The Value
of Online
Customer
Loyalty
And how you
can capture it
e S t r a t e g y   B r i e f
Pdf reverse page order online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf change page order acrobat; switch page order pdf
Pdf reverse page order online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
change page order in pdf file; how to move pages in a pdf
Figure 1:  Customer lifetime value
Why does customer loyalty have such a large 
impact on a site's economics? Consider the 
following facts, which were collected through 
two surveys of web shoppers conducted by 
Bain & Company and Mainspring
1
:
•  You won't break even on one-time shoppers.
Because customer acquisition costs in 
e-commerce are high, to recoup your 
investment you need to convince customers 
to return to your site time and again.  For 
example, the average online apparel shopper 
in this study wasn't profitable for the retailer 
until he or she had shopped at the site four 
times.  This implies that the retailer had to 
retain the customer for 12 months just to 
break even! (Figure 1)  And online grocers, 
who spent upwards of $80 to acquire a 
customer, had to retain that customer for 
18 months to break even.  In fact, except 
for high-ticket items, in almost no instance 
can an online retailer break even on a one-
time shopper.
The power of online customer loyalty 
In the first years of e-commerce, it was generally 
accepted that customer loyalty and online shopping 
were mutually exclusive.  The Web seemed to make 
customer loyalty irrelevant; at the click of a mouse, 
shoppers could effortlessly cover the globe in search 
of the lowest price, with little to hold them at one 
site.  Yet, while it’s true that online shoppers can skip 
easily from one site to the next, a highly loyal 
segment of online shoppers has emerged nonetheless, 
and tools such as Internet bookmarks have led to usage 
patterns that are loyal, almost addictive.  Today, loyal 
shoppers visit their favorite sites far more frequently 
than they would any bricks-and-mortar store. 
This surprising degree of customer loyalty can have 
an enormous impact on web-site profitability.  We 
simulated the long-term economics of web sites 
in various industries, and customer loyalty proved to 
be a crucial factor in profitability, even more so than 
for offline companies.  Small changes in loyalty alone, 
especially among the most profitable customers, can 
account for the long-term divergence of initially 
comparable online companies, with some rising 
to exceptional returns and others sinking to 
lasting unprofitability.  
1
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
-60
-50
-40
-30
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Profit per
Customer
per Six-Month
Period
Months Since First Purchase
0
6
12
18
24
30
36
Break even
Point
Referrals
Spending growth
Base Spending
Acquisition cost
Apparel
Source: Bain & Company/ Mainspring Online Retailing Survey (n=2116), December 1999
1
Two surveys of web shoppers were conducted.  The first, conducted by Bain, surveyed 522 web shoppers at ten popular Internet retailers.  The second, a joint effort by Bain 
and Mainspring, surveyed 2,116 online shoppers in three e-tailer categories:  groceries, consumer electronics and appliances.
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pages of pdf; reorder pages in pdf file
2
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
•  Repeat purchasers spend more and generate 
larger transactions.  
In our study, the longer 
their relationship with an online retailer, the 
more customers spent in a given period of time. 
In apparel, the average repeat customer spent 
67 percent more in months 31-36 of his or 
her shopping relationship than in months zero-
to-six.  (Figure 2)  And in groceries, customers 
spent 23 percent more in months 31-36 than 
in months zero-to-six.  Higher spending 
levels were due in part to more frequent 
shopping and in part to larger transactions.  
For instance, in apparel, a shopper's fifth 
purchase was 40 percent larger than the first, 
and the tenth purchase was nearly 80 
percent larger than the first.  This aids retailer 
profitability, because in e-commerce, where 
transaction costs are largely fixed, larger 
transactions equal more profitable transactions.
•  Repeat customers refer more people and bring 
in more business.  
Word of mouth is the single 
most effective and economical way online 
retailers grow their sites.  And loyalty, it turns 
out, can be a key lever for referrals.  On 
average, an apparel shopper referred three 
people each to an online retailer's site after 
their first purchase there.  After ten purchases, 
that same shopper had referred seven people 
to the site.  (Figure 3)  For consumer electronics 
and appliances, initial referrals were just over 
four, while total referrals after ten purchases 
were 13.  The dollar impact of these referrals 
can be significant: over three years, customers 
referred by online grocery shoppers spent an 
additional 75 percent of what the original 
shopper spent.  For both electronics and 
apparel, this number was over 50 percent.
2
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
0
100
200
300
400
Amount Spent
by the Average
Customer at a Retailer
6 months
12 months
18 months
24 months
30 months
Purchasing History with Retailer
$178
$234
$282
$332
$357
Apparel
Source: Bain & Company/ Mainspring Online Retailing Survey (n=2116), December 1999
Figure 2:  Spending growth impact
3
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
•  Loyal customers will buy other products from you.
Across the board, web shoppers expressed 
willingness to buy different types of products 
from their online retailers of choice.  For 
example, almost 70 percent of Gap Online 
customers said they would consider buying 
furniture from the Gap.  And 63 percent of 
online grocery shoppers would buy toiletries 
and OTC drugs from their online grocers.  
Repeat purchasing not only builds trust 
(so a customer will more likely consider 
purchasing other products), it also provides 
more cross-selling opportunities.  
All these facts add up to a simple sum: customer 
loyalty on the Internet is a key driver of long-
term profitability.  Loyal online customers, just like 
offline ones, spend more, refer more people, and are 
more willing to expand their purchasing into new 
categories.  As a result, they are more profitable than 
one-time shoppers.  Online retailers who succeed 
in building customer loyalty will ultimately be 
more profitable than online competitors who focus 
only on transactional metrics such as number of 
visitors, number of shoppers, eyeballs, and so forth.  
So what drives e-loyalty, and how can you improve it? 
Customer loyalty on the Internet is a key driver of long-term profitability. Loyal online 
customers, just like offline ones, spend more, refer more people, and are more willing
to expand their purchasing into new categories.
0
2
4
6
8
Average Number of
People Referred to
Retailer Since
First Purchase
First purchase
4 or 5 purchases
10 or more purchases
3.1
5.4
7.1
Apparel
Source: Bain & Company/ Mainspring Online Retailing Survey (n=2116), December 1999
Figure 3:  Referral impact
4
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
4
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
Key factors in building online customer loyalty
When asked, online shoppers said they returned 
to web sites that met their needs in four areas—
order fulfillment, price, customer service, and 
web-site functionality.  The impact these factors 
had on retaining customers is shown in Figure 4.
2
Order fulfillment and dependability
In both apparel and groceries, our analysis shows that 
improvements in order fulfillment and dependability 
can have a large impact on customer loyalty.  
Improving customer satisfaction scores on order 
fulfillment by 0.5 (on a scale of one to five) can 
increase implied customer retention rates by over two 
percent, a significant amount given the survey's 
average implied retention rate for all web sites of 86 
percent.
3
  For grocers, this translates to a 13 percent 
rise in long-term net present value.
Why are fulfillment and dependability such 
important issues? Because satisfaction in these 
areas is not a given on the Internet.  A surprising 
number of customers told us that they did not
 receive exactly what they thought they had 
ordered, they were not made aware of the total 
price when they placed their orders, product 
delivery was late or poor, and return policy and 
service commitments were not met.  Companies 
in the physical world expend enormous resources 
developing world-class capabilities in these areas. 
Why should it be easier, or less costly, on the Internet?  
The Internet's clear benchmark in this area is 
Amazon.com, whose customers show the highest levels 
of satisfaction on order fulfillment and dependability.
Groceries
Consumer Electronics / Appliances
Apparel
• Fees are reasonable
• Purchase is simple to execute
• Easy access to customer service
• Order delivered correctly
• Offers lower prices than competitors
• Real-time in-stock information
• Sells the brands/products I am interested in
• Online customer service
• Delivers in the correct time/ place
• Money-back guarantee
• Can find the products easily on the site
• Offers lower prices than competitors
Source: Bain & Company/ Mainspring Online Retailing Survey (n=2116), December 1999
Figure 4:  Repeat purchase drivers
2
In the joint Bain/Mainspring survey, we guaged the importance of various web site performance dimensions in drawing customers back to the web site; measured customers’ 
satisfaction with specific web sites along these dimensions; and asked customers how likely they were to return to those web sites in the future.  Using this information in a 
multivariate regression, we calculated the potential impact of each dimension on customer retention.
3
The implied retention rate was calculated for each web site based on the likelihood of its customers’ returning to that site.  “Definitely will return” implied a 100 percent 
retention for that customer; “probably will” = 70 percent; “might or might not” = 50 percent; “probably or definitely not” = 10 percent.  These results were then aggregated 
for all the customers of each web site to yield an implied retention rate by site.
Customer service doesn't necessarily mean complex 
service features such as click-to-call or expensive 
integration of customer information.  What it does 
mean is answering questions and solving problems 
quickly, whether person-to-person or via self-service. 
Crutchfield, for example, is a bricks-and-mortar 
retailer of electronics that has recently established 
an online presence.  It does an excellent job of 
providing customers the information they need to 
make an informed purchase, giving them not only 
fundamental information about products online 
(i.e., "A radar detector is…"), but also a fully-
staffed, 24-hour toll-free customer service number. 
They even provide links to the manufacturers of 
the products they sell. 
As a result, Crutchfield's customer service satisfaction 
rating is well above average versus the other sites we 
tested (4.25 out of five for Crutchfield versus 3.70 
on average).  And while customer retention cannot 
be solely attributed to high scores on customer 
service, Crutchfield's web site does enjoy an implied 
customer retention rate of 92 percent, six percent 
above the survey average of 86 percent.
Providing a fair price
Price is a key factor in both choosing a retailer and 
generating repeat sales.  But, as we discovered, "price" 
means different things in different industries.  In 
consumer electronics and appliances, "offers lower 
prices than competitors" was the most important 
reason for choosing and returning to an online 
retailer.  In apparel, however, beating competitors on 
price wasn't even in the top five criteria in terms of 
influencing choice, and placed only fourth in 
influencing repeat sales.  In addition, although 
over 95 percent of customers we surveyed say 
they comparison shop, most are actually 
comparing offline and online prices. 
So, what's the message for the online retailer? 
Simply put, for most industries it's important to 
provide customers a fair—but not necessarily the 
lowest—price.  You do need to meet or beat the 
offline price, but just as in the bricks-and-mortar 
world, you needn't have the absolute lowest price 
as long as you provide a good deal, and in fact 
you can make up for higher prices by providing 
exceptional customer service, reliability, and 
selection.  Once again, Amazon.com proves this 
point.  Although their books were on average 
$1.60 more expensive than those of the former 
Books.com (now bought and folded into 
BarnesandNoble.com), few Amazon.com customers 
were lured away from what they knew to be a reliable 
and timely service by promises of lower prices. 
Customer service
Our research shows that improvements in customer 
service can have a significant impact on customer 
loyalty.  In groceries, a one point improvement in 
customer service satisfaction (on a scale of one to 
five) yielded a five percent increase in implied 
retention rates.  And in consumer electronics, 
the same improvement yielded over a two percent 
increase in retention rates. 
5
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
So, what's the message for the online 
retailer? Simply put, for most industries 
it's important to provide customers a fair
—but not necessarily the lowest—price.
6
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
6
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
Monday morning, 8:00 A.M.: What can you do?
Clearly customer retention can have a big impact 
on the profitability of online retailers.  So how do 
you actually improve customer retention? Areas of 
leverage will differ for each company, but there are 
some steps that all online retailers can take:
•  Treat customers as assets, not transactions.
The conventional battleground for online 
retailers has been drawn around transactions 
and scale, and most e-commerce metrics like-
hits, click-throughs, visitors, and so on-reflect, 
this mentality.  But improving customer loyalty 
requires a fundamental shift in mind-set.  
Customers are not transactions, they are 
people, and capturing their long-term business 
requires earning their trust and consistently 
providing them real value and convenience.
•  Measure customer retention and customer 
satisfaction along key retention drivers.  
It's hard to improve something you don't 
measure.  Start by understanding which of 
your customers are repeat versus one-time 
shoppers.  Then, through customer research, 
identify the factors, such as customer service 
and order fulfillment, that are important to 
your customers, and measure satisfaction along 
these dimensions.  What do you do well? 
What do you do poorly? Why are your loyal 
customers loyal? How can you leverage your 
best attributes to turn every shopper into a 
loyal shopper and to attract more loyal customers? 
Web-site functionality
Thirty percent of customers leave sites because 
they can't find what they are looking for, and even 
for those who do start a shopping basket, the 
abandonment rate is 66 percent!
4
 In other words, 
the majority of people who would like to buy 
online are prevented from doing so because they 
either can't find the product they want, or they 
find the transaction process too complex. 
Easily located products, a simple order process, 
and access to real-time inventory information are 
what draw customers back to a web site.  And 
functionality improvements in these areas can 
yield significant gains in customer retention.  In 
groceries, raising site functionality satisfaction 
scores
5
 by 0.5 yielded nearly a three percent 
increase in implied customer retention rates. 
Once again, physical retailers invest heavily in 
simplifying the transaction process.  Consider the 
amounts spent on merchandising and product 
placement in a bricks-and-mortar retailer, or the 
large number of check-out counters, all equipped 
with UPC scanners, at a grocery store.  Shoppers 
expect, rightly, that online retailers will do their 
part to fully leverage the Internet's enormous 
potential to make shopping more convenient 
and to make their lives simpler.
The majority of people who would like to 
buy online are prevented from doing so 
because they either can't find the product 
they want, or they find the transaction 
process too complex. 
4
Forrester Research
5
Respondents were asked to rate the site from 1 to 5 based on the statement “The purchase was simple to execute.”
The value of best-in-class fulfillment and 
web-site functionality can also not be 
overstated, as many companies found out 
during the 1999 Christmas season.  The 
company that over-invests in marketing or 
advertising at the expense of fulfillment 
and basic site functionality may succeed in 
drawing customers to its site, only to lose 
them forever.  
•  Make the customer's life easier.  
Slick web-site
design and graphical interfaces with animation 
do not create loyalty; eliminating complexity 
from the customer's life does.  Online shoppers 
want their lives to be made simpler, with the 
offline world as their benchmark.  This is 
different from just providing a site that is easy 
to use or visually entertaining.  For example, 
the best online retailers allow customers to 
request notification when an out-of-stock 
item becomes available.  And reminder e-mails, 
based on customer requests about upcoming 
events or new information, can also save the 
customer time and effort.  
Most online shoppers' expectations are fairly 
modest:  they want a good service that's secure, 
easy to use, and simplifies life; a fair price; reliable 
and timely fulfillment; and resources available to 
answer questions quickly and accurately.  Meet 
these seemingly simple requirements, and you will 
earn the customer's loyalty.  The few companies that 
succeed at this have a real advantage over their 
competitors: they have loyal, satisfied customers 
and a business model that, in the long run, yields 
superior returns.  
•  Talk to your "defectors."
 One of the best ways 
to improve retention is to talk to people who 
have used your site and then taken their business 
elsewhere.  Through targeted e-mails you can 
gain insight into why people are leaving and 
where they are going, be it online or offline.
•  Keep tabs on competitors and other industry leaders.
Visit your competitors' web sites.  Now visit 
your own.  What are they doing that you are 
not? On which dimensions are you better or 
worse? You may also want to visit best-in-class 
web retailers in other product categories to 
see what they are doing around key drivers 
of retention.
•   Invest in key areas, especially where you are weak.
As the research shows, improvements in 
customer service, order fulfillment, price, 
and web-site functionality can have a 
large impact on customer retention rates.  
Hometownstores.com, for instance, added a 
chat support function to greet customers as 
they enter the site, providing a more timely 
resource than customer service e-mails.  
Within four weeks, sales grew 30 percent 
while e-mail volume fell from thousands 
to just dozens.  
Other customer service improvements 
that can impact retention include Frequently 
Asked Questions (FAQs) sections with well-
organized information, knowledge bases or 
wizards for process completion, and quick-
response e-mails.  Because these are automated 
services, they cost less than traditional offline 
customer service tools (such as toll-free 
telephone numbers), and are more scalable 
as the site grows.  
7
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
8
Mainspring
eStrategy Consulting
Mainspring is the leading eStrategy consulting 
firm that focuses exclusively on developing 
actionable Internet strategies.  It enables Fortune 
1000 companies to protect, evolve, and transform 
their business for sustained competitive advantage 
by offering an integrated process of business, 
customer, and technology strategy planning.  Its 
proprietary process hinges on the following 
activities to help guide clients effectively through 
eStrategy development:
• Building the Business Model 
• Creating the Customer Experience 
• Defining the Solution Architecture 
• Commercializing the Business Plan 
Working with Mainspring, companies identify,
define, and formulate a portfolio of strategic 
Internet initiatives that are customized for their 
business and designed to create sustainable 
competitive advantage.
Mainspring’s core services include eStrategy 
Consulting, eStrategy Direct, and the eStrategy 
Executive Council.  These services are provided 
to companies in the financial services; retail and 
consumer goods; technology, communications, and 
media; and manufacturing industries.  Mainspring 
was founded in 1996 and has offices in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts and New York City.
Bain & Company:  
Strategy for sustainable results
Bain is one of the world's leading global business 
consulting firms.  Its 2,500 professionals serve major 
multinationals and other organizations through an 
integrated network of 26 offices in 18 countries.  Its 
fact-based, "outside-in" approach is unique, and its 
immense experience base, developed over 27 years, 
covers a complete range of critical business issues in 
every economic sector.  Bain's entire approach is 
based on two guiding principles:  
1)working in true collaboration with clients to 
craft and implement customized strategies that 
yield significant, measurable, and sustainable 
results, and 
2)developing processes that strengthen a client's 
organization and create lasting competitive 
advantage.  The firm gauges its success solely 
by its clients' achievements.  
Bain & Company's global e-commerce practice 
helps businesses achieve outstanding results in the 
new economy.  We work with traditional companies 
to launch and manage online operations, and with 
pre-IPO clients to hone business models and accelerate 
to market.  We also work with entrepreneurs to 
incubate new ideas into viable businesses, in some 
cases taking equity stakes through our bainlab 
subsidiary.  Our e-commerce practice professionals 
work around the globe in every major industry.
8
Bain & Company, Inc.  The Value Customer Loyalty And how you can capture it
BAIN & COMPANY, INC.
Two Copley Place
Boston, Massachusetts 02116
Tel:  (617) 572 2000
Fax:  (617) 572 2427
www.bain.com
Atlanta  
Beijing  
Boston  
Brussels  
Chicago  
Dallas  
Hong Kong  
Johannesburg  
London  
Los Angeles  
Madrid  
Mexico City  Milan  
Munich  
New York  
Paris  
Rome  
San Francisco  
São Paulo  
Seoul  
Singapore  
Stockholm  
Sydney  
Tokyo  
Toronto  
Zurich
MAINSPRING
One Main Street
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142
Tel:  (617) 588 2300
Fax:  (617) 588 2305
www.mainspring.com
By
Sarabjit Singh Baveja, 
Sharad Rastogi, and Chris 
Zook of Bain & Company;  
Randall S. Hancock and 
Julian Chu of Mainspring
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested