c# render pdf : How to rearrange pages in a pdf reader software control dll windows web page wpf web forms USArmy-InternmentResettlement12-part66

Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-21 
Identification  bands  are  attached  to  the  left  wrist  of  each  detainee  using  the  personnel 
identification banding kit (National Stock Number 8465-01-015-3245). 
Detainees’ personal property and items of evidentiary value are stored in a temporary storage 
area until they are fully processed. 
Detainees are given DA Forms 4137 for any property temporarily or permanently stored in the 
internment facility storage area. 
Access to the temporary storage area is controlled. 
Detainees are provided food and water. 
Detainees are provided access to sanitation facilities. 
Detainees are provided first aid or medical treatment as required. 
Detainees are held in the receiving area until they can be processed. 
6-69. Body cavity searches may be conducted for valid medical reasons or when there is reasonable belief 
that a security risk is present. Body cavity searches are not to be routine, are only conducted by authorized 
persons (trained medical personnel) according to DOD policy, and are subject to the following conditions: 
Performance  of  routine  detainee  body  cavity  exams  or  searches  is  strictly  prohibited  except 
for— 
„ 
Valid medical reasons with the verbal consent of the individual. 
„ 
When there is a reasonable  belief that  the detainee is concealing  an  item  that presents a 
security risk. 
Examinations  or  searches  are  conducted  by personnel  of  the  same gender  as  the  detainee  if 
possible. 
Examinations and searches will be conducted in a manner that respects the individual. 
Note. Body  cavity searches other  than those  performed for valid  medical reasons require  the 
approval of the first general/flag officer in the chain of command. 
6-70. Table 6-1, page 6-22, shows the nine stations that each detainee must go through to complete the 
processing, the responsible individuals at each station, and actions that must be accomplished. Based on 
mission variables and the commander’s decision, the stations may need to be tailored to meet the situation. 
The  procedures  for  receiving  detainees  are  performed  at  stations  1  through  4,  and  the  procedures  for 
processing detainees are performed at stations 5 through 9. 
6-71. When detainees arrive at the TIF, they will go through an initial screening within the sally port or 
holding area before a more comprehensive screening by MI personnel. This process provides HUMINT 
collectors with detainee information to be used when conducting interrogation operations. Subsequently, 
the detainees proceed through a templated processing and screening area that includes areas found in table 
6-1, page 6-22. 
How to rearrange pages in a pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages in pdf reader; move pdf pages
How to rearrange pages in a pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
rearrange pdf pages in preview; move pages in pdf online
Chapter 6 
6-22 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Table 6-1. Nine-station internment process 
Station 
Purpose 
Responsible 
Individual(s)
1
Actions 
Search 
Military 
police 
•  Assign each detainee an ISN to replace the DD Form 2745 number. 
•  Ensure that accountability procedures are followed. 
•  Sign DD Form 2708, and take custody of detainees (may use a manifest 
for this), their records, and their impounded property/evidence. 
•  Receive impounded property separately according to the Joint Travel 
Regulations and Joint Federal Travel Regulations. 
•  Conduct joint inventory with the transporting unit. 
•  Escort detainees, their property, and accompanying evidence. 
•  Strip-search detainees (use military police of the same gender) before 
entering the processing area unless conditions prohibit it. 
•  Remove and examine property/evidence, place it in a container or tray, 
mark it with the detainee’s ISN, and take it to the temporary property 
storage area (where it is held until the detainee is processed). 
•  Prepare a receipt for the detainee’s retained property/evidence using DA 
Form 4137 or field-expedient materials. 
•  Supervise detainee movement to the next station. 
Personal 
hygiene 
Military 
police and 
processed 
detainees 
(when 
possible) 
•  Allow detainees to shower, shave, and get haircuts. 
•  Disinfect detainees, using the guidelines established by the PVNTMED 
officer. 
•  Allow detainees access to sanitation facilities. 
•  Supervise detainee movement to the next station. 
Medical 
evaluation 
Medical 
personnel 
and military 
police 
•  Inspect detainees for signs of illness or injury to discover health 
problems or communicable diseases that may require medical 
evacuation. 
•  Provide medical and dental care according to AR 190-8. 
•  Decide which detainees need to be medically evacuated for treatment 
and to what facility. 
•  Evaluate detainees as prescribed by theater policy. 
•  Immunize or reimmunize detainees as prescribed by theater policy. 
•  Initiate treatment and immunization records. 
•  Place detainees’ ISNs on their medical records to reduce the need for 
linguist support. Ensure that detainees’ names, service numbers (if 
applicable), and ISNs were entered at Station 1 with the aid of an 
interpreter. 
•  Annotate in the detainee’s medical records the date and place that the 
detainee was inspected, immunized, and disinfected. 
•  Document preexisting conditions and wounds in the detainees’ medical 
records. Use photographs if appropriate. 
•  Obtain height and weight of detainees and annotate them in the DRS 
and on DA Forms 2664-R. 
•  Supervise detainee movement to the next station. 
Personal 
items
2
Military 
police 
•  Issue personal comfort items (toilet paper, soap, toothbrush, and 
toothpaste). 
•  Issue clothing from one of the following sources: 
•  The detainee’s original clothing. 
•  Captured enemy supplies. 
•  Normal supply channels. 
•  Supervise detainee movement to the next station. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
pdf reverse page order online; how to move pages in pdf converter professional
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reverse pages in pdf; how to move pages in pdf acrobat
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-23 
Table 6-1. Nine-station internment process (continued) 
Station 
Purpose 
Responsible 
Individual(s)
1
Actions 
Adminis-
trative 
account-
ability 
Processing 
clerk 
(assisted by 
an 
interpreter, 
MI 
personnel, 
or others) 
and military 
police 
•  Ensure that an ISN was assigned to each detainee using the DRS at 
Station 1. Annotate the ISN on DD Form 2745 so that late-arriving 
property can be matched to its owner. 
•  Initiate personnel records, identification documents, DA Form 4137, and 
DA Form 4237-R. 
•  Use the DRS and/or digital equipment to generate forms and records. 
•  Prepare forms and records to maintain accountability of detainees and 
their property. (See AJP-2.5.) 
•  Prepare forms for the repatriation or international transfer of detainees as 
specified in local regulations or SOPs. 
•  Supervise detainee movement to the next station. 
Biometrics 
collection 
(photo-
graphs, 
DNA data, 
finger-
prints, and 
iris scans) 
Military 
police 
•  Fingerprint detainees using a DOD electronic biometric collection set by 
recording the information required. 
•  Prepare five-aspect photographs of each detainee using a digital camera. 
•  Take photographs of the head, with the detainee looking forward, 45 
degrees to the left and right and 90 degrees to the left and right. 
•  Digitally upload photographs into the DRS. 
•  Collect a DNA sample from each detainee using buccal (inside the cheek) 
swabs. 
•  Create an identification band using the DRS. 
•  Supervise detainee movement to the next station. 
Property/ 
evidence 
inventory
3
Military 
police 
•  Inventory and record, in the presence of the detainee, property brought 
from the temporary property storage area. 
•  Complete a separate DA Form 4137 for returned, stored, impounded, and 
confiscated property. 
•  List the property to be returned to the detainee or stored during internment 
on DA Form 4137. 
•  Give the detainee a completed copy of DA Form 4137 for property placed 
in temporary storage. 
•  Give the detainee a completed copy of DA Form 4137 as a receipt for 
money placed in the detainee’s account. (See AR 190-8 and DFAS-IN  
37-1.) 
•  Return retained property that was taken from the detainee at Station 1. 
•  Supervise detainee movement to the next station. 
Records 
review 
Military 
police 
•  Review the processed records for completeness and accuracy. 
•  Escort detainees back to the appropriate stations to correct errors if 
necessary. 
•  Allow detainees to prepare DA Form 2665-R (Capture Card for Prisoner of 
War). If they are being interned at the same place where they were 
processed, allow them to prepare DA Form 2666-R (Prisoner of War 
Notification of Address/Prisoner of War Mail). 
•  Have another individual (someone that is authorized by the commander) 
complete DA Form 2665-R and/or DA Form 2666-R for detainees who are 
unable to write. 
•  Supervise detainee movement to the next station. 
•  Ensure that CIs have an order of internment, with a record of any appeal 
requested. Prepare an order of internment according to AR 190-8 if one 
has not been completed, including appeal rights. 
Movement 
to living 
area 
Military 
police 
•  Brief detainees on internment facility rules and regulations. 
•  Escort detainees to their new living areas. 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
pdf reorder pages online; move pdf pages in preview
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
pages simply with a few lines of C# code. C# Codes to Sort Slides Order. If you want to use a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange
how to move pages within a pdf document; rearrange pdf pages online
Chapter 6 
6-24 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Table 6-1. Nine-station internment process (continued) 
Notes. 
1
The number of people who perform tasks depends on the number of detainees and the time available. 
2
Detainees being categorized as CIs, RP, and enemy combatants are clothed according to AR 190-8. 
3
Property records must be maintained electronically using the DRS and on the original hard copy of DA Form 4137. 
Legend: 
AJP 
allied joint publication 
AR 
Army regulation 
CI 
civilian internee 
DA 
Department of the Army 
DD 
Department of Defense 
DFAS-IN 
Defense Finance and Accounting Service-Indiana 
DNA 
deoxyribonucleic acid 
DOD 
Department of Defense 
DRS 
Detainee Reporting System 
ISN 
internment serial number 
PVNTMED 
preventive medicine 
RP 
retained personnel 
SOP 
standing operating procedure 
Initial Processing 
6-72. Initial processing is the gathering of critical information from detainees. The minimum information 
needed in the initial processing is— 
Complete name (first and last). 
Service number (only if classified as an EPW). 
DD Form 2745 number. 
Grade (only if classified as an EPW). 
Theater of capture. 
Power served. 
Detainee category. 
Capturing unit. 
Date of capture. 
POC (grid coordinates). 
Circumstances of capture. 
6-73. The  information  collected  during  the  initial  inprocessing  is  entered  into  the  Detainee  Reporting 
System. Subsequently; an ISN is then issued to the detainee. 
6-74. This information, along with the information needed to assign an ISN (capturing power, theater code, 
power  served,  sequence  number,  and  detainee  classification),  is  enough  to  move  the  detainee  into  the 
internment facility where additional data can be gathered as time permits. Much of the information comes 
directly from the DD Form 2745. The TDRC provides blocks of ISNs to make initial processing quick and 
effective. 
Full Processing 
6-75. Detainees  are  considered  fully  processed  when  all  fields  in  the  Detainee  Reporting  System  are 
completed (this also includes fields from initial processing). Remember that detainees are only required to 
give  their  name,  grade,  and  service number.  Items such  as  the  city of birth  and  next  of  kin are  to  be 
collected when possible; however, detainees are not required to provide this information. 
6-76. AR 190-8 states that the NDRC is responsible for maintaining the following information and items 
on detainees: 
Date of birth. 
City of birth. 
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages in extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order pdf; move pages in pdf file
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
pdf rearrange pages; how to move pages around in pdf
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-25 
Country of birth. 
Nationality. 
General statement of health. 
Power served. 
Name and address of a person to be notified of the detainee’s capture. 
Address to which correspondence may be sent. 
Notification of capture and the date sent. 
I
NTERNMENT 
F
ACILITY 
A
SSIGNMENT
6-77. The  initial  classification  of  a  detainee  is  accomplished  during  processing  and  is  based  on  the 
statements  or identity papers that  the  detainee provides.  Assignment  to  a  specific  compound within  the 
internment facility is further based on the assumption that the identity the detainee provided was correct. 
This provides the basis for assignment to various compounds and the establishment of individual detainee 
personnel files. 
C
LASSIFICATION AND 
R
EASSIGNMENT
6-78. Once the detainee is assigned to a facility, expect a continuing need for further reclassification and 
reassignment. It may become necessary to reclassify the detainee a second time as the detainee’s identity 
becomes apparent.  Agitators, other detainees,  or detainee leaders will  eventually  be  uncovered  by  their 
activities. They may then be reclassified according to their new identity or ideology and reassigned to a 
more appropriate facility. Commanders at detention/internment facilities must conduct Article 5 or civilian 
internee review tribunals according to the procedures in appendix D. 
Note.  Article  5  tribunals  are  conducted  if  there  is  a  doubt  as  to  EPW  status  or  upon  the 
detainee’s request. CIs (including suspected members of armed groups) should receive an order 
of  internment,  along  with  rights  of  appeal  to  a  review  board,  within  72  hours  of 
capture/internment if possible.
6-79. The reclassification and reassignment of detainees within a facility should be anticipated. The initial 
classification may be challenged by the detainees, MI personnel, or military police assets. For example, a 
detainee  may  come  forward  with  statements  or  documentation  that  indicates  that  he  or  she  should  be 
reclassified, or military police and/or MI personnel may determine after observation that a detainee was 
incorrectly classified. 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
P
ROCESSING AND 
R
ECORDS 
M
ANAGEMENT
6-80. From  the  POC  until  a  detainee  arrives  at  a  TIF,  the  proper  accountability,  processing,  and 
management  of the  detainee’s record  is crucial.  Failure to  do so  indicates a  breakdown in the  chain of 
custody of a detainee. Moreover, it provides a perception to  the media and others interested in detainee 
operations  (for  example,  the  protecting  power)  that  care,  concern,  and  overall  detainee  safety  and  
well-being are not a  prime concern  to the guard  force or  elements  conducting detainee operations. The 
overall  protection of  the  guard  force,  commanders, MI  personnel,  and medical personnel  (all  of  whom 
operate inside a TIF) is increased when the proper administrative recordkeeping is strictly enforced at the 
facility. 
Records Management 
6-81. All documentation related to the detainee’s capture and any documents generated from the POC until 
the detainee is released will be maintained in the detainee’s personnel file. If a detainee is transferred, the 
original file (containing medical, disciplinary, and administrative actions) will be provided to the receiving 
authority. If a detainee is released from DOD control, the original record will be sent to the TDRC. 
6-82. Legal files generated for the purpose of HN prosecution will be maintained by the assigned/attached 
TIF SJA. Records  management regarding  future prosecution  will  include  property captured at  the POC 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; reordering pages in pdf
Chapter 6 
6-26 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
(annotated on DA Form 4137), written statements placing detainees at the scene where an offense/crime 
was committed (DA Form 2823), and any disciplinary statements obtained on those particular detainees 
throughout their detention. 
Initiating Detainee Personnel Files 
6-83. The I/R battalion must develop and maintain hard copies of personnel files on each detainee within 
the detainee facility. At a minimum, initiate detainee personnel files with the following forms: 
DA Form 2662-R (EPW Identity Card). Completed if detainees do not hold an identification 
card from their country. 
DA  Form  2663-R  (Fingerprint  Card).  Completed  for  detainees  upon  inprocessing  into  the 
facility. 
DA Form 2664-R. Initiated upon inprocessing detainees and updated monthly. 
DA Form 4137. Used to record currency and property confiscated from detainees. 
DA Form 4237-R. Completed on detainees upon inprocessing into the facility. 
DD Form 2708. Used to account for evacuated detainees, regardless of the evacuation channel. 
DD Form 2745. Used to tag detainees who are captured. (Detainees should arrive at the site with 
this form attached.) 
DA Form 2823. Used to record capture information. 
Records and Reports 
6-84. The commander may establish local records and reports that are necessary for the effective operation 
of the facility. These reports provide the commander with information concerning the control, supervision, 
and  disposition  of  personnel  housed  in  the  facility.  The  commander  determines  the  type  of  reports 
(administrative,  operational,  sustainment,  and  intelligence)  and  the  frequency  (routine  or  as  required). 
Normal command and staff records and reports (such as DA Form 1594), worksheets, and situation maps 
are also required. (See appendix G.) 
6-85. Additional records and reports that are generated at the TIF may include— 
DA Form 2674-R. 
DA Form 2823. 
DD Form 2064. 
DD Form 2713 (Inmate Observation Report) (available on the Detainee Reporting System). 
DD Form 2714 (Inmate Disciplinary Report). 
DD Form 503 (Medical Examiner’s Report). 
DD Form 509 (Inspection Record of Prisoner in Segregation). 
DD Form 510 (Request for Interview). 
Memorandums for record (include incentives, incidents, or other situations not covered by other 
reports or records). 
Release or transfer orders available in the Detainee Reporting System. 
Disciplinary Record 
6-86. Each  commander  is  required  to  maintain  a  record  of  disciplinary  punishment  administered  to 
detainees. The use of DA Form 3997 (Military Police Desk Blotter) is suggested. Maintain this form at the 
facility at all times, even when detainees are transferred or released. 
O
PERATIONS
6-87. There are many varied components of TIF operations. These may range from identifying the proper 
linguists for employment to managing general security concerns within the facility. The paragraphs below 
are not all-encompassing, but merely provide considerations commanders must make when developing and 
implementing  operations  at  the  TIF  level.  Commanders  must  keep  in  mind  that  the  primary  focus  of 
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-27 
internment facilities  is  detainees. Detainees should be respected and  protected  according  to  the Geneva 
Conventions. 
Assigned Personnel 
6-88. Personnel assigned or attached to the facilities should be specially trained in the care and control of 
housed personnel. Each individual should be fully cognizant of the provisions of the Geneva Conventions 
and  the applicable regulations as they apply to the treatment of detainees. A training program does not 
occur once a deployment occurs. A proper training program begins during the mission-essential task list 
development  and  with  early  training  and  frequent  reinforcement of collective  and  individual  tasks  that 
support the mission-essential task list tasks. 
6-89. The  necessary  care  and  control  of  detainees  is  best  achieved with  carefully  selected  and  trained 
personnel. The specialized nature of duty at the different facilities requires personnel who can be depended 
on to cope successfully with behavior or incidents that call for calm, fair, and immediate decisive action. 
These  personnel  must  possess  the  highest  qualities  of  leadership  and  judgment.  They  are  required  to 
observe rigid self-discipline and maintain a professional attitude at all times. 
Multifunctional Boards 
6-90. Establish multifunctional boards (according to AR 190-8) to assist the detention facility commander 
in the decisionmaking process. The detention facility commander, in coordination with the MI commander, 
will  normally  chair  boards.  Multifunctional  boards  provide  full  staff  and  stakeholder  representation  to 
ensure a comprehensive review, analysis, and assessment of current functions. Boards will normally consist 
of representatives from all interested stakeholders but, at a minimum, should include military police, MI, 
legal, and medical representatives. Representatives may also include HN civil authorities, other government 
agencies,  military  criminal  investigative  organizations,  and  contractors  as  appropriate.  Boards  should 
incorporate  a  formal  process  based  on  published  protocols,  to  include  publishing  minutes,  reporting 
findings, making recommendations to higher headquarters, adjusting current action plans, and scheduling 
follow-up  meetings  as  necessary.  Multifunctional  boards  should  convene  to  address  a  variety  of  
detainee-related functions, to include the following: 
Changes in a detainee’s status (by Article 5 and CI review tribunals). 
Changes in detainee policy and detainee interrogation policy. 
Changes in release, transfer of custody, and repatriation procedures. 
Receipt of detainee complaints, allegations of abuse, and investigations. 
Corrective actions based on facility and operational assessments and inspections. 
Risk assessment, mitigation, and safety programs/plans. 
Review of detainee disciplinary policies and adjudication processes. 
Changes  in  detainee  management/environment  (compliance  measures,  integration  of  new 
facilities). 
Changes in ROE/RUF. 
Integration  of  approved  new  technologies  and  NLWs.  (When  dealing  with  detainees,  the 
detention  facility  commander  should  thoroughly  review  appropriate  use,  assess  risks,  and 
provide new equipment training.) 
Establishment  of  ICRC  or  protecting  power  communications  (does  not  preclude  mandatory 
ICRC reporting according to DOD policy). 
Monitoring and implementing of detainee facility transition plans. 
Standing Orders 
6-91. Standing orders at a facility are used to provide uniform and orderly administration of the facility. 
Procedures, rules, and instructions to be obeyed by detainees must be published (in their language), posted 
where detainees can read and refer to them, and made available to those without access to posted copies. 
Detention facility commanders should ensure that standing orders  are read to illiterate detainees in their 
Chapter 6 
6-28 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
native  language.  These  orders  should  generally  include  rules  and  procedures  governing  the  following 
activities and other matters as appropriate: 
Schedule of calls. It may include, but is not limited to— 
„ 
Reveille. 
„ 
Morning roll call. 
„ 
Readiness of quarters for inspection. 
„ 
Sick call. 
„ 
Mess call. 
„ 
Evening roll call. 
„ 
Lights out. 
Announcements of hours for religious services, recreational activities, and other activities. 
Emergency sick call procedures. 
Inspection procedures. 
Field sanitation and personal hygiene standards and procedures. 
Designated smoking areas. 
Laundry procedures and operations. 
Food service and maintenance operations and procedures. 
6-92. Examples of standing orders for detainees may include the following: 
Comply  with  rules,  regulations,  and  orders.  They  are  necessary  for  safety,  good  order,  and 
discipline. 
Immediately obey all orders from U.S. military personnel. Deliberate disobedience, resistance, 
or conduct of a mutinous or riotous nature will be dealt with by force. 
Noncompliance or any act of disorder or neglect that is prejudicial to good order or discipline 
will result in disciplinary or judicial punishment. 
Do not establish courts or administer punishment over other detainees. 
Do not possess knives, sticks, pieces of metal, or other articles that can be used as a weapon. 
Do not drill or march in military formation for any purpose except as authorized and directed by 
the detention facility commander. 
E
MERGENCY 
A
CTION 
P
LANS
6-93. TIF personnel will establish emergency action plans to assist in operating the facility. These plans 
may consist of— 
Fire drills. 
Air raid and indirect-fire drills. 
Disturbances (major/minor), including hostage situations. 
Emergency evacuations. 
Natural disaster drills, including severe weather. 
Blackouts. 
Escapes. 
Mass casualty situations. 
Defense against ground assault and response to a perimeter attack. 
R
ULES OF 
I
NTERACTION
6-94. The  ROI  provide  Soldiers  with  a  guide  for  interacting  with  detainees.  The  following  and  other 
directives may be included in the ROI: 
Speak to detainees only when giving orders or in the line of duty. 
Treat all detainees equally and with respect as human beings. 
Respect religious articles and/or materials. 
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-29 
Treat all medical problems seriously. 
Do not discuss politics or the conflict with detainees. 
Do not make promises. 
Do not make obscene gestures. 
Do not make derogatory remarks or political comments about detainees and their causes. 
Do not engage in commerce with detainees. 
Do not give gifts to detainees or accept gifts from them. 
C
ONTROL AND 
D
ISCIPLINE
6-95. Military  police  maintain  positive  control  of  detainees  under  their  care.  The  clear  and  consistent 
standards of behavior identified by the guard force will assist in maintaining discipline within the detainee 
population. Embedded within those standards is the inherent right to self-defense if a situation should arise. 
Through  fair  and  humane  treatment,  military  police  can  ensure  that  compliant  detainee  conditions  are 
established. 
6-96. Maintain humane but firm control by— 
Observing rigorous self-discipline. 
Maintaining a professional but impersonal attitude. 
Coping calmly with hostile or unruly behavior or incidents. 
Taking judicious, immediate, decisive action
6-97. Military  police take positive action  to  establish daily  or  periodic  routines  and  responses  that  are 
conducive to good order, discipline, and control. They— 
Require compliance with policies and procedures that provide firm control of detainees. 
Use techniques that provide firm control of detainees. 
Give  reasonable  orders  in  a  commanding  voice,  and  strive  to  learn  basic  commands  in  the 
detainees’ language to help them comply with facility standards and rules.  
Post copies of the Geneva  Conventions (printed in the detainees’ language) in the compound 
where detainees can read them. 
Post rules, regulations, instructions, notices, orders, and other announcements that detainees are 
expected to obey in areas where they can read them. Posted information must be printed in a 
language that they understand, and copies must be provided to detainees who do not have access 
to posted copies. 
Ensure that detainees obey rules, orders, and directives. 
Report a detainee’s refusal or failure to obey an order or regulation. 
6-98. The detention facility commander establishes the rules needed to maintain discipline and security in 
each facility. They are rigidly enforced. The following are never permitted: 
Fraternizing among detainees and U.S. armed forces or civilian personnel. 
Establishing relationships between detainees and U.S. armed forces or civilian personnel. 
Photographing or videotaping detainees for other than official reasons. 
Allowing detainees to establish their own court system. 
Donating or receiving gifts or any commercial activity between persons in U.S. custody and the 
U.S. armed forces. 
6-99. If  necessary, the military police commander or appointed officer can initiate general court-martial 
proceedings against  detainees  using  the  MCM; UCMJ; and U.S.  laws, regulations,  and  orders  in  force 
during the time of their internment. The I/R battalion requires adequate MOS 27D personnel to accomplish 
this mission. Do not deliver detainees to civil authorities for an offense unless a member of the U.S. armed 
forces would be delivered for committing a similar offense. (See AR 190-8 for a complete discussion on 
detainee judicial proceedings.) 
Chapter 6 
6-30 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
6-100.  Only  the  internment  facility  commander  or  an  appointed  designee(s)  may  order  disciplinary 
punishment  without  prejudice  to  the  competence  of  the  courts  or  higher  authority.  Detainees  are  not 
disciplined  until  they  are  given  precise  information  regarding  the  offense(s)  that  they  are  accused  of 
committing. The accused must be given a chance to explain their conduct and to defend themselves. The 
accused  is  permitted  to  call  witnesses  and  use  an  interpreter  if  necessary.  Disciplinary  measures,  the 
duration of which will not exceed 30 days, include— 
The  discontinuation  of  privileges  that  are  granted  over  and  above  those provided for  by  the 
Geneva Conventions. 
Segregation. 
A  fine, not  to  exceed one-half of  the  advance pay  and  working pay that  the  detainee  would 
otherwise receive during a period of not more than 30 days. 
Fatigue duties  (extra  duty),  not  to  exceed 2  hours  per day.  This  duty will  not be  applied  to 
officers. NCOs can only be required to do supervisory work.
I
NFORMATION 
C
OLLECTION
6-101.  Information collection methods relative to detainee activities may include— 
Conducting periodic and unannounced compound searches and patrols. 
Searching individual detainees on departure from and return to the internment facility. 
Training all  personnel  in  the techniques  of observing,  recognizing, and  reporting information 
that may be of intelligence value, such as— 
„ 
Unusual activities, especially before holidays or celebrations. 
„ 
Messages being passed between groups of detainees and CIs on labor details. 
„ 
Messages being passed to or from local civilians while detainees are on labor details. 
„ 
Messages being signaled from one compound to another. 
„ 
Detainees volunteering information of potential intelligence value. 
Ensuring that actions are taken to protect detainees from reprisal by  removing or transferring 
them to safe facilities once they provide information. 
C
OMPOUND 
O
PERATIONS
6-102.  For efficient compound operations, implement the following: 
Accountability procedures. These procedures are used to track the location and population of 
detainees. Such measures may include scheduled and random head counts. 
Observation  and  disciplinary  reports.  These  reports  are  used  to  document  infractions  of 
facility rules. 
Juvenile segregation rules. These rules are used to protect juveniles from the adult population. 
Special  housing unit/segregation  procedures.  These procedures are used  for  the  detainee’s 
protection and for disciplinary, medical, or administrative reasons. 
Personal  property  procedures. These procedures  are used to ensure that  detainees  properly 
account for and store personal property. 
H
EALTH AND 
C
OMFORT 
I
TEMS
6-103.  Meeting the subsistence needs of detainees is one of many measures implemented to ensure that 
humane treatment is provided to them. Subsistence needs may include— 
Clothing. Proper clothing should be issued to detainees to protect them from the elements. The 
use of personal clothing is encouraged when standard facility issue is not available. 
Bedding.  Bedding  should  be  provided  to  detainees  according  to  AR  190-8  and  established 
SOPs. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested