c# render pdf : Change page order in pdf online application SDK utility html winforms web page visual studio vb_dot_net_developers_guide60-part616

568
Chapter 12 • Security
RegistryPermission
Resource
Controls access to the registry
SecurityPermission
Resource
Controls access to 
SecurityPermission such as 
Assert, Skip Verification, and 
Call Unmanaged Code
ServiceControllerPermission
Resource
Controls access to services on 
the system
SocketPermission
Resource
Controls access to socket that 
are needed to set up or accept 
a network connection
SqlClientPermission
Resource
Controls access to SQL server 
databases
UIPermission
Resource
Controls access to UI function-
ality, such as Clipboard
WebPermission
Resource
Controls access to an Internet-
related resource
PublisherIdentityPermission
Identity
Permission is granted if the 
evidence publisher is provided 
by the caller
SiteIdentityPermission
Identity
Permission is granted if the 
evidence site is provided by 
the caller
StrongNameIdentityPermission
Identity
Permission is granted if the 
evidence strong name is 
provided by the caller
UrlIdentityPermission
Identity
Permission is granted if the 
evidence URL is provided by 
the caller
ZoneIdentityPermission
Identity
Permission is granted if the 
evidence zone is provided by 
the caller
Now let’s look at some examples of the different types of requests:
<assembly: SecurityPermissionAttribute(SecurityAction.RequestMinimum, _
Flags := SecurityPermissionFlag.ControlPrincipal)>
www.syngress.com
Table 12.3
Continued
Permission 
Permission Class
Type
Description
Change page order in pdf online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
change pdf page order; move pages in pdf
Change page order in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
rearrange pdf pages in reader; reordering pages in pdf document
Security • Chapter 12
569
In order for this assembly to run, it needs at least the permission to be able to
manipulate the principal object.This is a permission you would give only to an
assembly that you trust.
<assembly: SecurityPermissionAttribute(SecurityAction.RequestMinimum, _
ControleEvidence : = True)>
In order for this assembly to run, it needs at least the permission to be able to
provide additional evidence and modify the evidence as provided by the CLR.
This is a powerful permission you would give only to fully trusted assemblies.
<FileIOPermissionAttribute(SecurityAction.RequestOptional, _
Write := "C:\Test\*.cfg")> Public Class ClassAct
The ClassAct class requests the optional permission to be able to write to files
in the C:\Test directory with the extension .cfg. If the security policy permits
FileIOPermission, this restricted request is given. If the FileIOPermission is not
granted, then any subsequent write to a CFG file in C:\Test will fail.
<assembly: FileIOPermission(SecurityAction.RequestRefuse, Unrestricted
:= True)>
The assembly refuses the FileIOPermission, even if the security policy grants
this permission. If you used this request in combination with the previous
example, and the security policy grants FileIOPermission, only ClassAct will get
this restricted FileIOPermission, and the rest of the code in the assembly will not
have any FileIOPermission.
<assembly: FileIOPermission(SecurityAction.RequestRefuse, _
All := "C:\Winnt\System32\*.*")>
The assembly refuses only FileIOPermission to the access of files in the
C:\Winnt\System32 directory. If the security policy grants this permission, the
assembly can access all files, except for the one in the stated directory.
Instead of making requests for every code access permission, you can also
request one of the following named permission sets: Nothing, Execution, Internet,
LocalIntranet, SkipVerification, and FullTrust.You can do this by issuing the 
following request:
<assembly: PermissionSetAttribute(SecurityAction.RequestMinimum, _
Name := NamedPermissionSet)>
www.syngress.com
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C#
rearrange pdf pages; how to move pages around in pdf file
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
Note: if you are trying to change the order of a you want to see other VB.NET Word document editing controls, please read this Word reading page which has
pdf move pages; how to move pdf pages around
570
Chapter 12 • Security
Another way of requesting more code access permissions in one statement is
by using XML-coded permission sets:
<assembly: PermissionSetAttribute(SecurityAction.RequestMinimum, File
:= "Filename.xml")>
Demanding Permissions
By demanding permissions, you force the caller to have a specific permission it
needs to execute the code. If the caller has this request, it is very likely that he
obtained it by requesting it at the CLR.As we discussed before, a permission
demand triggers a security stack walk. Even if you do not perform these demands
yourself, the .NET Framework classes will.This means that you should never per-
form permission demands related to these classes, because they will take care of
those themselves. If you do perform a demand, it will be a redundant one and
only add to the execution overhead.This does not mean that you should ignore
it; instead, when writing code, you must be aware of which call will trigger a
stack walk and make sure that the code does not encourage a surplus of stack
walks. However, when you build your own classes that access protected resources,
you need to place the proper permission demands, using the declarative or
imperative security syntax.
Using the declarative syntax when making a permission demand is preferable
to using the imperative syntax, because the latter may result in more stack walks.
There are, of course, cases that are better suited for imperative permission
demands. For example, if a Registry key has to be set under specific conditions,
you will perform an imperative RegistryPermission demand just before the code
actually is called.This also implies that the caller can lack this permission, which
will result in an exception that the code needs to handle accordingly.Another
reason why you want to use imperative demands is when information is not
known at compile time. A simple example is FileIOPermission on a set of files
whose names are only known during runtime because they are user-related.
Two types of demands are handled differently than previously described. First,
the link demand can be used only in a declarative way at the class or method level.
The link demand is performed only during the JIT compilation phase, in which
it is checked if the calling code has sufficient permission to link to your code.A
security stack walk is not performed because linking exists only in a direct rela-
tion between the caller and code being called.The use of link demands can be
helpful to methods that are accessible through reflection.The link demand will
not only perform a security check on code that obtains the MethodInfo object,
www.syngress.com
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
For example, you may change your Word document order from 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 to 3, 5, 4, 2,1 with C# coding. C#.NET: Extracting Page(s) from Word.
reorder pages in pdf document; pdf rearrange pages
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page from PDF file and changing the position, orientation and order of PDF PDF Page and File Splitting. If you want to split PDF file into two or small files
pdf change page order acrobat; reorder pdf pages reader
Security • Chapter 12
571
hence performing the reflection, but the same security check is performed on the
code that will make the actual call to the method.The following two examples
show a link demand at class and at method level:
<SecurityPermissionAttribute(SecurityAction.LinkDemand, _
Unrestricted := True)> Public Class ClassAct
Public Shared Function _
<SecurityPermissiobAttribute(SecurityAction.LinkDemand)> Act1() 
As Integer
' body of the function
End Function
The second type of demand is inheritance demand, which can be used at both
the class and method level, through the declarative security. Placing an inheri-
tance demand on a class can protect that class from being inherited by a class that
does not have the specified permission.Although you can use a default permis-
sion, it makes sense to create a custom permission that must be assigned to the
inheriting class to be able to inherit from the class with the inheritance demand.
The same goes for the class that inherits from the inheriting class. For example,
let’s say that you have created the ClassAct class that is inheritable, but also has an
inheritance demand set.You have defined your own inherit permission InheritAct.
Another class called ClassActing wants to inherit from your class, but because it is
protected with an inheritance demand, it must have the InheritAct permission in
order to be able to inherit. Let’s assume that this is the case. Now there is another
class called ClassReacting that wants to inherits from the class ClassActing. In order
for ClassReacting to inherit from ClassActing, it also needs to have the InheritAct
permission assigned.The inheritance demand would look like this:
<InheritActAttribute(SecurityAction.InheritanceDemand)> Public Class
ClassAct
The inheritance demand at method level can be the following:
Public Overridable Function
<SecurityPermissionAttribute(SecurityAction.InheritanceDemand)>
Act1() as Integer
' Body of the function
End Function
www.syngress.com
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
how to move pages within a pdf document; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
reverse page order pdf online; how to move pages around in pdf
572
Chapter 12 • Security
Overriding Security Checks
Because stack walking can introduce serious overhead and thus performance
degradation, you need to keep stack walks under control.This is especially true if
they do not necessarily contribute to security, such as when a part of the execu-
tion can only take place in fully trusted code. On the other hand, your code has
permission to access specific protected resources, but you do not want code that
you call to gain access to these resources—so you want to have a way of pre-
venting this. In both cases, you want to take control of the permission security
checks, hence overriding security checks.You can do this by using the following
security actions: Assert, Deny, and PermitOnly (meaning “deny everything but”).
After the code sets an override, it can undo this override by calling the corre-
sponding Revert method, respectively RevertAssert, RevertDeny and RevertPermitOnly.
Get in the practice of first calling the Revert method before setting the override
because performing a revert on a nonexisting override has no effect.
W
ARNING
You can place more than one override of the same type, for example
Deny, within the same piece of code. However, this is not acceptable to
the CLR. If during a stack walk the CLR encounters more than one of the
same asserts it throws an exception, because it does not know which of
the overrides to trust. If you have more than one place in a piece of code
where you set an override, be sure to revert the first one before setting
the new one.
Assert Override
When you set an assert override on a specific permission, you force a stack walk
on this permission to stop at your code and not continue to check the callers of
your method.
W
ARNING
If you use an assert, you inadvertently create a security vulnerability,
because you prevent the CLR from completing security checks. You must
convince yourself that this vulnerability cannot be exploited.
www.syngress.com
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Enable C#.NET developers to change the page order of source PDF document file; Allow C#.NET developers to add image to specified area of source PDF
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; how to move pages around in a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via Change PDF original password. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be
how to move pages in pdf reader; reorder pdf page
574
Chapter 12 • Security
Public Function _
<FileIOPermission(SecurityAction.Assert, Write := "C:\Test\*.cfg")> _
Act1() As Integer
' body of the function
End Function
The second example uses the imperative syntax setting the same type of Assert:
Public Function Act1() As Integer
Dim ActFilePerm As New
FileIOPermission(FileIOPermissionAccess.Write, "C:\Test\*.cfg")
ActFilePerm.Assert
' rest of body 
End Function
Deny Override
The Deny does the opposite of Assert in that it lets a stack walk fail for the per-
mission the Deny is set on.There are not many situations where a Deny override
www.syngress.com
Figure 12.3
A Stack Walk Is Short-Circuited by an Assert
C
a
l
l
i
n
g
C
h
a
i
n
o
n
t
h
e
S
t
a
c
k
Assembly1
Method1a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
Assembly2
Method2a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
Assembly3
Method3a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
Assembly4
Method4a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
Assembly5
Method5a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
Assembly6
Method6a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
UIPermission
(SecurityAction.Demand)
Succeeded
Succeeded
S
t
a
c
k
W
a
l
k
R
e
s
u
l
t
:
S
U
C
C
E
S
S
S
e
c
u
r
i
t
y
S
t
a
c
k
W
a
l
k
d
e
m
a
n
d
i
n
g
t
h
e
U
I
P
e
r
m
i
s
s
i
o
n
UIPermission(SA.Assert)
Security • Chapter 12
575
makes sense, but here is one: Among the permissions your code has is
RegistryPermission. Now it has to make a call to a method for which you have no
information regarding trust.To prevent that code from taking advantage of the
RegistryPermission, your code can set a Deny. Now you are sure that your code
does not hand over a high-trust permission.
Because unnecessary Deny overrides can disrupt the normal working of secu-
rity checks (because they will always fail on a Deny), you should revert the Deny
after the call ends for which you set the Deny.
For the sake of the example, we use the same situation as in Figure 12.3, but
instead of an Assert, there is a Deny (see Figure 12.4).Again, the security stack
walk is triggered for the UIPermission permission in Assembly6.When the stack
walk reaches Assembly4, it recognizes the Deny on UIPermission and it ends with a
fail. In our example, the security check would ultimately have failed in Assembly1,
but if Assembly1 had been granted the UIPermission, the stack walk would have
succeeded, if not for the Deny. Effectively this means that Assembly4 revoked the
UIPermission for Assembly5 and Assembly6.
You can set a Deny by using both the declarative and the imperative syntax.
In the first example, the declarative syntax is used.A Deny is set on the
FileIOPermission permission for all the files in the C:\Winnt\System32 directory:
www.syngress.com
Figure 12.4
A Stack Walk Is Short-Circuited by a Deny
C
a
l
l
i
n
g
C
h
a
i
n
o
n
t
h
e
S
t
a
c
k
Assembly1
Method1a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
Assembly2
Method2a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
Assembly3
Method3a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
Assembly4
Method4a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
Assembly5
Method5a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
Assembly6
Method6a
Granted:
FileIOPermission
UIPermission
UIPermission
(SecurityAction.Demand)
Failed
Succeeded
S
t
a
c
k
W
a
l
k
R
e
s
u
l
t
:
F
A
I
L
S
e
c
u
r
i
t
y
S
t
a
c
k
W
a
l
k
d
e
m
a
n
d
i
n
g
t
h
e
U
I
P
e
r
m
i
s
s
i
o
n
UIPermission(SA.Deny)
576
Chapter 12 • Security
Public Function _
<FileIOPermission(SecurityAction.Deny, All :=
"C:\Winnt\System32\*.*")> _
Act1() As Integer
' body of the function
End Function
The second example uses the imperative syntax setting the same type of Assert:
Public Function Act1() As Integer
Dim ActFilePerm As New
FileIOPermission(FileIOPermissionAccess.AllAccess, _
"C:\Winnt\System32\*.*")
ActFilePerm.Deny
' rest of the body 
End Function
PermitOnly Override
The PermitOnly override is more like the negation of the Deny, by Denying every
permission but the one specified.You use the PermitOnly for the same reason you
use Deny, only this one is more rigorous. For example, if you permit only the
UIPermission permission, every security stack walk will fail but the one that
checks on the UIPermission.Take Figure 12.4 and substitute Deny with
PermitOnly. If in Assembly6 the security check for UIPermission is triggered, the
stack walk will pass Assembly4 with success, but will ultimately fail in Assembly1. If
any other security check is initiated, they will fail in Assembly.The end result is
that Assembly5 and Assembly6 are denied any access to a protected resource that
incorporate a Demand request, because every security check will fail.As you can
see, PermitOnly is a very effective way of killing any aspirations of called code in
accessing protected resources.The PermitOnly is used in the same way as Deny
and Assert.
Custom Permissions
The .NET Framework enables you to write your own code access permissions,
even though the framework comes with a large number of code access permis-
sion classes. Because these classes are meant to protect the protected resources and
code that are exposed by the framework, it may well be the case that the applica-
tion you are developing has defined resources that are not protected by the
www.syngress.com
Security • Chapter 12
577
framework permissions, or you want to use permissions that are more tuned
toward the needs of your application.
You are completely free to replace existing framework permission classes,
although this requires a large amount of expertise and experience. In case you are
just adding new permission classes to the existing ones, you should be particularly
careful not to overlap permissions. If more than one permission protects the same
resource or operation, an administrator has to take this into account if he has to
modify the rights to these resources.
N
OTE
The subject of overlapping permissions brings up a topic not discussed
earlier. Although the whole discussion of code access permission has
been from the standpoint of the CLR, or .NET Framework, eventually the
CLR has to access resources on behalf of the users/application. Even if
the code has been granted a specific permission to access a protected
resource, that does not automatically mean that it is allowed to access
that system resource. Take the example of a method having the
FileIOPermission permission to the directory C:\Winnt\System32. If the
identity of the Windows principal has not been given access to this part
of the file system, accessing a file in that directory will fail anyway. This
implies that the administrator not only has to set up the permissions
within the security policy, but he also has to configure the Windows
2000 platform to reflect these access permissions.
Building your own permissions does not only imply that certain development
issues are raised, but even more so the integrity of the whole security system
must be discussed.You have to take into account that you are adding to a rigid
security system that relies heavily on trust and permissions. If mistakes occur in
the design and/or implementation of a permission, you run the risk of creating
security holes that can become the target of attacks or grant an application access
to protected resources even if it is not authorized to access these. Discussing the
process of designing your own permissions goes beyond the scope of this chapter.
However, the following steps give you an understanding of what is involved in
creating a custom permission:
1. Design a permission class.
2. Implement the interfaces IPermission and IUnrestrictedPermission.
www.syngress.com
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested