c# render pdf : Change page order pdf reader software SDK cloud windows wpf winforms class USArmy-InternmentResettlement11-part65

12 Feb
L
OCA
6-
is
th
co
w
tr
bruary 2010 
Legen
BDE 
BFSB 
C&E 
CS 
DHA 
G-2 
G-2X 
HCT 
MI 
MDSC
MP 
OMT 
OPCO
PM 
TECHC
ATION
N
-28. The DHA
s present in the
he  receipt,  car
onducted in a c
within  subordin
n
ansportation ar
nd: 
ON 
CON 
Fig
A is established
e division AO. 
re,  and  evacua
counterinsurge
nate  BCT  AO
rteries that exp
F
briga
battle
colle
civil s
detai
intell
assis
coun
HUM
milita
medi
milita
opera
opera
provo
techn
gure 6-5. C2 w
w
d with the divis
s
The DHA is n
ation  of  detain
ency environm
Os)  may  be 
pedite further m
FM 3-39.40
0
ade 
efield surveillan
n
ction and explo
support 
inee housing a
a
igence officer o
stant chief of st
nterintelligence
MINT collection 
ary intelligence
ical deploymen
ary police 
ational manage
ational control
ost marshal 
nical control 
within the div
v
sion’s AO. The
normally locate
nees.  During 
ment, multiple D
D
required.  DH
movement of pe
nce brigade 
oitation 
rea 
or section 
taff, HUMINT a
a
team 
nt support comm
ement team 
vision and D
D
e best location 
ed in a safe, an
n
long-term  stab
DHAs placed a
HAs  should  b
ersonnel and su
and 
mand 
DHA 
may be within
nd secure area 
bility  operatio
across the divi
be  established
ustainment req
Detainee Fac
n the MEB AO 
that is accessib
ns,  especially 
ision AO (to in
 adjacent  to 
quirements. 
cilities 
6-11 
if one 
ble for 
those 
nclude 
main 
Change page order pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages in pdf online; reorder pages in pdf document
Change page order pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf reorder pages; how to reorder pages in pdf online
Chapter 6 
6-12 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
A
DDITIONAL 
P
LANNING 
C
ONSIDERATIONS
6-29. When  establishing  a  DHA    or  expanding  a  DCP  to  provide  extended  detainee  processing  and 
housing, commanders must consider design options, including— 
Building an outer perimeter using an earthen berm, fence, or rolled concertina or razor wire to 
contain the operation. 
Providing the following secure areas: 
„ 
An entry point (with double barriers) into the DCP and/or DHA. 
„ 
A reception area for custody transfer operations. 
„ 
An administrative area. 
„ 
A medical support area. 
„ 
An interrogation area and/or facility. 
„ 
A centralized property room (for evidence, found property, and confiscated property). 
„ 
Open compounds for housing multiple detainees by segregation designation. 
„ 
Single-cell units for disciplinary segregation. 
Establishing  small  compounds  for  segregation.  The  compound  design  should  include  the 
following, depending on the availability of resources: 
„ 
Towers or other fixed locations that provide for mutual support. 
„ 
Shelters  within  each  compound  if  detainees  are  being  housed  there.  (Hard  facilities  are 
preferred, but tents are the minimum requirement.) 
„ 
Communications between towers and adjacent compounds. 
„ 
Lights that are capable of illuminating and flooding compounds. 
„ 
Compounds that are free of rocks and other debris. 
„ 
Latrines and personal hygiene points that are separate from detainee living areas, but with 
easy access from the compounds. 
Developing individual cells or confinement spaces to provide additional segregation for violent 
or uncooperative  detainees, high-value detainees, or detainees who are vulnerable to harm by 
other detainees as the situation allows. 
6-30. The commander must— 
Stock appropriate cleaning supplies to sanitize areas and/or facilities. 
Provide adequate clothing and footwear. 
Provide three adequate meals and sufficient hydration daily to maintain good health. 
Provide appropriate medical care and preventive medicine as available. 
Post  information  on  the  applicable  protections  afforded  under  the  Geneva  Conventions  and 
detainee  rules  in  the  local  language.  (This  information  should  be  posted  in  a  conspicuous 
location.) 
6-31. A sufficient guard force should be established based on the location and facility structural design, 
number of detainees, segregation requirements, and detainee threat and risk levels. Accordingly, a guard 
force  should consist  of, at a minimum,  a sergeant  of the guard, tower and  static guards, roving guards, 
escort guards, and a reaction force. 
6-32. When conducting HUMINT collection in the DHA, military police should— 
Locate the site where screeners can observe detainees as they are segregated and processed. It 
should be shielded from the direct view of the detainee population and far enough away so that 
detainees cannot overhear screeners’ conversations. 
Select  a site that  will  accommodate operation,  administrative,  and interrogation  areas.  Lights 
should be made available for night operations. 
Ensure that guards are available and that procedures for escorting and securing detainees during 
the interrogation process are outlined in the SOP. 
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
Note: if you are trying to change the order of a you want to see other VB.NET Word document editing controls, please read this Word reading page which has
how to reorder pages in pdf preview; move pdf pages
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
various Word document processing implementations using C# demo codes, such as add or delete Word document page, change Word document pages order, merge or
how to rearrange pages in a pdf document; rearrange pdf pages reader
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-13 
Notify screeners about any detainees that will be moved and when they will be moved. 
Ensure that accountability procedures are implemented and that the required forms are available. 
6-33. Military  police  operating  the  DHA  have  tactical  control  over  HUMINT  collectors,  medical 
personnel, and other personnel who operate inside the DHA and are responsible for the humane treatment, 
evacuation,  custody,  and  control  (reception,  processing,  administration,  internment,  and  safety)  of 
detainees; security; and the operation of the internment facility. For HUMINT support at the DHA, the MI 
unit commander is responsible  for conducting interrogation operations (including prioritizing the effort) 
and  controlling  the technical  aspects  of interrogation and other intelligence  operations.  The  intelligence 
staff maintains  control through  technical channels  over interrogation  operations  to  ensure  adherence to 
applicable laws and policies, ensure the proper use of doctrinal approaches and techniques, and provide 
technical guidance for interrogation activities. Applicable laws and policies include U.S. laws, the law of 
war,  relevant  international  laws,  relevant  directives  (including  DODD 2310.01E  and  DODD  3115.09), 
DODIs, execution orders, and FRAGOs. The military  police  company or  battalion  commander will not 
establish intelligence priorities for HUMINT and/or counterintelligence personnel, nor should the military 
police  commander  compel  HUMINT  and/or  counterintelligence  personnel  to  involve  themselves  in 
nonintelligence  activities.  The  detainee  operations  medical  director  is  designated  by  the  medical 
deployment  support  command  commander  to  provide  technical  guidance  for  the  medical  aspects  of 
detainee operations conducted throughout the joint operations area. 
H
UMAN 
I
NTELLIGENCE 
S
UPPORT
6-34. To  facilitate  collecting  enemy  tactical  information,  MI  personnel  may  colocate  HUMINT  and 
counterintelligence  teams at the DHA to screen  arriving detainees and determine  which  of them are of 
immediate tactical intelligence value to the maneuver commander. This provides MI personnel with direct 
access to detainees  and their equipment and documents. Military police and MI  personnel coordinate  to 
establish  operating  procedures  that  include  the  accountability  of  detainees.  An  interrogation  area  is 
established away from the receiving and processing line so that MI personnel can interrogate detainees and 
examine their equipment and documents. If a detainee or the detainee’s equipment and/or documents are 
removed from the receiving and processing line, they are accounted for on DA Form 4137 and DD Form 
2708. 
6-35. HUMINT  collectors  screen  detainees  at  the  DHA  by  observing  them  from  an  area  close  to  the 
dismount point or processing area, looking for anyone who is a potential source of tactical and operational 
information.  As  each  detainee  passes,  MI  personnel  examine  the  DD  Form  2745  and  look  for  branch 
insignias  or  other  clues  which  indicate  that  a  detainee  has  information  to  support  command  priority 
intelligence and information requirements. They also look for detainees who are willing or attempting to 
talk to guards; intentionally joining the wrong group; or displaying signs of nervousness, anxiety, or fear. 
6-36. Military police assist the HUMINT collectors by identifying detainees who may have answers that 
support priority intelligence and information requirements. Because military police are in constant contact 
with detainees, they see how certain detainees respond to orders and see the types of requests that are made. 
The military police ensure that searches requested by MI personnel are conducted out of the sight of other 
detainees and that guards conduct same-gender searches when possible. 
6-37. MI screeners examine captured documents, equipment, and, in some cases, personal papers (journals, 
diaries,  letters).  They  look  for  information  that  identifies  a  detainee  and  the  detainee’s  organization, 
mission,  and  personal  background  (family,  knowledge,  experience).  The  knowledge  of  a  detainee’s 
physical and emotional status or other information helps screeners determine the detainee’s willingness to 
cooperate. 
6-38. HUMINT  collectors  at  the  DHA  provide  input  to  assist  in  the  decision  to  release  or  detain  an 
individual. If the decision is made to detain the individual, arrangements are then made to transport  the 
detainee to a TIF for formal processing into the Detainee Reporting System, including the issuance of an 
ISN. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc
pdf page order reverse; change page order in pdf online
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
change pdf page order preview; reorder pages pdf file
Chapter 6 
6-14 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
M
EDICAL 
S
UPPORT
6-39. Medical  personnel  organic  to  maneuver  units  or  the  brigade  support  medical  company  may  be 
required to provide emergency medical treatment or evacuation on an area support basis at a DHA. (See 
appendix I.) 
6-40. The medical screening that can be accomplished at a DHA is limited. The purpose of this medical 
screening  is  to  ensure  that  the  detainees  do  not  have  significant  wounds,  injuries,  or  other  medical 
conditions  (such  as  severe  dehydration)  that  require  immediate  medical  attention  and/or  evacuation. 
Medical personnel screen for conditions that could deteriorate before transfer to a TIF. This screening does 
not include the use of diagnostic equipment, such as X rays or laboratory tests, because these resources are 
not available at a DCP or DHA. Any injuries or medical treatment provided during screening is entered on 
the  DD Form 1380. The detainee’s  DD Form 2745 number is used as the identification number on  the 
DD Form 1380. If the detainee is not to be evacuated through medical channels, provide one copy of the 
DD Form 1380 to the detaining unit for inclusion in the detainee’s medical record, which will be initiated 
and maintained at the TIF. When an ISN is assigned at the TIF, it will be used for detainee identification in 
the detainee’s medical records folder. 
6-41. Detainees whose medical conditions require hospitalization are treated, stabilized, and evacuated to a 
supporting  medical  treatment  facility.  The DD Form  1380  is  sent  with  detainees for  inclusion  in  their 
medical records, which are established at the Level III hospital. 
6-42. The initial care provided to detainees at Levels I and II will be documented on DD Form 1380. Once 
detainees are evacuated  to  a higher  level  of  care,  the  appropriate medical record  folder  containing  the 
required  demographic  information  will  be  initiated.  All  medical  documentation  and  medications  from 
screening examinations or treatment at prior locations, such as the DCP, should be available for review and 
inclusion in the medical record. 
6-43. The  DHA  is  a  temporary  holding  area;  however,  temporary  can  be  a  relative  term.  If  the  DHA 
remains in the same  location for an extended period, improvement to  the field  sanitation areas (such as 
latrines and showers) should be undertaken, rather than relying solely on field-expedient facilities as done 
at  the  DCP.  Medical  personnel  and/or  units  could  also  be  attached  to  provide  an  expanded  sick  call 
capability. 
6-44. Inprocessing medical screenings are only conducted at the TIF. However, DHA medical personnel 
can  document  preexisting  injuries  with  medical  photography,  if  appropriate,  and  forward  this 
documentation with the detainees for  later inclusion in their medical records  initiated at the TIF. At the 
DHA, medical encounters may be documented on SF 600. If used, forward it with detainees upon transfer 
to the TIF for inclusion in their medical records. 
S
ECURITY 
C
ONSIDERATIONS
6-45. The  DHA,  like  the  DCP,  is  a  temporary  holding  area  for  detainees.  Nevertheless,  the  security 
considerations remain the same at any echelon where detainees are held. The temporary nature of the DHA 
does  not negate the responsibility of military police  and other forces to  plan for and establish security. 
Attempted  escapes  and  proper  protective  measures  for  the  forces  and  detainees  inside  the  DHA  must 
always be prime planning considerations. 
FIXED DETAINEE INTERNMENT FACILITIES 
6-46. Fixed detainee internment facilities include TIF and SIF facilities, each of which encompass many 
regulatory and doctrinal solutions. Detainees are selectively assigned to appropriate advanced internment 
facilities  that  best  meet  the  needs  of  the detaining  power  and  the  detainee.  Detainees  (such  as  enemy 
combatants) that hold violent opposing ideologies are interned in separate facilities in an effort to isolate 
them from the general population and preempt any unforeseen problems. Once they have been assigned to a 
facility, they may be further segregated because of nationality, language, or other reasons. 
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader; pdf reverse page order
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
VB.NET PDF - How to Modify PDF Document Page in VB.NET. VB.NET Guide for Processing PDF Document Page and Sorting PDF Pages Order.
change page order pdf preview; pdf reorder pages online
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-15 
D
ETAINEE 
R
EPORTING 
S
YSTEM
6-47. The  Detainee  Reporting  System  is  the  mandated  detainee  accountability  database  for  all  DOD 
agencies. Key functions of the Detainee Reporting System at the TIF/SIF include— 
Assigning ISNs. 
Documenting detainee transfers, releases, and repatriations. 
Recording detainee deaths. 
Recording detainee escapes. 
6-48. The  timely  and  accurate  reporting  of  data  through  the  Detainee  Reporting  System  is  critical  to 
ensuring detainee accountability. As detainees are collected and processed, the Geneva Conventions require 
that such information be forwarded to the appropriate authorities. Failure to do  so  may bring unwanted 
scrutiny on the U.S. government for neglecting its duties under international laws. 
6-49. The NDRC is designated by the OPMG to receive and archive all detainee information. The NDRC 
provides detainee information to the protecting power or ICRC (to fulfill U.S. obligations under the Geneva 
Conventions); various agencies in the DA, DOD, and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); and the U.S. 
Congress.  The  NDRC’s  principal  responsibility  is  to  ensure  the  collection,  storage,  and  appropriate 
dissemination of detainee information as required by AR 190-8 and DODD 2310.01E. The NDRC directs 
the development of a Detainee Reporting System and issues blocks of ISNs to the TDRC. 
6-50. The TDRC functions as the field operations agency for the NDRC, and it reports all detainee data 
directly to  the NDRC. The TDRC is responsible for maintaining information  on all detainees and  their 
personal property within an assigned theater of operations. It obtains and stores information concerning all 
detainees  in  the  custody  of  U.S.  armed  forces  (including  those  captured  by  U.S.  armed  forces  and 
transferred to other powers for internment or those received from other powers for internment [temporarily 
or  permanently]).  The  TDRC  serves  as  the  theater  repository  for  information  pertaining  to  detainee 
accountability  and  ensures  the  implementation  of  DOD  policy.  It  provides  initial  blocks  of  ISNs  and 
replenishes blocks of ISNs (as needed) to units performing detainee operations in the theater. The TDRC 
requests additional blocks of ISNs from the NDRC. The TIF requests ISNs from the TDRC and forwards 
all information concerning the detainees to the TDRC. 
6-51. All locations to which the TDRC issues ISNs should send information concerning the detainee back 
to the TDRC. A detainee’s ISN is used detainee’s internment as the primary means of identification. It is 
used to link the detainee with biometric data (such as fingerprints, iris image, and DNA), personal property, 
medical information, and issued equipment. 
I
NTERNMENT 
S
ERIAL 
N
UMBERS
6-52. The ISN is the DOD-mandated identification number used to account for and/or track detainees. (See 
figure 6-6, page 6-16.) Once an ISN is assigned, it is used on all documentation, including medical records. 
The  ISN  is  generated  by  the  Detainee  Reporting  System.  The  Detainee  Reporting  System  is  the  only 
approved  system  for  maintaining  detainee  accountability.  It  is  the  central  data  point  system  used  for 
reporting to the national level and sharing detainee information with other authorized agencies. ISNs are 
normally  issued  within  14  days  of  capture,  regardless  of  where  detainees  are  held,  or  according  to 
applicable policy. The ISN is comprised of the— 
Capturing  power  (a  two-digit  alpha  character  code  representing  the  capturing  power).  Only 
country codes found in the Defense Intelligence Agency manual (DIAM) 58-12 are used. 
Theater code (a one-digit number representing the command/theater under which the detainee 
came into U.S. custody). 
Power served (a  two-digit  alpha  character code representing the  detainee’s power served [the 
country the detainee is fighting for]). Only country codes found DIAM 58-12 are used. 
Sequence number (a unique  six-digit number assigned  exclusively  to  an  individual detainee). 
The  Detainee  Reporting  System  assigns  these  numbers  sequentially.  If  a  detainee  dies,  is 
released, is repatriated, is transferred, or escapes, the detainee’s number is not reissued during 
the same conflict. 
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File DLLs for PDF Page Rotation in C#.NET Project. In order to run the sample code, the following steps
reverse page order pdf; move pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via Change PDF original password. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be
how to move pages in pdf converter professional; reorder pdf pages reader
Chapter 6 
6-16 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Detainee classification (a two- or  three-digit alpha  character code  representing the  detainee’s 
classification). Current classifications are CI, RP, and enemy combatants. Enemy combatants are 
further divided into EPWs and members of armed groups. 
Figure 6-6. ISN 
6-53. The  detainee  information  is  reported  through  the  TDRC  to  the  NDRC.  The  TDRC  is  normally 
colocated  with the CDO.  Once  the  Detainee  Reporting  System  creates  an  ISN,  no  component  may be 
changed or corrected at the theater level without approval from the NDRC. All changes to ISNs must be 
requested in writing and approved by the NDRC. U.S. armed forces must accurately account for detainees 
and issue ISNs when required. 
6-54. When required by laws and/or policies, the NDRC provides detainee information (POC, country of 
origin, injury status, internment status) to the ICRC to satisfy the obligations of the Geneva Conventions. 
The  ICRC  uses  this  detainee  information  to  give  the  detainee’s  status  to  the  detainee’s  government. 
Commanders should try to standardize the tracking of detainees from the POC through the issuance of an 
ISN. The number found on DD Form 2745 is the only authorized tracking number that may be used before 
the assignment of an ISN. After an ISN is assigned, previously completed documents should be annotated 
with the assigned ISN. For example, medical channels should use the DD Form 2745 number at first and 
then use the ISN once an ISN is issued to the detainee. The Detainee Reporting System cross-references the 
ISN and the DD Form 2745 number for administrative purposes. 
6-55. If a detainee is inadvertently issued a second ISN ( clerical error, recapture) the processing personnel 
will contact the NDRC, which will correct the sequence. No gaps are permitted in the official records and 
numbering of detainees. 
D
ETAINEE 
I
DENTIFICATION 
B
AND
6-56. The requirements for identifying a detainee by name and ISN are many and varied. Among the more 
common reasons are— 
Periodically verifying detainee rosters against the actual compound population. 
Identifying compound work details. 
Matching detainees with their individual medical records. 
Checking the identities of detainees to be transferred or released against actual transfer rosters.  
Tracking detainees through medical channels. 
US9AF-000234RP
Capturing power 
Theater code 
Power served 
Sequence number 
Detainee 
classification 
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-17 
6-57. The  detainee  identification  band  permits  the  rapid  and  reliable  identification  of  each  detainee. 
Identification bands enhance  facility  administration  and  operation.  The  Detainee  Reporting  System can 
create identification bands  that show the  ISN number, name,  and photo of the detainee. If the  Detainee 
Reporting System is not available, record the detainee’s ISN and last name on the identification band and 
secure it to the  detainee’s left wrist. If  appropriate  bands are  not available, use a medical wristband or 
something similar. 
6-58. When the identification band has serious deterioration or the ISN and name are obscured, replace it 
with a new one. Periodic random checks of detainee identification bands will detect fair wear and tear and 
any efforts  to destroy  the bands. When inspecting for  fair wear and tear, also look for any evidence of 
detainees exchanging bands. Such exchanges are entirely possible and should be expected; however, the 
removal of an identification band by the original wearer will result in damage which is easily detected. 
When positive identification is essential, such as for transfer or hospitalization, examine the identification 
band carefully for the evidence of removal from another detainee. Additionally, conduct periodic routine 
inspections of randomly selected identification bands in the mess line, during compound inspections, or at 
other opportune times to help detect any attempt to tamper with or exchange an identification band. 
THEATER INTERNMENT FACILITY 
6-59. The  TIF  is  a  permanent  or  semipermanent  facility  (normally  located at  the  theater  level)  that  is 
capable of holding detainees for extended periods of time. A TIF is a long-term internment facility that is 
operated according to all applicable laws and policies. The JIDC is normally within the TIF. It is possible 
that detainees and/or enemy combatants may bypass a DCP or DHA and be transferred directly to the TIF. 
In such cases, all processing that would have taken place earlier  must be accomplished immediately on 
arrival at the TIF. Military police units task organized to the I/R battalion will be based on the  specific 
requirements of the TIF. (See appendix B.) 
6-60. The  TIF  is  the  first  location  where  detainees  may  be  held  for  extended  periods  of  time.  The 
infrastructure and design standards associated with the TIF reflect long-term detention and facilitate and 
ensure humane treatment throughout a detainee’s stay in the facility. (See appendix J for more information 
on internment facility design.) 
6-61. Key organization elements in the TIF may include a joint security group, JIDC, detainee hospital, 
joint  logistics  group,  joint  internment  operations  group,  CA  unit,  and  psychological  unit.  Special  staff 
considerations  may  include  a  joint  visitor’s  bureau,  chaplain,  inspector  general,  SJA,  public  affairs, 
surgeon, forensic psychologist, forensic psychiatrist, medical plans and operations officer, environmental 
health officer, and PM and/or security forces. 
6-62. Dedicated teams may be organized and employed to identify and mitigate threats within the facility. 
These teams, configured with specific capabilities based on requirements determined from current mission 
variables, will likely include bilingual bicultural advisors, intelligence officers, counterintelligence agents, 
and others as needed. The teams may be required for each major compound within the TIF or SIF. 
6-63. The  military  police  operating  the  TIF  have  tactical  control  over  HUMINT  collectors,  medical 
personnel, and other personnel who conduct operations at the TIF for the humane treatment, evacuation, 
custody, and control (reception, processing, administration, internment, and safety) of detainees; security; 
and  the operation of  the internment  facility. For HUMINT  support at the  TIF,  the JIDC  commander is 
responsible for conducting interrogation operations (including prioritization of effort) and controlling the 
technical aspects of interrogation or other intelligence operations. The intelligence staff maintains control 
over interrogation operations through technical channels to ensure adherence to applicable laws and policy, 
ensure  the  proper  use  of  doctrinal  approaches  and  techniques,  and  provide  technical  guidance  for 
interrogation  activities.  Applicable  laws  and  policies  include  U.S.  laws,  the  law  of  war,  relevant 
international laws, relevant directives (including DODD 3115.09 and DODD 2310.01E), DODIs, execution 
orders,  and  FRAGOs.  The  military  police  commander  will  not  establish  intelligence  priorities  for  the 
HUMINT and/or counterintelligence personnel. HUMINT and/or counterintelligence personnel should only 
remain  involved  with  activities  that  concern  intelligence  gathering.  The  detainee  operations  medical 
director  is  designated  by  the  medical  deployment  support  command  commander  to  provide  technical 
Chapter 6 
6-18 
guidan
(See fi
nce  for  the me
igures 6-7 and 6
6
L
A
C
C
G
I
M
M
M
M
O
P
T
T
T
edical aspects 
6-8.) 
Legend: 
ARFOR 
CDO 
CSG-2 
G-2X 
/R 
MDSC 
METT-TC 
MI 
MP
OPCON 
PM
TACON 
TECHCON 
TIF
F
Figure 6-7. 
FM 3-
of  detainee op
Sample TIF C
or multip
-39.40
perations cond
d
Army forces
commander, 
intelligence o
assistant chie
and counterin
internment an
medical deplo
command 
mission, enem
weather, troo
available, tim
civil considera
military intellig
military police
operational co
provost mars
tactical contro
technical con
theater intern
C2 in the the
ple small TIFs
s
ducted through
h
detainee opera
officer or sectio
ef of staff, HUM
ntelligence 
nd resettlemen
oyment suppor
my, terrain and
ops and suppor
me available, an
ations 
gence 
ontrol 
hal 
ol 
ntrol 
nment facility 
eater with sin
12
hout the joint 
ations 
MINT 
rt 
rt 
nd 
ngle 
2 February 201
1
operations are
10 
ea. 
12 Feb
6-
af
pr
de
P
LAN
6-
am
de
bruary 2010 
-64. Choosing
ffect  its  ability
riority.  Failure
etainees are wi
NNING 
C
ONS
-65. Planning 
mount of suppo
etainee  operati
i
Legend: 
ARFOR 
CDO 
G-2 
G-2X 
I/R 
MDSC 
MI 
MP 
MPC 
OPCON 
PM 
TACON 
TECHCON 
TIF 
Figure 6-8.
locations for 
 to  receive  s
e  to  consider 
ithout the right
SIDERATIONS
S
for operations 
ort, ranging fro
ions.  Proper  p
F
. Sample TIF
F
TIFs is critica
supplies.  Rece
e
resupply  proc
ts and privilege
S
at the TIF is 
om medical to 
planning  befor
FM 3-39.40
0
Army forces
commander
intelligence 
assistant ch
counterintel
internment a
medical dep
military intel
military polic
military polic
operational 
provost mar
tactical cont
technical co
theater inter
C2 in the th
multiple TIF
al during the p
p
iving  supplies
edures  could 
es required und
d
a much greate
engineer, is tim
re  operations  c
r, detainee ope
e
officer or secti
hief of staff, HU
U
ligence 
and resettleme
ployment suppo
lligence 
ce 
ce command 
control 
rshal 
trol 
ontrol 
rnment facility
y
eater with an
lanning phase.
 through  all  s
s
result  in  an  e
der U.S. policie
e
r challenge tha
me-consuming
commence  is 
erations 
on 
UMINT and 
ent 
ort command 
n MPC and 
. The location 
supply  classes
extended  perio
es and internati
an at lower ech
g and critical to
o
vital.  The  pla
Detainee Fac
of each facilit
s  is  a  top  com
od  of  time  in 
ional laws. 
helons. Plannin
o ensuring succ
anning  should 
cilities 
6-19 
ty will 
mmand 
which 
ng the 
cessful 
focus 
Chapter 6 
6-20 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
across the DOTMLPF domain to ensure that all requirements are met. Synchronization with adjacent staff 
elements and commands is another important element. 
6-66. At a minimum, training for operations at a TIF should include the following: 
Introduction to detainee operations. 
Detainee Reporting System training. 
Communications with detainees (cultural awareness). 
Introduction to the Geneva Conventions and U.S. policies on the humane treatment of detainees 
and DCs. 
Familiarization with stress management procedures. 
Introduction to HIV and universal precautions to take with HIV positive detainees. 
Advanced use-of-force criteria for I/R and interrogation operations. 
Introduction to frisk, cell, and area search procedures. 
Application of restraints. 
Personal safety awareness. 
Defensive tactics (unarmed self-defense). 
NLWs. 
Forced cell move procedures. 
Response procedures for a bomb and/or bomb threat. 
Current training support packages. 
Emergency response to fires, escapes, and disorders. 
Cell block operations. 
Meal procedures. 
Introduction to accountability procedures. 
Security and control activities. 
Familiarization with the special compound operations. 
Introduction to main gate/sally port operations. 
Written reports required to operate a TIF. 
Visitation operations. 
R
ECEIVING AND 
P
ROCESSING 
D
ETAINEES
6-67. Interpreters may be requested from MI personnel, PSYOP personnel, multinational forces, or local 
authorities. This may also  require  identifying  and clearing  trusted detainees  or local nationals to  act  as 
interpreters. Interpreters are absolutely necessary when entering required data into the Detainee Reporting 
System. 
Receiving Detainees 
6-68. When  detainees  are delivered to the  TIF,  they are  segregated from those  who arrived earlier  and 
those who are partially processed. Military police ensure that— 
Detainees are counted and matched against the manifest. Military police must also ensure that 
they have documentation for the detainees, their personal property, and anything of evidentiary 
value. 
Detainees are field-processed if the capturing unit or the DCP did not previously process them. 
Military police should not release the escorting unit until proper documentation is completed. 
Detainees  have  a  completed  DD  Form  2745  when  they  arrive,  which  will  be  used  at  the 
internment facility until they are issued ISNs. 
ISNs  and the last  names of  the detainees are  recorded  on identification  bands created by  the 
Detainee Reporting System. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested