c# render pdf : Reorder pages in pdf reader software Library project winforms .net web page UWP vb_dot_net_developers_guide65-part621

618
Chapter 13 • Application Deployment
4. Recompile the program and check the manifest, which will look some-
thing like Figure 13.2.
5. To be publicly available, it has to be placed in the general assembly
cache, by using the General Assembly Cache utility tool (gacutil.exe).
Issue the following command:
Gacutil.exe –/i Graphic.dll
www.syngress.com
Figure 13.1
Part of the Manifest from the Private Graphic.exe
Figure 13.2
Part of the Manifest from the Public Shared Graphic.dll
Reorder pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages in pdf files; pdf change page order online
Reorder pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
change page order in pdf online; how to rearrange pdf pages online
Application Deployment • Chapter 13
623
Technically speaking, you can find or put any of these sections in any config-
uration file. However, if a section does not apply to the use of the configuration
file, it will be ignored.
N
OTE
Configuration files, especially machine and security, have an impact on
the workings of all applications that make use of the .NET Framework. Be
very careful with making changes to these files before assessing the
impact they will have. When you deploy a new application, you should
not assume that certain modifications to general configuration files can
be made to suit your application needs. These changes may influence the
working of other applications.
A second warning about protecting your configuration files: Because
they are so readable, making changes to them is easy. Persons with ill
intent that have access to these files can do a lot of harm. Be sure that
you limit the access to these files and make them at least read-only to
also prevent accidental changes.
Machine/Administrator Configuration Files
Every machine that has the .NET runtime system installed has a machine config-
uration file named machine.config.You can find this file in the directory
%CLR_InstallDir%\config.This file is especially important to reflect the correct
assembly binding policy of that machine.The file also holds the settings for
remoting channels.The settings in the machine configuration file take precedence
over those in any other configuration file and cannot be overridden by any other
file.These settings are “etched in stone,” so to speak.The reason is obvious:The
machine.config is expected to reflect the machine; any change to it may result in
the breaking of the CLR. Nevertheless, you need to find the right balance
between putting certain settings in the application configuration file or in the
machine configuration file.
As an example, take a look at an excerpt from the machine.config file
regarding remoting:
<system.runtime.remoting>
<application>
</application>
www.syngress.com
624
Chapter 13 • Application Deployment
<channels>
<channel id="http"
type="System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels.Http.HttpChannel, 
System.Runtime.Remoting" /> 
<channel id="http server" 
type="System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels.Http
.HttpServerChannel, 
System.Runtime.Remoting" /> 
<channel id="tcp"
type="System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels.Tcp.TcpChannel, 
System.Runtime.Remoting" /> 
<channel id="tcp server" 
type="System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels.Tcp.TcpServerChannel, 
System.Runtime.Remoting" /> 
</channels>
<channelSinkProviders>
<serverProviders>
<formatter id="soap" 
type="System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels
.SoapServerFormatterSinkProvider, 
System.Runtime.Remoting" /> 
<formatter id="binary" 
type="System.Runtime.Remoting.Channels
.BinaryServerFormatterSinkProvider, 
System.Runtime.Remoting" /> 
<provider id="wsdl" 
type="System.Runtime.Remoting.MetadataServices
.SdlChannelSinkProvider,
System.Runtime.Remoting" /> 
</serverProviders>
</channelSinkProviders>
</system.runtime.remoting>
www.syngress.com
Application Deployment • Chapter 13
625
Application Configuration Files
The application configuration file is located in the installation directory of the
application and is named after the application’s program executable with .config
added to the name, thus program.exe.config.The CLR checks the application
directory for that file. Because an application does not need its own configuration
file, it can completely depend on the machine configuration file, but nothing will
happen if it is not there.Take notice of this! If you put it somewhere else, or use
a different suffix, the CLR will not find it, which may mean that the CLR is not
able to load the application. In the case of a browser-based application, the
HTML page should use a link element to give the location of the configuration
file, which resides in a directory on the Web server.
The application configuration file is especially useful for assembly binding
settings that relate to specific assembly versions an application needs and the places
the CLR has to look for the application’s private assemblies, called probing. A pos-
sible configuration file for our earlier example of Graphic.dll may look like this:
<configuration>   
<runtime>
<assemblyBinding xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1">
<probing privatePath=".\SubDir1;.\SubDir2"/>
<publisherPolicy apply="no"/>
<dependentAssembly>
<assemblyIdentity name="Graphic" 
publicKeyToken="83f879e949c242e1"
culture=""/>
<publisherPolicy apply="no"/>
<bindingRedirect oldVersion="1.0.0.0"
newVersion="1.0.0.1"/>
</dependentAssembly>
</assemblyBinding>
</runtime>
</configuration>
This sample configuration shows the use of probing, telling the CLR that it’s
private assemblies reside in the directories SubDir1 or SubDir2, which are subdi-
rectories of the application directory. It also shows the use of binding redirection—
www.syngress.com
Application Deployment • Chapter 13
627
<PermissionSet class="NamedPermissionSet" version="1"
Name="PrivatePermissions"
Description="My Private Permission Set">
<IPermission class="EnvironmentPermission" version="1"
Read="USERNAME;TEMP;TMP"/>
<IPermission class="FileDialogPermission" version="1"
Unrestricted="true"/>
<IPermission class="FileIOPermission" version="1"/>
<IPermission class="IsolatedStorageFilePermission" version="1"
Allowed="AssemblyIsolationByUser"
UserQuota="9223372036854775807"
Expiry="9223372036854775807"
Permanent="True"/>
<IPermission class="ReflectionPermission" version="1"
Flags="ReflectionEmit"/>
<IPermission class="RegistryPermission" version="1"
Read="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"/>
<IPermission class="SecurityPermission" version="1"
Flags="Assertion, Execution, 
RemotingConfiguration"/>
<IPermission class="UIPermission" version="1"
Unrestricted="true"/>
<IPermission class="DnsPermission" version="1"
Unrestricted="true"/>
<IPermission class="PrintingPermission" version="1"
Level="DefaultPrinting"/>
<IPermission class="EventLogPermission" version="1">
<Machine name="." access="Instrument"/>
</IPermission>
<IPermission class="MessageQueuePermission" 
version="1" Unrestricted="true"/>
</PermissionSet>
</NamedPermissionSets>
www.syngress.com
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested