c# pdf viewer wpf : How to move pages in pdf files Library SDK class asp.net .net windows ajax USA0-part52

Cartography and Geographic Information Science
周e Journal of the Cartography and Geographic Information Society – An Official Journal of the International Cartographic Association
Volume 38          No 3                  July 2011
 Cartography and Geographic Information Science             Volume 38          Number 3            July 2011
American Cartography 2011:
Benchmarks and Projections
The National Report of  
the United States of America to the 
International Cartographic Association
Guest Editor: Rob Edsall
How to move pages in pdf files - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pages in pdf reader; move pdf pages online
How to move pages in pdf files - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pages in pdf preview; how to rearrange pages in pdf document
C
artography
and
g
eographiC
i
nformation
S
CienCe
V
ol
. 38, n
o
. 3 
J
uly
2011
a
n
o
ffiCial
J
ournal
of
the
C
artography
and
g
eographiC
i
nformation
S
oCiety
d
eVoted
to
the
a
dVanCement
of
C
artography
i
n
a
ll
i
tS
a
SpeCtS
(p
rinted
: iSSn 1523-0406)
(o
nline
:  iSSn 1545-0465)
© 2011 Cartography and Geographic Information Society 
Printed in the U.S. A.
Rob Edsall: American Cartography 2011: Benchmarks and Projections   
Research From Academic Cartography
Ming-Hsiang Tsou: Revisiting Web Cartography in the United States: The Rise of User-Centered Design  
Fritz Kessler: Volunteered Geographic Information: A Bicycling Enthusiast Perspective  
Francis Harvey and Jennifer Kotting: Teaching Mapping for Digital Natives: New Pedagogical Ideas for 
Undergraduate Cartography Education  
Ola Alqvist: Converging Themes in Cartography and Computer Games   
Howard Veregin: GIS and Geoenabled Cartography  
Barbara P. Buttenfield, Lawrence V. Stanislawski and Cynthia A. Brewer: Adapting Generalization Tools 
to Physiographic Diversity for theUnited States National Hydrography Dataset  
Cartographic Activities and Issues in Industry and Government
E. Lynn Usery: The U.S. Geological Survey Cartographic and Geographic Information Science Research Activities, 
2006 – 2010  
Jon Thies and Vince Smith: Transitions in Digital Map Production: An Industry Perspective  
Douglas L. Vandegraft: A Cadastral Geodatabase for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service    
Constance Beard, Michael DeGennaro and William Thompson: Cartographic Support for the 2010 
Decennial Census of the United States  
Kari J. Craun, John P. Donnelly and Gregory J. Allord: The U.S. Geological Survey Mapping and 
Cartographic Database Activities, 2006 – 2010  
Reports from Institutions and Societies
Margaret W. Pearce and Terry A. Slocum: Cartography at the University of Kansas   
Cynthia A. Brewer and Anthony C. Robinson: GIScience at Penn State    
Susanna McMaster, Rob Edsall and Steven Manson: Geospatial Research, Education and Outreach Efforts 
at the University of Minnesota    
Sarah Battersby: Cartographic Research at the University South Carolina  
Ola Ahlqvist: Cartography at The Ohio State University    
Beth Freundlich: The History of Cartography Project  
Alan M. Mikuni: Cartography and Geographic Information Society (CaGIS)    
Margaret W. Pearce: The North American Cartographic Information Society (NACIS)    
246-249
250-257
258-268
269-277
278-285
286-288
289-301
302-309
310-312
313-319
320-325
326-329
330-331
332-334
335-337
338
339-340
341-343
344-345
346-347
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
rearrange pages in pdf reader; reorder pages in pdf document
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy
change page order pdf; rearrange pdf pages online
C
artography
and
g
eographiC
i
nformation
S
CienCe
Published by  
Cartography and Geographic Information Society
P.O. Box 1107, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina 29465, USA
Tel: (843) 324 - 0665 * URL: http://www.cartogis.org
CaGIS Journal Managing Editor: Scott M. Freundschuh
Editorial Advisory Board
Cynthia A. Brewer, Pennsylvania State University
Barbara P. Buttenfield, University of Colorado
Rick Bunch, 
University of North Carolina-Greensboro
Robert G. Cromley, University of Connecticut
Keith C. Clarke, University of California 
at Santa Barbara
Andrew Curtis, University of South Carolina
Suzana Dragicevic, Simon Fraser University
Rob Edsall, University of Minnesota
Michael F. Goodchild, University of California 
at Santa Barbara
Stephen C. Guptill, U.S. Geological Survey
Mark Harrower, AxisMaps
Michael E. Hodgson, University of South Carolina
C. Peter Keller, University of Victoria
Menno-Jan Kraak, ITC, The Netherlands
John Krygier, Ohio Wesleyan University
Jacqueline W. Mills, California State University - 
Long Beach
Nina Lam, Louisiana State University
Michael Phoenix, Environmental Systems 
Research Institute (ESRI)
Ashton Shortridge, Michigan State University
Terry Slocum, University of Kansas 
E. Lynn Usery, Center of Excellence for Geospatial 
Information Science, U.S. Geological Survey
Subscription:  CaGIS Subscriber Services, P.O. 
Box 465, Hanover, PA 17331-0465, USA. Tel: (717) 
632-3535;  Fax: (717) 633- 8920; E-mail: mbaile@tsp.
sheridan.com.
online CaGIS: Register for online CaGIS at http://
www.ingentaconnect.com, then follow instructions to 
activate your subscription.
Reprints:  Sheridan Press, Reprint Services, P.O. Box 
465, Hanover, PA 17331-0465, USA. Tel: (717) 632-
8448, ext. 8134; Fax: (717) 633-8929; E-mail: lhess@
tsp.sheridan.com. 
*
Cartography and Geographic Information Science (CaGIS) (ISSN 1523-0406) is 
published quarterly (January, April, July, and October) by the Cartography and 
Geographic Information Society. Postmaster: Send address changes to Scott 
M. Freundschuh, Managing Editor, Department of Geography, Bandelier 
West 103, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001. The  
Cartography and Geographic Information Society is not responsible for any state-
ments made or opinions expressed in articles, advertisements, or other portions 
of this publication. The appearance of advertising in this publication or use of 
the CaGIS name or logo on signs, business cards, letterheads, or other forms of 
advertising or publication does not imply endorsement or warranty by CaGIS 
of advertisers or their products or services.
The 2011 CaGIS journal basic subscription rates for institutions and non-member 
individuals are: $115 (USA) and $135 (international addresses). Annual printed 
and online subscription rates for institutions are: $180 (USA) and $200 (interna-
tional). Institutional rates for online only subscriptions are: $160 (USA) and $180 
(international). Individual non-member subscriber rates for printed and online 
CaGIS journal are: $130 (USA) and $150 (international). Individual online only 
subscription rates are: $115 (USA) and $135 (international). Back issues are sold 
to non-members at $20 per copy plus shipping and handling.
 All members of the Cartography and Geographic Information Society receive the CaGIS 
journal as part of their CaGIS membership dues. The journal subscription of $45 per year 
is part of membership benefits and cannot be deducted from annual dues.
*  Manuscripts of research papers and technical notes should be sent to the Editor, Michael 
Leitner, Department of Geography and Anthropology, E104 Howe-Russell Geoscience 
Complex, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803. Phone: (225) 578-2963. 
E-mail: <mleitne@lsu.edu>.
* Books for review should be sent to the Book Review Editor, c/o Ilse Genovese, Managing 
Editor, ACSM, 6 Montgomery Village Avenue, Suite 403, Gaithersburg, MD 20879. All 
other communication should be addressed to the CaGIS Managing Editor by e-mail at 
<ilse.genovese@acsm.net>.
 Cartography and Geographic Information Science is registered with the Copyright Clearance 
Center (CCC), 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923. URL: http://www.copyright.
com. Articles for which the CaGIS society does not own rights will so be identified at their 
end. Permission to photocopy for internal or personal use should be sought by libraries 
and other users registered with the CCC through the CCC.  
* All other requests for permission to use material published in this journal 
should be addressed to the Managing Editor at (505) 277 - 0058 or by e-mail at  
sfreunds@unm.edu.
Editor
Michael Leitner 
Louisiana State University
Associate Editors
David A. Bennett, University of Iowa
Jeong Chang Seong, University of West Georgia
Cartographic Editor
Thomas W. Hodler, University of Georgia
Book Review Editor
Max Baber, United States Geospatial Intelligence 
Foundation
Recent Literature Review
Michael P. Finn, U.S. Geological Survey
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get JPG, JPEG and other high quality image files from PDF Scan image to PDF, tiff and various image formats. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF
rearrange pages in pdf file; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
pdf reverse page order online; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
Introduction
T
he age  of  ubiquitous cartography  has 
arrived. Maps, whether defined narrowly 
or broadly, are a part of our technology-
filled lives more than ever before; each new day 
surely sets an all-time record for the number of 
maps produced, manipulated, and used in the 
world.  And those maps are changing in ways 
that are obvious today but impossible to have 
imagined a few short years ago.  Interactive and 
dynamic maps are no longer novel conveniences 
but  de  rigueur  necessities  for  an  amazingly 
diverse collection of uses and users: a traveler 
planning an international voyage expects that 
a web search for a hotel to be map-driven; a 
smartphone manufacturer bases advertising on 
the quality, detail, and usefulness of its maps; a 
teenager moves through a virtual game world 
with a meticulously designed, multiple-level-of-
detail  map;  a  newspaper  includes  interactive 
graphics  that allow a reader to visualize and 
analyze developing stories; a worldwide software 
corporation constantly improves its interactive 
maps to keep up with competing products; a 
cyclist shares knowledge of potholes and angry 
dogs along her route with others via wiki-based 
mapping  applications;  a  government  agency 
responds to user (and inter-agency) demand for 
American Cartography 2011:
Benchmarks and Projections
An Editorial Preface to the
National Report of the United States
to the International Cartographic Association
Robert Edsall, Guest Editor
US National Report
Cartography and Geographic Information Science, Vol. 38, No. 3, 2011, pp. 246-249
user-friendly  geo-interfaces to  its  spatial data; 
an emergency  manager coordinates  responses 
to a national security threat with an interactive 
map as the framework; a community organizer 
for  a  small  non-profit  shares  experiences  of 
individuals  from  his  community  through  a 
grassroots public mapping project; an aid worker 
directs resources according to a up-to-the-minute 
map that shows geo-referenced tweets, photos, 
and messages from individuals directly affected 
by an earthquake or tsunami – a map that can 
quite literally save lives. Cartography continues 
its  renaissance – we can answer the question 
“hasn’t the world already been mapped?” with 
the astonishing answer “there has never been so 
much to map.”
As exciting as these changes and potentials are, 
cartography research and development groups 
in  government,  industry,  and  academia  are 
challenged to remain nimble enough to appear 
progressive rather than reactionary, to remain 
essential  rather  than  extraneous.  We  must 
counter the misperception that these ubiquitous 
maps “design themselves,” and that the decades 
of vital cartographic research of the past – and 
future – are no longer important in the maps’ 
usefulness  and  potency.  Indeed,  many  long-
established cartographic principles of simplicity 
and  efficiency in  graphic  communication  are 
more evident – and found in more contexts – 
than ever. The desire that your message “go viral” 
Rob Edsall, Department of Geography, University of Minnesota, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55455, USA, E-mail: <edsal001@umn.edu>.
DOI: 10.1559/15230406382246
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
how to move pages around in pdf; how to rearrange pages in a pdf document
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge two or several separate PDF files together and into one PDF document in VB.NET. Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file.
how to move pages within a pdf document; rearrange pdf pages in preview
247                                                                                                           Cartography and Geographic Information Science
in a social media context, for example, requires 
clarity, succinctness, and easily consumed visual 
displays,  such  as  in  the  increasingly  popular 
“infographics” that keep the message short, direct, 
and – importantly – memorable.  Our research 
now must expand from visual communication 
to wise and responsive advances in form and 
function through novel modes of representation, 
interaction, abstraction and selection, evaluation, 
and visualization.
Every four years since 1984, this journal has 
published the National Report of the United 
States  to  the  International  Cartographic 
Association (ICA). Our reports have, over the 
years,  served  as  important  benchmarks  for 
the state of the art  in American cartography, 
showcasing seminal work through the years in 
directions such as “computer cartography,” atlas 
mapping,  psychometric  experiments  in  map 
reading, generalization,  analytical cartography, 
cartographic  communication  and  exploration, 
data modeling, geographic visualization, mobile 
mapping,  and  a  wide  variety  of  important 
products  and  applications  of  cartography 
from industry, government, and academia. I’m 
honored to have been asked to edit the 2011 
Report, which coincides with the 15th General 
Assembly of the ICA in Paris.  
Since 1984, our reports have coincided with 
the ICA General Assemblies, which are major 
international events  in  world  cities,  complete 
with  exciting  opening  ceremonies,  peer-
reviewed  technical  paper  sessions  in  applied 
and theoretical cartography, major disciplinary 
keynote  addresses,  lively  discussions  and 
debates  that  advance  our  field,  and  colorful 
showcases of national culture and international 
accomplishments in cartography. In many ways 
the  assemblies  are  similar  to  world’s  fairs  or 
Olympic  games:  celebrations  of  cooperation, 
innovation, pride, and achievement.  In selecting 
authors and papers for this report, I had such a 
celebration in mind; while we can take great pride 
in our national accomplishments in research and 
applications in cartography, we do so with the 
knowledge that many trends reported here are 
global and international in scale and importance, 
and that further advancement of the field is done 
primarily through international partnership and 
cross-pollination, which closely aligns with the 
mission of the ICA. The major purpose of this 
Report is to represent the broad spectrum of 
current research in the United States on areas 
of relevance to the ICA, and to highlight the 
original, significant, and  energetic efforts  that 
are advancing cartography and responding to, 
and in many senses, creating the changes in the 
way maps and geographic information are being 
created, disseminated, and used in today’s society.
In the call for contributions to the Report, I 
followed the lead of guest  editors  before me 
and asked for a variety of types of papers.  First, 
authors could submit longer, fully peer-reviewed 
papers that either review the state of the art of an 
important branch of American cartography or 
present novel research to solve a specific problem 
in cartography (or both).  Second, I requested 
research  “notes”  that  gave  medium-length 
summaries of accomplishments or perspectives 
on dynamics in cartography from various points 
of view; the editors reviewed for content and 
clarity by the editors.  Finally, I invited reports of 
activities of various institutions and societies that 
present a cross-section of activities, personalities, 
and places that shape American cartography at 
the beginning of the second decade of the 21st 
century.
While I did not plan in advance for specific 
themes  to  be  highlighted  in  the  submissions, 
several themes quickly became apparent in the 
submissions.  The first and foremost of these 
is the focus on the changing roles of users of 
the maps.  Ming-Tsang Tsou, in his review of 
the state of web cartography, sees the “rise of 
user-centered design” as a major trend in all of 
mapping, much of which, of course, is happening 
on  and  between  computers  via  the  Internet.  
He  sees  the  cartographer’s  role  as  changing 
from a communicator of an idea to a provider 
of the means for displaying ideas, tracing the 
remarkable worldwide trend of user-generated 
content and speculating about its future.  User-
generated content is also a primary theme in Fritz 
Kessler’s contribution about the implications of 
so-called “volunteered geographic information” 
(VGI)  and  “neogeography.”    He  finds  open 
questions in neogeography, including important 
research  imperatives  to  determine  if  VGI  is 
more  or  less  reliable  than  more  top-down 
data collection approaches that may be more 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
character and text string to PDF files using online int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save
reorder pdf pages; reorder pdf pages online
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
can split target PDF document file by specifying a page or pages. If needed, developers can also combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF
change page order pdf acrobat; how to move pages in pdf reader
Vol. 38, No. 3                                                                                                                                                          248  
controlled but far more sparse in space and time.  
He  contextualizes  such  problems  reflexively 
through  his  own  experiences and analysis of 
VGI in the context of recreational bicycling.  
Kessler’s  paper  also  demonstrates  the 
symbiotic  relationship between  modern  maps 
and everyday activities.  To today’s young people, 
digital maps are so entwined in their everyday 
experience  that,  according  to  Francis  Harvey 
and Jennifer Kotting, new approaches should 
be  adopted  to  educate  these  “digital  natives” 
in modern cartography.   They report  on the 
development of a new course designed for college 
students for  whom  the  use of  technology  in 
general, and of digital interactive dynamic maps 
in particular, is so commonplace as to be taken 
for  granted.  Using  contemporary  educational 
literature and practice, they adapt pedagogical 
models responsive to these new learners into a 
new cartography/GIScience course, and report 
on their successes and goals.  In his paper on 
the parallels  between  games and cartography, 
Ola Alqvist notes that maps have had historical 
roles in seemingly banal recreational activities, 
but  that  these  activities,  now  technologically 
advanced networked digital games, could now 
show cartography  paths toward  the future in 
visual and computational design.   
Tsou’s user-centered design focus is echoed in 
the paper by Vince Smith and Jon Thies, from 
Intergraph,  who  have  first-hand  knowledge 
of  the  changing  demands  of  customers  and 
map users.   American software  designers are 
responding to the ever-expanding expectations 
of map users, once satisfied to use paper maps 
created by others, but who are now expecting 
not only seamless  and user-friendly platforms 
to display data but also the provision of that 
current (and “raw”) geo-data.  Is such a shift 
from  completed  cartographic  products  to 
modular, do-it-yourself mapping environments 
leading  us  to  a  diminished  role  for  artisanal 
cartographers?  Howard Veregin, who recently 
worked for Rand McNally, gives his perspective 
on  the  new  role  of  cartography  in  the  web-
enabled digital  mapping age. He argues  that 
“geoenabled” cartography, which relies on GIS 
and the rules and procedures that characterize 
it, can be seen as a liberation for cartography, 
long mired in tedious “silos” of map production: 
the efficient creation and sharing of maps – as 
well as the data and procedures used to make 
the maps – will in fact foster communication and 
evolution  in  cartographic  design.  For  present 
users, the map is not enough – both papers argue 
that tech-savvy users of maps now wish do delve 
deeper: into analysis, into problems, and into the 
data itself.
Geoenabled  cartography,  introduced  by 
Veregin, is well illustrated by Doug Vandegraft’s 
report on activities at the US Fish and Wildlife 
Service,  where  a  team  of  cartographers  was 
responsible  not  for  the  creation  of  a  set  of 
maps, but rather the construction and provision 
of  a  comprehensive  database  of  geographic 
information  regarding  the  FWS’s  property 
and other related cadastral data.  Additionally, 
the team has made the data available though 
an interactive web interface. The US Census 
Bureau shares a commitment to user-centered 
access to the wealth of data collected for the 
2010 decennial US Census; Constance Beard 
and her colleagues provide us with a tour of 
the activities of the cartographic branch of the 
census, illustrating the increased  efficiency of 
geoenabled mapping through the development 
of  databases  and  software  that  enable  rapid 
and automated map creation for both census 
operations and outreach and communication.
The  US  government’s  longstanding 
commitment  to  providing  comprehensive 
and free geo-data is a clear source of national 
pride;  in  particular,  a  number  of  papers  in 
the  issue  describe  important  research  in  the 
creation of the National Map.  This project, a 
cornerstone of the US Geological Survey and 
the Department of the Interior, provides digital 
topographic information for use in base maps, 
scientific analysis, recreation, and other uses. It 
is designed to update and digitize the familiar 
“topo sheets” that display elevation data as well as 
settlement, roads, and hydrography.  Lynn Usery 
provides an overview of the research arm of 
the USGS’ cartography team at the Center for 
Excellence in Geospatial Information Systems, 
and discusses the initiatives underway to provide 
access  to  the  National  Map  data  using  user-
centered design.  Kari Craun and her colleagues 
showcase  the  modernization  and  archiving 
of the topographic data in the National Map 
249                                                                                                           Cartography and Geographic Information Science
and the creation of  a  new online version of 
the National Atlas of the US.  Finally, Barbara 
Buttenfield, Lawrence Stanislawski, and Cynthia 
Brewer  present  cutting-edge  developments  in 
the landscape-specific methods of generalization 
of the National Map’s hydrography dataset, the 
detail of which depends on the display scale.  
These  papers  are  interspersed  in  the  issue 
with brief reports from several universities that 
have proud and ongoing cartographic traditions 
(Kansas,  Penn  State,  Minnesota,  South  Caro-
lina, and Ohio State) and activity reports from 
societies that promote the discipline and enable 
exchanges of ideas in the United States (CaGIS, 
NACIS).  
Clearly, this is an exciting time for cartography, 
both here in the United States and worldwide. 
If you are an international reader, those of us 
involved  in  the  Report  would  be  pleased  to 
welcome you to the US to share your work and 
find out more about ours, possibly at the next 
General Assembly meeting in 2015, but definitely 
at  meetings  such  as  AutoCarto,  GIScience, 
and  NACIS,  or  in  individual  or  collective 
partnerships with us.  This has been an exciting 
project for me, as I have been exposed to large 
parts of the spectrum of current cartographic 
research in the US.  It has been a pleasure to 
work with the dedicated contributors, and I am 
deeply indebted to the panel of reviewers who 
provided tremendous feedback to me and to the 
authors in the process of assembling this report.  
I am also tremendously grateful to the USNC, 
chaired by E. Lynn Usery, the managing editor 
of the journal, Scott Freundschuh, the figures 
editor, Thomas Hodler, and the editor-in-chief, 
Michael Leitner, for their support and advice 
from the beginning.  I hope this Report similarly 
inspires,  provokes,  and  invites  you  to  pursue 
creative and collaborative work in our dynamic 
discipline.  
About  the  Author:  Rob  Edsall  has  been  an 
assistant professor of GIS and cartography at 
the University of Minnesota since 2008, and will 
begin an appointment as an associate professor 
at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin in 
Fall  2011. He teaches cartography,  GIS, and 
research methods, and is involved in research in 
geovisual analytics, multi-modal interface design, 
and GIScience-society interaction.
Introduction
Redefining Web Cartography
T
he hybrid or the meeting of two media is a moment 
of truth and revelation from which new form is 
born... the moment of the meeting of media is a 
moment of freedom and release from the ordinary trance 
and numbness imposed by them on our senses (McLuhan 
1964, p. 80). The web is the new medium of 
maps,  changing  cartographic  representation 
from  paper  and  desktop  GIS  to  distributed, 
user-centered, mobile, and real-time geospatial 
information services. Web cartography is a new 
frontier in cartographic research transforming 
the design principles of map-making and the 
scope of map use.  
Following  the  argument  made  by  Plewe’s 
2007  paper,  the  recent  development  of  web 
cartography research “has not been nearly as 
dynamic  as  the  commercial  sector”  (Plewe 
2007, p. 135). In the United States, only a few 
cartographers focus on web mapping research 
topics,  such  as  web  mapping  protocols  and 
standards,  map  application  programming 
Revisiting Web Cartography in the United States:
the Rise of User-Centered Design 
Ming-Hsiang Tsou
Abstract This paper reviews the recent development of web cartography based on 
Plewe’s 2007 short paper in the U.S. National Report to the ICA, titled Web Cartography 
in the United States. By identifying major changes and recent research trends in web car-
tography, this paper provides an overview about what the web means to cartography, 
and suggests two major research directions for web cartography in the future: 1) the rise 
of user-centered design, including design of user interfaces, dynamic map content and 
mapping functions; 2) the release of the power of map-making to the public and amateur 
cartographers. I also present web cartography concepts in this paper to challenge the 
traditional research agenda in cartography. 
Keywords: web cartography, user-centered design, neocartographer
Cartography and Geographic Information Science, Vol. 38, No. 3, 2011, pp. 250-257
interfaces  (APIs),  mashups,  performance  and 
usability,  and  user-generated  map  contents. 
Many cartographers  view  web mapping as  a 
technical  solution  rather  than  an  academic 
research  topic.  Web cartography plays  a  less 
significant role in academics compared to other 
topics such as visualization, generalization, and 
thematic  map  design.  For  example,  the  ten 
major keywords identified by the International 
Cartographic  Association  (ICA)  for  the  2005 
ICA brainstorming sessions did not highlight any 
major web mapping research topics. There is only 
a tiny paragraph that mentions web mapping in 
the ICA report (Virrantaus et al. 2009). 
Most  cartographers  would  agree  that  web 
maps are becoming more and more important 
in our daily lives and scientific research.  The 
disconnect between the relatively few academic 
research projects in web cartography and the 
great popularity of web maps may be explained 
by  the  slowness  of  academia  and  the  rapid 
changes  of web technology. Web cartography 
has  also  yet  to  be defined in the context of  
“transformative” research, which “involves ideas, 
discoveries, or tools that radically change our 
understanding of an important existing scientific 
or engineering concept or educational practice 
Ming-Hsiang Tsou, Department of Geography, San Diego State 
University, San Diego, California, 92182-4493. E-mail: <mtsou@mail.
sdsu.edu>.
DOI: 10.1559/15230406382250
251                                                                                                           Cartography and Geographic Information Science
or leads to the creation of a new paradigm or 
field  of  science,  engineering,  or  education.” 
(NSF  2007).  Here,  I  propose  to  elevate  and 
redefine web cartography in order to highlight 
its potential for transformative research. 
Peterson  (1997)  identified  two  important 
categories of web cartography research: Internet 
map use (such as map types, various users, and 
the numbers of maps created) and Internet map-
making (including web graphic design, file format, 
printing,  map  scale,  and  maps  on  demand). 
“The Internet has made possible both new forms 
of maps and different ways of using them and, 
perhaps, has created a new category of map user” 
(Peterson 1997, p.9). Crampton (1999) focused 
on user defined mapping, and defined online 
mapping as “the suite of tools, methods, and 
approaches to using, producing, and analyzing 
maps via the Internet, especially the World Wide 
Web, characterized by distributed, private, on 
demand, and user defined mapping.” (p. 292).   
Both Crampton  and Peterson  highlighted the 
important role of map users in web cartography. 
Peterson’s description emphasized the emergence 
of new web-based users who are quite different 
from traditional map users. Crampton further 
described the new characteristics of web map 
users who are granted more power and control 
in web mapping.
In the early development of web cartography, 
many researchers used various terms to describe 
similar  concepts,  such  as  online  mapping 
(Crampton  1999),  Internet  mapping  (Tsou 
2003), web mapping (Haklay et al. 2008), and 
cybercartography  (Taylor  2005).  Kraak  and 
Brown’s edited book Web Cartography (2001) 
benchmarked  web  cartography  research  at 
that time. Peterson’s two books, Maps and the 
Internet (2003) and International Perspectives on 
Maps and the Internet (2008) cover key research 
in web mapping, including user-centered design 
(Tsou  and  Curran  2008),  web  cartographic 
theories  (Monmonier  2008),  cartographic 
education (Giordano and Wisniewski 2008), and 
map usability and evaluation (Wachowicz et al. 
2008).
This  article  redefines  web  cartography  as 
the study of cartographic representation using the web 
as  the  medium,  with  an  emphasis  on  user-centered 
design (including user interfaces, dynamic map contents, 
and  mapping  functions),  user-generated  content,  and 
ubiquitous access. This new definition emphasizes 
two  important  research  directions  for  web 
cartography:
1. The rise in importance of user-centered design 
(UCD), including the designs of user interfaces, 
dynamic map content and mapping functions.
2. Releasing the power of map-making to the 
public and amateur cartographers.
For this definition, the “web” refers to the 
connected  Internet  and  its  broader  network-
based applications. The meaning of web in this 
paper is different from the technical definition 
of the World Wide Web, which is built upon the 
Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). The study 
of web cartography should not be limited to web 
browser applications only. For example, Google 
Earth and NASA World Wind can be used to 
create cartographic representations in the form 
of  digital  globe  without  web  browsers.  The 
following sections will start with an overview of 
web technology development and then discuss 
the  two  research  trends  in  web  cartography 
by  highlighting  related  cartographic  research 
projects in the U.S. and their contributors.
An Evolution in 
Web Mapping Technology, 
a Revolution in Web Map Design
Plewe  (2007)  identified  four  ‘generations’  of 
web mapping technologies. The first was based 
on HTML and Common Gateway Interfaces 
(CGI). The second was developed by applets and 
component-oriented web tools (Peng and Tsou 
2003). The third generation included mashups, 
asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX), and 
API-enabled mapping applications. The fourth 
generation came with the invention of Google 
Earth (and other digital globes, such as NASA 
World Wind and Microsoft Virtual Earth), which 
created an immersive mapping environment for 
users. From a technological progress perspective, 
these  changes  in  computer  science  and  web 
technology were an evolutionary process rather 
than a technology revolution. The evolution of 
web mapping technology continues today. The 
fifth generation of web maps is built on cloud 
computing,  rich  internet  applications  (RIA), 
Vol. 38, No. 3                                                                                                                                                          252  
and  crowdsourcing.  The  following  is  a  short 
summary of the three key technologies for the 
new generation of web maps.    
Cloud  computing:  delivers  applications,  software, 
and infrastructures  as  services to many  users 
from distributed data centers over the Internet 
(Buyya et al. 2009). Users can directly use web-
based software (such as Google Docs, Gmails, 
and ESRI ArcGIS Explorer online), instead of 
downloading  and  installing  desktop  software 
on  their  local  computers.  Programmers  and 
application  developers  can  also  use  cloud 
computing to create virtual servers and on-line 
computing  platforms  (such  as  Amazon’s  EC2 
platform and FGDC’s Geospatial Platform) for 
their web applications rather than maintaining 
expensive  local  web  servers  and  hardware 
equipments for their projects .
Rich  internet  applications:  refer  to a  set of web 
programming methods for producing interactive 
asynchronous  web  applications  (Farrell  and 
Nezlek  2007).  RIA  can  provide  very  user-
friendly,  high  performance,  and  responsive 
web applications with powerful user interface 
gadgets and  tools  (Kay 2009). Some popular 
RIA methods include Adobe FLEX, Microsoft 
Silverlight, and Java Scripts.
Crowdsourcing: is a new approach for generating 
data  or  reporting  information  by  amateurs, 
volunteers, hobbyists, or part-timers (Howe 2006).  
A large group  of people  without professional 
cartographic training can create and share their 
own maps and geospatial data online. Volunteers 
can contribute their local knowledge and efforts 
to collect mapping information by using GPS, 
mobile sensors, and web mapping tools, such 
as  OpenStreetMap  project  (Goodchild  2007; 
Haklay and Weber 2008). 
The evolution of web mapping technologies 
could lead to a revolution of web map designs. 
In  this  article,  web map designs  refer  to  the 
integrated design plans for creating effective map 
user interfaces with dynamic map contents, and 
mapping functions. Powerful web platforms (RIA 
and cloud computing) can lead to the creation 
of innovative  map user  interfaces. Diversified 
web  user  tasks  (such  as  navigation,  location-
based services, housing and renting, etc.) require 
unique designs of dynamic map contents (map 
displays)  and  mapping  functions  in  order  to 
satisfy different user needs.
Similar to the impacts of Web 2.0 to our society 
(Batty  et  al.  2010),  web  maps  have  changed 
the  context  of  cartographic  representation; 
from  traditional  thematic  mapping  on  paper 
or  desktop  computers  to   user-centered  map 
applications on various mobile devices, virtual 
globes, and web browsers. Several cartographic 
studies  have  highlighted  this  new  design 
direction with the creation of neologisms, such 
as maps 2.0 (Crampton 2009), GIS/2 (Miller 
2006),  neogeography  (Turner  2006),  and 
neocartographers (Lui and Palen 2010). These 
commentaries illustrate the needs for creation 
of new  web map designs to  cope  with  these 
dynamic changes. 
The  first  wave  of  the  web  map  design 
revolution  may  be  observed  in  2005,  when 
Google  released  its  two  popular  mapping 
services, Google Maps and Google Earth.  Miller 
describes this revolution as new form of GIS, 
called “GIS/2”, enabling the creation of more 
dynamic and “socially mutable” (changeable and 
sometime contradictory) geospatial information 
(Miller  2006),  accommodating  “an  equitable 
representation  of  diverse  views,  preserving 
contradiction,  inconsistencies,  and  disputes 
against premature resolution.” (p. 196). A related 
term, “Maps 2.0,” was used by Crampton to 
describe “the explosion of new spatial media on 
the web, the means of production of knowledge 
are  in  the  hands  of  the  public  rather  than 
accredited  and  trained  professionals”  (p.  92). 
Harris  and  Hazen  (2006)  both  caution  and 
celebrate that the use of crowdsourced geospatial 
data by the public in mapmaking may cause 
counter-mapping and counter-knowledge. One 
key factor that led to the first wave of web map 
design revolution was the dramatic improvement 
in web mapping performance with the adoption 
of  tile-based  mapping  engines  and  AJAX 
technologies (Tsou 2005)., which improve client/
server communication response time significantly 
and generate multi-scale map graphics rapidly.  
Tile-based  mapping engines  also  improve the 
performance of web maps by storing a set of 
pyramidal image layers at different map scales 
inside web map servers. AJAX and image tiling 
have existed for a while, but the combination of 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested