c# render pdf : How to reorder pdf pages in reader application SDK cloud windows winforms .net class verticaldatumsdeltav10_e1-part639

Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
The latest Height Transformation for Canada is HTv2.0 (Véronneau et al., 2001). 
HTv2.0:  
Height Transformation version 2.0 is based on CGG2000.  A Height Transformation (HT) 
is a distorted geoid model to represent as accurately as possible the official vertical datum 
of Canada (CGVD28).  A HT represents the separation between the GRS80 ellipsoid and 
CGVD28 in NAD83 (CSRS) reference frame.  The quality of the HT depends on:  
1)  The precision of the GPS measurements on benchmarks; 
2)  The distribution of these GPS on benchmarks across the leveling network; and  
3)  The stability of the benchmarks.   
The HT is more accurate than a scientific geoid model (e.g., CGG200 and CGG05) with respect 
to CGVD28, but its precision is less due to the three reasons mentioned above.  Furthermore, the 
HT will reproduce all systematic errors and even possible blunders that are part of CGVD28. The 
accuracy of the HT can reach a few decimeters in remote regions where leveling is sparse or 
inexistent. 
3.4 Chart datum 
This section is not intended to describe the chart datum in detail.  It limits itself to explaining how 
land surveys, done either by leveling or GPS techniques, can be related to the MSL.  Fisheries 
and Oceans Canada (DFO) is responsible for the maintenance of the chart datums.  At each tide 
gauge, DFO establishes a chart datum.  It is set to a level where water level rarely goes below it.  
In general, the Lower Low Water Large Tide (LLWLT) defines the chart datum.  Each datum is 
independent unless leveling or GPS surveys tie the tide gauges together.  In this case, the chart 
datums can be referenced with respect to a vertical datum (benchmarks, geoid or ellipsoid).   
At each tide gauge, DFO measures regularly the water level with respect to the chart datum. From 
these measurements, DFO can establish MSL above the chart datum.  The separation between the 
MSL  and the chart datum is the Z
0
value.   Furthermore, the  stability of the tide  gauge is 
maintained by referencing it to a series of markers in close proximity having heights known 
above the chart datum.  CD expresses the height of a reference point above the chart datum.  
Thus, if the reference point is also known above a vertical datum, the separation between the 
vertical datum and MSL (
datum
) can be determined either by 
datum
= H – CD + Z
0
(7) 
or 
datum
= h – N – CD + Z
0
.  
(8) 
A negative 
datum
would mean that the MSL is below the vertical datum.  If the vertical datum 
corresponds  to  the  geoid  (the  global  MSL), 
datum
would  represent  the  actual  sea  surface 
topography. 
5 April 2006 
11
How to reorder pdf pages in reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages in pdf files; change pdf page order
How to reorder pdf pages in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
rearrange pdf pages reader; rearrange pages in pdf online
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
4. Datums for the Mackenzie Delta 
Now, let’s consider the datum situation in the Mackenzie Delta, NWT.  The Delta region covers 
an area of approximately 20,000 km
2
at the mouth of the Mackenzie River, next to the Beaufort 
Sea.  A significant portion of the Delta has an elevation of less than a couple of metres.  It is a 
region where floods are common during storm surges and spring freshet.  Furthermore, the Delta 
is currently a region of important economic activity with the development of a gas project and, 
naturally, environmental issues.  Thus, the Delta requires an accurate vertical datum.  A decimetre 
height difference could represent different scenarios of flooded areas.  Figure A.1, in appendix, 
illustrates the relation between the different datums in Tuktoyaktuk. 
During  the  1970’s,  leveling  surveys 
were conducted in the Yukon and NWT 
to  extend  CGVD28  into  the  western 
Canadian  Arctic  (Figures  2  and  5).  
Leveling  along  the  Alaska,  Klondike 
and  Dempster  Highways  and  the 
Mackenzie  River  were  done  to  tie 
Whitehorse, Dawson City, Tsiigehtchic 
(formerly  Arctic  Red  River),  Norman 
Wells,  Fort  Simpson  and  Fort 
Providence  to  a  common  reference 
height reference system.   Tuktoyaktuk 
was tied to Tsiigehtchic by leveling in 
1987-1988.    The  sections  south  and 
north  of  Inuvik  were  surveyed  in  the 
summer and winter times, respectively.  
The  western  segment  from  Inuvik  to 
klavik was surveyed in the winter of 
s at M039008 could be erroneous if station 66T9503 has 
oved since 1988. 
503 appears to be stable because station 
039008 has comparable 
CGVD28
to the other stations. 
A
1991.   
The leveling data between Tsiigehtchic 
and  Tuktoyaktuk  was  adjusted  by 
constraining the two ends.  The southern 
end  was  constrained  to  the  CGVD28 
height derived from the 1970’s survey 
and the northern end was constrained to MSL at the tide gauge (# 6485) in Tuktoyaktuk.  Thus, 
CGVD28 was made to coincide with MSL in the Delta region.  This can be verified by using Eq. 
7.  Table 1 indicates the separation between CGVD28 and MSL (
CGVD28
) at some reference 
markers to tide gauge #6485 in Tuktoyaktuk.  Stations 66T9503, 66T9504, 73T9515 and 749151 
were leveled in 1987 following first-order standard while station M039008 was tied directly by 
leveling to station 66T9503 in 2004.  No check leveling was conducted to verify stability of the 
existing local benchmarks.  Thus, height
Figure 5: Leveling surveys in the Mackenzie Delta i
1970’s (magenta), 1980’s (black) and 1990’s (red). 
m
The results in Table 1 show a separation of approximately 1 cm between CGVD28 and MSL, 
which can be considered negligible.  A negative 
CGVD28
indicates that MSL is slightly below the 
vertical datum (CGVD28).  Furthermore, station 66T9
M
5 April 2006 
12
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
change page order in pdf online; change page order in pdf reader
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
pdf change page order online; how to move pdf pages around
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
Table 1: Separation between CGVD28 and MSL (
CGVD28
) at Tuktoyaktuk (Unit: m). 
Tide Gauge #6485 
Station 
H
CGVD28
C.D. 
Z
0
CGVD28
66T9503 
2.690 
3.064 
0.364 
-0.010 
66T9505 
2.690 
3.064 
0.364 
-0.010 
73T9515 
5.945 
6.317 
0.364 
-0.008 
749151 
5.671 
6.052 
0.364 
-0.017 
M039008 
4.739 
5.113 
0.364 
-0.010 
However,  by  constraining  the  leveling  section  in  Tsiigehtchic  and  Tuktoyaktuk,  does  the 
adjustment create a systematic error?  It is unlikely that the heights in Tsiigehtchic are accurate 
because of the accumulation of systematic errors throughout CGVD28.  The comparison of 
CGVD28 with Nov04, which is a free adjustment north of Tsiigehtchic, indicates a discrepancy 
that is increasing systematically from –73 cm to –55 cm in the northern direction over almost 300 
km of leveling (see Figure A.2).  It constitutes an error of 0.6 mm/km in CGVD28.  If the local 
MSL at Tuktoyaktuk would define the vertical datum, CGVD28 heights in Tsiigehtchic should be 
higher by 18 cm.  The large absolute differences come from the fact that Nov04 is a minimum 
constrained adjustment by holding the height of a station in Rimouski fixed with respect to its 
local MSL.  The separation between Nov04 datum and MSL (
Nov04
) in Tuktoyaktuk is given in 
Table 2.  If we assume that Nov04 has no accumulation of systematic error, 
Nov04
indicates that 
the local MSL at Tuktoyaktuk is higher than the local MSL at Rimouski by 53 cm.   
Table 2: Separation between Nov04 and MSL (
Nov04
) at Tuktoyaktuk (Unit: m). 
Tide Gauge #6485 
Station 
H
Nov04
C.D. 
Z
0
Nov04
66T9503 
3.232 
3.064 
0.364 
0.532 
66T9504 
3.232 
3.064 
0.364 
0.532 
73T9515 
6.484 
6.317 
0.364 
0.531 
749151 
6.210 
6.052 
0.364 
0.522 
M039008 
5.281 
5.113 
0.364 
0.532 
The hybrid datum HTv2.0 should also coincide with MSL because it is a realization of CGVD28 
by definition.  However, at the time of its realization, only a single GPS site on a benchmark was 
available in the Delta making the correction rather weak.  The GPS measurements came from an 
early survey in 1987, when accuracy of the GPS measurements were at the decimeter level.  
Because the stations are rather sparse, it is difficult to confirm stability of the benchmarks.  Figure 
A.3 shows the location of the few GPS/Leveling stations available for the realization of HTv2.0 
in 2001, and the discrepancies between CGG2000 and CGVD28 at those stations.  Also, it depicts 
the  30-cm  distortion  applied  to  CGG2000  in  the  region  to  create  HTv2.0.  Naturally,  this 
distortion reduces the precision of the Height Transformation.  
It is only in 2004 that an extensive GPS campaign was conducted in the Delta region to validate 
the precision of the geoid model (Figure A.4).  This campaign included observations at station 
M039008, which is a reference marker to the tide gauge in Tuktoyaktuk.  Thus, it is possible to 
5 April 2006 
13
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pdf page; reorder pages pdf
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
Support navigating to the previous or next page of the PDF document; Able to insert, delete or reorder PDF document page in VB.NET document viewer;
reorder pages in pdf file; how to reorder pages in pdf reader
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
determine directly the separation between HTv2.0 datum and MSL (
HTv2.0
) at Tuktoyaktuk by 
using Eq. 8: 
HTv2.0
= h
NAD83
– N
HTv2.0/NAD83
– CD + Z
0
. = -2.767  -7.164  5.113 + 0.364 = -0.352 m  
A 35-cm separation indicates that HTv2.0 is a poor realization of CGVD28 in the region, which is 
not surprising based on the constraints that were available.  Figure A.5 shows discrepancies 
between HTv2.0 and CGVD28 at the remaining points of the 2004 GPS campaign.  A valid 
height transformation should have residuals (h-H-N) near zero with an approximate error of ±2.5 
cm or better.  
Figure 6: CGG05 geoid model for the Mackenzie D
elta, 
NWT.  (C.I.: 0.5 m) 
On  the  other  hand,  the  Canadian 
Gravimetric  Geoid  2005  (CCG05) 
model  agrees  well  with  the  Nov04 
datum after removing  a  80-cm bias 
(Figure A.6).  The bias is irrelevant 
because the two datums (Nov04 and 
CGG05) do  not  represent the  same 
equipotential  surface  by  definition 
and  include  systematic  errors.  
CGG05 
corresponds 
to 
an 
equipotential  surface  representing 
global  MSL.    This  surface  is 
approximately  30  cm  above  local 
MSL  in  Rimouski.    The  standard 
deviation of the residuals (h – H
Nov04
–  N
CGG05
 is  2.8  cm  for  the  Delta 
region even though the geoid changes 
by 5 m across the region as shown in 
Figure  6.    The  statistic  does  not 
include  the  two  stations  in 
Tuktoyaktuk  and  two  stations  with 
large  discrepancies.    These  larger 
discrepancies at stations 87T509 and 
90T030 are probably due to vertical 
motion of the benchmarks between the leveling and GPS observation epochs.  The separation 
between CGG05 and MSL (
CGG05
) is given by (station M039008): 
CGG05
= h
NAD83
– N
CGG05/NAD83
– CD + Z
0
. = -2.767  -7.135  5.113 + 0.364 = -0.381 m. 
For the two stations (M039007 and M039008) in Tuktoyaktuk, we notice from Figure A.6 that 
their residuals are smaller than the mean residuals of the other stations across the Delta by 11 and 
14 cm, respectively.   This step might indicate a problem with the leveling data or the geoid 
model.  However, it would be unlikely that the error can be associated with the geoid model 
without affecting other stations in the Delta.  It is also unlikely that it is a systematic error in the 
leveling because it would represent an error of 5 mm/km from station 80T7000, which is only 40 
km west of Tuktoyaktuk (see Figure A.6). Most probably, there is a blunder in the leveling data 
somewhere along the 40 km stretch.  This can be verified by re-leveling the segment (expensive 
and laborious) or by conducting a GPS survey on more benchmarks between the two stations.  If 
there is a blunder and the local benchmarks in Tuktoyaktuk are tied to MSL, it would mean that 
5 April 2006 
14
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
how to reorder pdf pages in; how to move pages within a pdf
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change pdf page order online; reorder pdf pages in preview
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
all heights in the Delta are actually higher than MSL in Tuktoyaktuk by 11 to 14 cm.  Thus, 
comparing CGVD28 at the GPS stations of the 2004 campaign with CGG05 (Figure A.7) we 
notice again the systematic error in CGVD28 between Tsiigehtchic and Tuktoyaktuk and the step 
between stations 80T7000 (-23 cm) and station M039008 (-39 cm).   As for Nov04, if the blunder 
is in the leveling data, CGVD28 heights should be higher by about 12 cm across the Delta.  If we 
include the systematic error of 18 cm in CGVD28, the actual CGVD28 heights should be higher 
than MSL by an additional 30 cm when reaching Tsiigehtchic.  
Finally, stations M039007 and M039008, which are just a few metres apart, can be considered as 
having identical geoid heights and the height difference measured by leveling between these two 
stations should have a precision at a few mm (1-3 mm).  The observed difference of 3 cm 
between the two stations is probably due to GPS errors.  It cannot be caused by instability of the 
stations because the leveling and GPS were conducted at the same epoch.  Thus, when validating 
geoid models against GPS measurements at benchmarks, it is important to consider that the GPS 
error can be a few cm. 
5. Recommendations 
Is it possible to recommend an appropriate method for topographical measurements when such 
discrepancies exist between vertical datums within a relatively small region?  Usually, for this 
size of area, the relative precision between the different datums is within a few cm, and certainly 
not at the decimeter level.  The adoption of a geoid model as the official vertical datum for 
Canada, as proposed by the Height Modernization project, would eliminate the existing problems 
with CGVD28 and hybrid datums (e.g., HTv2.0).  However, this modernization of the vertical 
datum would not be reality before 2009.  In the meantime, projects are currently happening in the 
Delta region and a surveying method has to be recommended to surveyors. 
The best approach is to work with ellipsoidal heights, i.e., using the ellipsoid as the vertical 
datum.  They are accurate and precise measurements available in a cost-efficient manner when 
project areas extend over 5 to 10 km.  The GPS heights are the original measurements and those 
to safeguard for future use such as for local crustal deformation.  However, ellipsoidal heights 
alone cannot be used for water management because the geoid can change significantly within a 
project area.  For example, the geoid changes by 2.5 m along the coastline between Tuktoyaktuk 
and the Yukon/NWT border.  When GPS measurements are well established and secured, they 
can be easily transformed to heights above MSL by subtracting  the geoid height.  If more 
accurate geoid heights are available later on, new heights above mean sea level can be determined 
easily by retrieving the ellipsoidal heights.  The key element is to document properly the geoid 
model used for the determination of the heights above MSL. 
If the highest precision is required for proper water management, the ellipsoidal heights should be 
corrected using the latest geoid model, which is currently CGG05.  It will allow the highest 
precision  for orthometric  heights  in  the region.   These  heights  can  be  related to  MSL by 
measuring the separation (
Datum
) between the vertical datum (geoid) and MSL at tide gauges.  
Datum
should be a constant for a local area.  Thus, the actual height above mean sea level (H
MSL
can be determined by: 
H
MSL
= h
RF
– N
Datum/RF
Datum
(9) 
where subscripts RF and Datum are the names of the reference frame (e.g., NAD83 (CSRS), 
ITRF) and datum (e.g., CGVD28, HTv2.0, CGG05), respectively. 
5 April 2006 
15
VB.NET PDF: VB.NET Guide to Process PDF Document in .NET Project
It can be used to add or delete PDF document page(s), sort the order of PDF pages, add image to PDF document page and extract page(s) from PDF document in VB
how to reorder pages in pdf file; pdf page order reverse
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
rearrange pdf pages; reorder pages in pdf online
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
If the ellipsoidal height must be converted to CGVD28, the Height Transformation (e.g., HTv2.0) 
is the most efficient technique and would give accuracy better than 5 cm in most region of 
southern Canada where the leveling network is dense with GPS sites co-located with benchmarks.  
However, the error in HT can reach the decimeter level or more where GPS measurements on 
benchmarks are sparse, where the transformation was realized using early GPS ellipsoidal heights 
(1980’s and early 1990’s), and where the benchmarks are unstable.  For these regions, it is 
preferable for the surveyors to realize their own height transformation using GPS measurements 
on local benchmarks to estimate the bias (and tilt) between the geoid model and CGVD28.    
Software GPS-H, developed at and available from Natural Resources Canada, allows users to 
create their own height transformation.  Again, it is important to document properly how the local 
transformation was done. 
6. Conclusion 
Surveyors are currently at the crossroads between the traditional leveling and modern space-based 
positioning technology for the determination of accurate and precise heights.  The leveling is 
highly precise, but it is a laborious technique dependent on access and for which cost increases as 
a function of distance.  GPS is a highly efficient and cost-effective positioning technique at most 
locations.  Unfortunately, heights derived from either  technique do not necessarily coincide 
because of systematic errors in their reference datum.  In particular, CGVD28, which is a 1928 
construct datum, contains several systematic errors making it incompatible with accurate geoid 
models developed today.  Hybrid datums, which distort a geoid model to make it fit to an official 
datum realized by leveling, are only a band-aid solution that adds more confusion at times 
because they coincide neither with the official datum nor the geoid model in regions where 
benchmarks are sparse or inexistent (e.g., northern Canada).  
Discrepancies between different datums are demonstrated for the region of the Mackenzie Delta, 
NWT.  Precise heights are required in this low-lying area along the Beaufort Sea because river 
and storm-surge flooding are significant issues in relation to important economic activity and 
environmental concerns.  CGVD28, geoid model CGG05 and hybrid datum HTv2.0 disagree at 
the level of a few decimeters in the Delta.  CGVD28 has systematic errors that accumulate to 18 
cm  from  Tsiigehtchic  to  Tuktoyaktuk  because  of  constraints  imposed  in  its  adjustment.  
Furthermore, the leveling data, west of Tuktoyaktuk, may contain a blunder that would increase 
the error in CGVD28 by an additional 10-15 cm making CGVD28 heights too low in Tsiigehtchic 
by about 30 cm with respect to MSL at the tide gauge in Tuktoyaktuk.  HTv2.0, which was 
realized in 2001, is not appropriate for the Delta region because it is based on only two GPS 
ellipsoidal heights collocated with benchmarks in Inuvik and Tsciigehtchic.  These measurements 
date  back  to  1987  when  GPS  accuracy  was  at  the  decimeter  level.    Furthermore,  the 
measurements were too sparse to investigate the stability of the observed benchmarks. 
The best approach to determine accurate heights above MSL is through the combination of GPS 
and  an accurate  gravimetric geoid  model  (CGG05).    Even though  geoid  and  MSL  do not 
coincide, the separation between the two surfaces can be measured at the reference markers of 
tide gauges.  However, the fundamental values are the ellipsoidal heights, which are accurate 
measurements in reference to a stable reference surface: an ellipsoid.  The orthometric height is 
derived by subtracting a geoid height that will improve continuously over the next few years.  
Thus, it is important to secure GPS information and document properly the method used to 
transform ellipsoidal heights to heights above mean sea level. 
5 April 2006 
16
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada 
5 April 2006 
17
References 
Canon J.B. (1928) Adjustments of the precise level net of Canada 1928. Publication No. 28, 
Geodetic Survey Division, Earth Sciences Sector, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Canada 
Canon J.B. (1935) Recent Adjustments of the precise level net of Canada. Publication No. 56, 
Geodetic Survey Division, Earth Sciences Sector, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Canada 
Heiskanen W.A., and H. Moritz (1967) Physical Geodesy, Freeman 
LeGrand P, E.J.O. Schrama, and J. Tournadre (2003) An Inverse estimate of the Dynamic 
Topography of the Ocean.  Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, No. 2, 1062, doi: 
10.1029/2002GL014917, 2003 
Véronneau M. (2001) The Canadian Gravimetric Geoid Model of 2000 (CGG2000).  Report, 
Geodetic Survey Division, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa 
Véronneau M., A. Mainville, and M.R. Craymer (2001) The GPS Height Transformation (v2.0): 
An Ellipsoidal-CGVD28 Height Transformation for Use With GPS in Canada. Report, 
Geodetic Survey Division, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa 
Véronneau M., R. Duval, and J. Huang (2005) A Gravimetric Geoid Model as a Vertical Datum 
in Canada. Proceedings of the Canadian Institute of Geomatics, Ottawa 
Zilkoski D.B. (1986) The new adjustment of the North American datum.  ACSM Bulletin, April, 
35-36 
Zilkoski D.B., J.H. Richards, G.M. Young (1992). Results of the general adjustment of the North 
American vertical datum of 1988.  American Congress on Surveying and Mapping, Surveying 
and Land Information Systems, Vol. 52, No. 3, 1992, pp. 133-149 
(http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/PUBS_LIB/NAVD88/navd88report.htm) 
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada – Appendix A 
Figure A.1: Illustration representing the relation of the different vertical datums in Tuktoyaktuk, NWT.  Points 1 and 2 represent two stations 
along the coast.  H is an orthometric height; h is an ellipsoidal height (negative in this case); N is the geoid height (negative in this case); 
C.D. is the height of a station above chart datum; Z
0
is the height of the mean water level (MWL) above the chart datum; H
CGVD28
is the 
“orthometric” height above CGVD28; SST is the sea surface topography (height of sea surface above the geoid); and SSH is the Sea 
Surface Height (height of the sea surface above the ellipsoid).  The ellipsoid, geoid, CGVD28, MWL and chart datum are not parallel 
surfaces in reality. 
5 April 2006 
18 
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada – Appendix A 
Figure A.2: Difference between the leveling datums of Nov04 and CGVD28 (CGVD28 – Nov04) for the region of the Mackenzie Delta.
5 April 2006 
19 
Demystifying the Vertical Datum in Canada – Appendix A 
Figure A.3: Distortions applied to CGG2000 to represent CGVD28 in the Mackenzie Delta (C.I.: 2 cm).  The black points represent GPS stations 
on benchmarks available for the realization of HTv2.0.  The values, in cm, indicate h-H-N where h is the ellipsoidal heights, H is the 
CGVD28 heights and N is the CGG2000 geoid height.  
5 April 2006 
20 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested