c# pdf viewer wpf : How to rearrange pages in a pdf document software control cloud windows web page .net class v18n17-part455

Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
66
writing tasks, consistent with the earlier analysis of the students’ attitudes toward TEILI, shown in Table 
2. Unlike the other two projects, 
E-pal 
was a free writing exchange and also a one-on-one communication 
project. This gave students a sense of novelty and motivated them to communicate. The students 
commented that they were looking forward to having a pen pal (S1), enjoyed writing about anything they 
liked to their foreign friends, and gained more knowledge about foreign life (S6, S10).  
Table 3
Learners’ Attitudes Towards the Projects 
The project… 
Folk tales 
project 
Video 
conference 
E-pal project 
…I liked most 
6.7% 
26.7% 
10 
66.7% 
…I liked least 
12  80% 
13.3% 
6.7% 
…with the hardest writing tasks 
46.7% 
40% 
3.3% 
…with the easiest writing tasks 
20% 
12 
80% 
Most of the students shared information about their everyday lives in their emails. For students, writing 
about their personal experiences was easier than writing traditional stories. The students said that the 
E-
pal
project allowed them to write about daily life as if they were chatting and without pressure, and it was 
therefore easy to write a lot in a short time (S3, S8, S10).   
There is one positive comment especially worthy of notice. A student mentioned the benefit of 
asynchronous communication:  
We don’t have to write back to the key pals right away. I have enough time to think carefully 
before writing. (S11) 
S11 is a quiet, shy boy and group discussions and synchronous activities, such as video conferencing, put 
him under pressure. In asynchronous activities, he was able to take time to think and work at his own 
pace. His example reminds us that students have unique personalities and learning styles. Teachers need 
to consider the advantages and disadvantages of technology-enhanced learning activities and provide 
multiple tasks to support learners’ diverse learning needs.  
In contrast, the project most students did not enjoy was the 
Folk tales project 
(
n
= 12, 80%), which was 
also chosen as the project with the most difficult writing tasks (
n
= 7, 46.7%). The students enjoyed the 
collaborative writing in the 
Folk tales project
and 
Video conference
; however, creative writing proved to 
be a challenge for students with little English writing experience. The students made the following 
comments: 
Group writing relaxes my writing pressure, so I don’t think it is hard to write stories. However, 
it is a challenge to modernize traditional stories or adapt stories to scripts. (S4) 
When writing a story, we have to pay attention to a lot of elements, such as vocabulary, 
grammar, and even dialogues between characters. We need imagination and creativity. It is not 
easy. (S8)  
In addition, students also mentioned that they expected to have multi-aspect exchanges instead of 
focusing exclusively on exchanges of traditional stories. S8 mentioned that there was less direct 
communication with foreign partners in the 
Folk tales project
than in the other two projects. The students 
expected to have more interactions that would help them 
“understand different cultures and foreign life 
more deeply”
(S3). 
Students’ learning benefits from TEILI 
The students reported in their reflections and interviews that they received many learning benefits from 
How to rearrange pages in a pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages in a pdf; reorder pdf pages
How to rearrange pages in a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf page order reverse; pdf change page order online
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
67
TEILI, including increased understanding their own and other cultures, increased English vocabulary, 
improved language skills, experience using technology learning tools, experience with intercultural 
communication, and improved collaboration skills. Table 4 shows that cultural understanding was the 
main learning benefit reported for all three projects. The reflective surveys for the 
Video conference
and 
E-pal project
also showed the students’ positive attitudes towards cultural learning; both the 
Video 
conference 
(
= 4.20, 
SD
= .86) and 
E-pal project
(
= 4.20, 
SD
= 1.01) improved students’ cultural 
understanding, but the 
E-pal project,
with its close individual interaction, provided the participants the 
most opportunities to explain their own culture (
video 
= 3.93, 
SD
= .70;
e-pal 
= 4.20, 
SD
= .86).  
Table 4
Students’ Learning Benefits from TEILI 
Folk tales/storytelling 
Improving language 
ability (vocabulary and 
writing skills) 
I forgot a lot of English vocabulary that I had memorized before, but now I know these 
words again because I have to use them in my writing. I learned more vocabulary. (S4) 
I learned how to respond to messages and interact with foreign students on the forum. 
At first, I had to think about the feedback content for a long time. Now, I can reply 
faster. (S6) 
During the project, I felt that I was making progress in writing. Now, I can write a 
longer forum message than before, without just using a lot of emoticons. (S7) 
Improving technology 
ability 
I learned a new way, iEARN, to communicate with foreign students through the 
Internet. I know more about the world. (S8) 
During the writing process, ...I also learned how to use online dictionaries in learning 
English. (S3) 
I learned more technology tools, and now I can type faster in English. (S9) 
Developing 
collaboration skills 
I learned how to work collaboratively with others. (S11, S12) 
Understanding 
different cultures 
I learned more about our own folk tales and also learned about other countries’ folk 
tales. (S3) 
Video conference 
Understanding 
different cultures 
We shared our stories, food, and festivals; they also shared their culture...I learned a lot 
and understood that others’ lives are not the same. (S2) 
…I touched a very different culture. I saw that the clothes they wore were so different 
from ours. Every country has its own unique culture. (S5) 
…I knew about Pakistani students’ school life. Their school life is similar to ours. They 
wear school uniforms, and they also have PE classes. (S8) 
E-pal project 
Understanding 
different cultures 
Their school schedules are very different from ours. Their school starts later, but they 
go home earlier than us. (S8) 
American students like sports very much. They play many outdoor sports. They also 
have field trips (over 3 or 4 days). They have to do reports after the trips. (S7) 
They don’t have to wear uniforms, and they don’t always have the same subjects. For 
example, some choose to study Spanish, and some study French. We all have the same 
subjects and only study English. They are freer and have more choices. (S10) 
The Whole Program 
Improving language 
ability 
My largest gain is that I have learned a lot of vocabulary. To write articles and emails 
correctly, I looked up words and made sure their usages, so I learned a lot of new 
words. (S2) 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
rearrange pages in pdf file; reorder pages in pdf preview
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
move pages in pdf reader; how to rearrange pages in a pdf file
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
68
Through the communicative process, I understand my learning problems. The projects 
improve our English ability and let us learn new vocabulary. (S9) 
Improving technology 
ability 
I have better technology skills than before. I didn’t know we can use these tools to learn 
English before. The Internet has a lot of learning resources and I learn knowledge 
beyond textbooks, (S11) 
Understanding 
different cultures 
I understand different countries and cultures deeply. I also understand the differences 
between us and foreign students. (S6) 
The students agreed that TEILI created opportunities for learning about cultures, including their own and 
their interlocutors’. Based on Byram’s model, we found that, through TEILI, the students developed their 
ICC skills in four dimensions (see Table 5): knowledge of their own and their interlocutors’ cultures, 
open attitudes towards intercultural exchanges, skills for interacting with interlocutors, and a critical 
cultural awareness necessary to evaluating cultures.  
Due to the interlocutors’ diverse cultural backgrounds, the students’ reflections indicated that their 
knowledge about cultures was largely acquired through the process of interaction, which is one of the 
main advantages of the TEILI model. The students introduced their own culture and learned about life in 
Dubai, Pakistan, and the USA through their communications. They developed cultural awareness of both 
their home culture and the cultures of their interlocutors.  
Students reported that most of their critical cultural awareness was developed in the 
E-pal project
. Unlike 
the group interactions, the students experienced an intensive compare/contrast process in the individual 
interactions of the 
E-pal project
. They learned facts about American school life, gave responses to their 
interlocutors, and shared their own experiences of attending school in Taiwan. In every email exchange, 
the students familiarized themselves with the use of comparison and contrast to view cultures critically. 
Table 5.
Students’ Development of Intercultural Communication 
Dimensions 
Students’ descriptions 
Knowledge: 
…of one’s own culture 
and the interlocutors’ 
culture 
For me, these learning experiences broaden 
my vision! I learn foreign cultures, customs, 
and traditions. (S6) 
I not only learn other cultures but know more 
about my own culture. (S7) 
Intercultural 
attitudes:  
Curiosity and openness to 
learn about one’s own 
culture and the 
interlocutors’ culture 
I hope to have more opportunities to 
communicate with    foreign students; then, I 
can practice intercultural communicative 
skills and know about the world. (S7) 
I hope we can keep working with other 
countries on new projects. (S5) 
Discovery and 
interaction skills: 
The ability to acquire 
new knowledge of a 
culture through 
synchronous interaction 
I learn different cultures by using English and 
Internet tools in real communication. (S6) 
I learn how to exchange ideas with foreign 
students. (S10) 
Critical cultural 
awareness: 
The ability to evaluate a 
culture 
They don’t have to wear school uniforms, and 
they have a monthly dance. Their school life 
seems more colorful, with fewer restrictions 
than ours. (S10) 
They also have exams like us, but only at the 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
do if you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
rearrange pdf pages reader; how to change page order in pdf document
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with a few a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides
reorder pages pdf file; rearrange pages in pdf
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
69
beginning and the end of the semester...It 
seems that we pay more attention to studying. 
They have more time to play sports, but we 
don’t. American students seem freer, with less 
pressure. (S13) 
Students’ self-perceived challenges with TEILI 
Though students showed positive attitudes towards the new teaching model, several of them still had 
difficulty interacting. Table 6 reveals that low vocabulary knowledge was the major barrier for students in 
their projects. Due to their limited vocabulary, the students did not know which words to use to express 
their ideas well. Such challenges may be unavoidable in the Taiwanese EFL context. These problems also 
reflect the value of the course: building language ability through realistic communication. Students are 
able to enlarge their vocabularies as they experience cross-cultural communication challenges.  
To solve their vocabulary deficiencies, students usually used online tools to look up words or directly 
asked the instructor for help. However, some relied on online translation tools to translate entire 
messages. This was convenient, but improper. These translation tools may work well for words or simple 
sentences, but they always almost translate complex descriptions incorrectly. Using improper tools may 
create other learning problems and cause confusion and misunderstanding. The result indicates that it is 
necessary to teach students how to use technology tools correctly and in ways that will benefit their 
language learning.  
Accents were another challenge. Because American English was taught in their school, the Taiwanese 
students were only familiar with American English pronunciation. With few opportunities to listen to 
other accents, it was not easy for students to immediately become involved in real language situations 
during the videoconferences. For these students, an unfamiliar accent sounded like a different language. 
However, this provided an opportunity for students to realize the variety of authenticity within the 
English-speaking community. One of the students commented,  
I understand our accent is not always correct. There are different accents in the world. We 
should try to understand and accept others’ accents. (S10) 
From the following student’s feedback, we can infer that if students are exposed to this authentic oral 
interaction for a longer period of time, they may accept the accent more and understand it better: 
At first, I totally couldn’t understand what they said, but as we spoke to the second school, it 
became better. The accent was not so strange to me. I could understand more. (S1) 
Table 6
Students’ Learning Challenges with TEILI
Folk tales/storytelling 
Lack of language skills  
(vocabulary) 
When I read Dubai information on the English website, there were a lot of words I 
didn’t know. I tried to use online dictionaries or the Google translator, but some 
English words were still difficult to understand. (S4) 
My writing was a big problem. I need more vocabulary and to learn to write good 
sentences. (S6) 
I had difficulty finding the right words to clearly express the meaning I wanted. (S12) 
Problems of within-
group cooperation 
Sometimes I thought the story we wrote was very strange. Though the group worked 
together, members usually had different ideas. We didn’t know which one was better, 
so it usually took us a long time to discuss the story plot. (S6) 
Video conference 
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
By dragging your pages in the editor area you can rearrange them or delete single pages. We try to make it as easy as possible to merge your PDF files.
reordering pages in pdf document; pdf change page order
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader; change page order in pdf reader
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
70
Lack of language skills  
(accent, vocabulary, 
grammar) 
Because of the accents, I had to listen to their words very carefully. However, I still 
couldn’t understand all their words. Sometimes they spoke fast; then it was even more 
difficult to understand what they meant. (S8) 
Because of the accents, I couldn’t hear clearly. I often misheard what they said or 
misunderstood the meaning. It seemed we spoke different languages. (S9) 
I feel that writing the script is the most difficult part. I have problems in vocabulary, 
grammar, etc. I usually think in Chinese, and then have trouble in writing it in 
English. (S10) 
As I wrote the script, my problem was that I didn’t have enough vocabulary to 
express the meaning. I depended on the Internet dictionary to look up the words. (S7) 
Language anxiety 
Though I had prepared in advance, I was very nervous and forgot what to say. (S11) 
I was nervous during the VC. When I was nervous, I started to stutter and didn’t 
know what to say. (S14) 
E-pal project 
Lack of language skills  
(vocabulary, grammar) 
There were no serious problems; only some problems with vocabulary or grammar. 
(S5) 
There were no big problems or difficulties. My problem is with vocabulary. I should 
learn more English words. (S10) 
The students’ feedback reveals the disadvantages of Taiwan’s English language learning environment. 
Typically, English is taught in decontextualized forms; students learn the correct forms of the language 
and are able to use English in a structured situation. However, the authentic context is unstructured, ill 
defined, and interactive. If students cannot transfer their knowledge into functional use, they will not be 
able to use the language actively outside the class. 
Teaching reflections on TEILI  
Though research, including this action study, has verified the positive effects of TEILI, the 
implementation of TEILI in classrooms is a challenge for teachers. Unlike traditional, static, classroom-
based instruction, TEILI is a dynamic process based on interactions among participants. The differences 
in educational systems and participants’ backgrounds create many uncertain features in the interactive 
process. The teacher, as a project manager, must connect all of the elements of the TEILI program and 
consider not only instructional tasks but also project arrangements. The teacher must also resolve 
unexpected problems in the interactive process. It is important for teachers of partner classes to work 
closely to create suitable and realistic project plans in advance. Then, during the project process, they 
must remain in close communication with each other to ensure that the whole TEILI program advances 
smoothly and successfully.  
Since instructors must exchange ideas frequently, TEILI builds authentic intercultural communication not 
only for learners but also for instructors in the EFL community. Teaching is learning; collaborating with 
other foreign educators will enable instructors to use the language that they teach, establish pragmatic 
competence, and gain professional development from real experience. This course instructor benefited 
greatly from interacting with the partner teachers, and especially from their instructional designs for the 
project activities. The Dubai teacher shared his method for inspiring his students to discuss different types 
of folk tales before writing; the American teacher worked with his colleagues to integrate issues of 
globalization into the email exchanges. They demonstrated creativity in the teaching designs and 
prompted the course instructor to think about teaching and learning from a different perspective.  
Though it takes much time and effort to develop a TEILI course, the students’ positive feedback during 
this study was encouraging. The students always rushed into the classroom, eager to learn and 
communicate with their foreign partners. I did not have to struggle with classroom discipline or urge the 
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
reverse page order pdf online; pdf reverse page order
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader; pdf reorder pages
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
71
students to work hard because their foreign partners were the best stimuli for motivating language 
learning. As they heard the Pakistani students’ fluency in English, they were shocked, and the students 
commented that the “
Pakistani students were so active, and their English was so good. It seemed English 
is easy for them. They could say what they want to say. I should work hard on my English
” (S9). “
Though 
I couldn’t understand all their English, their English ability shocked me. If I have another opportunity, I 
will avoid the problems and improve my English” 
(S13). The comments reveal that students can reflect on 
their own language learning through TEILI and find the motivation to become active learners. The 
instructor’s challenge is to provide the context, direct the process of learning, and foster students’ abilities 
to understand the changing world around them. 
DISCUSSION  
The participants’ responses to TEILI and its instructional design validated the pedagogical benefit of 
extending the learning context outside the classroom to provide authentic and meaningful language 
learning. The result agrees with the current research on technology-enhanced learning (Warschauer, 1997; 
Kern, Ware, & Warschauer, 2008). The findings are discussed in terms of what we can learn about 
language learning and instructional design from TEILI.  
Language learning  
The analysis of the learning process showed that a lack of FL skill was the students’ main barrier during 
the intercultural projects (see Table 6). In the process of intercultural interaction, the participants were 
aware of their language difficulties. The students described the obstacles presented by vocabulary, 
grammar, writing and accents. Leow (2000; 2001) found that awareness plays a critical role in second 
language learning. Gilakjani (2011) also concluded from previous studies that conscious awareness of 
language is necessary for second language acquisition. As Gilakjani (2011) comments, “Both 
consciousness and language are inextricably connected like two sides of a coin”. TEILI, which recreates 
authentic situations, provides opportunities for social interactions that evoke learners’ conscious 
awareness of the target language system. This helps learners to use language correctly and appropriately 
in later tasks. The findings confirmed that the students perceived their language skills to be improved 
through the project tasks (see Table 4). From the instructor’s perspective, the students’ language 
challenges brought about their learning benefits.  
The first two projects of this action study focused on the same topic: folk tales. Multimodal projects 
integrating multiple semiotic modes, such as written words and imagery, were expected to enable students 
to transform the mode of communication and expression from text into speech, reducing the students’ 
anxieties when speaking in English. However, the teaching result did not entirely meet the expectation. 
The students’ experiences revealed that the multimodal design lacked transformation between tasks and 
had no active effect on lowering anxiety (see Table 6: Language anxiety). According to Krashen’s (1982) 
affective filter hypothesis, second language learners with high motivation, self-confidence, positive 
attitudes, and low levels of anxiety are better equipped for successful language learning. For the students 
with high anxiety, the affective filter became a barrier to language performance. To reduce the negative 
affective factor during videoconferencing, it is necessary to revise the learning tasks to allow students to 
become more familiar with synchronous communication. 
In his research on multimodality, Nelson (2006) examined the synesthetic functions of transformation and 
transduction through the process of multimodal communication. Other research has shown that language 
skills can be transformed from text, as in online chatting, to second language speech (Blake, 2005; Payne 
& Ross, 2002; Sanders, 2006). The resemblance between an online task and a real-time conversation is a 
vital factor for successful transformation across semiotic modes. A re-examination of the learning tasks in 
the first two projects may reveal that the similarity across tasks may be not high enough to facilitate 
learning transformation, especially given the differences between asynchronous and synchronous tasks. 
Based on the positive effects found in multimodality research, conducting an online real-time chat 
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
72
(textual exchange) before videoconferencing (audio and video exchange) may increase students’ self-
confidence in synchronous conversations. 
Instructional design and ICC 
Thorne (2005) once described Internet-mediated intercultural FLE as a complex Venn diagram that 
overlapped with other areas of research and with numerous models. In addition, each model has varied 
instructional designs. Educators must consider which model or instructional method will be best suited for 
their context. The research suggests that students’ levels of cognitive development could be one of the 
most important considerations when creating an effective TEILI instructional design.  
Richards (2010) launched a study on technology-enhanced intercultural collaboration between elementary 
school students in the U.S. and Jordan. The 16-week project focused on guided story writing, and ePals 
and Skype were the communicative tools. The researcher, who was also the project facilitator, worked 
closely with two instructors to design the project plan and assign tasks. This tended to be a teacher-
managed instructional design. Our action research chose the same tools (ePals and Skype) and similar 
themes (sharing stories and information about daily life), but we utilized a teacher-and-student-managed 
instructional model in a junior high school context. The instructor was a facilitator; the students engaged 
in discussion and had great freedom in deciding how to interact with their foreign partners. Based on 
theories of cognitive development, the tasks were designed to require different cognitive skills and 
proceeded in an orderly developmental sequence, gradually “transforming from sensory-motor actions to 
representations and then to abstractions” (Fischer, 1980). At different ages, students think in different 
ways. Generally, middle school students are becoming increasingly capable of handling more 
sophisticated and abstract learning tasks. We therefore required our students to engage in complicated 
tasks autonomous learning and critical thinking tasks that would challenge them.  
Telecollaboration conducted at the university level tends to adopt a more student-managed instructional 
model. For instance, Liaw (2006) created a web-based system with self-help resources in the form of 
online reference tools to foster reading discussions between Taiwanese university students and their 
American partners. The participants were seen as independent, self-directed learners.   
Above all, telecollaboration cases insist on the effectiveness of “international class-to-class partnership 
within institutionalized settings” (Thorne, 2005, p. 4). With proper designs that consider students’ levels 
of cognitive development, TEILI can be put into practice across a variety of education levels.   
In addition to language learning, another core aim of TEILI is to develop intercultural communication 
awareness. All three of the above cases revealed that intercultural collaboration may enhance cultural 
understanding and cultural awareness. Due to differences in the project designs and the ages of 
participants, the aspects of the students’ intercultural development were not the same. However, in all 
three cases, students perceived that they could gain knowledge about their own and other cultures. Liaw 
(2006) showed that students developed the ability to change their perspective of and knowledge about the 
intercultural communication process, which was not discovered in Richards (2010) nor in our research. It 
is possible that projects with more discussion tasks could encourage participants to interact with each 
other more deeply and facilitate high-level ICC. It is also possible that university students have higher 
order cognitive abilities and better development of ICC. 
CONCLUSION 
The action research revealed that the TEILI course provided authentic opportunities for students to 
develop their language skills and ICC. The students acknowledged that they improved their knowledge of 
the varieties of English language use and culture, improved their vocabulary, writing, and technological 
abilities, and learned collaboration. TEILI participation revealed the students’ inadequate expressive skills 
and the limits of traditional language instruction. Online educational communities provide diverse 
collaboration projects for classes around the world. The study found that, with proper planning and 
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
73
project management, learners could experience varied intercultural projects without difficulty. TEILI 
promoted language-learning motivation and helped learners develop active attitudes towards language 
learning and intercultural communication. 
TEILI allows students use language in school that is relevant to the way they will use language outside 
school. This action study implemented only one type of TEILI curriculum. Future studies should 
investigate the results of integrating other types of projects into such a course. They should consider 
whether it is better to work on a project over a long period of time or to try various short-term projects, 
what type of TEILI curriculum design will benefit students most, and how students’ learning autonomies 
and cultural awareness can be systematically developed through TEILI. As this action research has 
shown, authentic language learning environments can be created through technology use. Further research 
on curriculum design and the impact of TEILI on language teaching and learning will allow the model to 
be evaluated from different perspectives.  
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
This research was partially supported by the National Science Council of Taiwan, grant number 
(NSC100-2628-H-110-007-MY3) and “The Aim for the Top University Plan” of the National Sun Yat-
sen University and Ministry of Education, Taiwan, R.O.C. 
ABOUT THE AUTHORS 
Jen Jun Chen is currently a Ph.D. student of the Graduate Institute of Education, National Sun Yat-sen 
University, and is also a member of the country coordination team of iEARN Taiwan as well as an 
English teacher at Kaohsiung Municipal Jhengsing Junior High School. She received an M.S. in 
Education from National Sun Yat-sen University in 2004.  
Shu Ching Yang is a professor at Graduate Institute of Education, National Sun Yat-sen University, 
Taiwan. She received her PhD in Instructional Systems Technology at Indiana University of 
Bloomington. Her current research focuses on the learning processes associated with various kinds of 
interactive technologies. She has additional articles published in Computers and Education, Computers in 
Human Behavior, etc.
E-Mail
: shyang@mail.nsysu.edu.tw
REFERENCES 
ACTFL. (1996). 
Standards for foreign language learning: Preparing for the 21
st
century
. Lawrence, KS: 
Allen. 
Blake, R. J. (2005). Bimodal CMC: The glue of language learning at a distance. 
CALICO Journal, 22
(3), 
497–512.  
Byram, M. (1997). 
Teaching and assessing intercultural communicative competence
. Clevedon, UK: 
Multilingual Matters. 
Byram, M. (2012). Language awareness and (critical) cultural awareness– relationships, comparisons and 
contrasts. 
Language Awareness, 21
(1–2), 5–13.  
Byram, M., Gribkova, B., & Starkey, H. (2002). 
Developing the intercultural dimension in language 
teaching. A practical introduction for teachers
. Strasbourg, France: Council of Europe Publishing, 
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
74
Language Policy Division.  
Chen, Y. C. (2007). 
An analysis study on the knowledge contents of “cultural globalization” in Junior 
High School English textbooks
. (Unpublished master’s thesis). National Taipei University of Education, 
Taipei, Taiwan. 
Cunningham, U. M., Fägersten, K. B., & Holmsten, E. (2010). "Can you hear me, Hanoi?" Compensatory 
mechanisms employed in synchronous net-based English language learning. 
The International Review of 
Research in Open and Distance Learning, 11
(1), 161–177.  
Cziko, G. A. (2004). Electronic tandem language learning (eTandem): A third approach to second 
language learning for the 21st century. 
CALICO Journal, 22
(1), 25–40.  
Deardorff, D. K. (2006). Identification and assessment of intercultural competence as a student outcome 
of internationalization. 
Journal of Studies in International Education, 10
(3), 241–266.  
Erling, E. J. (2005). The many names of English. 
English Today, 21
(1), 40–44.  
Fischer, K. W. (1980). A theory of cognitive development: The control and construction of hierarchies of 
skills. 
Psychological Review, 87
(6), 477–531.  
Gilakjani, A. P., & Ahmadi, S. M. (2011). Role of consciousness in second language acquisition. 
Theory 
and Practice in Language Studies, 1
(5), 435–442.  
Greenfield, R. (2003). Collaborative e-mail exchange for teaching secondary ESL: A case study in Hong 
Kong. 
Language Learning and Technology, 7
(1), 46–70. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/vol7num1/greenfield/default.html 
Jenkins, J. (2006). Current perspectives on teaching world Englishes and English as a lingua franca. 
TESOL Quarterly, 40
(1), 157–181.  
Kern, R., Ware, P., & Warschauer, M. (2008). Network-based language teaching.
Encyclopedia of 
Language and Education, 4
, 281–292.  
Kilickaya, F. (2009). World Englishes, English as an international language and applied linguistics. 
English Language Teaching, 2
(3), 35–38.  
Kilimci, S. (2010). Integration of the internet into a language curriculum in a multicultural society. 
TOJET, 9
(1), 107–113.  
Kramsch, C. (1998). 
Language and culture
. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. 
Krashen, S. (1982). 
Principles and practice in second language acquisition
. Retrieved from 
http://www.sdkrashen.com/content/books/principles_and_practice.pdf 
Lee, L. (2007). Fostering second language oral communication through constructivist interaction in 
desktop videoconferencing. 
Foreign Language Annals, 40
(4), 635–649.  
Leow, R. P. (2000). A study of the role of awareness in foreign language behavior. Studies in Second 
Language Acquisition, 22(4), 557–584.  
Leow, R. P. (2001). Attention, awareness, and foreign language behavior. 
Language Learning, 51
, 113–
155.  
Liaw, M. (2006). E-learning and the development of intercultural competence. 
Language Learning & 
Technology, 10
(3), 49–64. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol10num3/liaw/default.html 
Liu, G-Z. (2005). The trend and challenge for teaching EFL at Taiwanese universities. 
RELC Journal, 
36
(2), 211–221. 
McKay, S. L. (2003). Toward an appropriate EIL pedagogy: Re‐examining common ELT assumptions. 
Jen June Chen and Shu Ching Yang  
Technology-Enhanced Intercultural Projects 
Language Learning & Technology
75
International Journal of Applied Linguistics, 13
(1), 1–22.  
McKay, S., & Bokhorst-Heng, W. D. (2008). 
International English in its sociolinguistic contexts: 
Towards a socially sensitive EIL pedagogy.
New York, NY: Routledge. 
Nelson, M. E. (2006). Mode, meaning, and synaesthesia in multimedia L2 writing. 
Language Learning & 
Technology, 10
(2), 56–76. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol10num2/nelson/default.html 
O’Dowd, R. (2007). Evaluating the outcomes of online intercultural exchange. 
ELT Journal, 61
(2), 144–
152. 
Payne, J. S., & Ross, B. M. (2005). Synchronous CMC, working memory, and L2 oral proficiency 
development. 
Language Learning & Technology, 9
(3), 35–54. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/vol9num3/payne/default.html 
Peters, L. (2009). 
Global education: Using technology to bring the world to your students
. Washington, 
D.C.: International Society for Technology in Education. 
Richards, B. E. (2010). An exploration of what happens when second and third graders in two countries 
interact through a technology enhanced multicultural collaboration. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, 
University of South Carolina, Columbia. Retrieved from http://gradworks.umi.com/34/34/3434964.html 
Sanders, R. (2006). A comparison of chat room productivity: In-class versus out-of-class. 
CALICO 
Journal, 24
(1), 59–76.  
Shomoossi, N., & Ketabi, S. (2008). Authenticity within the EIL Paradigm. 
Iranian Journal of Language 
Studies, 2
(2), 173–185.  
Smith, E. A. (2000). Making culture and language real in a rural setting: The technology connection. 
Inquiry, 5
(1), 37–41.  
Spitzberg, B. H. (2000). A model of intercultural communication competence. 
Intercultural 
Communication: A Reader, 9
, 375–387.  
Spitzberg, B. H., & Changnon, G. (2009). Conceptualizing intercultural competence. In D. K. Deardorff 
(Ed.), 
The Sage handbook of intercultural competence
(pp. 2–52). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 
Stier, J. (2006). Internationalisation, intercultural communication and intercultural competence. 
Journal 
of Intercultural Communication, 11(
1), 1–12. 
Su, Y. C. (2008). Promoting cross-cultural awareness and understanding: incorporating ethnographic 
interviews in college EFL classes in Taiwan. 
Educational Studies, 34
(4), 377–398. 
Thorne, S. L. (2005). 
Internet-mediated intercultural foreign language education: Approaches, pedagogy, 
and research.
CALPER Working Paper Series No. 6. The Pennsylvania State University, Center for 
Advanced Language Proficiency Education and Research. 
Warschauer, M. (1997). Computer‐mediated collaborative learning: Theory and practice. 
Modern 
Language Journal, 81
(4), 470–481.  
Wu, W. V., & Marek, M. (2010). Making English a “habit”: Increasing confidence, motivation, and 
ability of EFL students through cross-cultural, computer-assisted interaction. 
TOJET, 9
(4), 101–112.  
Wu, W. V., Yen, L. L., & Marek, M. (2011). Using online EFL interaction to increase confidence, 
motivation, and ability. 
Educational Technology & Society, 14
(3), 118–129. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested