for language learners, which is rarely possible to achieve with other instructional models. 
Below, the relationships among the role of culture, the use of technology, and language teaching will be 
discussed to elucidate the theoretical and practical frameworks of the instructional design. 
LITERATURE REVIEW 
The Role of Culture in Language Education   
Language and culture are closely linked. Although linguistic accuracy is necessary for language users to 
communicate effectively, when language “is used in contexts of communication, it is bound up with 
culture in multiple and complex ways” (Kramsch, 1998, p. 3). Traditionally, English language education 
has involved learning how English is used in native English-speaking countries. However, “[t]he global 
spread of English into diverse multilingual contexts has brought with it the development of many varieties 
of English” (McKay & Bokhorst-Heng, 2008). To increase authenticity in the teaching of English as an 
international language (EIL), instructors need to “re-emphasize the context of use, to re-define the 
participants, and to reconsider the nature of EIL” (Shomoossi & Ketabi, 2008, p. 182). English education 
should consider the status of English in all of its varieties and functional ranges throughout the world, 
prepare students to communicate across cultures, and create linguistic awareness through exposure to 
different varieties of English.  
In their standards for FL learning, the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL, 
1996) advocated for application of the ‘‘five Cs’’ of language learning: communication, culture, 
connection, comparison, and community. Communication is the heart of language learning. 
Understanding the cultural context of both the target language and the learners’ native language leads to 
greater awareness of the interdependent relationship between languages and cultures. Connection refers to 
interdisciplinary instruction, which provides learners with detailed information about the FL and its 
cultures from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Comparison refers to increasing awareness of linguistic 
elements and cultural concepts by comparing and contrasting the studied language and the native 
language. Finally, community suggests that learners can use the language in an international setting and 
actively participate in multilingual communities beyond the classroom. Clearly, the sociocultural 
component is a significant feature of FL education (FLE). Students are expected to gain insight into and 
awareness of cultural interactions in communication settings. 
Recently, intercultural competence has been the central concern for instructors in EFL classrooms (Liaw, 
2006). Intercultural communication is not just an encounter between cultures; it should “be viewed and 
analyzed as a complex process” (Stire, 2006, p. 5). A range of intercultural communicative education 
models have been proposed by researchers worldwide (Byram, 1997; Deardorff, 2006; Spitzberg, 2000; 
Spitzberg & Changnon, 2009; Stier, 2006). The most exhaustive and influential is that of Michael Byram, 
whose model incorporates holistic linguistic and intercultural competence and has clear, practical, and 
ethical objectives (Byram, 1997). According to Byram, the aims of intercultural language teaching are:  
to give learners intercultural competence as well as linguistic competence; to prepare them for 
interaction with people of other cultures; to enable them to understand and accept people from 
other cultures as individuals with other distinctive perspectives, values and behaviors; and to help 
them to see that such interaction is an enriching experience (Byram, Gribkova, & Starkey, 2002, 
p. 10). 
Byram’s model consists of five factors (see Figure 1). Critical cultural awareness is positioned centrally in 
relation to the other four: knowledge, intercultural attitudes, interpreting and relating skills, and discovery 
and interaction skills. Byram (2012, p. 9) insists that critical cultural awareness “embodies the educational 
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
rearrange pdf pages; reorder pdf pages reader
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including sorting pages and swapping two pages. Copying and Pasting Pages.
how to rearrange pdf pages reader; rearrange pages in pdf reader
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
59
dimension of language teaching” and that “skills, attitudes and knowledge, both linguistic and cultural,” 
should be centered on the dimension of critical awareness (p. 6).  
Interpreting and relating skills 
Ability to interpret a document or 
event from another culture, explain it, 
and relate it to one’s own culture. 
Knowledge 
Knowledge of one’s own culture, 
that of one’s interlocutor, and of 
the general processes of societal 
and individual interaction. 
Critical cultural awareness 
Ability to evaluate, both critically and 
on the basis of explicit criteria, the 
perspectives, practices, and products 
of one’s own culture and those of 
other cultures and countries. 
Intercultural attitudes 
Curiosity and openness, readiness to 
suspend preconceptions about other 
cultures and one’s own. 
Discovery and interaction skills 
Ability to acquire new knowledge of a 
culture and cultural practices and the 
ability to implement knowledge, 
attitudes, and skills under the 
constraints of real-time 
communication and interaction. 
Figure 1.
Byram’s model of intercultural communicative competence (Byram, 1997, 2012 & Byram et 
al., 2002)  
Teaching Intercultural Communication in the Digital Age 
As noted above, authentic language teaching with an intercultural dimension helps students acquire the 
linguistic and intercultural competence needed for communication. What matters most in this complex 
interactive process is what teachers do to reach these goals. Byram’s model only provides a link between 
intercultural communication and FL teaching; teachers must formulate the best teaching strategies for 
their own contexts (Byram, 1997 & Byram et al., 2002). 
Traditionally, cultural learning in the classroom has been decontextualized and has borne minimal 
resemblance to actual communication scenarios. Through telecommunications, the limitations of the 
classroom can be overcome through the use of web-based tools to bring authentic texts and real 
intercultural communication experiences into the classroom (Byram, 1997 & Byram et al., 2002). Web 
2.0 technologies (blogs, Skype, and social networking sites) facilitate online practices that allow a 
classroom to connect with the world (Peters, 2009). Additionally, online education communities, such as 
the ePals Global Community and the International Education and Resource Network (iEARN), provide 
collaborative projects that enable teachers and students to build authentic cross-cultural communication 
pathways.  
Studies show that by integrating technology into their curriculum, teachers enable students to experience 
varied cultures and cultivate their language skills through meaningful learning situations relevant to real-
life communicative events (Cunningham, Fagersten, & Holmsten, 2010; Cziko, 2004; Greenfield, 2003; 
Kilimci, 2010; Lee, 2007; Richards, 2010; Smith, 2000; Wu & Marek, 2010; Wu, Yen, & Marek, 2011). 
This allows learners to “develop meaningful relationships with one another and to use the language they 
are studying to do so” (Thorne, 2005). 
Research Questions  
Based on the evidence presented above, this study designed 3 web-based projects to promote cross-
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F, 100F). String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath);
reverse page order pdf; how to rearrange pdf pages
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Dim pageIndex As Integer = 0 ' Move cursor to (400F, 100F). Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save(outputFilePath).
rearrange pdf pages in reader; rearrange pdf pages online
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
60
cultural communication and expose students to various English language contexts. The umbrella term 
“technology-enhanced intercultural language instruction” (hereafter TEILI) is used in this study to 
describe a cross-cultural FL instruction model mediated by technology tools. The study aims to illustrate 
the possibilities and problems associated with TEILI, evaluate the influence of TEILI on FLE, and 
examine the instructional challenges of TEILI by soliciting teaching reflections. The research questions of 
this study are as follows: 
1.
How do learners respond to TEILI? 
2.
What benefits and challenges did the learners experience during TEILI? 
3.
What teaching-related challenges are associated with TEILI? 
METHODOLOGY 
Participants 
The 15 participants were 7
th
grade students in a pull-out bilingual program. Students were removed from 
their regular classes ten class periods per week to receive specialized instruction in Chinese and English. 
These participants had to pass language tests in both Chinese and English before enrolling. Compared to 
their classmates, these students were advanced learners with stronger language skills. A beginning-of-
semester survey revealed that all of the students agreed that English is an important tool for connecting 
with the world. Nine of them had studied English in cram schools for over 6 years, and 4 had previously 
used the Internet to learn English.  
In the 2011 academic year, the first author taught a one-year English course in this pull-out program, 
meeting with the students regularly for 45 minutes per week. The research comprised the records and 
analyses of the classroom activities in which students were engaged throughout the course.  
Instructional design 
The one-year English course utilized TEILI to create a realistic language-learning environment. Three 
projects were conducted in the course: 
Folk tales/storytelling: past and present 
in the first semester
(16 
weeks) and, in the second semester,
Video conference: storytelling and cross-cultural discussion 
and 
E-
pal project 
(8 weeks each) (see Table 1). Since none of the participants had ever been exposed to TEILI, 
the first two projects consisted of group work to allow students to become more comfortable with this 
mode of instruction. The final project focused on one-on-one communication. At the beginning of the 
course, participants were asked to complete a questionnaire that evaluated their language learning 
experience. At the end of each project, a reflective questionnaire was administered to encourage students 
to reflect upon their learning. Finally, a questionnaire was given at the end of the course to analyze the 
participants’ perceptions and to obtain course evaluations. The students’ learning journals were 
systematically collected and examined, and the curriculum and teaching was adjusted according to 
students’ feedback. The project activities are detailed in the following sections. 
Table 1
. Theoretical and Procedural Framework of the Three Projects  
Projects 
Description 
Learning focus 
ICT tools 
1
st
semester 
1
st
project 
Folk tales/ 
storytelling:  
Past and present   
Beginning-of-semester survey about students’ language learning backgrounds 
Small-group learning: 16 weeks 
Participants shared 
traditional folk tales and 
creative stories in an 
online forum.  
Language skills: Reading English stories; 
writing traditional folk tales and creative 
stories. 
Intercultural communication: Exchanging 
ideas and feedback on stories with Dubai 
Weblog 
Online 
forum 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
pdf change page order acrobat; how to reorder pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
change pdf page order preview; switch page order pdf
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
61
students. 
Mid-term survey analyzing students’ perceptions of the project 
2
nd
semester 
2
nd
project 
Videoconference: 
Storytelling and 
cross-cultural 
discussion 
Small-group learning: 8 weeks 
Participants told 
traditional stories in a 
puppet show and then 
discussed customs and 
daily life via 
videoconferencing.   
Language skills: Listening and speaking to 
non-native speakers via video 
conferencing; writing scripts for the puppet 
show. 
Intercultural communication: Live 
discussion with Pakistani students about 
folk tales and cultural similarities and 
differences. 
Weblog 
Skype 
3
rd
project 
E-pal project 
Individual learning: 8 weeks 
Participants exchanged 
weekly emails through 
ePals. 
Language skills: Reading and writing 
emails. 
Intercultural communication 
Exchanging information about daily life 
with American key pals. 
Weblog 
E-mail 
End-of-term survey analyzing students’ perceptions of the whole course 
A class weblog (see Figure 2) was set up to facilitate teaching and learning in the course. The blog 
contained a collection of information and learning resources that gave step-by-step support to students as 
they completed their project tasks. Each group had its own individual blog within the class blog in which 
students wrote their project drafts and did peer-corrections. The researcher also answered students’ 
questions and commented on students’ work through the class weblog.  
Figure 2
Screenshot of the class weblog
Folk tales/storytelling: past and present 
Folk tales/storytelling: past and present
is an iEARN project in which students from different parts of the 
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
62
world share stories through their preferred digital forum. iEARN, founded in 1988, is the world's largest 
non-profit educational network, and each iEARN project has its own project forum that provides a safe 
and structured online discussion environment. Our project partner was a class from Dubai containing 10 
students who had been learning English for more than 8 years. We began with a preliminary project plan 
that became more defined through experience with each school’s schedule and the students’ English 
language abilities. Figure 3 illustrates the 5-phase procedural framework of the project conducted in 
Taiwan. Before the project, 2 technology lessons were offered to familiarize the students with the iEARN 
forums and web-based tools that would be used in the project. During the interactive process, students 
visited the project forum to read stories from other countries and exchange ideas with project participants. 
Figure 4 shows the intensive interaction between the students and their foreign partners in the project 
forum. 
Figure 3
The procedural framework of the Folk tales/storytelling: past and present project
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
63
Figure 4
Screenshot of the folk tales project online forum
Video conference: storytelling and cross-cultural discussion 
In the second semester, we had two 45-minute videoconferences via Skype. This was an extension 
activity of the Folk tales project and involved sharing folk tales with two Pakistani partners. For this 
activity, the students turned their stories into a puppet show. They worked collaboratively to adapt their 
stories into scripts, practice reading the scripts aloud, make paper puppets, and draw the story 
background. Along with these tales, the students introduced their partners to traditional customs and food. 
Furthermore, to build intercultural awareness, the students were asked to read a book about a Taiwanese 
woman’s experience in Pakistan, and a class discussion was held. Then, in the videoconference, the 
participants asked each other questions to learn about the similarities and differences between their 
cultures. 
E-pal project: email exchange 
After the first two collaborative projects, the E-pal project was used to build students’ independent 
English language skills and to offer them opportunities to develop autonomous language learning skills. 
Our partner class was American. Each student had his or her own American key pal, with whom they 
exchanged weekly emails through ePals webmail. The students learned email formatting and netiquette 
before the exchanges began. To relieve students’ anxieties and enhance their confidence in writing, this 
was a free language exchange. Students could write about anything that they were interested in and 
worked on their email-writing independently during class time. The instructor gave advice to help the 
students decide upon their writing topics and solve their language problems.  
Data collection 
The research utilized both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis, including 
questionnaires, interviews, and document analysis. Five separate questionnaires were administered: 
1. Beginning-of-course survey 
The beginning-of-course questionnaire contained 6 questions relating to students’ language learning 
background and self-evaluation on their language skills. The findings from the survey helped the 
researchers to understand the participants and create an appropriate instructional design. 
List of posts 
showing 
participants’ 
nationalities  
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
64
2. Mid-term survey 
The mid-term survey, conducted at the end of the first semester, allowed students to make comments and 
suggestions; it was helpful in evaluating the first-semester course and adjusting the curriculum in the 
following semester. The first part of the questionnaire comprised 14 5-point Likert scale measuring the 
students’ attitudes towards the project and the instructional design. In the second part, the students were 
asked to express their thoughts about the course and their own learning process.  
3. Two reflective surveys 
At the end of projects two and three, reflective questionnaires were used to encourage students to reflect 
upon their English language learning. Each reflective questionnaire contained two parts. The first part 
solicited responses about learning attitudes, teaching activities, and learning results in a 5-point Likert-
style format. The second part, which employed open-ended questions, required students to report their 
difficulties and learning gains in the project.   
4. End-of-term survey 
The final questionnaire, which had 5 open-ended questions, was created to provide an overview of 
participants’ experiences in, perceptions of, and attitudes towards the whole course.  
FINDINGS 
Students’ attitudes towards TEILI  
The one-year course utilized 3 projects with different language activities to enhance English language 
learning and cross-cultural communication. Table 2 shows that the participants had strong positive 
reactions towards TEILI. The learners enjoyed studying English through these intercultural projects and 
especially enjoyed the 
E-pal project
(
= 4.80). The students affirmed that the projects helped them to 
learn English in an authentic learning context. In the interviews conducted at the end of the 
Folk tales 
project
, all of the learners but one said that they would like to have had more intercultural language 
learning activities. Table 2 reveals the same responses at the end of the videoconference (
= 4.33) and e-
pal exchanges (
= 4.40).  
We utilized a weblog-assisted teaching model and a collaborative learning method to overcome the 
students’ lack of experience with intercultural projects. In the mid-term survey, over 93% of the students 
affirmed that the weblog-assisted teaching model was helpful for their projects. Table 2 shows that 
collaborative activities can reduce learning pressure in the
Folk tales 
(
= 4.60)
and 
Video conference
(
= 4.00) projects. The instruction conducted during the projects was acceptable to the learners. The 
learning tasks were not beyond the learners’ language abilities, and the 
E-pal project 
was considered the 
easiest (
= 4.40).  
Table 2.
Learners’ Attitudes Towards TEILI and its Instructional Design 
Learner’s attitudes 
Folk tales
Video 
conference
E-pal 
project
M
(SD)
M
(SD)
M
(SD)
I like this new type of learning activity involving 
communication with foreign students.
4.26
(.79)
4.27
(.88)
4.80
(.41)
The project enables us to use English in realistic situations.
4.33
(.61)
4.40
(.82)
4.33
(.72)
I hope that in the future I can keep participating in this type 
of learning activity. 
4.33
(1.04)
4.40
(.63)
I appreciated the teacher’s instruction during the project; it 
4.66
(.72)
4.60
(.63)
4.73
(.50)
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
65
was clear and helpful.
Learning through collaboration can reduce learning 
pressure. 
4.60
(.63)
4.00
(1.00)
The learning activities in the projects were not difficult for 
me.
4.00
(1.19)
4.00
(.85)
4.40
(.63)
In the end-of-term survey, all of the participants preferred TEILI to traditional classroom-based 
instruction. The primary reason was because TEILI provided authentic, lively, practical, and interesting 
learning experiences. In describing the benefits of TEILI, many of the participants criticized the limits of 
traditional instruction in Taiwanese English classrooms, in which rote memorization of language 
knowledge is emphasized over language use; two students used the term “dead English” to describe 
learning in traditional classroom-based instruction (S2, S5) and preferred the “living” English of TEILI.       
With traditional classroom teaching, I don’t know how to use the English that I have learned in 
real life. With TEILI, I can communicate with foreigners. I have more opportunities to use the 
English that I have learned. (S6) 
With traditional instruction, it takes us a lot of time to memorize vocabulary and grammar rules, 
but my mind goes completely blank when I need to speak English. With TEILI, I can 
communicate directly with English speakers. It is a more real experience and is more helpful. 
(S7) 
I prefer TEILI because it makes English class more interesting, vivid, and lively. With traditional 
teaching, we only read textbooks. With TEILI, we can use English in a natural environment, just 
as we use Chinese. (S13) 
The above comments indicate that traditional instruction could not satisfy students’ learning needs. The 
students were aware of the aim of learning English via TEILI and were eager to learn in a realistic 
communicative context.  
Students’ evaluations of TEILI  
To improve the instructional design, students were asked to provide feedback about the curriculum and its 
implementation in the end-of-term survey. All of the students expressed positive attitudes towards the 
researcher’s instruction. They commented that the instructional practices were helpful and sufficient, with 
no need for improvement (S1, S2, S5).  
Interestingly, the students and the instructor differed in their views of the teacher’s role in TEILE. While 
the instructor viewed herself as a facilitator, some students felt that the course instructor was strict 
because the students were asked to complete each task on time. Students who could not meet the 
deadlines had individual meetings to discuss their problems. Some students had positive attitudes towards 
the requirements. One student commented, “Teacher, keep your strict education, and then students will 
learn they should work hard on their project tasks” (S13). 
Given that students bring differing perspectives to language learning, learners with passive orientations 
require careful guidance and intervention from pedagogical applications to this approach. Strict 
supervision can ensure that projects go smoothly and can help students gain awareness that learning 
English through TEILI demands new learning strategies and self-directed learning. Strict project 
management also assures successful interactive experiences, which is beneficial for building students’ 
communicative confidence in cross-cultural projects. 
Table 3 presents the students’ evaluation of the projects; the project that 66.7% of the students liked best 
was the 
E-pal project
. This was also the project that 80% of the students chose as the one with the easiest 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested