c# pdf viewer wpf : Move pages in pdf acrobat software control project winforms azure windows UWP vbhtp2_021-part557

96
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
Chapter 2
trols that are contained in the Toolbox is a powerful feature of the Visual Studio .NET
IDE. We will use the Toolbox when we create our own program later in the chapter.
The  Toolbox  contains  groups  of  related  controls  (e.g.,  Data,  Components  in
Fig. 2.11). When the name of a group is clicked, the list expands to display the various con-
trols contained in the group. Users can scroll through the individual items by using the
black scroll arrows to the right of the name of the group. If there are no more members in
a group to reveal by scrolling, the scroll arrow appears in gray, meaning that it is disabled,
i.e., it will not perform its normal function if clicked. The first item in the group is not a
control—it is the mouse pointer. The mouse pointer is used to navigate the IDE and to
manipulate a form and its controls. In later chapters, we discuss many of the Toolbox’s
controls.
Fig. 2.11 Toolbox window.
Controls
Group names
Scroll arrow
(disabled)
Group name
Scroll arrow
(enabled)
Move pages in pdf acrobat - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pdf pages; how to move pages in pdf converter professional
Move pages in pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reordering pages in pdf document; reorder pdf pages online
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
97
2.4.3  Properties Window
The Properties window (Fig. 2.12) displays the properties for a form or control. Proper-
ties specify information such as size, color and position. Each form or control has its own
set of properties; a property’s description is displayed at the bottom of the Properties win-
dow whenever that property is selected. If the Properties window is not visible, accessing
View > Properties Window, or pressing F4, displays the Properties window.
In Fig. 2.12, the form’s Properties window is shown. The left column of the Prop-
erties window lists the form’s properties; the right column displays the current value of
each property. Icons on the toolbar sort the properties either alphabetically (by clicking the
Alphabetic icon) or categorically (by clicking the Categorized icon). Users can scroll
through the list of properties by dragging the scrollbar’s scrollbox up or down. We show
how to set individual properties later in this chapter and throughout the book.
The Properties window is crucial to visual programming; it allows programmers to
modify controls visually, without writing code. This capability provides a number of ben-
efits. First, programmers can see which properties are available for modification and, in
many cases, can learn the range of acceptable values for a given property. Second, the pro-
Fig. 2.12
Properties
window.
Properties
Description
Categorized icon
Alphabetic icon
Component 
selection 
Scrollbar
Scrollbox
Property values
Toolbar
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
how to move pages in pdf; move pages in a pdf file
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to rearrange pdf pages; pdf page order reverse
98
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
Chapter 2
grammer does not have to remember or search the Visual Studio .NET documentation for
the  possible  settings of  a particular  property.  Third, this  window also displays  a  brief
description of the selected property, helping programmers understand the property’s pur-
pose. Fourth, a property can be set quickly using this window—usually, only a single click
is required, and no code needs to be written. All of these features are designed to help pro-
grammers  avoid repetitive tasks while ensuring that settings are correct and consistent
throughout the project.
At  the top  of the  Properties window is the component selection  drop-down list,
which allows programmers to select the form or control whose properties are displayed in
the Properties window. When a form or control in the list is clicked, the properties of that
form or control appear in the Properties window.
2.5  Using Help
The Visual Studio .NET IDE provides extensive help features. The Help menu contains a
variety of commands, which are summarized in Fig. 2.13. 
Dynamic help (Fig. 2.14) is an excellent way to get information about the IDE and its
features, as it provides a list of articles based on the current content (i.e., the items around
the location of the mouse cursor). To open the Dynamic Help window (if it is not already
open), select Help > Dynamic Help. Then when you click a word or component (such as
a form or a control) in the IDE, links to relevant help articles appear in the Dynamic Help
window. The window lists relevant help topics, samples and “Getting Started” information.
There is also a toolbar that provides access to the Contents, Index and Search help fea-
tures.
Command
Description
Contents
Displays a categorized table of contents in which help articles are 
organized by topic.
Index
Displays an alphabetized list of topics through which the programmer 
can browse.
Search
Allows programmers to find help articles based on search keywords.
Fig. 2.13 Help menu commands.
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to change page order in pdf document; pdf reverse page order online
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
how to rearrange pdf pages in preview; how to move pdf pages around
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
99
Visual Studio .NET also provides context-sensitive help, which is similar to dynamic
help, except that it immediately displays a relevant help article, rather than presenting a list
of articles. To use context-sensitive help, click an item and press F1. Help can appear either
internally or externally. When external help is selected, a relevant article immediately pops
up in a separate window outside the IDE. When internal help is selected, a help article
appears as a tabbed window inside the IDE. The help options can be set from the My Pro-
file section of the Start Page.
2.6  Simple Program: Displaying Text and an Image
In this section, we create a program that displays the text “Welcome to Visual Ba-
sic!” and an image of the Deitel & Associates bug mascot. The program consists of a sin-
gle form that uses a label control (i.e., a control that displays text which the user cannot
modify) to display the text, and uses a picture box to display the image. Figure 2.15 shows
the program as it executes. The example here (as well as the image file used in the example)
Fig. 2.14
Dynamic Help
window.
Selected item
Relevant help articles
Dynamic Help window
Toolbar
Search
Index
Contents
100
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
Chapter 2
is available on our Web site (www.deitel.com) under the Downloads/Resources
link.
To create the program whose outputs are shown in Fig. 2.15, we did not write a single
line of program code. Instead, we use the techniques of visual programming. Various pro-
grammer gestures (such as using the mouse for pointing, clicking, dragging and dropping)
provide Visual Studio .NET with the information necessary to generate all of this simple
program’s code. In the next chapter, we begin our discussion of how to write program code.
Throughout the book, we produce increasingly substantial and powerful programs. Visual
Basic programs usually include a combination of code written by a programmer and code
generated by Visual Studio .NET. 
Visual programming is useful for building GUI-intensive programs that require a large
amount of user interaction. Some programs are designed not to interact with users and
therefore do not have GUIs. Programmers must write the code for the latter type of program
directly.
To create, run and terminate this first program, perform the following steps:
1. Create  the  new  project.  If  a  project  is  already  open,  close  it  by  selecting
File > Close Solution. A dialog asking whether to save the current solution
may appear. To keep the unsaved changes, save the solution. Saving a solution
saves all files that are part of that solution, including projects and forms. To create
a new Windows application for our program, select File > New > Project... to
display the New Project dialog (Fig. 2.16). Click the Visual Basic Projects
folder to display a list of project types. From this list, select Windows Applica-
tion. Name the project ASimpleProgram, and select the directory to which the
project will be saved. To select a directory, click the Browse... button, which
opens a Project Location dialog (Fig. 2.17). Navigate through the directories,
find one in which to place the project and click OK to close the dialog. The select-
Fig. 2.15 Simple program executing.
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
101
ed folder will now appear in the Location text box. Click OK to close the New
Project dialog. The IDE will then load the new single-project solution, which
contains a form named Form1.
2. Set the form’s title bar. The text in the form’s title bar is determined by the form’s
Text property (Fig. 2.18). If the form’s Properties window is not open, click
Fig. 2.16 Creating a new Windows Application.
Fig. 2.17 Setting the project location in the Project Location dialog.
Project 
name
Project 
location
Click to 
change 
project 
location
Project 
types
Selected project location
Click to set project location
102
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
Chapter 2
the properties icon in the toolbar, or select View > Properties Window. Click
the form to display the form’s properties in the Properties window. Click in the
textbox to the right of the Text property’s box, and type A Simple Program,
as in Fig. 2.18. Press the Enter key (Return key) when finished; the form’s title bar
will be updated immediately.
3. Resize the form. Click and drag one of the form’s enabled sizing handles (the
small white squares that appear around the form shown in Fig. 2.19). The mouse
pointer changes its appearance (i.e., it changes to a pointer with one or more ar-
rows) when it is over an enabled sizing handle. The new pointer indicates the di-
rection(s) in which resizing is permitted. Disabled sizing handles appear in gray
and cannot be used to resize the form. The grid on the background of the form is
used by programmers to align controls and is not present when the program is run-
ning.
4. Change  the  form’s  background  color.  The  BackColor  property  specifies  a
form’s or control’s background color. Clicking BackColor in the Properties
window causes a down-arrow button to appear next to the value of the property
Fig. 2.18 Setting the form’s 
Text
property.
Fig. 2.19 Form with sizing handles.
Selected 
property
Property value
Name and type 
of object
Property 
description
Disabled sizing handle
Enabled sizing 
handle
Grid
Title bar
Mouse pointer over 
a sizing handle
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
103
(Fig. 2.20). When clicked, the down-arrow button displays a set of other options,
which varies depending on the property. In this case, the arrow displays tabs for
System (the default), Web and Custom. Click the Custom tab to display the
palette (a series of colors). Select the box that represents light blue. Once you se-
lect the color, the palette will close, and the form’s background color will change
to light blue (Fig. 2.21).
5. Add a label control to the form. Click the Windows Forms button in the Tool-
box. Next, double-click the Label control in the Toolbox. This action causes a
label with sizing handles to appear in the upper left corner of the form. (Fig. 2.21).
Although double-clicking any Toolbox control places the control on the form,
programmers also can “drag” controls from the Toolbox to the form. Labels are
used to display text; our label displays the text Label1 by default. Notice that our
label’s background color is the same as the form’s background color. When a con-
Fig. 2.20 Changing the form’s 
BackColor
property.
Down-arrow button
Current color
Custom palette
light blue
104
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
Chapter 2
trol is added to the form, its BackColor property is set to the form’s BackCol-
or.
6. Set the label’s appearance. Select the label, so that its properties appear in the
Properties window. The label’s Text property determines the text (if any) that
the label displays. The form and label each have their own Text property. Forms
and controls can have the same types of properties (e.g, BackColor, Text, etc.)
without conflict. Set the Text property of the label to Welcome to Visual Ba-
sic! (Fig. 2.22). Resize the label (using the sizing handles) if the text does not fit.
Move the label to the top center of the form by dragging it or by using the key-
board’s left and right arrow keys to adjust its position. Alternatively, you can cen-
ter 
the 
label 
control 
horizontally 
by 
selecting
Format > Center In Form > Horizontally.
Fig. 2.21 Adding a label to the form.
Fig. 2.22 Label in position with its 
Text
property set.
Label control
New background 
color
Label centered 
with updated 
Text
property
Chapter 2
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
105
7. Set the label’s font size, and align the label’s text. Clicking the value of the Font
property causes an ellipsis button (…) to appear next to the value, as shown in
Fig. 2.23. When the ellipsis button is clicked, a dialog that provides additional val-
ues—in this case, the Font dialog (Fig. 2.24)—is displayed. Programmers can se-
lect the font name (MS Sans Serif, Arial, etc.), font style (Regular, Bold, etc.)
and font size (8, 10, etc.) in this dialog. The text in the Sample area displays the
selected font. Under the Size category, select 24 points, and click OK. If the text
does not fit on a single line, it will wrap to the next line. Resize the label if it is not
large enough  to  hold  the  text.  Next, select the label’s TextAlign  property,
which determines how the text is aligned within the label. A three-by-three grid of
buttons representing alignment choices will be displayed. The position of each
button corresponds to where the text appears in the label (Fig. 2.25). Click the
top–center button in the three-by-three grid; this selection will cause the text to ap-
pear at the top–center position in the label.
Fig. 2.23
Properties
window displaying the label’s properties.
Fig. 2.24
Font
dialog for selecting fonts, styles and sizes.
Ellipsis button
Current font
Font sample
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested