c# pdf viewer wpf : How to reorder pdf pages in SDK control service wpf azure html dnn v18n19-part457

Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
86
participation and commenting, except the different computer-mediated corrective-feedback type, it can be 
concluded that the main significant effect here could be attributed to the feedback type. That is, the track 
changes feedback type tends to have the most significant positive effect on EFL students’ writing, 
followed by recast feedback, and then metalinguistic feedback type. 
Table 5
MANOVA of Students’ Scores for the 
Computer-mediated Corrective-feedback Type on 
the Writing Post-test
Feedback 
type 
 Mean 
Standard 
deviation 
Track 
changes 
16  54.00  2.16 
127.10* 
Recast  
16  48.89  1.63 
Metalinguistic   16  44.26  1.29 
Total 
48  49.04  4.37 
Note: * p < 0.05 
Table 6
Results of Scheffe Test for 
Computer-mediated Corrective-feedback 
Type on the Writing Post-test 
Feedback 
type 
Recast 
Metalinguistic 
MD  Sig.  MD 
Sig. 
Track 
changes 
4.19*  0.00  7.94*  0.00 
Recast 
3.57*  0.00 
Note: * p < .05. 
Effect of Corrective-feedback Types on Writing Aspects 
The third question sought to determine which writing aspects the computer-mediated corrective feedback 
(track changes, recast, or metalinguistic) developed the most. Table 7 shows the means and standard 
deviations for the writing aspect by computer-mediated corrective-feedback type on the writing post-test.  
Table 7
MANOVA of Students’ Scores for Computer-Mediated Corrective-Feedback Type on the Post-
Test in Writing Aspects
Writing aspect** 
Corrective feedback type 
F
Track changes  Recast 
Metalinguistic 
SD 
SD 
SD 
Content 
8.06 
0.93  7.00 
0.73  6.25 
0.58 
23.02* 
Structural organization (text level)  
8.25 
0.77  7.38 
0.89  6.19 
0.75 
26.44* 
Structural organization (sentence level) 
8.25 
0.86  7.06 
0.68  6.13 
0.62 
34.47* 
Grammatical accuracy 
8.38 
0.62  7.31 
0.95  6.31 
1.01 
22.12* 
Punctuation 
8.38 
0.62  7.50 
1.10  6.38 
0.62 
24.53* 
Lexical appropriateness 
6.06 
1.24  6.50 
0.52  6.56 
0.51 
1.73 
Spelling  
6.63 
0.50  6.13 
0.81  6.44 
0.63 
2.36 
Total 
54.00  2.16  48.89  1.63  44.26  1.29 
127.10* 
Note: * p < 0.05; ** The maximum score for each writing aspect is 10. 
According to the table, the MANOVA test revealed that students in the track-changes group obtained 
more mean scores in all writing aspects except two, lexical appropriateness and spelling, at the 
p
< .05 
level. A post-hoc Scheffe test also indicated that there was a significant effect for writing aspect between 
the track-changes group and the other two groups (recast and metalinguistic) in favor of the track-changes 
group in all writing aspects, except lexical appropriateness and spelling (Table 8). This seems to indicate 
that the track-changes feedback was more effective for learning the five writing aspects than the other 
feedback types (recast and metalinguistic) on the writing post-test in the present study. However, the 
Scheffe Test shows that there were no significant differences between corrective-feedback types (track 
How to reorder pdf pages in - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages in pdf; change pdf page order online
How to reorder pdf pages in - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
rearrange pages in pdf online; move pages in a pdf
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
87
changes, recast, and metalinguistic) in lexical appropriateness and spelling (
p
= 0.01), indicating that 
students in the three computer-mediated corrective-feedback groups in this study could develop the two 
writing aspects (lexical appropriateness and spelling) in the same way in the writing post-test. The post-
hoc comparison (Scheffe Test) also shows that the recast group significantly outperformed the 
metalinguistic group in all writing aspects except lexical appropriateness and spelling at the 
p
= .01 
(Table 8). This appears to suggest that the recast corrective-feedback type is more helpful for the 
participants in learning the writing aspects than the metalinguistic corrective-feedback type. As the 
instructor worked to ensure that participants in all treatment conditions had similar opportunities to locate 
errors and to correct them except the different corrective-feedback types, it can be concluded that the 
main significant effect related to the writing aspects could be attributed to the corrective-feedback type 
from track changes.  
Table 8
Results of Scheffe Test for Writing Aspect by Computer-mediated Corrective-feedback Type on 
the Writing Post-test
Writing aspect 
Recast 
Metalinguistic 
MD* 
Sig. 
MD* 
Sig. 
Content 
1.06*  0.00 
1.81* 
0.00 
0.75* 
0.03 
Structural organization (text level)  
0.88*  0.01 
2.06* 
0.00 
1.19* 
0.00 
Structural organization (sentence 
level) 
1.19*  0.00 
2.13* 
0.00 
0.94* 
0.00 
Grammatical accuracy 
1.06*  0.01 
2.06* 
0.00 
0.94* 
0.00 
Punctuation 
.88*  0.01 
1.13* 
0.00 
1.13* 
0.00 
Lexical appropriateness 
-0.44  0.34 
-0.50 
0.24 
-0.06 
0.98 
Spelling 
0.50  0.11 
0.19 
0.72 
-0.31 
0.41 
Note: * The mean difference is significant at the 0.05 level. 
DISCUSSION 
Corrective Feedback Types 
The findings of this study affirm that learners who received corrective feedback delivered via computer 
about error types while writing essays performed significantly better than those who did not receive 
corrective feedback. Providing computer-mediated corrective feedback by peers seemed to have enhanced 
students' writing performance. This finding may be attributed to two reasons. The first is that the sample 
of the study may need more help than other groups of learners, such as advanced learners or native 
speakers, as it consisted of intermediate level EFL learners. Second, students in the treatment conditions 
used the computer to provide corrective feedback about errors in their classmates' essays. Most likely, the 
computer might support them to improve their writing performance. This finding has been supported by 
other studies conducted to identify the effect of computer-mediated corrective feedback on both form and 
content (Arnold, Ducate, & Kost, 2009; Liu & Sadler, 2003; Yeha & Lob, 2009). They found that the 
corrective feedback delivered via computer was quite useful for the development of students' writing 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
how to rearrange pdf pages online; how to move pages around in pdf file
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
move pages within pdf; how to rearrange pdf pages
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
88
abilities on post-tests. Similarly, Savignon and Roithmeier (2004) and Ho and Savignon (2007) found that 
computer-mediated written corrective feedback has the ability to foster language learning and to help 
learners in finding errors and correcting them.  
The present study also lasted over eight weeks and included different writing aspects, focusing on both 
content and form. Studies that explored the effect of corrective feedback on students' writing development 
(Ferris, 2003, 2006; Hyland & Hyland, 2006; Lee, 2010) supported the findings of this study. They 
recommended focusing on both the local and the global, or organization, grammar, and mechanics on the 
one hand and content on the other. Vyatkina (2011) was also in agreement with this finding. She reported 
that the majority of the participants felt that providing foreign language programs with corrective 
feedback on different writing aspects, including both content and appropriateness and grammatical 
accuracy, was quite useful; using wikis and chats in collaborative writing also allowed learners to 
concentrate more on different writing components (Elola & Oskoz, 2010). Oskoz and Elola (2011) also 
reported that computer-mediated communication facilities helped learners in refining the organization of 
their essays, thus becoming better writers. 
Computer-mediated Corrective-feedback Types 
This study also investigated the effect of computer-mediated corrective-feedback type (track changes, 
recast, and metalinguistic) on EFL learners' performance in writing. The findings of this study showed 
that students who received recast feedback significantly outperformed those who received metalinguistic 
feedback. Moreover, the results of this study revealed that students who received track-changes 
corrective-feedback type obtained the highest mean scores compared with the other groups, indicating 
that it is the most useful computer-mediated corrective-feedback type for developing learners' writing 
performance on the post-test. This finding was supported by the research carried out to identify the effect 
of track changes on the development of students' writing abilities. Ho and Savignon (2007), for instance, 
concluded that most participants think that the track-changes technique is very convenient for providing 
feedback about writing and facilitates the editing process. Caws (2006) also found that students felt that 
using track changes in the written evaluations helped them to identify and analyze their errors. 
This finding may be attributed to several reasons. First, track-changes corrective feedback has certain 
advantages as it reformulates the ill-formed text, sentence, phrase, or word through double-striking 
deletions without providing metalinguistic information about the incorrect form. It also marks insertions 
in a red color, which reformulates the error and provides the correct form of the problematic 
word/phrase/sentence. According to Ho and Savignon (2007), the major function of track changes is to 
record any change in a written text, including notes, questions, insertions, and deletions. This may attract 
the user's attention to the error. Furthermore, track changes is actually different than either the recast or 
metalinguistic corrective-feedback types. It is different from the metalinguistic feedback which provides 
the learner with metalinguistic information or comments about the error explaining the nature of the error 
indicated and providing a reformulation indirectly. Track changes does not provide metalinguistic 
feedback about the error; however, it allows for a direct reformulation of the error. Track changes also 
differs from recast feedback in that the error is always repeated in the correct form and in the 
reformulation. However, track changes allows for error identification and provides target-like 
reformulation. The original ill-form produced by the learner was preserved so that he/she could make a 
cognitive comparison and notice the difference between the error and the suggested correct form. 
However, the same could not be said for recast corrective-feedback type because the learner's original 
output (error) was deleted and no longer available. This made it not possible for him/her to make a 
cognitive comparison. All of this makes track changes a unique corrective-feedback type; it has 
distinctive characteristics making it different from other corrective-feedback types.   
Finally, this study concludes that using the track-changes corrective-feedback type may narrow the gap 
between explicit and implicit feedback. Many researchers think that there is a connection between 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order pdf reader; change page order pdf
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
Support navigating to the previous or next page of the PDF document; Able to insert, delete or reorder PDF document page in VB.NET document viewer;
how to move pages in pdf files; reorder pdf pages in preview
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
89
implicit and explicit knowledge bases (DeKeyser, 1998; Hulstijn, 1995), while others (Doughty & 
Williams, 1998; Long & Robinson, 1998) see implicit and explicit knowledge as being separated and 
adhere to an intermediate position between these two types. Track-changes corrective feedback can be 
used in both manners: implicitly and explicitly. That is, there is no direct or metalinguistic feedback 
showing that an overt error has been committed, so it is implicit. However, the error is identified 
indirectly and reformulated, so it is explicit. Therefore, it is a learning/teaching method that is different 
from both explicit and implicit feedback, having unique characteristics and advantages. This may explain 
the high significant mean scores obtained by students who received feedback using this method. Thus, the 
use of this method, which is based on technological innovations, may have prospective opportunities for 
language learning in general and in the area of providing corrective feedback about errors while writing in 
a more specific way. 
Effect of the Corrective-feedback Types on the Writing Aspects 
Students in the track-changes group significantly outperformed participants in other conditions in most 
writing aspects related to both form and content on the writing post-test. Some studies supported this 
finding. For example, Vyatkina (2011) found that most respondents provided feedback to intermediate-
level learners on certain writing aspects, including content, lexical appropriateness, grammatical accuracy, 
organization, spelling, and punctuation. Students might find an opportunity in the corrective feedback 
they received from other peers to find their errors and correct them. This finding also entails that 
corrective feedback should cover comprehensive writing aspects, including content, organization, and 
form. Restricting corrective feedback to include error correction related to treatable or focused errors may 
be less helpful in aiding the development of learners' writing abilities. In this way, corrective feedback is 
not provided in a real writing context, which focuses on developing all writing aspects concurrently. Van 
Beuningen (2010) and Storch (2010) demonstrated that students might find it confusing when they 
observe that some of their errors have been corrected while others have not been.  
The findings of this study also showed that there was a significant effect in all writing aspects on the post-
test except for two: lexical appropriateness and spelling. Students also obtained the lowest means in these 
aspects. This finding was not expected. Despite the fact that students in the three treatment conditions 
(track changes, recast, and metalinguistic) had the same opportunities to study the seven writing aspects 
in the same way during the writing course, they obtained lower mean scores in these two writing aspects. 
However, this finding may be attributed to the nature of errors related to these writing aspects that 
students had to find and correct. Most likely, these error types were not focused. That is, students learned 
to use certain lexical items, but this did not ensure that they learned to use other items because they were 
different and had different lexical usages. Similarly, spelling errors were generally unfocused 
(untreatable). Participants might learn the spelling of a number of words. However, this does not 
necessarily show that they have learned the spelling of other new words compared to other learning 
focused (treatable) grammatical aspects, such as the definite or indefinite article. The findings in the 
tables indicated that there was actually an improvement in all students' mean scores on the writing post-
test in lexical appropriateness and spelling. However, this does not show an established level of 
significant effect among the three groups for these writing aspects. 
CONCLUSIONS, LIMITATIONS, AND IMPLICATIONS 
This study’s unique contribution is to look at asynchronous peer-generated computer-mediated corrective 
feedback and represents a bridge between computer-assisted language learning (CALL) or computer-
mediated teaching methods and work being carried out on corrective feedback in language writing. It 
yielded several major findings. First, students who received computer-mediated corrective feedback while 
writing achieved better results in their overall test scores than the control subjects who did not receive 
corrective feedback. Second, there was a significant effect for the track-changes feedback type when 
compared with the recast feedback and metalinguistic feedback types. Third, students in the track-changes 
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
how to change page order in pdf acrobat; reorder pages in a pdf
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pages in a pdf document; reorder pages in pdf
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
90
group significantly outperformed those in the recast and metalinguistic group in most writing aspects. As 
this may be the first study which has investigated the effect of track changes as a corrective-feedback type 
while teaching writing, it is still early to claim that it is the best corrective-feedback type to be used by 
learners, as the issue of how the different types of corrective feedback contribute to language learning 
“has been and still remains one of the most controversial issues in language pedagogy” (Ellis, 2005, p. 
214). Therefore, future research may be conducted using track changes to verify or refute the findings of 
this study.  
Even though providing feedback is still a controversial issue, corrective feedback is commonly used in the 
classroom. Therefore, it is essential to continue investigating whether or not technology has further 
implications for the creation of more efficient feedback because the increased use of technology for 
feedback purposes has been less explored. Track changes is a computer-mediated corrective-feedback 
type which has its distinguished features and can be described as both partially implicit and explicit, and 
somewhat metalinguistic and recast in usage. It is a unique method as it is based on error identification 
and reformulation in which the nature of error is provided indirectly without providing an overt indicator 
about the error. Therefore, there is a need for conducting more studies related to using different computer-
mediated corrective-feedback techniques and which also facilitates the integration of the track-changes 
feedback type in the teaching and learning of writing, including different modes of commenting and 
tracking such as Reviewing Panel, Balloons, and Show Markup, and Track Changes Options. It is also 
essential to continue investigating whether or not technology is providing benefits when compared to the 
absence of corrective feedback. As the current study has revealed that the presence of certain techniques 
delivered via computer are more useful in supporting learners' writing performance than the absence of 
corrective feedback, researchers and pedagogues may think of conducting more studies using other 
computer-mediated corrective-feedback methods and techniques.  
Another implication is related to studies about the effectiveness of corrective feedback using paper-and-
pencil. Researchers may think of conducting these studies differently. The need arises to compare 
between the effectiveness of track changes and paper-and-pencil corrective feedback to find whether it 
may aid learners in getting more efficient corrective feedback. Researchers may also think of using 
computer-mediated corrective-feedback methods that focus on both content and form over several 
sessions. The findings of this study may raise a question about the validity of the methodology and 
findings of studies that have tested the effectiveness of corrective feedback about focused-error types, or 
did not provide corrective feedback on unfocused-error types (see, for more information, DeKeyser, 2007; 
Ferris, 2004, 2010; Storch, 2010; Van Beuningen, 2010). Such studies might not be conducted in a real 
classroom context where students did not learn how to write; they just examined the effect of corrective 
feedback on certain error types and ignored others. According to Van Beuningen (2010), conflicting 
findings on the effect of corrective feedback on developing-learners' writing abilities could be due to 
methodological issues and study design. Furthermore, in light of the push towards more distance 
education and the use of online peer and group work in writing courses, this study may present a practical 
model that can be used as guidance for instruction on the use of peer feedback in language-learning 
contexts. Finally, this study was based on giving and receiving peer-generated corrective feedback. A 
future study may compare between the act of giving versus receiving feedback and which of these is 
responsible for the learning differences observed.  
The findings of this study should be interpreted with caution for the following reasons. Firstly, the results 
are limited to using a specific word processor: 
Microsoft Word 2010
. Further studies are needed using 
other word processors, including their different modes of commenting and tracking changes. Secondly, 
the study was conducted on a limited sample (sixty-four learners) over a limited period (eight weeks) on 
certain feedback types (track changes, recast and metalinguistic) in a particular situation. Therefore, there 
is a need for other studies to be conducted on a greater number of students over longer periods and tracing 
error type over time. Thirdly, the analysis was restricted to seven major writing aspects. Other studies 
VB.NET PDF: VB.NET Guide to Process PDF Document in .NET Project
It can be used to add or delete PDF document page(s), sort the order of PDF pages, add image to PDF document page and extract page(s) from PDF document in VB
how to reorder pages in a pdf document; pdf move pages
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
SDK, developers are easily to access, extract, swap, reorder, insert, mark up and delete pages in any multi upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents.
how to reorder pages in pdf file; switch page order pdf
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
91
may be devised to measure different error types, such as local vs. global, or focused vs. non-focused, and 
their subcategories using different corrective feedback types in the computer-mediated corrective-
feedback environment. Finally, both the experimental and control groups were taught by one of the 
researchers, which does not make it an ideal situation
because the involvement of the researcher in the 
teaching could introduce bias.  
APPENDIX. Vyatkina's (2011) Classification for Writing Aspects and their Operational Definitions 
Writing aspect  Definition 
Example 
Metalinguisti
c feedback 
Reformulation 
Content 
It includes irrelevance 
content, long sections, 
unsuitable examples, 
redundancy, missing 
content, senseless ideas 
(illogical information), and 
unbalanced discussion. 
English 
language 
includes four 
basic skills: 
reading, 
writing, and 
listening.  
Missing 
content 
English language 
includes four 
basic skills: 
reading, writing, 
speaking, and 
listening.  
Structural 
organization 
(text level)  
Ideas follow each other in 
a logical, coherent order at 
the text level to make 
sense to the reader. Errors 
include the wrong use of 
transitions, main sentence 
in the essay, main sentence 
in each paragraph, and 
consistency between them 
and other sentences, and 
correct paragraph 
transition.  
English is very 
important to 
study in 
schools and 
universities. 
Since you 
have to speak 
English well 
these days if 
you want to 
get ahead in 
your study.  
Wrong use of 
transition 
English is very 
important to 
study in schools 
and universities. 
Since Therefore, 
you have to 
speak English 
well these days if 
you want to get 
ahead in your 
study. 
Structural 
organization 
(sentence 
level)  
Ideas follow each other in 
a logical order at the 
sentence level to make 
sense to the reader. Errors 
include the wrong use of 
transitions, and connection 
between words and 
phrases, and ideas at the 
sentence level.  
I think you 
have a nice but 
very nice 
future if you 
have good 
English. 
Wrong use of 
transition 
I think you have 
a nice but very 
nice future if you 
have good 
English. 
Grammatical 
accuracy 
It includes incorrect word 
form or word order.  
English are the 
mother 
language of 
the world.  
Subject-verb 
agreement 
English are is the 
mother language 
of the world. 
Punctuation 
This is restricted to the 
wrong use of punctuation 
marks.  
Finally I think 
you have a 
very nice 
future if you 
have good 
English. 
Use a comma 
after the 
transition  
Finally Finally, I 
think you have a 
nice but very 
nice future if you 
have good 
English. 
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
92
Lexical 
appropriatenes
It refers to using 
inappropriate use of lexical 
items. 
You must 
speak English 
well if you 
want to get 
ahead in your 
business. 
Use should 
to express 
advice 
You must should 
speak English 
well if you want 
to get ahead in 
your business. 
Spelling  
It is related to using wrong 
spelling of words. 
English 
Language is 
very important 
in our life 
these days. 
Capitalizatio
English 
Language 
language is very 
important in our 
life these days. 
ABOUT THE AUTHORS 
Dr. Ali Farhan AbuSeileek is an associate professor at Al al-Bayt University. He has published papers and 
designed several CALL programs for EFL learners. His major research interest is CALL and its 
application in EFL teaching and testing, machine translation, and CALL program development.  
E-mail: alifarhan@aabu.edu.jo 
Awatif Abu-al-Sha'r is an associate professor in TEFL, the Dean of the Faculty of Education at Al-Al-
Bayt University, Jordan. Her main concern is in the fields of TEFL; e-Translation, Curricula and Quality 
Insurance Standards, CALL, and Language Corpora. 
E-mail: awatifabualshar@yahoo.com  
REFERENCES 
AbuSeileek, A. (2006). The use of word processor for teaching writing to EFL learners in King Saud 
University. 
Journal of King Saud University, 19
(2), 1–15. 
AbuSeileek, A. (2012). The effect of computer assisted cooperative learning method and group size on 
EFL learners' achievement in communication skills. 
Computers & Education, 58
(1), 231–239.
 
Arnold, N., Ducate, L., & Kost, C. (2009). Collaborative writing in wikis: Insights from culture projects 
in intermediate German classes. In L. Lomicka & G. Lord (Eds.), 
The next generation: Social networking 
and online collaboration in foreign language learning 
(pp. 115–144). San Marcos, TX: CALICO.  
Arnold, N., Ducate, L., & Kost, C. (2012). Collaboration or cooperation? Analyzing group dynamics and 
revision processes in wikis. 
CALICO Journal, 29
(3), 431–448. 
Bitchener, J. (2008). Evidence in support of written corrective feedback. 
Journal of Second Language 
Writing, 17
(2), 102–118.  
Bitchener, J., & Knoch, U. (2009). The relative effectiveness of different types of direct written corrective 
feedback. 
System,
37
(2), 322–329. 
Bitchener, J., Young, S., & Cameron, D. (2005). The effect of different types of corrective feedback on 
ESL student writing. 
Journal of Second Language Writing 14
(3), 227–258.  
Canale, M. & Swain, M. (1980). Theoretical bases of communicative approaches to second language 
teaching and testing". 
Applied Linguistics, 1
, 1–47. 
Caws, C. (2006). Assessing group interactions online: Students’ perspectives. 
Journal of
Learning
Design
1
(3), 19–28. 
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
93
Chandler, J. (2003). The efficacy of various kinds of error feedback for improvement in the accuracy and 
fluency of L2 student writing. 
Journal of Second Language Writing, 12
, 267–96.  
DeKeyser, R. (1998). Beyond focus on form: Cognitive perspectives on learning and practicing second 
language grammar. In C. Doughty & J. Williams (Eds.), 
Focus on form in classroom second language 
acquisition 
(pp. 42–63). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 
DeKeyser, R. (2007). Skill acquisition theory. In B. VanPatten & J. Wiliams (Eds.), 
Theories in second 
language acquisition
(pp. 97–113). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.  
Doughty, C., & Williams, J. (1998). Pedagogical choices in focus on form. In C. J. Doughty & J. 
Williams (Eds.), 
Focus on form in classroom second language acquisition 
(pp. 197–261). Cambridge, 
UK: Cambridge University Press. 
Duff, P., & Li, D. (2009). Issues in Mandarin language instruction: Theory, research, and practice. 
System
32
(3), 443–456. 
Ellis, R. (2004). The definition and measurement of L2 explicit knowledge. 
Language Learning 54
(2), 
227–275. 
Ellis, R. (2005). Principles of instructed language learning. 
System 33
(2), 209–224.  
Ellis, R. Sheen, Y. Murakami, M., & Takashima, H. (2008). The effects of focused and unfocused written 
corrective feedback in an English as a foreign language context. 
System
36
, 353–371. 
Elola, I., & Oskoz, A. (2010). Collaborative writing: fostering foreign language and writing conventions 
development. 
Language Learning & Technology
14
(3), 51–71. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/issues/october2010/elolaoskoz.pdf 
Ferris, D. (2002). 
Treatment of error in second language student writing
. Ann Arbor, MI: The University 
of Michigan Press. 
Ferris, D. (2003). 
Response to student writing: Implications for second language students
. Mahwah, NJ: 
Lawrence Erlbaum. 
Ferris, D. (2004). The "grammar correction" debate in L2 writing: Where are we, and where do we go 
from here? (and what do we do in the meantime?). 
Journal of Second Language Writing 13
(1), 49–62.  
Ferris, D. (2006). Does error feedback help student writers? New evidence on the short- and longterm 
effects of written error correction. In K. Hyland & F. Hyland (Eds.), 
Feedback in second language 
writing: Contexts and issues 
(pp. 81–104). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 
Ferris, D. (2010). Second language writing research and written corrective feedback in SLA. 
Studies in 
Second Language Acquisition, 32
(2), 181–201. 
Ferris, D. (2012). Written corrective feedback in second language acquisition and writing studies. 
Language Teaching, 45
(4), 446–459.  
Ferris, D., & Roberts, B. (2001). Error feedback in L2 writing classes: How explicit does it need to be? 
Journal of Second Language Writing
10
, 161–184.  
Guénette, D. (2007). Is feedback pedagogically correct?: Research design issues in studies of feedback on 
writing. 
Journal of Second Language Writing
16
(1), 40–53. 
Hendrickson, J. M. (1978). Error correction in foreign language teaching: Recent theory, research and 
practice. 
Modern Language Journal, 62
(8), 387–398. 
Ho, M., & Savignon, S. (2007). Face-to-face and computer-mediated peer review in EFL writing.
CALICO Journal, 24
(2), 269–290. 
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
94
Hulstijn, J. H. (1995). Not all grammar rules are equal: giving grammar instruction its proper place in 
foreign language teaching. In R. Schmidt (Ed.), 
Attention and awareness in foreign language learning 
(pp. 
359–386). Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii. 
Hyland, K., & Hyland, F. (2006). Contexts and issues in feedback on L2 writing: An introduction. In K. 
Hyland & F. Hyland (Eds.), 
Feedback in second language writing: Contexts and issues 
(pp. 1–19). 
Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. 
Kessler, G. (2009). Student-initiated attention to form in wiki-based collaborative writing. 
Language 
Learning & Technology, 13
(1), 79–95. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol13num1/kessler.pdf 
Lee, L. (2005). Using Web-based instruction to promote active learning: Learners' perspectives. 
CALICO 
Journal, 23
(1), 139–156.  
Lee, L. (2010). Exploring wiki-media collaborative writing: A Case Study in an Elementary Spanish 
Course. 
CALICO Journal, 27
(2), 260–276.  
Liu, J., & Sadler, R. (2003). The effects and affect of peer review in electronic versus traditional modes 
on L2 writing. 
Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 2
, 193–227.  
Long, M. H., & Robinson, P. (1998). Focus on form: Theory, research, and practice. In C. Doughty & J. 
Williams (Eds.), 
Focus on form in second language acquisition 
(pp.15–41). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge 
University Press. 
Lyster, R., & Ranta, L. (1997). Corrective feedback and learner uptake: Negotiation of form in 
communicative classrooms. 
Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 19
, 37–66.  
O’Donnell, M. (2007). Policies and practices in foreign language writing at the college level: Survey 
results and implications. 
Foreign Language Annals, 40
, 650–671.  
Oskoz, A., & Elola, I. (2011). Meeting at the wiki: The new arena for collaborative writing in foreign 
language Courses. In M. J. W. Lee & C. Mcloughlin (Eds.), 
Web 2.0-based E-learning: Applying social 
informatics for tertiary teaching
(pp. 209–227). Hershey, PA: IGI Global 
Paulus, T. M. (1999). The effect of peer and teacher feedback on student writing. 
Journal of Second 
Language Writing, 8
(3), 265–289.  
Russell, J., & Spada, N. (2006). The effectiveness of corrective feedback for the acquisition of L2 
grammar: A meta-analysis of the research. In J. Norris & L. Ortega (Eds.), 
Synthesizing research on 
language learning and teaching 
(pp. 133–164). Amsterdam, Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing.  
Santos, M., López-Serrano, S., & Manchón, R. (2010). The differential effect of two types of direct 
written corrective feedback on noticing and uptake: Reformulation vs. error correction. 
International 
Journal of English Studies,
10
(1), 131–154.
Savignon, S. J. (Ed.). (2002). 
Interpreting communicative language teaching. 
New Haven, CT: Yale 
University Press.  
Sauro, S. (2009). Computer-mediated corrective feedback and the development of l2 grammar.
Language 
Learning & Technology, 13
(1), 96–120. Retrieved from http://llt.msu.edu/vol13num1/sauro.pdf 
Sheppard, K. (1992). Two feedback types: do they make a difference? 
RELC Journal
23
, 103–l10. 
Sotillo, S. (2000). Discourse functions and syntactic complexity in synchronous and asynchronous 
communication. 
Language Learning & Technology, 4
(1), 82–119. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/vol4num1/sotillo/default.html 
Storch. N. (2010). Critical feedback on written corrective feedback research. 
International Journal of 
English Studies
10
(2), 29–46. 
Ali AbuSeileek and Awatif Abualsha’r 
Peer CMC Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing
ting
Language Learning & Technology
95
Truscott, J. (1996). The case against grammar correction in L2 writing classes. 
Language Learning, 46
327–369.  
Truscott, J. (2007). The effect of error correction on learners’ ability to write accurately. 
Journal of 
Second Language Writing, 16
(4), 255–272.  
Truscott, J. (2009). Arguments and appearances: A response to Chandler. 
Journal of Second Language 
Writing, 19
(1), 59–60.  
Truscott, J., & Hsu, A.Y.-P. (2008). Error correction, revision, and learning. 
Journal of Second Language 
Writing
17
, 292–305.  
Van Beuningen, C. (2010). Corrective feedback in L2 writing: Theoretical perspectives, empirical 
insights, and future directions. 
International Journal of English Studies,
10
(2), 1–27. 
Van Beuningen, C., De Jong, N., & Kuiken, F. (2012). Evidence on the effectiveness of comprehensive 
error correction in second language writing. 
Language Learning, 62
(1), 1–41. 
Vyatkina, N. (2011). Writing instruction and policies for written corrective feedback in the basic language 
sequence. 
L2 Journal
3
, 63–92.  
Vygotsky, L. (1978). 
Mind in society. 
Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.  
Ware, P. D., & O’Dowd, R. (2008). Peer feedback on language form in tellecollaboration. 
Language 
Learning & Technology, 12
(1), 43–63. Retrieved from 
http://llt.msu.edu/vol12num1/wareodowd/default.html 
Ware, P. D., & Warschauer, M. (2006). Electronic feedback and second language writing. In K. Hyland & 
F. Hyland (Eds.), 
Feedback in second language writing: Contexts and issues 
(pp. 105–122). Cambridge, 
UK: Cambridge University Press. 
Wells, G. (1999). 
Dialogic inquiry: Toward a sociocultural practice and theory of education
Cambridge,UK: Cambridge University Press. 
Yeha, Sh., & Lob, J. (2009). Using online annotations to support error correction and corrective feedback. 
Computers & Education, 52
(4), 882–892.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested