c# pdf viewer wpf : Change pdf page order reader application SDK cloud windows winforms asp.net class vbhtp2_020-part556

2
Introduction to the 
Visual Studio .NET IDE
Objectives
• To be introduced to the Visual Studio .NET Integrated 
Development Environment (IDE).
• To become familiar with the types of commands 
contained in the IDE’s menus and toolbars.
• To understand the use of various kinds of windows in 
the Visual Studio .NET IDE.
• To understand Visual Studio .NET’s help features.
• To be able to create, compile and execute a simple 
Visual Basic program.
Seeing is believing.
Proverb
Form ever follows function.
Louis Henri Sullivan
Intelligence… is the faculty of making artificial objects, 
especially tools to make tools.
Henri-Louis Bergson
Change pdf page order reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages in pdf reader; how to reorder pdf pages in reader
Change pdf page order reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reordering pages in pdf; move pages in pdf reader
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
87
2.1 Introduction
Visual Studio .NET is Microsoft’s Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for creat-
ing, running and debugging programs (also called applications) written in a variety of .NET
programming languages. This IDE is a powerful and sophisticated tool that is used to create
business-critical and mission-critical applications. In this chapter, we provide an overview
of the Visual Studio .NET IDE and demonstrate how to create a simple Visual Basic pro-
gram by dragging and dropping predefined building blocks into place—a technique called
“visual programming.” We introduce additional features of the IDE and discuss the more
advanced “visual programming” techniques throughout the book.
2.2 Overview of the Visual Studio .NET IDE
When Visual Studio .NET is executed, the Start Page is displayed (Fig. 2.1). The left-
hand side of the StartPage contains a list of helpful links, such as GetStarted. Clicking
a link displays its contents. We refer to single-clicking with the left mouse button as select-
ing,or clicking,whereas we refer to double-clicking with the left mouse button as double-
clicking. [Note: Your Start Page may be slightly different depending on your version of Vi-
sual Studio.]
Outline
2.1 
Introduction
2.2 
Overview of the Visual Studio .NET IDE
2.3 
Menu Bar and Toolbar
2.4 
Visual Studio .NET IDE Windows
2.4.1 Solution Explorer
2.4.2 Toolbox
2.4.3 Properties Window
2.5 
Using Help
2.6 
Simple Program: Displaying Text and an Image
Summary • Terminology • Self-Review Exercises • Answers to Self-Review Exercises • Exercises
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc
rearrange pdf pages; how to reorder pdf pages
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
VB.NET PDF - How to Modify PDF Document Page in VB.NET. VB.NET Guide for Processing PDF Document Page and Sorting PDF Pages Order.
rearrange pdf pages in preview; pdf rearrange pages
88
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
Chapter 2
When clicked, Get Started loads a page that contains a table of the names of recent
project (such as ASimpleProgram in Fig. 2.1), along with the dates on which these
projects were last modified. A project is a group of related files, such as the Visual Basic
code and images that make up a program. When you load Visual Studio .NET for the first
time, the list of recent projects will be empty. There are two buttons on the page—Open
Project and New Project, which are used to open an existing project (such as the ones in
the table of recent projects) or to create a new project, respectively. We discuss the process
of creating new projects momentarily.
Other links on the StartPage offer information and resources related to Visual Studio
.NET. Clicking What’s New displays a page that lists new features and updates for Visual
Studio .NET, including downloads for code samples and programming tools. Online Com-
munity links to on-line resources for contacting other software developers through news-
groups (organized message boards on the Internet) and Web sites. Headlines pro-
Fig. 2.1
Start Page
in Visual Studio .NET.
Recent projects
StartPage links
Location bar
Navigation buttons
Hidden window
Buttons
Toolbar
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
reorder pdf pages reader; change page order pdf reader
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
reorder pdf page; move pages in a pdf
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
89
vides a page for browsing news, articles and how-to guides. To access more extensive infor-
mation, users can select Search Online and begin browsing through the MSDN (Microsoft
Developer Network) on-line library, which contains numerous articles, downloads and tuto-
rials on various technologies of interest to Visual Studio .NET users. When clicked, Down-
loads displays a page that provides programmers access to product updates, code samples
and reference materials. The Web Hosting page allows programmers to post their software
(such as Web services, which we discuss in Chapter 21, and ASP.NET) on-line for public
use. The My Profile link loads a page where users can adjust and customize various Visual
Studio .NET settings, such as keyboard schemes and window layout preferences. (The pro-
grammer can also access Tools>Options... and Tools>Customize... to customize the
Visual Studio .NET IDE.) [Note: The Tools>Options... notation indicates that
Options... is a command in the Tools menu.]
Programmers can browse the Web from the IDE using Internet Explorer (also called
the internal Web browser in Visual Studio). To request a Web page, type its address into
the location bar (Fig. 2.1) and press the Enter key. [Note: The computer must, of course, be
connected to the Internet.] Several other windows appear in the IDE besides the Start
Page; we discuss them in subsequent sections.
To create a new Visual Basic program, click the New Project button (Fig. 2.1), which
displays the New Projectdialog (Fig. 2.2). Dialogs are windows that facilitate user–com-
puter communication.
The Visual Studio .NET IDE organizes programs into projects and solutions. Projects
are groups of related files that form a Visual Basic program; solutions contain one or more
Fig. 2.2
New Project dialog.
Visual Basic WindowsApplication (selected)
Project name
Project location
Description 
of selected 
project
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# users to reorder and rearrange multi-page Tiff file Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move pages or make a totally new order for all
how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader; change pdf page order online
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
various Word document processing implementations using C# demo codes, such as add or delete Word document page, change Word document pages order, merge or
rearrange pdf pages online; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
90
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
Chapter 2
projects. Multiple-project solutions are used to create large-scale applications in which
each project performs a single, well-defined task.
The Visual Studio .NET IDE provides project types for a variety of programming lan-
guages. This book focuses on Visual Basic, so select the Visual Basic Projects folder
from the ProjectTypeswindow (Fig. 2.2). We use several Visual Basic project types in
this book. A WindowsApplication, which is a program that executes inside the Win-
dows OS (e.g., Windows 2000 or Windows XP). Such programs include customized soft-
ware that you create as well as software products like Microsoft Word, Internet Explorer
and Visual Studio .NET. 
By default, the Visual Studio .NET IDE assigns the name WindowsApplication1 to
the new project and solution (Fig. 2.2). The VisualStudioProjects folder in the My
Documents folder is the default folder referenced when Visual Studio .NET is executed
for the first time. Programmers can change both the name and the location where projects
are created. After selecting a name and location for the project, click OK to display the IDE
in designview (Fig. 2.3), which contains all the features necessary to begin creating Visual
Basic programs.
Good Programming Practice 2.1
Developers should change the name and location of each project to describe the program’s
functionality.
2.1
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Enable C#.NET developers to change the page order of source PDF document file; Allow C#.NET developers to add image to specified area of source PDF document
pdf reverse page order preview; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
speaking, you will receive a copy of email containing order confirmation and dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pages in pdf; change page order pdf preview
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
91
The gray rectangle (called a form) titled Form1 represents the Windows application
that the programmer is creating. Later in this chapter, we discuss how to customize this
form by adding controls (i.e., reusable components, such as buttons). Collectively, the form
and controls constitute the program’s Graphical User Interface (GUI), which is the visual
part of the program with which the user interacts. Users enter data (inputs) into the program
by typing at the keyboard, by clicking the mouse buttons and in a variety of other ways.
Programs display instructions and other information (outputs) for users to read in the GUI.
For example, the NewProject dialog in Fig. 2.2 presents a GUI where the user clicks with
the mouse button to select a project type and types a project name and location from the
keyboard.
The name of each open document is listed on a tab. In our case, the documents are the
Start Page and Form1.vb[Design] (upper left portion of Fig. 2.3). To view a docu-
ment, click its tab. Tabs save space and facilitate easy access to multiple documents. The
active tab, or the tab of the document currently displayed in the IDE, is displayed in bold
text (e.g., Form1.vb [Design]) and is positioned in front of all the other tabs.
Fig. 2.3
Design view of Visual Studio .NET IDE.
Menu
Active tab
Form
(Windows application)
Tabs
Properties window
Solution Explorer
Menu bar
92
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
Chapter 2
2.3 Menu Bar and Toolbar
Commands for managing the IDE and for developing, maintaining and executing programs
are contained in the menus, which are located on the menu bar (Fig. 2.4).Menus contain
groups of related commands (also called menu items) that, when selected, cause the IDE to
perform specific actions (e.g., open a window, save a file, print a file and execute a pro-
gram). For example, new projects are created by selecting File>New>Project.... The
menus depicted in Fig. 2.4 are summarized in Fig. 2.5. In Chapter 13, Graphical User In-
terfaces: Part 2, we discuss how programmers can create and add their own menus and
menu items to their projects.
Rather than having to navigate the menus for certain commonly used commands, the
programmer can access them from the toolbar (Fig. 2.6), which contains pictures, called
icons, that graphically represent commands. To execute a command via the toolbar, click
its icon. Some icons contain a down arrow that, when clicked, displays additional options.
Fig. 2.4
Visual Studio .NET IDE menu bar.
Menu
Description
File
Contains commands for opening projects, closing projects, printing project data, 
etc.
Edit
Contains commands such as cut, paste, find, undo, etc.
View
Contains commands for displaying IDE windows and toolbars.
Project
Contains commands for managing a project and its files.
Build
Contains commands for compiling a program.
Debug
Contains commands for debugging (i.e., identifying and correcting problems in a 
program) and running a program.
Data
Contains commands for interacting with databases (i.e., files that store data, 
which we discuss in Chapter 19, Databases, SQL and ADO .NET).
Format
Contains commands for arranging and changing the appearance of a form’s con-
trols.
Tools
Contains commands for accessing additional IDE tools and options that enable 
customization of the IDE.
Windows
Contains commands for arranging and displaying windows.
Help
Contains commands for accessing the IDE’s help features.
Fig. 2.5
Summary of Visual Studio .NET IDE menus.
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
93
Positioning the mouse pointer over an icon highlights the icon and, after a few seconds,
displays a description called a tool tip (Fig. 2.7). Tool tips help novice programmers
become familiar with the IDE’s features.
2.4 Visual Studio .NET IDE Windows
The IDE provides windows for accessing project files and customizing controls. In this sec-
tion, we introduce several windows that are essential in the development of Visual Basic
applications. These windows can be accessed via the toolbar icons (Fig. 2.8) or by selecting
the name of the desired window in the View menu.
Visual Studio .NET provides a space-saving feature called auto-hide, which can be
activated by clicking the pin icon in the upper right corner of a window (Fig. 2.9). When
auto-hide is enabled, a toolbar appears along one of the edges of the IDE. This toolbar con-
tains one or more icons, each of which identifies a hidden window. Placing the mouse
pointer over one of these icons displays that window, but the window is hidden once the
Fig. 2.6
Toolbar demonstration.
Fig. 2.7
Tool tip demonstration.
Fig. 2.8
Toolbar icons for three Visual Studio .NET IDE windows.
Toolbar icon (indicates a command to open a file)
Down arrow indicates 
more options
Tool tip displayed 
when the mouse 
pointer has rested 
on the icon for a 
few seconds
Solution Explorer
Properties
Toolbox
94
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
Chapter 2
mouse pointer is moved outside the window’s area. To “pin down” a window (i.e., to dis-
able auto-hide and keep the window open), click the pin icon. Notice that when a window
is “pinned down,” the pin icon has a vertical orientation, whereas when auto-hide is
enabled, the pin icon has a horizontal orientation (Fig. 2.9).
2.4.1 Solution Explorer
The Solution Explorer window (Fig. 2.10) provides access to all the files in the solution.
When the Visual Studio .NET IDE is first loaded, the Solution Explorer is empty; there
Fig. 2.9
Demonstrating the auto-hide feature.
Mouse pointer over icon label
Close button
Icons for hidden windows
Vertical orientation for pin icon 
(auto hide disabled)
Title bar
Horizontal orientation for pin 
icon (auto hide enabled)
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
95
are no files to display. Once a solution is open, the Solution Explorer displays that solu-
tion’s contents.
The solution’s startup project is the project that runs when the program is executed and
appears in bold text in the Solution Explorer. For our single-project solution, the startup
project is the only project (WindowsApplication1). The Visual Basic file, which corre-
sponds to the form shown in Fig. 2.3, is named Form1.vb. (Visual Basic files use the .vb
filename extension, which is short for “Visual Basic.”) The other files and folders are dis-
cussed later in the book. 
[Note: We use fonts to distinguish between IDE features (such as menu names and
menu items) and other elements that appear in the IDE. Our convention is to emphasize IDE
features in a sans-serifboldhelvetica font and to emphasize other elements, such as
filenames (e.g., Form1.vb) and property names (discussed in Section 2.4.3), in a serif
boldcourier font.]
The plus and minus boxes to the left of the name of the project and the References
folder expand and collapse the tree, respectively. Click a plus box to display items grouped
under the heading to the right of the plus box; click the minus box to collapse a tree already
in its expanded state. Other Visual Studio .NET windows also use this plus-/minus-box
convention.
The Solution Explorer window includes a toolbar that contains several icons. When
clicked, the show all filesicon displays all the files in the solution. The number of icons
present in the toolbar is dependent on the type of file selected. We discuss additional toolbar
icons later in the book.
2.4.2 Toolbox
The Toolbox (Fig. 2.11) contains controls used to customize forms. Using visual pro-
gramming, programmers can “drag and drop” controls onto the form instead of writing
code to build them. Just as people do not need to know how to build an engine in order to
drive a car, programmers do not need to know how to build a control in order to use the
control. The use of preexisting controls enables developers to concentrate on the big pic-
ture, rather than the minute and complex details of every control. The wide variety of con-
Fig. 2.10
Solution Explorer
with an open solution.
Minus box  
collapses tree 
when clicked
Plus box  
expands tree
when clicked
Show all files
Properties window
Startup project
Toolbar
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested