c# pdf viewer wpf : How to change page order in pdf acrobat software SDK dll windows winforms .net web forms v18n18-part456

Language Learning & Technology
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/abuseileekabualshar.pdf 
February 2014, Volume 18, Number 1 
pp. 76-95 
Copyright © 2014, ISSN 1094-3501 
76
USING PEER COMPUTER-MEDIATED CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK TO 
SUPPORT EFL LEARNERS’ WRITING 
Ali AbuSeileekAl al-Bayt University 
Awatif Abualsha’rAl al-Bayt University 
This study investigated the effect of using computer-mediated corrective feedback on EFL 
learners' performance in writing. Sixty-four intermediate-level learners were randomly 
assigned to either a no-feedback control condition or a corrective feedback, including three 
treatment conditions. The first is the “track changes” feature of 
Microsoft Word 2010
which double strikes through deletions and marks insertions in a different color. The 
second is recast feedback while the third is metalinguistic feedback. Over the course of 
eight weeks, each student was required to provide corrective feedback on drafts written by 
another group member and to discuss it with the group members. The study yielded three 
major findings. First, students who received computer-mediated corrective feedback while 
writing achieved better results in their overall test scores than students in the control 
condition who did not receive feedback. Second, there was a significant effect for the track 
changes made in the corrective-feedback type when compared with that made in the recast 
and metalinguistic feedback types. Students in the recast treatment condition also obtained 
higher significant mean scores than those who received metalinguistic corrective feedback. 
The study concluded with suggestions for further research and pedagogical implications. 
Keywords: 
Corrective feedback, foreign language writing, computer-mediated 
communication, peer review, error type. 
APA Citation:
. AbuSeileek, A., & Abualsha’r, A. (2014) Using peer computer-mediated 
corrective feedback to support EFL learners’ writing. 
Language Learning & Technology 
18
(1), 76–95. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/february2014/abuseileekabualshar.pdf 
Received: 
May 1, 2012; 
Accepted
: March 29, 2013; 
Published
: February 1, 2014 
Copyright:
© Ali AbuSeileek, Awatif Abualsha’r 
INTRODUCTION 
Corrective feedback is one of the major tools used for enhancing English language learning and teaching 
by providing students with feedback to correct their errors. It may support learners with explicit or 
implicit feedback that may be useful in developing writing. Although corrective feedback has been used 
for a long time in traditional classrooms, computer-mediated corrective feedback has been introduced 
only recently. The user may have access to different types of computer-based facilities that may help in 
providing corrective feedback for students regarding their errors and mistakes. According to Yeha and 
Lob (2009), corrective feedback or error correction provided via written computer-mediated 
communication could play an important role in developing learners’ metalinguistic awareness, especially 
marking up text with colored annotations and focusing the learners’ attention on limited information. This 
makes corrective feedback an efficient way to draw learners’ attention to the error and the feedback about 
it in the written text. As the use of computer-mediated corrective-feedback method has become more 
common in writing classes, different studies have looked for more innovative ways to aid learners in 
developing their writing abilities (Hyland & Hyland, 2006), and called for a test of the effectiveness of 
new technologies on teaching learners how to write (Ware & Warschauer, 2006). Moreover, as "the 
computer is a pedagogical tool that needs to be carefully used, evaluated, and explored by pedagogues 
and researchers alike" (Caws, 2006, p. 20), there is a need to search for more helpful computer-mediated 
How to change page order in pdf acrobat - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages within a pdf; how to reorder pdf pages
How to change page order in pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
moving pages in pdf; how to move pages in a pdf file
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
77
corrective-feedback methods and techniques that may support students when receiving peer-corrective 
feedback in a manner that may aid them more in the development of their writing performance. Despite 
the fact that some studies were conducted on the effectiveness of computer-mediated corrective feedback 
on learners' writing performance, the present study is based on introducing new computer-mediated 
corrective-feedback types for learning and teaching writing, including track changes and its effect on 
developing learners' performance in seven writing aspects: content, structural organization (text level), 
structural organization (sentence level), grammatical accuracy, lexical appropriateness, punctuation, and 
spelling. 
Corrective Feedback and Language Learning 
Some studies focused on providing feedback only on grammar (Bitchener, Young, & Cameron, 2005 & 
Ferris, 2006), content (Ferris, 2004 & Hendrickson, 1978), or on both (Arnold, Ducate & Kost, 2009; De 
Jong, & Kuiken, 2012; O’Donnell, 2007; Sheppard, 1992; Van Beuningen, 2010; Vyatkina, 2011). 
Though the term "corrective feedback” is generally used for errors on form not content, it may mean 
different things for the readers. Corrective feedback in this study refers to both feedback on linguistic 
forms and content (e.g., rhetorical aspects of writing) in the computer-based written form.
Corrective 
feedback or error correction may aid learners’ writing development and can act as a functional method for 
language learning. Van Beuningen (2010) reports that it fosters language learning and develops accuracy 
as it offers learners opportunities to notice the gaps in their linguistic systems, testing interlanguage 
hypotheses, and engaging in metalinguistic reflection. The accuracy of students who received written 
corrective feedback in the immediate post-test outperformed those in the control group, and this level of 
performance was retained two months later (Bitchener, 2008).  
Many studies, particularly by Truscott (1996, 2009), raised objections to corrective feedback use and 
pointed out that corrective feedback is unhelpful or even harmful for students' writing development 
(Truscott & Hsu, 2008). In conclusion, the usefulness of written corrective feedback is a topic of 
considerable debate (Ferris, 2004, 2010, 2012; Truscott, 2007, 2009). According to Guénette (2007), there 
has been considerable controversy among theorists and researchers about the usefulness of the process of 
corrective feedback in language learning and teaching. He added,  
The debate continues between those who believe in giving corrective feedback to students 
to improve their written accuracy and those who do not. Indeed, the results of the many 
experimental studies on written corrective feedback carried out over the last 20 years have 
been so contradictory that second language teachers looking to support their pedagogical 
choice to correct, or not to correct, the grammar of their students' written production are 
left in the midst of controversy. (p. 40) 
For the researchers who believe in the effect of corrective feedback on students' writing, different types of 
corrective feedback can be used to aid students' writing development including explicit error correction, 
metalinguistic feedback, elicitations, repetitions, recasts, translations, clarification requests
(Lyster & 
Ranta, 1997), and reformulation of correcting error types (Santos, López-Serrano, & Manchón, 2010). 
Other studies (Ellis, 2004; DeKeyser, 1998; Sauro, 2009) referred to two types of corrective feedback, 
including explicit and implicit or conscious knowledge about error vs. procedural
knowledge. Another 
classification is based on conceptualizing the feedback types as indirect or direct feedback (Ferris, 2003, 
2006; Truscott & Hsu, 2008) where "direct CF [corrective feedback] consists of an indication of the error 
and the corresponding correct linguistic form, [while] indirect CF only indicates that an error has been 
made" (Van Beuningen, 2010, p. 12). There are also other subcategorizations of these major types. For 
instance, indirect corrective feedback is divided into underlining and codes (Chandler, 2003; Ferris & 
Roberts, 2001), while the effect of direct feedback is examined as direct corrective feedback with or 
without written metalinguistic explanations (Bitchener, 2008; Bitchener & Knoch, 2009).  
In this study, three types of corrective feedback are used, namely track changes, recast, and metalinguistic. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF.
pdf reverse page order preview; rearrange pages in pdf document
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark to PDF file in order to help or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; how to rearrange pdf pages in preview
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
78
Table 1 illustrates these types. The examples are based on the sentence: 
They speaks English fluently. 
The 
definitions for the terms 
recast
and 
metalinguistic
feedback and the categorization of the characteristics of 
these corrective-feedback types are based on the model introduced by Lyster and Ranta (1997) and Sauro 
(2009). However, the definitions are operationalized and adapted to suit this study.  
Table 1
Characteristics of Corrective-Feedback Types in Microsoft Word 2010 
Feedback type  Definition 
Location 
in text 
Example  Nature of 
error 
indicated 
Target-like 
reformulation 
provided 
Elicited 
output 
Track changes  It is a computer-mediated 
method for providing 
corrective feedback that can 
be used in an implicit or 
explicit manner. It is based 
on reformulation of the error 
where the program strikes 
through deletions and marks 
insertions in a different 
color. 
Inline  
They 
speaks 
speak 
English 
fluently.
Provided 
indirectly 
Yes 
Error is 
identified 
and 
reform-
ulated 
Recast 
It is a computer-mediated 
method used for providing 
feedback. The error is 
always reformulated without 
providing any metalinguistic 
information about it.  
Marginal 
comment 
displayed 
inline  
They 
speak 
English 
fluently. 
Yes  
Reformulation 
provided 
Repeti-
tion of 
the error 
in the 
correct 
form 
Metalinguistic 
feedback  
It is a computer-mediated 
method based on providing 
metalinguistic information 
or comment about the error 
without reformulating it.  
Marginal 
comment 
displayed 
inline  
Subject-
verb 
agree-
ment 
Yes  
Provided 
indirectly  
Refor-
mulation 
of error 
On the other hand, the location in text characteristics of feedback types represent an attempt made in this 
study to specify where and how the note is displayed in the text. Figure 1 also provides an illustrative 
example about computer-mediated corrective-feedback types. 
Figure 1
. A screenshot for computer-mediated corrective-feedback types. Here, marginal comments are 
used for clarification to the reader, but they were displayed in line for students. 
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
as easy as printing; Support both single-page and batch Drop image to process GIF to PDF image conversion; Provide filter option to change brightness, color and
reorder pdf pages reader; move pdf pages
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
how to reorder pdf pages in; rearrange pdf pages
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
79
Peer written Corrective Feedback 
The peer-written corrective feedback is based on the Vygotsky's (1978) sociocultural theory. That is, the 
computer-mediated environment helps learners to provide corrective feedback about writing errors where 
one can achieve more when they interact with peers than when they work alone. Wells (1999) also 
demonstrated that the cooperative context helps the learners to receive help from their peers in the 
cooperative activity. It is a learner-centered approach based on learners' interactions to correct their errors. 
The learning process is considered as collaborative and cooperative (Oskoz & Elola, 2011). Therefore, 
peer-written corrective feedback is based on the communicative approach which is different from the 
traditional method that focuses on teaching isolated linguistic features and grammatical rules. It aims at 
developing learners' ability to use language in meaningful communication where they help each other to 
develop their linguistic competence while interacting. Inspired by the theory of communicative 
competence introduced by Canale and Swain (1980), this study focused on creating opportunities for 
asynchronous peer written interaction and meaningful communication. It is based on providing peer 
written corrective feedback where each student reads essays written by other classmates and provides 
written corrective feedback about their errors.  
The major goal of peer-written corrective feedback is to foster an atmosphere of reciprocal learning 
between learners based on the communicative approach to language teaching (Savignon, 2002). Ho and 
Savignon (2007) also reported that numerous studies have explored aspects of peer-review activities, 
including learners’ reactions and negotiation patterns, the effects of peer response on learners’ writing, 
and learners’ attitudes and affective benefits. Studies conducted to identify the effect of peer-written 
corrective feedback on learners' writing abilities (Elola & Oskoz, 2010; Ho & Savignon, 2007; Ware & 
O’Dowd, 2008) reported that it is quite helpful for learners to focus more on structure and organization, 
as well as content because they work collectively to address different types of errors in a cooperative 
environment. Finally, this study focused on the effect of asynchronous, computer-mediated, peer-writing 
corrective feedback. "One main benefit of CMC in asynchronous writing environments is that it promotes 
collaboration amongst students and reduces inhibition towards communication" (Caws, 2006, p. 20).  
Other studies made comparisons between presenting computer-mediated corrective feedback 
cooperatively and individually. For example, Elola and Oskoz (2010) made a comparison between 
learners’ peer-writing performance and individual writing performance using wikis and chats. Findings 
showed that there were no statistically significant differences in terms of complexity, accuracy, and 
fluency when comparing the individual and collaborative assignments. Finally, another study (Arnold, 
Ducate, & Kost, 2012) compared students' revisions only (cooperation) and their revision for the essays as 
a whole (collaboration). The results indicated that learners used both cooperative and collaborative 
strategies to revise for form. However, they were more cooperative when they made content revision. 
Finally, peer-revision computer-based collaborative writing created an environment which helped learners 
to state their views and to reorganize their essays (Oskoz & Elola, 2011), to contribute to autonomy 
through providing opportunities for practicing language (Kessler, 2009), and to develop their writing 
skills (Lee, 2010). 
Error Type 
There are two major different error types that address both content and form, including focused and 
unfocused (Ellis, Sheen, Murakami, & Takashima, 2008), treatable or rule governed (e.g., article use) and 
untreatable (e.g. lexical use) (Ferris, 2002), or targeted and untargeted (Storch, 2010) error types.
According to Van Beuningen (2010, p. 11), focused corrective feedback "targets a (number of) specific 
linguistic feature(s) only" while unfocused corrective feedback "involves correction of all errors in a 
learner’s text, irrespective of their error category."
Despite the fact that some studies (Sheppard, 1992) 
focused on classifying error types into global vs. local, other studies (Arnold, Ducate & Kost, 2009; 
O’Donnell, 2007; Vyatkina, 2011) provided more detailed types, including content, structural 
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
rearrange pages in pdf; reorder pages pdf file
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. a few clicks; Ability to convert PDF documents to and upgrade; Easy to convert multi-page PDF files to
reorder pdf pages; reorder pages in pdf file
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
80
organization (text level), structural organization (sentence level), grammatical accuracy, lexical 
appropriateness, punctuation, and spelling. Moreover, research has also explored the effect of corrective 
feedback on separate error types. Ferris (2006), for example, discerned between five major error types 
related to verb, noun, article, lexicon, and sentence, while Bitchener, Young, and Cameron (2005) 
distinguished between three error types (past simple tense, articles, and prepositions).  
Research about the effectiveness of corrective feedback proposes focusing on global error types rather 
than local errors since they impair communication (Hendrickson, 1978). However, other studies 
recommended focusing on both content and form, and different types of feedback should be used to 
address both content and form (Ferris, 2003, 2006; Hyland & Hyland, 2006; Lee, 2010; Sheppard, 1992; 
Vyatkina, 2011). This may help learners focus on both local error correction and global revision related to 
different writing aspects, including content, organization, and form. Thus, based on these studies, the 
evidence in support of writing corrective feedback on a limited number of error types is not very strong.
Moreover, research did not generally support conducting studies based on a limited number of errors. For 
example, Ferris (2010) noted that the purpose of error correction is to improve writing accuracy in general 
and not just to use one grammatical structure, though exploring the effect of focused error types might not 
be functional in improving learners' performance in writing from a practical perspective. Similarly, Storch 
(2010) demonstrated among other things that it is questionable whether we can draw generalizations 
about the efficacy of writing corrective feedback based on the evidence from such a limited range of 
structures. She added, "Studies which provide feedback on one type of error and only on one piece of 
writing and in controlled environments are unlikely to be relevant to language teachers" (p. 43). Other 
studies (Storch, 2010; Van Beuningen, 2010;) recommended provision of feedback within a realistic 
writing context to enable valid assessment of the role of corrective feedback in language-learners’ 
written-accuracy development. That is, learners provide corrective feedback on different error types as 
they learn how to write. 
Studies (DeKeyser, 2007; Ferris, 2004) suggested that the administration of extensive and sustained 
meaningful exposure and practice is effective in language learning and recommended the incorporation of 
feedback on content even at earlier stages of language instruction. This study is concerned with this issue. 
It provides a writing context in which students' writing performance was investigated over eight weeks to 
enable a valid assessment of the role of corrective feedback in language-learners’ written-accuracy 
development and in which the writing aspect was mainly developed by computer-mediated corrective 
feedback. The marking scale used by Vyatkina (2011, p. 73) related to the seven writing aspects was 
adopted. Appendix A contains this study’s operational definitions for each of the seven writing aspects, 
examples about them, metalinguistic feedback, and reformulation of the error. 
Computer-mediated Corrective Feedback 
Though many studies have face-to-face comparison for certain types of corrective feedback over others 
(Russell & Spada, 2006), there is a limited number of outcome-based studies on peer-writing corrective 
feedback in computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools like using wikis and chats (Elola & Oskoz, 
2010), and Word (AbuSeileek, 2006). Some studies (Caws, 2006; Duff & Li, 2009; Ho & Savignon, 
2007,) have focused on investigating the effect of computer-mediated corrective-feedback method using 
WebCT, email and Word on participants' attitudes, and reported that it was quite helpful for the 
development of students' writing. Lee (2005) also demonstrated that web-based learning reinforced 
learners' communication skills and writing, and actively involved them in being responsible for their 
learning. Other studies (Ho & Savignon, 2007; Savignon & Roithmeier, 2004) found that computer-
mediated peer review based on online-text discussion offers flexibility for learners as it reduces 
psychological pressure on learners who do not like to give feedback in face-to-face situations because it 
allows them to offer remote feedback asynchronously at the learners' convenience. 
Furthermore, other researchers compared between computer-mediated corrective feedback and traditional 
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter. Additionally, high-quality image conversion of DICOM & PDF files in single page
rearrange pages in pdf reader; how to reorder pdf pages in reader
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
interface; Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support
reorder pages of pdf; pdf change page order acrobat
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
81
feedback. For example, Yeha and Lob (2009) developed an online corrective feedback and error analysis 
system called Online Annotator for EFL Writing. The system consisted of five facilities: Document 
Maker, Annotation Editor, Composer, Error Analyzer, and Viewer. The findings indicated that students' 
corrective feedback revealed significantly better performance in the experimental group on recognizing 
writing errors. Moreover, Liu and Sadler (2003) also explored whether differences in both modes of 
commenting (Microsoft Word) and interaction (MOO) were more effective than traditional instruction in 
writing. The findings show that the overall number of comments, the percentage of revision-oriented 
comments, and consequently the overall number of revisions made by the technology-enhanced group 
were larger than those made by the traditional group. However, the study suggested using 
Microsoft Word 
2010
for editing in an electronic peer review mode, combined with face-to-face interaction in the 
traditional peer-review mode, for effective peer-review activities in L2 writing classrooms. Moreover, 
wikis were found to be an effective educational tool that encouraged the revision behavior and 
collaborative writing skills, and collaborative electronic writing may enhance more revisions (Arnold, 
Ducate, & Kost, 2009).  
In conclusion, the number of computer-mediated studies examining the effect of corrective-feedback 
types was too limited to argue for the advantage of this method compared with the traditional method or 
type of corrective feedback, though many studies showed that CMC was very helpful for developing 
learners' performance in writing (AbuSeileek, 2012; Sotillo, 2000; Ware & Warschauer, 2006). The 
present study aims to introduce a new corrective-feedback type of track changes that may be different 
from the other types used in previous studies. Using this method, the learner can strike through deletions 
and mark new insertions in the text in a different color where the error is identified indirectly and 
reformulated. This makes using track changes a combination of both implicit and explicit corrective-
feedback types. Furthermore, the study used different feedback types to address both content and form, 
including focused and unfocused error types. It sought to determine the effect of corrective-feedback type 
on EFL learners' performance in different writing aspects, including content, structural organization (text 
level), structural organization (sentence level), grammatical accuracy, lexical appropriateness, 
punctuation, and spelling. It seemed that no studies have investigated its effect on developing learners' 
proficiency in different writing aspects, including correcting local and global errors over a long period 
using the track changes method. Consequently, this was a major goal of this study.  
THIS STUDY 
1.  This study investigated the effect of using peer-generated computer-mediated corrective 
feedback on EFL learners' performance in writing. It also explored how three types of 
computer-mediated corrective feedback (track changes, metalinguistic, and recast) support EFL 
writing. More specifically, it sought to answer the following three research questions: 
2.  Do learners who receive computer-mediated corrective feedback from their peers perform 
significantly better when writing post-tests than those who do not receive feedback?  
3.  Which type of computer-mediated corrective feedback (track changes, recast, or metalinguistic) 
is more effective for EFL learners' writing performance? 
4.  Which writing aspect (content, structural organization (text level), structural organization 
(sentence level), grammatical accuracy, lexical appropriateness, punctuation, and spelling) is 
mainly developed by computer-mediated corrective feedback (track changes, recast, or 
metalinguistic)?  
Participants and Design 
Sixty-four undergraduate participants were enrolled in a writing course in a university. The course aimed 
at improving students’ written English communication. This included improving learners' ability to 
generate, organize, compare, contrast, and develop ideas supported by examples or evidence. Students in 
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
82
this class were freshmen in the Department of English. A survey was done for their age, gender, and 
language capabilities. Their age range was 18.3–19.1 years. The sample consisted of 48 females and 16 
males. However, the four study groups were balanced in their composition with twelve females and four 
males assigned to each group. 
A score range between 68 and 75/100 in the university’s English Placement Test is considered as an 
intermediate level and is roughly equal to level 5 on the IELTS, FCE, and CCSE, level 2 on the 
Cambridge exams, AP according to the ARELS exams, and OP according to the Oxford exams. Based on 
their scores, the 64 participants were placed in the intermediate linguistic level. They were randomly 
assigned into four groups (one control and three experimental) of sixteen students each. The MANOVA 
which was run on pre-test scores found no statistically significant difference between the computer-
mediated groups (N = 48; mean = 24.19; standard deviation = 1.93) and the control group (N = 16; mean 
= 23.63; standard deviation = 1.79); 
F
(1,63) = 1.06, 
=.31. The MANOVA test also showed that there 
was no significant effect for computer-mediated corrective-feedback type, 
F
(2,47) = 1.06, 
=.31, on the 
writing pre-test for all groups: track changes (N = 16; mean = 24.19; standard deviation = 2.26), recast (N 
= 16; mean = 24.38; standard deviation = 1.82), and metalinguistic (N = 16; mean = 24.00; standard 
deviation = 1.79). This indicates that all four groups began with similar levels of writing ability. 
The same instructor taught all of the participants in this study. Moreover, all students studied the same 
material and wrote eight essays over the same period: eight sessions over eight weeks. Students were 
informed that they were participating in a study that was being conducted solely for academic purposes. 
They were also informed that their participation in the study would not affect their evaluation in the 
course. To reduce the possibility of students' sharing what they were doing in each group, they had access 
to the materials and used the computer-mediated techniques only during the lessons. Due to the absence 
of some students, the instructor was forced to postpone two lessons (one for the track changes group and 
the other for the metalinguistic group) in order to enable all students in different groups to participate in 
the discussions. 
Test 
For the purposes of this study, a test was designed by the researchers to gauge the effect of the corrective 
feedback-type on EFL learners' writing abilities. It aimed at measuring students' ability to write correctly 
in English, including the ability to generate, organize, compare, contrast, and develop ideas, and to 
support those ideas with examples or evidence. Two raters, a native speaker and an EFL instructor, who 
were applied linguists, validated the test with regard to the clarity of instructions and the suitability of the 
questions to the goals and content of the course. They presented several suggestions such as changing the 
marking scale. Their suggestions and comments were taken into consideration. The test consisted of two 
main questions.  
The first question required students to write an essay of 150–200 words within a 30-minute time limit. 
For this question, the marking scale included the following seven writing aspects: content, structural 
organization (text level), structural organization (sentence-level), grammatical accuracy, lexical 
appropriateness, punctuation, and spelling.
Each writing aspect received ten points, with a maximum 
question score of 70 (Table 2). 
Table 2
Writing Scoring Rubrics
Question 
Writing aspect 
Number of errors  Points 
1. Write an essay  
Content 
10 
Structural organization (text level)  
10 
Structural organization (sentence level) 
10 
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
83
Grammatical accuracy 
10 
Punctuation 
10 
Lexical appropriateness 
10 
Spelling  
10 
Total 
70 
2. Underline and    
correct errors  
Content 
10 
Structural organization (text level)  
10 
Structural organization (sentence level)  5 
10 
Grammatical accuracy 
10 
Punctuation 
10 
Lexical appropriateness 
10 
Spelling  
10 
Total 
35 
70 
The second question required each student to search and correct, also in 30 minutes, a writing sample that 
had 35 errors covering the seven writing aspects. Each writing aspect received ten points, two points for 
each error, with a maximum question score of 70 (Table 2). Each student was required to underline the 
error and identify the type. The test re-test technique was used to establish the reliability of the test. The 
test was administered twice to a pilot study of twenty students within a two-week period between the two 
tests. The reliability coefficient of the test was .83, which is statistically acceptable for the purposes of the 
study. Before the test, students were briefed about its components and the criteria to be used in assessing 
their work. Each essay was scored by the same two raters who jointly assessed five of the essays and 
discussed points of disagreement until a consensus was obtained. Each essay was then rated 
independently by the two raters. Neither of them knew the rating assigned by the other. The inter-rater 
reliability between them was .86, which was statistically acceptable for the purposes of this study. It 
should be noted that the research questions in this study were addressed through the writing pre- and post-
tests. However, students’ essays were analyzed only to address the extent to which corrective feedback 
was delivered for each writing aspect and corrective-feedback type.   
Description of Procedures and Instructional Treatment 
Students were surveyed about personal information. They were then assigned into four treatment groups 
of 16 students each. Each of them was also randomly assigned into four small cooperative groups of four 
students each. All the writing tasks, including providing the corrective feedback, were conducted in the 
computer laboratory using 
Microsoft Word 2010
under the supervision of the instructor. Each student was 
set in front of a computer. They had to write an essay of 150–200 words about a specific topic. The topics 
included describing a person, describing a place, the similarities/differences between two things, hobbies, 
how to spend spare time, telling a story, a journey, and the Internet. Each student then submitted their 
work to the instructor. To reduce students' anxiety about making mistakes and errors, they were instructed 
not to write their names on the drafts; numbers were used instead. Each student in the small cooperative 
groups wrote one essay in each session. The teacher then assigned each student in the group one essay to 
be corrected. Each of them worked individually to provide corrective feedback related to the seven 
writing aspects in the draft written by another student from the group. Each group then had face-to-face 
discussion about the corrective feedback provided by each of its members about the errors in the draft 
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
84
he/she had checked. This step was adopted to help them trust the corrective feedback from their peers 
who were still developing their own writing proficiency (Paulus, 1999). Students did not directly receive 
teacher corrective feedback about their errors. However, each group then checked the corrective feedback 
they provided about the errors in the drafts with their instructor as an additional step to instill confidence 
in the feedback. Finally, the essays with corrective feedback were brought back to the instructor who sent 
each student his/her essay, a procedure that ensured confidentiality. Then each student worked alone to 
revise and rewrite his/her draft, considering the corrective feedback he/she had received. 
The instructor familiarized the participants in all groups with the target writing aspects. He also trained 
them to provide different types of corrective feedback as well as strategies to avoid when providing their 
own corrective feedback about the writing aspects. Four instructional treatments were included in the 
present study: track changes, recast, metalinguistic, and no feedback. In the first treatment, students 
commented on their peers’ writing by using the track changes feature of 
Microsoft Word 2010
. From the 
Review menu, the student used the option Track Changes. It allowed the learner to double-strike through 
deletions and to insert changes and mark them in red without providing metalinguistic information. In the 
second treatment, recast feedback, the student used the option New Comment from the Review menu. 
Comments were displayed inline through the option "Show All Revisions Inline" which can be reached 
through Show Markup and then Balloons in the Review menu in 
Microsoft Word 2010
. Students had to 
reformulate learners' errors related to the seven writing aspects without providing any metalinguistic 
information about the error. The third group used the same comment format; however, each student in this 
group had to provide metalinguistic information related to the seven writing aspects without 
reformulating the error. Finally, the fourth treatment was the control group in which no corrective 
feedback was provided by peers or the instructor. Each student worked alone on the writing task. 
However, students in this group received feedback once the study was finished because it was a long time 
for them not to receive feedback. All participants were post-tested, and their writing mean scores were 
analyzed per the study variables. Table 3 shows the extent to which corrective feedback was delivered for 
each writing aspect and corrective-feedback type. Based on the table, the amount of corrective feedback 
each group received was comparable as there were no statistical differences in the mean error between the 
corrective-feedback types as well as the writing aspects for each group (
F
(2,47) = 0.07); 
p
= .13.  
Table 3
Total Errors and Mean Errors for Corrective-feedback Types and Writing Aspects 
Writing aspect 
Corrective feedback type 
Total 
Track changes  Recast 
Explicit 
Total 
errors 
Mean 
error 
Total 
errors 
Mean 
error 
Total 
errors 
Mean 
error 
Total 
errors 
Mean 
error 
Content 
68 
4.25 
73 
4.56  72 
4.5 
213 
13.31 
Structural organization (text level)  
58 
3.63 
49 
3.06  62 
3.88 
169 
10.57 
Structural organization (sentence level)  152 
9.50  147 
9.19  157 
9.81 
456 
28.50 
Grammatical accuracy 
186 
11.63  195 
12.19  190 
11.88  571 
35.70 
Punctuation 
167 
10.44  154 
9.63  168 
10.50  489 
30.57 
Lexical appropriateness 
81 
5.06 
86 
5.38  79 
4.94 
246 
15.38 
Spelling  
164 
10.25  174 
10.88  170 
10.63  508 
31.76 
Total 
876 
54.76  878 
54.89  898 
56.14  2652 
165.79 
Statistical Analysis  
Means and standard deviations were calculated for either a no-feedback control condition or a corrective-
feedback treatment including one of the three types: track changes, metalinguistic, or recast. To find the 
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
85
presence or absence of any effect of computer-mediated corrective feedback on EFL learners' 
performance in writing, and explore how the three types of computer-mediated corrective feedback 
supported EFL writing, a MANOVA test was administered to the overall scores of students who 
participated in this study. Scheffe post-hoc tests were also conducted to compare any differences among 
the different groups in corrective-feedback types. Descriptive statistics, including mean scores and 
standard deviations, and the MANOVA test, relating to the seven writng aspects in the third question of 
the study, were calculated. Post-hoc Scheffe multiple comparisons were calculated to find the effect of 
corrective-feedback type on the seven writing aspects. The corrective-feedback types were the 
independent variables, and the students’ mean scores on the ‘writing post-test’ and ‘writing aspects’ were 
the dependent variables. 
RESULTS 
Corrective Feedback Types 
Question number one sought to determine whether learners who received computer-mediated corrective 
feedback from their peers while writing performed significantly better on the writing post-test than those 
who did not receive feedback. Table 4 lists the means and standard deviations of the students' scores on 
the post-test comparison of those means (
values). The data in Table 4 show that the overall mean of 
students' scores in the experimental condition was significantly higher than that of the students' scores in 
the control group on the writing post-test (
F
(1,63) = 27.65, 
p
= 0.00). In other words, the MANOVA test 
showed that the computer-mediated groups had significantly higher mean scores than the control group 
who did not receive corrective feedback from their peers about their writing errors. Moreover, the 
standard deviation is double in the group that received feedback, indicating that students in this group did 
not receive homogeneous mean scores on the writing post-test. As the instructor worked to ensure that all 
students had the same opportunity to participate in the writing sessions, except getting or not getting peer 
corrective feedback, the main significant effect for corrective-feedback type in this study may be 
attributed to receiving and giving computer-mediated corrective feedback by the sample while learning to 
write (Table 4). 
Table 4
MANOVA of Students’ Scores on the Post-test for Corrective-feedback Types
Corrective feedback  
 Mean  Standard 
deviation 
Computer-mediated feedback  48  49.04  4.37 
27.65* 
Control 
16  41.44  1.93 
Note: * p < 0.05. 
Computer-mediated Corrective-feedback Types 
Question number two required students to indicate which type of computer-mediated corrective feedback 
(track changes, recast, or metalinguistic) was more effective for EFL learners' performance on the writing 
post-test. Table 5 presents the results of a MANOVA of students’ post-test scores for the three computer-
mediated corrective-feedback types.  
According to the table, there was a significant effect for the computer-mediated corrective-feedback type 
on the students' scores on the writing post-test (
F
(2,47) = 127.10, 
p
= 0.00). Post-hoc comparison 
(Scheffe test) shows that the track-changes treatment group significantly outperformed the other groups. 
The recast group also significantly outperformed the metalinguistic group (
p
= 0.01) (Table 6). These 
findings show the following order of the effect of computer-mediated corrective-feedback type on EFL 
learners' writing performance on the post-test from strongest to weakest: track changes > recast > 
metalinguistic. As the three treatment groups had the same treatment conditions and opportunities for 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested