c# render pdf : Reordering pdf pages application Library utility azure asp.net html visual studio verticaldatumsdeltav10_e0-part638

Demystifying the vertical datum in Canada: A case study in the Mackenzie Delta 
Marc Véronneau 
Natural Resources Canada 
615 Booth Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0E9 
E-mail: marcv@nrcan.gc.ca  
Abstract 
Surveyors are currently going through a transition period for the determination of heights.  Over 
the last few hundred years, the sole technique for precise height determination was spirit leveling.  
Today, surveyors also have the capability of determining accurate heights using space-based 
technologies (e.g., GPS) in a more efficient and cost-effective manner.  While the leveling 
technique gives surveyors precise heights above mean sea level when measurements are tied to a 
benchmark, space-based positioning relates heights to a geometric reference surface (ellipsoid) 
representing the general shape of the Earth.  Unfortunately, the latter does not have any physical 
meaning (i.e., water could flow up-hill). Therefore, a correction is required to relate ellipsoidal 
heights to the mean sea level.  This is done by using a geoid model, which describes the separation 
between the ellipsoid and geoid.  The geoid is the equipotential (level) surface describing mean 
sea level at rest. 
When using either leveling or space-based positioning for height determination, surveyors require 
a vertical datum (reference surface), which allows a homogeneous height system at the national, 
continental or global scale.  There may be only one practical definition of a vertical datum (mean 
sea level); however, its realization will vary as a function of the input data used to model it.  This 
is where complications arise for surveyors: each new realization brings along a different, but 
generally more accurate datum than the previous one.  More recently, the complications were 
compounded when geoid models became routinely available allowing GPS surveyors to measure 
significant  mismatches  between  the  geoid-derived  datum  and  the  distorted  leveling-defined 
Canadian Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1928 (CGVD28). 
1. Introduction 
This report is intended for those who are involved in positioning and geo-referencing for GIS, 
mapping, and navigation, and are not geodetic experts.  It will help clarify the terminology 
currently used and the different vertical datums that are available to surveyors in the context of 
Canada and North America.   This will be applied to a case study in the region of the Mackenzie 
Delta in the Northwest Territories (NWT). 
Precise positioning and a consistent height system are the basis for a broad spectrum of activities 
in  earth  sciences.    These  activities  range  from  mapping,  engineering  and  dredging  to 
environmental  studies  and  natural  hazards;  from  precision  agriculture  and  forestry  to 
transportation, commerce and navigation;  and from mineral exploration and  management  of 
natural resources to emergency and disaster preparedness.  While the height reference system 
supports numerous technical applications, it is also implied in many legal documents related to 
land management and safety such as easement, flood control, boundary demarcation, etc.  All 
these activities depend on a common coordinate reference system through which all types of geo-
referenced information can be interrelated and exploited reliably.  For heights, the common and 
practical reference system is the mean sea level (MSL).  Actually, it is the geoid to be exact, as 
we will see later. 
Reordering pdf pages - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to reorder pdf pages in; reorder pdf pages in preview
Reordering pdf pages - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
move pages in pdf reader; move pages in a pdf file
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
Over centuries sea level has been for surveyors the natural reference surface for heights, and it 
remains today the best understood global reference surface for heights.  Even though the overall 
concept to define topographical heights is simple, the realization of an accurate reference surface 
is complex.  This complexity has increased even more with the advent of Global Navigation 
Satellite Systems (e.g., Global Positioning System), which require the development of a geoid 
model to convert heights from a reference ellipsoid to MSL.  Currently, surveyors are at the 
crossroads  between  traditional  leveling  and  modern  spaced-base  techniques  for  height 
determination and, unfortunately, the two approaches do not always agree within the required 
precision due to inherent errors in the realization of each datum.  This mismatch is even more 
accentuated when GPS heights must be converted to Canada’s official datum, which is a 1928 
construct datum that includes several known systematic errors.  
It is important to know that MSL is not an equipotential (level) surface, i.e., as land, the oceans 
have a topography that ranges from approximately –1.8 m to +1.2 m globally (LeGrand et al., 
2003).  Vertical datums realized by leveling observations and constrained to several tide gauges 
will  not  coincide  with  an  equipotential  surface  (geoid)  because  MSL  at  each  tide  gauge 
corresponds most probably to a different equipotential surface (elevation).  However, if these 
same observations were constrained to MSL at a single tide gauge and be errorless, the vertical 
datum realized would coincide with an equipotential surface.  Thus, in theory, leveling and geoid 
modeling can determine a common vertical datum. 
With the knowledge that MSL has topography, commonly referred to as Sea Surface Topography 
(SST), how can we determine accurately where MSL would be in the middle of Saskatchewan?   
Actually, MSL can only be determined along the coasts and cannot be propagated accurately 
inland.  For example, the height of a benchmark in Saskatchewan could vary by approximately 60 
cm depending on whether it is tied by leveling to a tide gauge on the Pacific, Atlantic or Arctic 
Ocean.  On the other hand, equipotential surfaces are continuous surfaces that can be determined 
accurately at any location by knowing the Earth’s gravity field.  Furthermore, the geopotential 
describes precisely the flow of water, which is not necessarily always the case with heights. 
Naturally, a vertical datum is only as good as the input data used for its realization.   Systematic 
and random errors in the data are significant reasons for the discrepancy between the different 
realizations.  In the past, these errors could not be observed easily because the leveling network 
was re-observed, roughly, on a 25-year cycle.  Still today, several leveling lines do not have a 
second observation epoch and some of them date back to the 1920’s.  However, over the last ten 
years, progress in geoid theory along with the acquisition of accurate terrestrial, airborne and 
spaceborne gravity data with high resolution has allowed for the determination of a more accurate 
geoid model, revealing errors in the leveling datum to surveyors using space geodetic techniques 
such as GPS for heighting. 
In Canada, the Canadian Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1928 (CGVD28) is the official reference 
surface for heights.  As its name indicates, it is a vertical datum that was realized back in 1928, 
using leveling measurements that existed at the epoch, to connect the east and west coasts in the 
southern part of the country.  For its realization, several systematic errors in leveling observations 
were either unknown or disregarded (e.g., SST, actual gravity corrections, refraction and rod 
calibration) creating a distorted national vertical datum for Canada (though very precise for the 
time).  Today, these distortions are clearly noticeable because new scientific adjustments of the 
primary leveling network now account for most known systematic errors and accurate gravimetric 
geoid models are readily available. 
5 April 2006 
2
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
function, PDF page inserting function, PDF page reordering function and XDoc.PDF enables you to delete PDF page(s a single page, a series of pages, and random
pdf reorder pages online; rearrange pdf pages in preview
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Codes to Sort TIFF File with .NET
Visual Basic .NET method for sorting pages from a multi-page TIFF (Tagged Image File), PDF, Microsoft Office Besides reordering this TIFF file using VB.NET
how to rearrange pdf pages in preview; change pdf page order online
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
2. Concepts and Terminology 
Demystifying the understanding about the vertical datum in Canada should start with a review of 
concepts and terminology that will provide a common ground for discussion on the matter.  The 
explanations of the terms may not be rigorous, but they should serve the purpose of this paper. 
First, heights need a reference system
because it defines the set of rules that will determine how 
elevation values will be assigned to a point.  For example, fixing MSL at six tide gauges is one 
set of rules for CGVD28.  The reference frame
is the actual realization of the reference system.  
For example, assigning elevations to benchmarks using a defined set  of rules results in the 
realization of a unique reference frame for leveling.  The development of a geoid model also 
constitutes a reference frame.   
The vertical datum
is the reference surface for heights; it corresponds to the zero elevation.  It can 
be any arbitrary surface as long as it remains constant for different users to reproduce the same 
height value at a common point.  However, the vertical datum should preferably represent an 
equipotential surface
(W), i.e., a level surface on which the water is at rest.  An infinity of 
equipotential surfaces surrounds the Earth.  These surfaces are usually expressed in units of m
s
-2
or kGal m, where one kGal represents 1x10
1
m s
-2
.  The equipotential surface (W
0
) that best 
represents MSL globally is usually referred to as the geoid
 However, in practice, the geoid could 
be any equipotential surface close to MSL.  The geometric distance above the geoid and along the 
plumbline (perpendicular to the equipotential surfaces) is the orthometric height
.  It is commonly 
known as the height above mean sea level
.  Nowadays, the vertical datum could also be the 
ellipsoid, which is the reference surface for the ellipsoidal heights
as derived from GPS.   
Water management is an application where precise heights are required. Water flows in the 
direction  of  decreasing  elevation  in  response  to  variations  in  the  Earth’s  potential.    The 
equipotential surfaces mentioned above are not parallel; they actually converge and are closer to 
each other at the poles where gravity is larger than at the equator.  This convergence makes the 
geometric distance between two equipotential surfaces shorter in the north than in the south (for 
the northern hemisphere).  Thus, the surface of a lake, which is an equipotential surface, would 
have a higher orthometric height at its southern end than at its northern end.  For this reason, 
hydrologists work instead with dynamic heights
, which are scaled geopotential numbers
.  A lake 
surface has a constant dynamic height.  The International Great lakes Datum 1985 (IGLD85) uses 
dynamic heights.  In most applications, the relative difference between orthometric and dynamic 
heights is negligible.  
The orthometric height (H) and dynamic height (H
d
) can be expressed as: 
g
C
H
=
(1) 
and 
γφ
C
H
d
=
  
(2) 
respectively.  C is the geopotential number, 
g is the mean gravity between the topography and 
datum  along  the  plumbline  and 
γφ
is  a  constant  representing  normal  gravity,  which  is  an 
approximate gravity value derived from a mathematical model.  For dynamic heights in North 
5 April 2006 
3
C# Excel - Sort Excel Pages Order in C#.NET
C#.NET Excel document page reordering control SDK (XDoc.Excel) is a thread-safe .NET library that can be used to adjust the Excel document pages order.
how to move pages in pdf reader; reorder pdf pages
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in PDF page deleting, PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image
rearrange pdf pages; change pdf page order reader
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
America, the normal gravity is evaluated on the ellipsoid at latitude 45°. The geopotential number 
C can be determined from leveling observations by: 
2
)
(
j
i
ij
ij
g
g
H
C
+
+
= ∆
ε
,
(3) 
where 
H
ij
is the measured height difference by leveling technique between points i and j
ε
is a 
correction for systematic errors and g
i
and g
j
are the observed gravity on the terrain at points i and 
j, respectively. 
Similarly, orthometric height H can be determined from space-based technologies by using the 
following equation: 
h N
H
= −
 
(4) 
where h is the ellipsoidal height and N is the geoid height, i.e., the separation between the 
ellipsoid and geoid.  A geoid height can be determined from gravity data by solving Stokes’s 
global integral (Heiskanen and Moritz, 1967): 
=
d
gS
R
N
( )
( )
4
0
ψ
φ
πγ
,
(5) 
where 
g are gravity anomalies, S(
ψ
) is the weight function, R is the Earth mean radius and 
γ
0
is 
the normal gravity on the ellipsoid along a latitude (
φ
). 
Bathymetry shown on hydrographic charts is referenced to chart datum
 It corresponds to the 
lower low water in order to assure clearance for vessel transit.  Water level rarely goes below the 
chart datum.  Chart datum is a local reference surface and does not correspond to a particular 
equipotential surface.  A chart datum is referenced to local physical markers near tide gauges.  
These markers have known height above the chart datum
(CD).  The separation between the MSL 
(based on tide gauge measurements) and the chart datum is the Z
0
value.  
There are also normal heights
, which are used in several European countries.  These heights are 
similar to orthometric height with the exception that the term in the denominator of Eq. 1 is 
replaced by the mean normal gravity at the station along the normal, i.e., perpendicular to the 
ellipsoid.  Thus, they do not require the knowledge of the topographical density making them 
somewhat advantageous over the orthometric heights and easy to transform to dynamic heights.  
The ellipsoidal heights can be related to the normal heights through the telluroid
(quasi-geoid).  
The telluroid is not an equipotential surface.   
Finally,  it is  also  important to distinguish between accuracy
and precision
  In  this report, 
accuracy  indicates  the absolute
error with respect  to  the “true  reference  datum  while  the 
precision represents the relative error between two points on the same datum.  For example, two 
geoid heights within a few km could have an accuracy of ±10 cm while their relative precision 
can be ±1 cm. Also, a CGVD28 height could be said to have an accuracy of ±50 cm with respect 
to an equipotential surface, but also have an accuracy of ±5 cm with respect to its own reference 
system.  
5 April 2006 
4
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
in following VB.NET Word page reordering API is Apart from this VB.NET Word pages sorting function powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order pdf acrobat; rearrange pages in pdf file
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
page rotating function, Word page inserting function, Word page reordering function and options, including setting a single page, a series of pages, and random
how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader; move pdf pages in preview
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
3. Datums 
Basically,  there are  two techniques to  realize a national  vertical datum: leveling and geoid 
modeling.  Leveling is the traditional technique for the realization of a datum.  It is determined in 
relation to the topography where benchmarks have known orthometric heights.  Geoid modeling 
is the modern technique, even though geoid concepts date back to F. Gauss (1777-1855).  Geoid 
modeling came to the forefront with the advent of space-based positioning in order to relate 
ellipsoidal heights to MSL.  Geoid models describe the vertical datum in relation to an ellipsoid.  
In theory, the two techniques determine the same vertical datum.  However, in practice, the two 
datums will  be  different due to systematic  and random errors in the input  data of the two 
techniques.    Thus,  the  objective  of all  existing  realizations of  a vertical  datum (CGVD28, 
NAVD88, GSD95, CGG2000) is to represent “MSL” as accurately as possible. 
3.1 Leveling datum 
Most countries, if not all, still rely on leveling for the realization of their national vertical datum.  
The main advantage is its very high precision over short distances.  On the other hand, it is also 
laborious, time consuming and prone to accumulation of systematic errors over long distances.  
The leveling technique consists in measuring a height difference between two graduated rods 
roughly 100 m apart in a leapfrog fashion (Figure 1).  Thus, surveyors literally have to walk 
across the country to establish reference markers (benchmarks) along main transportation roads. 
These benchmarks provide physical access to the datum.   
The official vertical datum in Canada is determined by leveling and accessible through some 
80,000 benchmarks mostly distributed in southern Canada.  It is referred to as the Canadian 
Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1928 
(Canon,  1928  and  1935).    It  is 
based  on  an  adjustment  of 
leveling measurements made prior 
to 1928 with constraints to MSL 
at  six  tide  gauges:  two  on  the 
Pacific  Ocean  (Vancouver  and 
Prince-Rupert),  three  on  the 
Atlantic 
Ocean 
(Yarmouth, 
Halifax and New York City) and 
one  on  the  St-Lawrence  River 
(Pointe-au-Père, 
east 
of 
Rimouski).    These  tide  gauges 
constitute the reference system for 
CGVD28.  Since then, all leveling 
measurements  consisting  of  re-
observations or extensions to the 
network,  have  been  processed 
following the same procedure and 
constrained as  the  1928 original 
adjustment.    Figure  2  illustrates 
the  coverage  of  the  primary 
leveling network in Canada.  The 
primary  leveling  networks  for 
Figure 1: Illustration depicting two techniques (leveling 
and GPS) for the determination of height differences. 
5 April 2006 
5
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
page rotating function, PowerPoint page insert function, PowerPoint page reordering function and including setting a single page, a series of pages, and random
rearrange pages in pdf; reorder pages pdf file
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Add Page(s) to TIFF Document Using C#
SDK still empowers developers and end users to do Tiff image rotating, deleting, reordering, extracting, etc. C# Tiff processing application - sort Tiff pages.
how to rearrange pdf pages reader; how to reorder pages in pdf online
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
Figure 2: The Canadian primary leveling network 
Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, Anticosti and Vancouver Island belong to CGVD28 even 
though they are not directly tied to the six tide gauges mentioned above. 
The published CGVD28 heights provide a standard reference frame that meets the needs of the 
majority of users in  Canada.    However,  these  heights  have  not  been  corrected  for  certain 
systematic  errors  that  have  become  well  known.    While  published  values  are  occasionally 
corrected for gross errors, neglecting corrections for systematic errors do not adversely affect the 
precision of published heights within a region.  The following describes some of the existing 
systematic errors: 
CGVD28 heights are computed using approximate gravity values (normal gravity) based 
upon latitude instead of the actual gravity measurements;    
CGVD28 does not take into consideration that the mean sea level is rising due to the 
melting of glaciers and ice caps and ocean thermal expansion, and that the land elevation 
is changing due to the rebound (or subsidence) of the Earth’s crust following the last 
glaciation; 
CGVD28 heights are not corrected for systematic errors due to atmospheric refraction, 
rod calibration and rod temperature, and the effects of solar and lunar tides on the Earth’s 
geopotential surfaces; and 
CGVD28 does not take into account sea surface topography. 
The  CGVD28  heights  are  said  to  be  normal-orthometric  heights
because  they  are  defined 
following the concept of orthometric height (Eqs. 1 and 3), but all actual gravity measurements in 
these equations are replaced by normal gravity. Thus, CGVD28 heights are neither normal nor 
orthometric heights and CGVD28 coincides neither with the geoid nor the quasi-geoid. 
The above-mentioned systematic errors are well known.  Geodesists in Canada and the United 
States had similar vertical datum issues prior to the 1993 adoption of the North American Vertical 
Datum of 1988 (NAVD88).  During the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, the Canadian and American 
5 April 2006 
6
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
geodetic  agencies  cooperated  towards  the  realization  of  a  new  vertical  datum  that  would 
encompass  corrections  to  most  systematic  errors.   The  resulting  NAVD88  (Zilkoski,  1986; 
Zilkoski et al., 1992) is a minimum constraint adjustment of the North American primary leveling 
networks (Canada, USA and Mexico).  The reference system of NAVD88 is the MSL at the tide 
gauge in Rimouski, Québec. 
NAVD88 was not implemented in Canada because of unexplained discrepancies of the order of 
1.5 m from east to west coasts (likely due to accumulation of systematic errors) and the slight 
improvement overall that this new datum would bring.  Since then, Canada has continued its data 
analysis and experimental adjustments of the primary leveling network; however, the efforts were 
expended mainly for the validation of geoid models in Canada.  The latest adjustment of the 
national primary leveling network in Canada, referred as Nov04
(also a minimum constraint 
adjustment like NAVD88), indicates a discrepancy of 80 cm between the east and west coasts.  
Oceanographers estimate that this discrepancy should be around 50 cm.  Nov04 represents true 
orthometric heights that can be compared directly with those derived from the combination of 
ellipsoidal heights and a geoid model.   
The actual  accuracy of the Nov04  reference  frame is  difficult to assess.   There is  still an 
accumulation  of  systematic  errors  in  the  network  of  the  order  of  0.1  mm/km  due  to  old 
instrumentation and uncertainty regarding corrections applied to the measurements.  Furthermore, 
leveling lines observed at a single epoch may have unknown blunders that may not be detected 
until leveling is repeated.  For example, most  leveling throughout  the Yukon Territory and 
Northwest Territories was observed once during the 1970’s.  The accuracy of Nov04 with respect 
to the equipotential surface representing MSL in Rimouski can be estimated at the decimeter level 
while CGVD28 would have an accuracy of several decimeters with respect to the same reference 
surface.  On the other hand, the precision of the leveling is estimated to be better than 4 mm x 
(K)
1/2
where K  is  the distance  in  km between two  benchmarks.  Analysis  of  leveling loops 
observed after 1980 reveal that it can be as precise as 1.5 mm x (K)
1/2
.  These overall precisions 
are valid as long as benchmarks remain stable.  
3.2 Geoid Datum 
Geoid modeling is an alternative technique to leveling for the realization of a vertical datum.  
Canada is currently leading the way in implementing and adopting a geoid model as an official 
and national vertical datum (Véronneau et al., 2005).  Previously, geoid models did not have the 
required precision and accuracy to be used as a datum.  Several regions of Canada did not have 
gravity measurements and precise theoretical equations were not fully developed at the time.  
However, the advent of GPS and other space-based techniques and their potential for precise 
heighting have driven the requirement for improved geoid modeling, leading to the challenging 
objective of achieving an accuracy of 1 cm across Canada.  Today, most of the country and 
surrounding oceans have gravity measurements with the exception of a few areas: Great Bear 
Lake, Lake Athabasca, Bay of Fundy and a few small sectors in the Arctic.  Furthermore, the 
theory has been developed to achieve the millimetre accuracy thanks to national and international 
cooperation between several governmental agencies and academic institutions. 
The latest published Canadian geoid model CGG2000 (Véronneau, 2001), while not meeting the 
accuracy requirement of a new datum, confirms the potential of a gravity-based system as a 
seamless vertical datum covering all of the Canadian territory and surrounding oceans.  Current 
international progress in satellite gravimetry contributes greatly to improving the accuracy of the 
geoid model in Canada and will likely enable its adoption as a new datum.  The CHAMP and 
5 April 2006 
7
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
GRACE gravity missions now allow the cm accuracy for the long wavelengths (~600 km) of the 
geoid model.  While the future GOCE gravity mission (2007) will hopefully bring this same level 
of accuracy down to the ~100-km wavelengths.  The terrestrial gravity data (land, shipborne and 
airborne surveys) and Digital Elevations Models (DEM) complement well the space-based data 
by improving the geoid model regionally and locally.   
The latest experimental geoid model CGG05 (soon to be published), which is based on early 
results from the CHAMP and GRACE gravity missions, has a national standard deviation of 14 
cm when compared to geoid heights derived from GPS ellipsoidal heights and Nov04 orthometric 
heights.  If a systematic tilt is removed from the leveling data, the standard deviation decreases to 
6 cm.  This same comparison with CGVD28 indicates a standard deviation of 20 cm.  These 
standard deviations are not entirely representative of the accuracy of CGG05 because they also 
include errors from the orthometric and ellipsoidal heights. 
The main  challenge remains to  demonstrate  the actual accuracy and  precision  of the  geoid 
models.  As for leveling, geoid modeling is not absent of systematic errors.  They leak principally 
from the terrestrial gravity anomalies required in the Stokes integral.  Gravity anomalies are 
differences between measured and normal gravity, corrected for terrain effects.  However, the 
systematic errors in geoid modeling are estimated to be smaller than those from leveling data.    
An error propagation model indicates that CGG05 has an average accuracy of ±6 cm nationally.  
The accuracy is a few cm for the flat regions (e.g., Saskatchewan), but it can reach over the 
decimeter level in the rough terrain of the Western Cordillera.  On the other hand, the precision of 
the geoid model could be as good as 1 to 3 cm for baselines less than 100 km based on its 
validation against GPS measurements on benchmarks.  The current weakness in the geoid model 
could be for baselines between 100 km and 600 km where the precision could be less due to 
accumulation of systematic errors in the terrestrial gravity anomalies. 
The current geoid models available are:  
Canadian Gravimetric Geoid 2000 (CGG2000): 
Latest published
scientific geoid model for North America developed at Natural Resources 
Canada  (Véronneau,  2001).  The  model  represents  the  separation between  the  GRS80 
ellipsoid and geoid (W
0
= 62636855.8 m
2
/s
2
) in the International Terrestrial Reference 
Frame (ITRF). 
Canadian Gravimetric Geoid 2005 (CGG05):  
Latest  experimental
geoid  model  for  North  America  developed  at  Natural  Resources 
Canada.    This  model  includes  early  results  from  the  CHAMP  and  GRACE  space 
gravimetry missions.  CGG05 is the new benchmark  for the development of the next 
generation of models in Canada. The model represents the separation between the GRS80 
ellipsoid and geoid (W
0
= 62636856.88 m
2
/s
2
) in the International Terrestrial Reference 
Frame (ITRF).  This equipotential surface represents a separation of +11 cm with respect to 
CGG2000 and approximately -30 cm with respect to the mean water level at the tide gauge 
in Rimouski.  The mean water level near Rimouski would be lower than CGG05 datum. 
Even  though  a  geopotential  surface  is  independent  of  the  horizontal  reference  frame,  the 
realization of a geoid model requires a reference frame to relate the geoid to its ellipsoid.  It is 
important to differentiate the NAD83 (CSRS) and ITRF geoid models because the geocentre of 
5 April 2006 
8
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
these two frames is approximately two metres apart.  This represents a 1.4 m slope across Canada 
(over ~6000 km) between the NAD83 (CSRS) and ITRF geoid models.  On the other hand, the 
geocentre of the more recent ITRF realizations differs only at the centimetre level.  Thus, the 
difference is negligible for geoid modeling.  Furthermore, it is important to know that WGS84 
and ITRF are basically the same.  The latest version of WGS84 is based on ITRF2000. Finally, 
transformation  software  between the  different  reference  frames are  available from  Geodetic 
Survey Division of Natural Resources Canada.   
3.3 Hybrid datum (Height Transformation) 
The hybrid datum is the source of many problems.  It is a band-aid solution to help surveyors 
using GPS technologies to tie their surveys to the official vertical datum.  The role of the hybrid 
datum is to convert a datum known only at benchmarks (leveling datum) to a continuous datum 
by the intermediary of a geoid model.  This conversion would be relatively simple if the leveling 
datum would coincide to an equipotential surface.  It would consist of observing GPS on a few 
benchmarks and evaluating the systematic bias through: 
h – H – N = 
ε
(6) 
where 
ε
is the local bias between the leveling and geoid datums. 
The main problems in Canada are that: 
CGVD28 is defined by normal-orthometric heights;  
CGVD28 contains systematic errors;  
Several leveling lines have not been re-observed within the last 30 years increasing the 
possibility of significant vertical motion at some benchmarks;  
There are no simple mathematical functions for transforming a geoid model to CGVD28; 
and  
CGVD28 benchmarks are poorly distributed geographically, they are mostly located in 
southern Canada and are sparse or inexistent in northern Canada.  
These  problems  require  that  the  geoid  model  be  distorted  to  represent  CGVD28.    These 
distortions are so significant that Canada refers to this new surface as a Height Transformation
to 
avoid misleading users who might think CGVD28 coincides with the geoid.  In the USA, the 
realization of a hybrid datum is relatively easier because they adopted NAVD88 (orthometric 
heights) and have a leveling network that covers their landmass well.  Their hybrid datum is 
called a geoid (e.g., Geoid99, Geoid03).  
While the US National Geodetic Survey observed GPS on benchmarks at some 11,000 sites 
distributed fairly homogenously throughout the continental US; Geodetic Survey Division of 
Natural  Resources  has  2,243  benchmarks co-located  with  GPS measurements.   These  GPS 
stations are part of the Canadian GPS network commonly referred as Supernet version 3.3a 
(SN33a).  The sparse network of GPS on benchmarks in northern Canada makes it difficult to 
interpolate and extrapolate the geoid model to represent CGVD28.  Figure 3 depicts the existing 
distortion in CGVD28 vis-à-vis the CGG05 geoid model.  This figure can be compared with 
Figure 4, which illustrates the datum difference of the same geoid model with Nov04.  Nov04 has 
mostly an east-west systematic tilt with a few local distortions due to local instability of the 
benchmarks and to old leveling lines. 
5 April 2006 
9
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
Figure 3: Distortion between CGG05 and CGVD28 (C.I.: 0.05 m) 
Figure 4: Distortion between CGG05 and Nov04 (C.I.: 0.05 m) 
5 April 2006 
10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested