c# pdf viewer wpf : Rearrange pages in pdf online application Library utility azure asp.net html visual studio v5n1_curtis_10-part471

JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
21
EXPLORING COLLABORATIVE ONLINE 
LEARNING 
David D. Curtis
david.curtis@flinders.edu.au
Michael J. Lawson
mike.Lawson@flinders.edu.au
http://wwwed.sturt.flinders.edu.au/edweb/staff/lawson.htm 
8-61- (618) 8201 2829 
School of Education 
Flinders University of South Australia 
GPO Box 2100 
Adelaide 5001 
ABSTRACT 
An investigation was carried out to determine the extent to which evidence of collaborative learning 
could be identified in students’ textual interactions in an online learning environment. The literature 
on collaborative learning has identified a range of behaviors that characterize successful collaborative 
learning in face-to-face situations. Evidence of these behaviors was sought in the messages that were 
posted by students as they interacted in online work groups. Analysis of students’ contributions 
reveals that there is substantial evidence of collaboration, but that there are differences between 
conventional face-to-face instances of collaborative learning and what occurs in an asynchronous, 
networked environment. 
KEYWORDS 
collaboration, learning behaviors, textual interaction 
I.  ONLINE COLLABORATIVE LEARNING IN HIGHER 
EDUCATION 
Changes in both the levels of funding and the profiles of students have led to an increasing emphasis 
on the use of flexible methods of course delivery in higher education and as part of that trend there is 
increasing interest in the use of communication and information technologies (CIT). The availability 
of flexible learning resources has in turn led to the increased use of flexible delivery methods based 
on CIT for on-campus students. This has raised questions about the effects of these methods on the 
quality of interaction among students and between students and teaching staff. In this paper we 
address one of these questions that focusing on the student-student interaction in a flexible delivery 
system. 
Caught in the midst of conflicting demands for increased efficiency in systems of delivery and 
improvement in the quality of teaching, universities face some difficult decisions for which they have 
access to very limited information. Whether flexible learning will influence quality outcomes and 
whether increased efficiency can be achieved through the use of CIT remain open questions. There 
appears to be an implicit assumption that efficiencies can be achieved through the use of CIT, but it is 
clear that setting up to use such technologies entails high infrastructure and staff development costs 
and may require the "re-engineering" of course delivery processes. It would not be in the universities' 
interests for such re-engineering to result in a decline in the level of student satisfaction. The lone 
student scrolling through pages of on-line text is a step backward in terms of quality of teaching and 
learning. There is therefore a need to gather information about the experiences of students engaged in 
study in the new flexible delivery modes. 
In this study, online interactions among students in higher education were investigated. Interactions 
among students make positive contributions to students' learning (Laurillard, 1993; Moore, 1993; 
Ramsden, 1992). There is a question about whether this belief is justified in the case of online 
Rearrange pages in pdf online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to change page order in pdf document; rearrange pdf pages in preview
Rearrange pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf reorder pages; move pdf pages
JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
22
learning environments because the interactions among students are mediated, there is an absence of 
non-verbal cues, and text-on-screen is a very limited mode for what should be semantically rich 
exchanges. In this study we sought evidence of good quality interactions among students who are not 
present in the one physical site from data obtained from students' online exchanges. Our focus was on 
the  extent  and  depth  of  on-task  activity  (numbers  of  contributions  and  the  'depth'  of  those 
contributions), social chat, extent of collaboration, possible gender influences, mutual explanations 
(seeking clarification and providing information to peers), and regulatory behaviors (encouraging 
effort and monitoring peers' efforts and contributions). 
A. Previous research 
One way to implement high levels of interaction among students, and thereby to increase both the 
quality of students' learning experiences and the efficiency of delivery, is to implement collaborative 
learning. Much previous work on collaborative learning has focused on face-to-face situations, while 
in this study, the focus is on collaboration in an online learning environment. Online interactions 
differ in quite important ways from face-to-face discussion. Online interactions lack the non-verbal 
cues  that  are  a  component  of  face-to-face  contact,  and  this  may  reduce  the  extent  of  the 
communication that occurs. Much online conversation occurs asynchronously, with substantial delays 
in receiving a reply. This may have both advantages and disadvantages for the participants. The lack 
of spontaneity associated with a seminar group gathered around the one table may be offset by the 
possibility of having greater time for reflection and generation of a considered response. 
B. Collaborative learning 
Dillenbourg and Schneider (1995) make a distinction between cooperative and collaborative learning. 
They indicate that cooperative learning is “… a protocol in which the task is in advance split into sub-
tasks that the partners solve independently”. Collaborative learning describes situations “… in which 
two or more subjects build synchronously and interactively a joint solution to some problem”. This 
distinction places greater emphasis on the extent and quality of the exchanges that occur within 
groups of students in collaborative environments. With cooperative tasks, participants could agree on 
the elements of the task and distribute those across group members who would work independently 
until each has completed her/his component. The separate components could then be assembled to 
produce the final product. It is clear that some authors, e.g. Johnson & Johnson (1996) use the term 
cooperative learning to describe the higher level processes that Dillenbourg & Schneider would label 
collaborative. Clearly, an important component of collaboration is the discussion that occurs during 
task engagement, since the cognitive benefits that are claimed for collaborative learning (Pressley & 
McCormick, 1995) must be mediated  by  the verbal exchanges among learners. Verdejo  (1996) 
emphasizes this theme, basing collaborative learning on a “conversation or dialogue paradigm”. Henri 
and Rigault (1996), in addition to the shared approach to tasks and student interdependence, also refer 
to greater student autonomy in distinguishing collaborative from cooperative learning. 
In reciprocal teaching (Brown & Palincsar, 1989) interactions among students have been shown to 
exert positive influences on students' learning. Reciprocal teaching is a form of collaboration and 
there is evidence that in the discourse in which learners articulate and share their understandings, there 
is potential for sharing the cognitive load of the learning task (Dillenbourg & Schneider, 1995), for 
greater on-task engagement (Cavalier, Klein, & Cavalier, 1995), and for greater mutual explanations 
(Cavalier et al., 1995). 
Johnson & Johnson (1996) provide a sound theoretical basis for collaborative learning arguing that it 
has been  described in terms  of  cognitive  developmental  theories, especially  from a  Vygotskian 
perspective; from behavioral learning approaches; and on the basis of social interdependence theory. 
Collaboration in a seminar does allow for scaffolding of thinking for student and provides immediacy 
of  feedback.  The behaviors  that characterize positive social  interdependence include giving  and 
receiving help, exchanging resources and information, giving and receiving feedback, challenging and 
encouraging  each  other,  and  jointly  reflecting  on  progress  and  process.  Positive  social 
interdependence is contrasted with individualistic and competitive work environments. Where people 
work in relationships in which each individual depends upon others within the group, that is where 
reciprocal dependencies exist, they achieve more individually, they make greater effort to achieve, 
they experience greater social support, and they report feelings of greater self esteem than they do in 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
reverse pdf page order online; reorder pages in pdf file
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
Then press the button below and download your PDF. By dragging your pages in the editor area you can rearrange them or delete single pages.
reverse page order pdf; how to reorder pages in pdf
JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
23
competitive and individualistic settings (Johnson & Johnson, 1996). Johnson and Johnson (1996) also 
note that the effect sizes, for the dependent variables just listed, favor collaborative approaches even 
more when the task is more complex and involves greater problem-solving and creativity. 
Could  such  benefits  be  associated  with  collaborative  learning  that  was  not  face-to-face?  In 
commenting on technology assisted collaborative learning (TACL) Johnson & Johnson (1996) note 
that  "conceptual  models  of  how  technology  and  teamwork  may  be  productively  integrated are 
practically nonexistent" (p. 1038) so that there are few guidelines to direct the efforts of teachers who 
might like to implement TACL. Levin (1995) supports this view, but does provide a framework for 
organizing network-based learning environments as a first step towards the development of a theory 
of online interactive learning. Indeed, since the Johnson &Johnson (1996) paper, substantial work on 
collaboration in online environments has continued. Both Verdejo (1996) and Henri and Rigault 
(1996) add to the emergence of theory. They take a conversational approach to understanding the role 
of computer conferencing in supporting online collaborative learning, but also draw attention to the 
components  of  discussion  moderation  and  management.  Gunawardena,  Lowe,  &  Anderson 
(Gunawardena,  Lowe,  & Anderson,  1997)  analyzed  the content of  an online debate to  identify 
elements of knowledge construction among participants, but in doing so, also sought evidence of 
collaboration among participants as a component of the knowledge construction process. Hiltz (Hiltz, 
1998) has demonstrated that collaborative learning can lead to learning outcomes comparable with 
those achieved in face-to-face classes. Harasim et al. (1995) provide extensive guidelines to initiate, 
sustain, and manage online discussion. These sources, and the authors’ experience in online teaching, 
were used to generate sets of guidelines, for both online interaction and for collaborative work, that 
were distributed to students at the beginning of the course.1 
C. Types and roles of interaction 
In a seminar room effective interaction needs to be managed in order to help students to generate deep 
understanding. Moore (1993) asserts that this  management involves three  key types of learning 
interaction: interaction with resources; with teachers; and with peers. The quality of each of these 
types of interaction is of concern in both face-to-face and online environments. In the latter, Hansen 
(1996) reminds us that a new element of interaction is introduced – the interaction of both the teacher 
and the learner with an interface. 
Interaction with good quality resources in an online environment is often not a major difficulty. 
Although distance education may be associated with a restricted set of learning resources the new 
technologies are reducing this problem for both lecturers and students. Indeed even for on-campus 
students an increasing proportion of the resources they access are online. 
In on-campus study students have access to interactions with academic teachers in seminars and in 
individual consultations. In online teaching such interaction is available, though it is mediated through 
some form of CIT. The one-to-many interaction of the lecture and seminar that comprises most of the 
student-teacher interaction for the many students who do not seek individual consultations with their 
teachers,  is  often  replaced  by  one-on-one  interaction  via  CIT.  However,  for  the  lecturer  this 
interaction occurs at the expense of efficiency because mediated one-on-one interactions, such as 
email interchanges, are easily initiated by the students and can be very time-consuming. 
Interactions among students in the online situation may be more problematic. Laurillard (1993, 99-
105), in developing a principled analysis of media use in higher education, provides a detailed model 
of high quality teacher-student interaction, a model based on a staged, iterative dialogic structure for 
the interactions between teacher and student.  Encouraging  such high  quality interactions among 
students may achieve both quality and efficiency goals, but do they occur? We wanted to examine 
whether the richness of the interactions described by Laurillard was present in online student-student 
interactions. 
Paulsen (1995a) describes alternative ways of implementing Moore’s (1993) three types of interaction 
in online environments, alternatives that should encourage more effective student-student interaction. 
For that purpose he lists options such as symposia, debates, role plays, case studies, discussion 
1 Copies of these guidelines are available from the David Curtis. 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order pdf acrobat; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages to a
change page order pdf; reordering pages in pdf document
JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
24
groups, brainstorming, and project groups. Following Paulsen, the task set for the participants in this 
study required groups to act as consultants to educational and training organizations (with which they 
were all very familiar) and to make recommendations on ways in which CIT could be used to achieve 
the organizations’ goals while maintaining quality in service delivery. This task had elements of role 
play, case study, and project group approaches. 
D. Computer-mediated communication 
Over recent years much attention has been paid to the use of computer-mediated communication 
(CMC) in learning, and especially in distance education (e.g., Daniel, 1995; Ellsworth, 1995; Grint, 
1992; Harasim et al., 1995; Hesketh, Gosper, Andrews, & Sabaz, 1996; Paulsen, 1995b; Szabo, 1995). 
Definitions of CMC vary but virtually all observers include email, chat, and computer conferencing 
while most also include access to information, e.g. the use of online databases. With the convergence 
of communication and information technologies, it is now common to find references to desktop 
video-conferencing as a CMC application. Indeed the term computer conferencing is used in different 
ways: those who come to it from the perspective of email and bulletin boards use the term to refer to 
asynchronous structured  text based interactions,  while  those who have been  involved  in  video-
conferencing refer to synchronous interactions that may include video, audio, and document sharing, 
but that do include real time text interactions. 
The major focus of this study is on asynchronous interaction, the form of interaction that is most 
common in current online courses. In this discussion computer conferencing refers to the use of a 
web-based application that enables participants to create and edit messages that are stored in an area 
that is accessible to group members and that organizes messages into ‘threads’ of conversations. 
It was our intention to use an email discussion list for part of the topic, during which time students 
introduced themselves, and to use the computer conferencing component of Blackboard Classroom 
for that part of the topic that was to be the main focus of this investigation of online collaborative 
learning. However, as reported in the results, the students spontaneously demonstrated a need also to 
use synchronous communication. 
Thus it has been the purpose of this research to examine the nature of the interactions among students 
working in small collaborative groups in terms of collaborative learning behaviors and the constraints 
and  affordances  of  the  medium.  Such  an  examination  should provide  better  estimates than are 
currently available of the effect of online study environments on the quality of interactions among 
students. 
II.  RESEARCH QUESTIONS 
As Johnson and Johnson (1996) point out, there is a very strong theoretical basis for collaborative 
learning, but much of that body of theory is derived from studies of face-to-face interactions among 
learners. The major question of interest here is: "To what extent can the components of collaborative 
learning be identified in the online interactions of students placed in collaborative learning groups?" 
Students who choose to learn in online situations do so because of distance from the institution 
offering their chosen course, work commitments, or family commitments. They require flexibility in 
their study arrangements, and online learning is one way of participating in their chosen courses. This 
flexibility exists in that students may study where and when they choose. In general, while learning in 
an online environment, students' interactions are restricted to text only messages on screen. This 
medium of interaction may inhibit the degree of collaboration that is possible by limiting the extent 
and depth of interactions. However, since this online interaction is much more than most students 
would normally experience in a distance learning course, they may perceive that the experience 
enhances the interactions available to them. This leads to a subsidiary question: "To what extent does 
the text-only online environment inhibit or enhance the collaboration that occurs within small project-
based groups?" 
A.   Participants and procedures 
Twenty four students (18 women and 6 men) undertaking either a Bachelor of Education in Adult 
Education or a Graduate Diploma in Adult and Further Education who were enrolled in an existing 
online course Internet and Education during semester 2, 1998 were involved in the study. Five 
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
the simplest procedures, for instance, using online clear C# out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides
reorder pdf pages reader; pdf change page order acrobat
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages in extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change pdf page order online; change page order in pdf reader
JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
25
students withdrew from the course during the semester. All participants were mature age students and 
most worked either in the Technical and Further Education (TAFE) or Vocational Education and 
Training (VET) sectors or were employed in training roles in enterprises. While most students were 
located in Adelaide (South Australia), ten lived outside the metropolitan area, including five from 
interstate. Clearly, for many students, face-to-face meetings were not feasible. All used email and the 
web comfortably, although there was variation in their skill levels. 
Within this course, students undertook three assigned tasks. Prior to the assignments, all students were 
required to subscribe to an email discussion list that had been established for the course and to 
participate in a ‘get to know you activity’ in which each posted an introduction and responded to 
others’ introductions. 
The first assignment was a cooperative activity in which students selected a topic for investigation. 
They reported to the class as a whole on their investigation in stages and received feedback from their 
peers as they reported. This interaction occurred via the class email discussion list. The second, and 
major,  activity  required  students  to  work  collaboratively  in  small  groups  to  develop  a  set  of 
recommendations for the implementation of internet based communications services and information 
resources in an education or training program. Each group produced a single composite group report. 
Guidelines for their interaction were provided in the learning resources for the topic and were further 
explained  in  discussion  with all students  via the  class  email  discussion  list.  The final task, an 
individual one, was the  development  of a learning resource using one of the  services that was 
investigated as part of the collaborative activity. Online interactions for the first two assignments were 
a compulsory component of the course and formed part of the assessment for it. Of the 19 participants 
who completed the course, only 13 students worked in groups. Those who elected not to participate in 
group work either experienced illness or had unusual work requirements. 
The primary data source was the log of interactions that occurred among groups of students on their 
collaborative  projects.  Most  collaboration  occurred  using  the Blackboard Classroom program, 
although as discussed later, students also used the telephone and fax to communicate with each other. 
Blackboard Classroom is a web-based application that facilitates: the provision of course information; 
the distribution of learning resources; communication between teachers and students and among 
students, both as a whole class and in separate discussion forums; file sharing; and online assessment 
and feedback. For this study, communication services for small groups of students were the main 
means of interaction and the main focus of investigation. 
Groups of students were self selected. An email message describing the purposes and processes of the 
task, with suggestions for group tasks, was circulated to all students. Students were invited to respond, 
nominating topics, and other students then replied, electing to join particular groups. Group size 
varied from 2 to 4. No attempt was made to control group composition on either a gender or prior 
achievement basis. 
Each group in the investigation was regarded as a case and the focus of the analysis was the online 
discussions that were recorded for the group. Online exchanges were email messages that were 
circulated among group members and the messages that were posted to the group's private discussion 
board. The first author, who was also the academic teacher for this topic, was a member of each group 
forum in order to fulfill a mentoring role. The intention was that the bulk of the communication would 
occur via the discussion board. However the design of the interface was such that an option to send an 
email message to the group was more readily available (i.e. fewer mouse clicks from the entry point) 
and it seems that students preferred to use email. 
Students were able to contact each other outside the group forum by personal email, fax, or by 
telephone. There is evidence that some exchanges between students did occur via private email 
messages, fax, and face-to-face meetings. From discussions with individual students this seems likely 
to  occur  when  one  student  disagrees  with  the  contribution  of  another:  rather  than  express 
disagreement 'publicly' through the class discussion list or conference forum, critical comments were 
offered privately. Indeed this approach had been advocated in guidelines provided to students because 
online, text-only interactions can lead to misunderstandings due to the limited information capacity of 
the medium compared with the relative richness of the vocal and non-verbal interactions of face-to-
face learning environments. Further, several of the groups organized synchronous chat sessions to 
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
how to rearrange pages in a pdf document; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf change page order online; move pages in pdf acrobat
JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
26
supplement the other forms of communication, and because of the software being used, it was not 
possible to capture those interactions. For these reasons, the researcher was not able to access all 
interactions among students and those interactions recorded may include a bias towards positive and 
supportive comments. 
B.  Research methods 
The study was exploratory and attempted to identify elements of face-to-face modes of collaboration 
in the online environment. These behaviors are enumerated in the data analysis section below. The 
extent to which text-on-screen as the dominant medium of exchange limits (or possibly enhances) 
collaborative behaviors was investigated, but since a comparative method was not used, only tentative 
conclusions based upon claims in the literature (e.g. Harasim et al., 1995) about the benefits and 
disadvantages of this medium of interaction are offered. 
The number and content of text contributions made by group members in their online interactions via 
email messages and postings to the group discussion board were analyzed seeking utterances that 
were indicative of the behaviors that are reported for other forms of collaborative learning. Student 
evaluations of the topic were also a source of information for this study. Johnson & Johnson (1996) 
list the following major types of behaviors in collaborative learning situations: 
•  giving and receiving help and assistance; 
•  exchanging resources and information; 
•  explaining elaborating information; 
•  sharing existing knowledge with others; 
•  giving and receiving feedback; 
•  challenging others' contributions (cognitive conflict and controversy leading to negotiation 
and resolution); 
•  advocating increased effort and perseverance among peers; 
•  engaging in small group skills; 
•  monitoring each others' efforts and contributions. 
Other behaviors, such as organizing group work, initiating further interactions, and commenting or 
reflecting on the medium were also anticipated. Other utterances are also anticipated. For example, 
Cook  (1997) and Bonk  et  al.  (1998)  identified both  repetitive  and  social  elements  in  students' 
interactions at the expense of task-related exchanges in courses in which online interactions were an 
optional supplemental form of interaction to the dominant face-to-face interactions. A coding scheme 
for utterances that indicate the above listed behaviors was developed and applied to the records of 
interaction that occur in the email exchanges and discussion forums. A number of coding schemes 
have been trialed by others. For example, in their analyses of an online debate, (Gunawardena et al., 
1997) developed a scheme grounded in the debate that they studied. They were critical of other 
schemes, e.g. those of Levin and of Henri (cited in (Gunawardena et al., 1997)), but also commented 
upon the limitations of the debate as a vehicle for knowledge construction, and by implication, 
collaboration,  which  may  suggest  that  different  purposes  of  investigation may  require  different 
schemes of analysis. Since our primary concern was the identification of the classical elements of 
collaboration in an  online environment,  we  based  out scheme  largely upon the  components  of 
collaborative behavior described by Johnson & Johnson (Johnson & Johnson, 1996). 
Three sources of data were available to answer the two research questions posed. For each group, 
information on the number and form of interactions was collected, although as indicated earlier, 
information on private email messages, fax transmissions, and chat exchanges was not available. For 
each group, the content of email messages and postings to the discussion board was collected and 
analyzed. Only student messages, and not those contributed by staff, were analyzed. All students were 
asked to complete a voluntary and anonymous subject evaluation form. In particular, students' views 
about the collaborative component of the course and about the software that was used were sought. 
Analyses of these data are presented below. 
JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
27
III.  RESULTS 
A.  Summary of online interactions 
Students worked in five groups, although Group 5 comprised the six people who elected to work 
alone. A group area was established for these students and they were invited to use it to keep in touch. 
This group was relatively inactive and only three members made any contributions. The forms of 
interaction that are recorded in Table 1 are: email messages, postings to the group discussion board, 
and file up-loads. Although there is anecdotal evidence for chat sessions, telephone calls, faxes, and 
face-to-face visits, they could not be tracked and so are not recorded in the table. 
Although  students  were  encouraged  to  use  the  group  discussion  board,  most  of  the  recorded 
communication occurred via group email messages. It appears that students were more familiar with 
email and were more comfortable using it than using the discussion board. The design of the interface 
also enabled an email message to be sent to the group three mouse clicks from entering the course 
home page. Getting into the discussion board required four clicks, and then reading a message and 
replying to it required at least two further clicks, but could have required many more depending upon 
the location of the message within a thread. Several students did however comment favorably on the 
structure of the discussion board messages indicating that it was very easy to navigate through earlier 
discussions to find out “where the discussion was going” rather than try to sort through volumes of 
email that were mixed with other work related email messages. 
In the five groups, there were 198 email messages, 24 postings to a discussion board, and 10 file up-
loads. There was a wide range in the frequency of interactions across the groups, from 16 to 160, the 
median number of interactions being 90. Within each group there was also variation in the pattern of 
contributions. In Groups 1 and 5 there was a relatively even pattern of contribution, though Group 5 
was the least active group. In each of the other groups the pattern of contribution was quite uneven, 
with some students emerging as dominant contributors. In Group 4, the individual who contributed 
the least effectively withdrew and decided to submit an individual paper. 
Those students who contributed more are likely to have been 'natural leaders' within the groups. In 
Group 2 two forms of leadership were in evidence: one student made many contributions that were 
classified as organizing group work and initiating activities while another made a greater proportion 
of contributions that were classed as giving help and feedback. Other factors likely to influence the 
extent of contribution are the availability of time and interest in the topic. 
Table 1: Summary of online interactions 
Group 
Email 
messages 
Discussion 
board 
postings 
File 
up-
loads 
Individual 
student 
contribution
Group 1 
22 
27 
Group 2 
66 
17 
83 
Group 3 
57 
58 
Group 4 
45 
45 
Group 5 
Course totals 
198 
(85.3%) 
24 
(10.3%) 
10 
(4.3%) 
Only Group 2 began to make effective use of the structure available through the discussion board. The 
structure of their messages is shown in Figure 1. The earliest discussions to occur within the group 
were conducted via email while they negotiated the topic. They then began to use the discussion board 
and to up-load files, but during the final  stages  of submitting  drafts and sending and receiving 
comments,  reverted to group email.  It seems  that students were more  comfortable in attaching 
documents to email messages than in up-loading files to the group area. 
JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
28
B.  The analysis of text 
The principal hypothesis of this study is that the behaviors associated with collaborative learning 
activities can be identified in the online interactions of students. The contributions made by group 
members, either as email messages or as postings to the group discussion board, were analyzed for 
utterances indicative of the behaviors identified earlier as a result of the Johnson & Johnson (1996) 
work. In addition, other behaviors including social interactions, organization of group work, initiation 
of activities, and reflections on the medium were sought. Descriptions of the utterances that were 
coded as being indicative of the behaviors just described and the codes that have been used for them 
are  shown  in  an  Appendix.  The  coded  behaviors  were  further  grouped  within  the higher-level 
categories  of  Planning,  Contributing,  Seeking  Input,  Reflection  and  Monitoring,  and  Social 
Interaction, to reflect more general aspects of students' online interactions. 
IV.  EVIDENCE FOR COLLABORATION  
IN ONLINE INTERACTIONS 
Data derived from this analysis of the postings of students in Group 2 of this study are summarized in 
Table 2. The data for Group 2 have been used in this analysis because that group had the highest 
frequency of contributions. 
The analysis of the utterances of group members indicates approximately equal proportions of the 
general behaviors of planning, contributing, and seeking input. How this balance compares with face-
to-face collaborative learning situations is unclear, and whether such behaviors can be expected in the 
online environment in similar proportions to face-to-face situations is also unclear. The results in 
Table 2 do indicate, however, that none of the members were ‘lurkers’ who sought input from the list 
without making a contribution. 
Table 2: Analysis of postings of Group 2 
Participants 
Behavior 
categories 
Codes  G201  G202  G203  G204  Code 
totals 
Code 
percent 
Category 
percent 
Planning 
GS 
4.31% 
OW 
6.90% 
IA 
18 
15.52%  26.72% 
Contributing  HeG 
5.17% 
FBG 
11 
9.48% 
RI 
3.45% 
SK 
7.76% 
Ch 
0.00% 
Ex 
0.00%  25.86% 
Seeking Input  HeS 
10 
8.62% 
FBS 
16 
13.79% 
Ef 
5.17%  27.59% 
ME 
1.72% 
Reflection 
Monitoring 
RM 
16 
13.79%  15.52% 
Social 
Interaction 
SI 
4.31% 
4.31% 
Person totals   
38 
18 
34 
26 
116 
32.76% 15.52% 29.31% 22.41%  
JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
29
The frequency of planning behaviors seems high and is inflated by the number of instances of 
‘initiating activity’ (IA). In the interactions of Group 2, there were many exchanges seeking to 
establish and schedule chat sessions so that clarification could occur over work that had been planned 
using group email and the discussion board. It seems that this is likely to be rather different from face-
to-face collaborative learning situations, since the discussion does occur both in real time and face-to-
face and there may be less need to seek clarification of tasks. If this is so, guidelines for staff and 
students should reflect the greater need for such planning activities. 
One of the more notable differences is the absence of challenges to the input of others (CH) and 
attempts to explain and elaborate participants’ own contributions (EX) in the interactions of the group 
being studied. This might be attributed to several factors. In the guidelines prepared before the topic 
was presented, students were advised to be cautious in their interactions because of the ease with 
which text only messages can be misinterpreted. In addition, students did not know each other at the 
beginning of the course and they did not meet face-to-face, although they did participate in email 
introductions and discussion in an earlier assignment. Despite these earlier online interactions, they 
did not become acquainted with each other as the topic progressed in the way that does occur in 
similarly small classes on-campus. These factors may have inhibited the more robust exchanges that 
are part of a ‘challenge and explain’ cycle. 
Actively seeking help and feedback (HeS, FBS) are prominent behaviors. They do indicate that 
participants are willing to expose their naiveté in relation to the task or in relation to the software that 
they  are  required  to  use  and  indicate  that  their  participation  is genuinely  collaborative.  In  the 
Contributing category, we see that the complements of these calls for input – feedback giving (FBG), 
and sharing of knowledge (SK) – were also relatively frequent. 
The pattern  of interaction in  the reflection/monitoring  category  is also interesting.  Most  of this 
reflection was about the effectiveness of the medium, with very little being focused on task progress. 
It maybe that this outcome was the result of the novelty of the medium for these students. 
Social interaction accounts for almost 5% of all coded contributions. This figure is interesting as 
previous research (eg Cook, 1997) has indicated that a very high proportion of online interchanges are 
merely social  interactions.  However, in  her  study, the  online  component  was optional.  A  high 
proportion of unproductive social interaction appears to be associated with online discussions that are 
not a compulsory component of the topic being taught and where the online discussion is not related 
to assessable tasks (Hiltz, 1997). It appears that most of the discussion in Group 2 has been task 
focused, although there has been some social interaction. However, far from being a distraction from 
the  academic  tasks, it  is thought  that this  form  of conversation  contributes  positively to social 
cohesion, perhaps being the equivalent of the patter that occurs as groups work together in a seminar 
room  task.  Some  of  the  social  discussion  about  work  situations  also  contributed  to  others’ 
understanding of group members’ preferences for particular forms of technology as they helped to 
establish the context in which group members worked. 
In summary, the analysis of participants’ postings reveals many of the behaviors associated with 
collaborative learning in face-to-face situations. Challenging others and offering explanations were 
absent in this study and this may be associated with students’ unfamiliarity with each other. The 
encouragement of more social interactions, perhaps through more structured online self-introductions, 
could help to overcome this possible barrier. However, it ought be noted that self-introduction was 
required and modeled by the academic teacher. Guidelines for students and staff that acknowledge 
this limitation could also promote greater debate, and modeling of appropriate forms of challenge by a 
group of teaching staff could lead to greater levels of online debate among students. It is speculated 
that other behaviors, such as planning, appear to be more common in online situations as there is a 
greater need for overt clarification of goals in the absence of face-to-face interactions. 
V.  THE INFLUENCE OF THE MEDIUM 
A second research question was: “To what extent does the text-only online environment inhibit or 
enhance  the  collaboration  that  occurs  within  small  project  based  groups?”.  In  the  foregoing 
discussion,  reference  has  been  made  to  possible  differences  between  online  and  face-to-face 
collaboration.  The  online  medium  seems  to  influence  collaboration  along  several  dimensions. 
JALN Volume 5, Issue 1 - February 2001 
30
Although the students who participated in this study were familiar with the basic internet technologies 
email and the web, they revealed some reluctance in embracing the discussion group, reverting to the 
use of email (albeit facilitated by the convenience of being able to click a group email button within 
the Blackboard Classroom program). Students did spend some time reflecting on the medium, this 
behavior comprising 15% of total utterances. They acknowledge the advantages of being able to go 
back into the records of discussion provided by the discussion board, but need greater encouragement 
to make more use of it. In part, this could be achieved by a redesign of the interface so that fewer 
mouse clicks were required to go to the discussion board. In this study, the assumption was made that 
students who were familiar with email and the web would be able to use the web-based Blackboard 
Classroom software without further instruction. It seems likely that, had students been given more 
information about the software and its functionality (beyond the information sheet provided), and how 
to make best use of the various functions available, they may have used it more effectively. 
There is an important distinction between real-time and asynchronous forms of interaction. For the 
reasons outlined early in this paper, there is considerable interest in asynchronous forms of online 
interaction in higher education. In addition, the current forms of real-time interaction are limited by 
the capacity of the communication links now available and only the exchange of text is readily 
accessible and reliable. Despite these limitations, the students in this study chose to engage in chat 
sessions several times during the study and they did so despite the difficulties of fitting such sessions 
around work and social commitments and across a time zone. Clearly, there is a need to incorporate 
among the asynchronous interactions that will increasingly characterize online delivery systems in 
higher education, opportunities for real-time interactions among students. For now, those interactions 
will  be  via  the  very  limited  text-only  chat  sessions.  However,  the  convergence  of  telephony, 
videoconferencing,  and  computing  accompanied  by  increases  in  communication  bandwidth  will 
enable  real-time  voice  communication  (using  applications  like NetPhone),  with  simultaneous 
document  sharing  and  electronic  whiteboards,  and  eventually  fully  integrated  desktop 
videoconferencing. To take advantage of this scenario, some research that examines the need for and 
relationship between asynchronous and real-time interactions is required. 
A.  Student perceptions of the process 
An anonymous evaluation of the topic was conducted via a form placed on the course web site. It 
included nine questions adapted from the SEEQ instrument (Marsh & Roche, 1994) and a series of 
open questions relating to the collaborative learning experience. Through these questions, students 
were asked to comment on the collaborative learning processes that were implemented. In particular, 
they  were  asked  to comment on the  amount of work involved in the collaboration, to identify 
perceived advantages and disadvantages, and to indicate whether they found the experience valuable. 
Some of the comments about the collaboration are presented below (as submitted by students). 
The collaborative exercise turned out to be more work than I thought. Collaborating over the 'net, with 
the time delays and with people who I didn't know provided a good exercise in communication. It 
created some difficulties for me and I realized that I much prefer to communicate in person. 
For the small part that I played in the group, I found it very interesting and stimulating. because I 
spent time offshore the whole process was very disjointed and fragmented making it difficult to 
maintain a line of thought and adequate contact with other group members. Much of my work was 
done alone and that will be reflected in my assignments which may or may not be off on a different 
tangent 
This was new to me and it took me a while to get my head around how it was going to work. I felt 
more time was spent chasing late submissions. As far as physically writing a piece of he assignment 
not a great deal of work pressure - more so with collaborating and communicating with the group and 
trying to chat etc. was more of a challenge. Advantages: Thinking with others, new contacts, different 
work  backgrounds.  Disadvantages:  Can  be  a  time  waster,  Assignment  time  (2a)  seemed  to 
unnecessarily drag on forever due to trying to catch up with everyone, Rely on others to contribute to 
your grade. 
I found the collaborative group activity to be interesting as it provided me with an interface with other 
students and thus exposed me to their thoughts on the subject matter. This part of the course was very 
time consuming, particularly with time differences, work, study and family commitments. The need 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested