c# pdf viewer wpf : How to reorder pages in pdf Library application class asp.net html winforms ajax vb_dot_net_developers_guide10-part561

68
Chapter 2 • The Microsoft .NET Framework
Type Safety
Type safety limits access to memory locations to which it has authorization. So, if
we have Object A trying to reference the memory location of Object B that is
within the memory area of Assembly C, Object A will not be allowed access.
Even if Object A tries to access a memory location that is accessible by its
assembly and does not have permission, it will be denied.An optional verification
process can be run on the MSIL to verify that the code is type safe. It’s optional
because it can be skipped based on permissions given to the code.
Type-safe code tells the runtime that it can go ahead and isolate the code,
since it’s not going to need anything outside its boundaries. Even if the trust
levels are different within a type safe code, it can execute on the same process.
Code that is not type-safe might cause crashes in the runtime or even shut down
your whole system, so be careful with it. Remember, we’re working with a beta
runtime, and it can be touchy!
Relying on Automatic 
Resource Management 
We are now getting to the nuts and bolts of .NET. So far, we’ve discussed
enhancements and changes in semantics. However, memory management in
.NET is radically different. Previously, we used the deterministic finalization
system, in which we declare that the code ran on the class initialization and ter-
mination plus had control over where a class was terminated. Deterministic final-
ization had its drawbacks, because if the programmer forgot to declare the class
empty (null, in some cases) or simply forgot to run the termination event, we’d
www.syngress.com
End Property
End Class
Using the abstract class fruit_eat, we set a requirement that class
monkey_boy must have to say that monkey_boy eats fruit. This can be
further  expounded  to  another  class,  animal_kingdom,  that  can  use
fruit_eat  to  organize  between  herbivores  and  carnivores  within  its
kingdom of wild animals and monkey_boys.
How to reorder pages in pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
rearrange pdf pages reader; change pdf page order
How to reorder pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pdf pages in reader; move pages in a pdf
The Microsoft .NET Framework • Chapter 2
69
have a memory leak or worse when control over the project terminated.VB’s
system of destroying classes once the class count reached zero caused some prob-
lems when the last instance of a class was referenced by the last instance of
another class, and neither class would technically reach zero, so no cleanup was
done.
This outdated memory management system is referred to as reference counting.
A count is kept within each object, usually in its header, of how many references
there are for the object. Each application (or client, as it is referred to in COM
circles) that is referencing an object states when it is referencing the object and
when it is releasing the object.As new objects are instantiated, the count (or
number of objects in the count) is incremented and decremented when the
object is either overwritten or recycled.
The burden of doing the actual cleanup of the object, however, was not on
the application.All the application did was merely issue the destroy command to
the object, and the object then had to free itself from the reference count.When
an object was not properly deallocated (destroyed), we had an instance of a
memory leak. Reference counting also had a limited growth size, because objects
became bloated (made bigger artificially) in order to store the reference count,
and of course cyclic objects generated the previously mentioned nonzero refer-
ence count.
.NET replaces all this with automatic resource management.The runtime is now
smart enough to know when and how to handle memory allocation, dealloca-
tion, and usage.A major drawback is that we can’t control when an object or a
class is terminated, and therefore we have no knowledge of when the termination
takes place.This is a very valid point and, quite honestly, the only noticeable
drawback because it won’t release the memory and so we encounter a dead refer-
ence. However, most of the time this won’t matter, because Garbage Collection
will eventually get to it. Now let’s see how .NET handles memory and how this
relates to Garbage Collection.
The Managed Heap
When a program is run in .NET, the runtime creates the region of address space
it knows it needs but does not store anything on it.This region is the heap (also
referred to as the free store or freestore). .NET controls the heap and determines
when it’s time to free an object. Figure 2.6 presents an illustration of the 
following pointer interaction process:
www.syngress.com
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
reorder pages in pdf document; change page order in pdf online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order pdf preview; how to rearrange pages in a pdf document
70
Chapter 2 • The Microsoft .NET Framework
1. A pointer is created for the allocated space (heap) that keeps track of the
next available free area on the allocated space that the runtime can use
for storage.
2. As the application creates new objects, the runtime checks to see if the
space currently being pointed to can handle the new object. If it can’t, it
dynamically creates the space.
3. Then the object is placed on the heap, its constructor is called, and the
new operator returns the address block of our newly created object.
www.syngress.com
Figure 2.6
Pointer Interaction with a Managed Heap
Address
Space
Initializing the Space
and Pointer
Pointer
Allocating Space and
verifying Space is correct
Address
Space
Space
Requested
Returning Space and
placing Object on heap
APPLICATION
Pointer
Pointer
Address
Space
OBJECT
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
from PDF documents; Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; Save and print PDF as you wish; More PDF Reading
reordering pdf pages; reorder pdf pages reader
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
rearrange pdf pages in preview; how to reorder pdf pages
The Microsoft .NET Framework • Chapter 2
71
N
OTE
When an object/type is over 20,000 bytes, a special large heap is created
to store them. This special heap does not go through compression when
Garbage Collection is called. Compression occurs during the generation
process, described in a later section in this chapter.
Garbage Collection and the Managed Heap
As mentioned, .NET handles the managed heap by using Garbage Collection. In
its purest sense, Garbage Collection is an algorithm designed to determine when
the life cycle of an object has ended. In order to determine if an object is at or
near its end, Garbage Collection analyzes the root of the object. Roots (also
known as strong references), much like the actual roots found in nature, act as road
maps to where vital resources, such as objects, are stored. Global or static pointers,
local variables that are on a thread stack, and CPU registers containing pointers
to the heap are all considered roots.All the roots that are visible are stored in a
list created and updated by the JIT and CLR.
Once Garbage Collection starts, it assumes that all the roots available to the
heap are null.This makes the Garbage Collection begin a verification process in
which it goes through each root recursively and starts to make a graph that con-
tains all the references available and any linked references (i.e., Object A references
Object B).This step is repeated once more to make sure that everything is in place
by assuming that if it’s a duplicate object, it’s already on the list and thus a legiti-
mate object, meaning that the graph it just built is correct.The final step of this
verification process is that Garbage Collection starts to trace the root of each
object to determine if the root is coming from the program that is going to use
the current address space.Any objects without roots are considered null or no
longer in use and are treated as garbage, which is an accurate assumption since no
two applications share the same address space, and are promptly removed from the
heap.You can also manually invoke Garbage Collection. It’s not necessary to do
that since Garbage Collection works automatically, but it’s useful for those times
that you find an object that needs to be destroyed immediately (such as an object
that needs to be reset by destroying it and recreating it immediately).You can
manually invoke Garbage Collection as follows:
System.GC.Collect()
www.syngress.com
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
move pages in pdf acrobat; how to move pages in pdf acrobat
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
how to reorder pages in a pdf document; change page order pdf reader
72
Chapter 2 • The Microsoft .NET Framework
This code automatically starts Garbage Collection. However, it eventually cre-
ates overhead if used repeatedly, so it’s best to use it sparingly. Roots also provide
the fix to memory leaks and stray resources.The runtime uses the roots to deter-
mine when an object or resource is no longer in use, enabling Garbage
Collection to clean them up. Now that we know how Garbage Collection
works, let’s take a look at just what the Garbage Collection namespace offers (see
Table 2.6).
Table 2.6
The Garbage Collection (GC) Namespace 
Property/Method 
Type
Method
Description
Properties—public 
MaxGeneration
Lists the generations that 
static
the system can support.
TotalMemory
This method displays the 
total byte space of alive 
objects and can occasion-
ally overlap objects that 
will be released soon.
This method is used fre-
quently for high-usage 
areas, especially the areas 
that contain expensive 
and/or limited resources, 
such as CE.
Methods—public 
Collect
An example of an over-
static
loaded method; it forces a 
collection of all available 
generations. Can be useful 
in building your own 
garbage collection system 
for your particular appli-
cation by analyzing avail-
able generations. You can 
then use this information 
to force any objects into a 
disposal.
GetGeneration
Another overloaded 
method; it returns the 
specific generation that 
an object is in.
www.syngress.com
Continued
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
SDK, developers are easily to access, extract, swap, reorder, insert, mark up and delete pages in any multi upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents.
move pages in pdf; pdf reorder pages
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
pdf reorder pages online; reorder pages in a pdf
The Microsoft .NET Framework • Chapter 2
73
KeepAlive
A method that assists in 
migrating VB 6.0 code to 
VB.NET. Using KeepAlive, 
you can tell GC that this 
object does not get recy-
cled, even if there are no 
roots to it from the rest of 
the managed cod by 
sending GC a “fake” alive 
response.
RequestFinalizeOnShutdown This method is an imple-
mented workaround to a 
bug in the beta1 
Framework; the .EXE 
engine usually shut downs
without calling a finalize 
routine. This method 
causes all finalization that 
needs to be done on 
shutdown.
SuppressFinalize
This method simply tells 
the system to not finalize 
a object. Very useful for 
helping GC “skip” prefi-
nalized objects (objects 
that have been manually 
finalized) and thus keeps 
GC from wasting time on 
something that’s not 
there. 
WaitForPendingFinalizers
A really buggy implemen-
tation of a good idea. This 
method suspends the cur-
rent running thread until 
all finalizers in the queue 
are run. However, since 
running a finalizer almost 
always kicks in a GC, this 
method causes a circular 
www.syngress.com
Table 2.6
Continued
Property/Method 
Type
Method
Description
Continued
74
Chapter 2 • The Microsoft .NET Framework
loop that will keep 
waiting for finalizers as 
new finalizers are created. 
This method would be 
much more useful if it 
could target generations 
instead.
Methods—public 
Equals
Checks to see if the object 
instance (all of these
being evaluated is the 
methods are in-
same instance as the cur-
herited from 
rent object.
System.Object 
namespace)
GetHashCode
Returns the hash function 
for a specific type. 
GetType
Returns the type from an 
object.
ToString
Returns a string to 
represent the object.
Methods—protected Finalize
Allows cleanup before GC 
instance (all of these
gets to it. However, the 
methods are in-
CLR can decide to 
herited from 
“ignore” this command, 
System.Object 
as when the root is still 
namespace)
active or it’s considered a 
constantly used resource.
MemberwiseClone
Creates a copy of the 
current object’s members.
We can use the methods and properties inherent to the Garbage Collection
namespace to formulate a workaround to Garbage Collection having full control
over the disposal of objects. (Remember, the runtime controls the memory allo-
cation through Garbage Collection; that includes the destruction of objects.) An
example of this code would be:
Imports System
'class/module/assembly code here to do whatever you want
www.syngress.com
Table 2.6
Continued
Property/Method 
Type
Method
Description
The Microsoft .NET Framework • Chapter 2
75
'please note that this is just an example and is non-functioning.
' there is a very good functional example of this similar process
' available in the .NET SDK Samples under the GC/VB folder of the
' SAMPLES directory. 
'now that we have the objects / resources set, let's create a typical
' Dispose class.
Public Class DisposeMe
Inherits Object
Public Sub Dispose(objName as String)
'objName would be received by previously using the
'ToString Public Instance Method and storing the value in a string.
Finalize
GC.SuppressFinalize(objName)
End Sub
Protected Overrides Sub Finalize()
' no clean-up code needed; this will cause Finalize to be run
End Sub
End Class
'note the use of SuppressFinalize to keep the GC from repeating itself.
Congratulations! We’ve just resolved one of the basic problems of Garbage
Collection.With this example, we can successfully control manual termination 
of objects and resources. It’s best to reserve this type of workaround for intensive
resources.
www.syngress.com
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested