c# render pdf : Reorder pdf page software SDK cloud windows winforms .net class USArmy-InternmentResettlement13-part67

Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-31 
Personal-hygiene items. Personal hygiene items and activities should be provided to detainees 
on  a  daily  basis  as  available.  Such  provisions  ensure  a  healthy  environment  for  facility 
personnel, including the security force. 
Food. The daily individual food ration for detainees will be sufficient in quantity, quality, and 
variety to keep them in good health and prevent nutritional deficiency. The TIF command may 
require a dietician to properly determine caloric intake for detainees.
E
MERGENCY 
P
ROCEDURES
6-104.  The implementation of emergency procedures is important to ensure the safety and security of TIF 
personnel  and  detainees.  These  procedures,  developed  and  implemented  by  the  TIF  command,  may 
include— 
Risk assessments and risk mitigation measures. 
Training and certification. 
Rehearsals  and  adjustments  to  SOPs  based  on  lessons  learned  and  observations  of  effective 
practices. 
After-action reviews. 
Training of newly arrived personnel on emergency procedures. 
I
NTEGRATION OF 
E
MERGING 
T
ECHNOLOGY
6-105.  Commanders and staff may be prone to take off-the-shelf technology and incorporate it into TIF 
operations.  However,  subsequent  to  higher  headquarters  approval,  proper  planning,  risk 
assessments/mitigation, training, certification, and indoctrination must be considered before implementing 
such technologies into day-to-day operations at the TIF. 
I
NCIDENT 
R
EPORTING
6-106.  All  reportable  incidents—any  suspected  or  alleged  violation  of  DOD  policy,  procedures,  or 
applicable  laws  for  which  there  is  credible  information—that  DOD  personnel  or  contractors  allegedly 
commit will be— 
Promptly reported and investigated by proper authorities. 
Remedied by disciplinary or administrative action when appropriate. On-scene commanders and 
supervisors  ensure that  measures  are  taken to preserve  evidence  pertaining  to any
reportable 
incident. 
S
ECURITY 
C
ONSIDERATIONS
6-107.  The military police commander should use  security  measures  that effectively  control detainees 
with the minimum use of force. The same use of force that is employed for one category of detainees may 
not be applicable to another. Security  measures  must protect housed  personnel from threats outside the 
facility. Maintaining a high state of discipline, a system of routines, and required standards of behavior are 
all measures that enhance effective internal security and control. Security and control activities at a TIF 
include— 
Accountability procedures. 
Guard force duties. 
Main gate/sally port procedures. 
Tower guard duties. 
Perimeter (mobile/foot) security. 
Reaction-force duties. 
Close-contact guard duties. 
Key control. 
Contraband control. 
Reorder pdf page - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages in a pdf; reorder pages pdf file
Reorder pdf page - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pages of pdf; move pdf pages in preview
Chapter 6 
6-32 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Detainee correspondence control. 
Escort procedures. 
Restraint procedures. 
Segregation. 
Forced cell move procedures. 
6-108.  Control  and  accountability  of  detainees  must  be  maintained  at  all  times.  Policies,  tactics, 
techniques, and procedures must be adapted to achieve this end state. 
6-109.  Expect some detainees to actively cooperate with U.S. armed forces authority or assume a passive 
and  compliant role. Cooperative  or compliant personnel may  be  composed,  in  part, of  individuals with 
ideologies favorable to the United States. Others, through resignation or apathy, will simply adapt to the 
conditions of their internment. 
6-110.  Some  detainees  will  engage  in  activities  to  embarrass  and  harass  U.S.  armed  forces  at  every 
opportunity. In the case of enemy combatants, this is to force the facility to use the maximum number of 
troops  to keep them  away from combat missions. In  addition, these  activities, regardless  of the  type of 
detainees participating, will create valuable propaganda for their cause. The leaders of this uncooperative 
faction may attempt to ensure a united effort and blind obedience by all members. They will not be content 
with merely planning and attempting to escape or using normal harassment tactics. The leaders will assign 
duties and missions to individuals so that resistance will not stop while they are interned. Detainees will 
immediately detect and fully exploit any relaxation of security. 
6-111.  The commander should use security measures that effectively control detainees with a minimum 
use of force. Adverse actions by detainees will vary from acts of harassment to acts of violence. Detainees 
may— 
Refuse to eat. 
Refuse to attend formations, refuse to work, or work in an unsatisfactory manner. 
Malinger. 
Sabotage equipment and facilities. 
Assault other detainees or guard personnel. 
Take hostages to secure concessions. 
Attempt individual escapes or mass breakouts. 
Intimidate other detainees. 
Fabricate weapons or other illegal items. 
Print and circulate propaganda material. 
Create  embarrassing situations or make false accusations to influence  international inspection 
teams or members of the protecting powers and the ICRC. 
Instigate  disturbances  or  riots  to  place  the  detention  facility  commander  and  staff  in  an 
unfavorable position to gain concessions and influence custodial policies. 
Intrusion Detection System 
6-112.  The detention facility commander should consider the use of intrusion detection systems (motion 
and  detection sensors) for  the early detection of  detainees  attempting to escape from  the  facility. Such 
systems may also be applied to external threats along the perimeter security of the facility. Additionally, 
ground-penetrating  radar  should  be  considered  for  the  detection  of  underground  tunnels  as  part  of  a 
material solution within a facility. 
Security Precautions 
6-113.  The  following  are  common  places  where  detainees  from  different  compounds  and  internment 
facilities may use to communicate with each other: 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .NET is powerful enough to enable C# users to reorder and rearrange multi-page Tiff file flexibly.
change page order in pdf file; reorder pdf pages in preview
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Sort PDF Pages - online C#.NET tutorial page for how to reorder, sort, reorganize or re-arrange PDF document files using C#.NET code.
how to change page order in pdf acrobat; change page order pdf
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-33 
Internment facility dispensary and food distribution points. Messages may be hidden where 
other  detainees  from neighboring compounds  can  find  them. Alert observations  and periodic 
searches will minimize the value of these areas. 
Infirmary facility. If  a detainee is  sick  or  injured, a  careful examination  should  be done  to 
ensure that hospitalization is required. Patients should not be informed of their discharge until 
the last possible moment. A complete search of detainees and their personal effects is completed 
upon admission and discharge from the hospital. 
Work details.  Guards should maintain  an  adequate distance between details to  preclude  the 
exchange of information between detainees. 
Work Detail Security Requirements
6-114.  Work details must have sufficient guards to ensure security and prevent escape. Guards must keep 
a reasonable distance from the work detail and properly position themselves to provide the best observation 
of the area and  work detail. Authorized rest breaks by the guards should be taken separately and while 
detainees are working. 
Military Working Dogs 
6-115.  MWDs are trained for scouting, patrolling, and performing building and area searches. Properly 
trained  MWDs  can  prevent  a  detainee  from  escaping.  Some  MWDs  have  also  been  trained  to  track, 
although this is not a required skill for all MWDs. The local MWD kennel master will know which dogs 
have been trained to track. 
WARNING 
MWDs will not be used during any interrogation process. 
Escape Prevention and Early Detection 
6-116.  Detainee  escapes  can  be  kept  to  a  minimum  through  proper  security  precautions.  These 
precautions include— 
Conducting periodic, unannounced, and systematic searches of internment facility areas to detect 
evidence of tunneling and to discover caches of food, clothing, weapons, maps, money, or other 
valuables. 
Maintaining strict accountability for tools and equipment used by or accessible to detainees. 
Inspecting perimeter fencing daily to detect cut wire evidence or other weaknesses in the fence. 
Assessing  lighting  systems  during  hours  of  darkness  to  detect  poorly  lit  areas  along  the 
perimeter. Immediately replace any burned out or broken light bulbs. 
Conducting training, to include refresher training, to ensure that guard and security personnel are 
thoroughly familiar with security precautions, techniques, and procedures. 
Searching vehicles and containers taken into or out of the internment facility. 
Closely supervising the disposition of unconsumed rations in the internment facility and on work 
details to prevent the caching of food supplies. 
6-117.  The following measures will assist in the early detection of escape attempts: 
Conduct ISN counts and head counts on a regular and an unannounced basis. 
Conduct roll calls at least twice daily, preferably early in the morning and again before “lights 
out.” 
Conduct other head counts independent of roll calls. Appropriate times for additional detainee 
head  counts  might  be  immediately  following  a  mass  disturbance,  the  discovery  of  an  open 
tunnel, or the detection of a hole or break in the fence. 
VB.NET PDF: VB.NET Guide to Process PDF Document in .NET Project
It can be used to add or delete PDF document page(s), sort the order of PDF pages, add image to PDF document page and extract page(s) from PDF document in VB
how to move pages in pdf acrobat; pdf reverse page order preview
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
are easily to access, extract, swap, reorder, insert, mark up and delete pages in any multi-page TIFF images upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents
how to move pages in pdf; how to reorder pdf pages
Chapter 6 
6-34 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Conduct  head  counts  at  frequent  intervals  while  on  work  details  and  en  route  to  another 
internment facility. 
S
UICIDE 
R
ISK
6-118.  Military police may initially determine that certain detainees need to be placed on suicide watch 
even before a behavioral assessment has been done. 
6-119.  If a TIF staff member determines that a detainee should be carefully observed to ensure his or her 
safety, the staff member places the detainee in an observation cell adjacent to the control point if available. 
Military police should search the detainee and remove all items that could be used in a suicide attempt (for 
example, bed sheets). If the detainee makes suicidal gestures with articles of clothing, remove everything 
from the cell except the detainee’s underwear. Ensure that the detainee is continuously monitored while in 
the observation cell. Have a mental health team member evaluate the detainee before returning him/her to 
the general population. TIF security personnel will log each time a mental health team member evaluates a 
suicidal detainee. 
6-120.  If a TIF staff member has problems, concerns, or disagreements about suggestions for care of a 
detainee  made by a  mental  health  team member,  the  staff member will  contact  the  TIF commander  to 
discuss  the  matter.  However,  the  military  police  will  not  simply  disregard  the  recommendation  of  the 
mental health team member. 
6-121.  If a TIF staff member feels that a detainee can be safely removed from a suicide watch status, the 
staff  member  may  make  this  recommendation  to  a  supervisor.  The  supervisor  will  assess  the 
recommendation  and  situation  and,  if  deemed  appropriate,  may  recommend  to  the  mental  health  team 
member that the detainee be removed from suicide watch status. The mental health team member provides 
the  recommendation  to the psychiatrist or psychologist for resolution. Under  no circumstances will TIF 
security  personnel  or  other  staff  members  remove  a  detainee  from  a  suicide  watch  status  without  the 
permission of  a psychiatrist or  psychologist.  No  other  mental health  team  member has the authority  to 
remove a detainee from a suicide watch status. The psychiatrist or psychologist may interview the patient 
personally or discontinue the watch based on the recommendation of a mental health team member. 
S
UICIDE 
R
ESPONSE
6-122.  If  a  detainee  seems  to  be  undergoing  a  severe  emotional  crisis  and  a  suicide  attempt  seems 
imminent, notify a mental health team member. If a detainee appears suicidal and professional help has not 
arrived, personnel should— 
Call for backup. 
Approach the detainee calmly and with concern. Do not panic. 
Ask how they can help. 
Listen carefully without challenging. Avoid arguing with the detainee. 
Physically prevent the detainee from self-harm if necessary. 
6-123.  If  military  police  or  other  TIF staff  members come  upon a  detainee  who has  hung himself  or 
herself— 
Immediately lift the detainee to relieve pressure on his or her neck, and support his or her head 
when doing so. 
Immediately  call  for  backup  and  notify  emergency  medical  treatment  personnel  and  mental 
health team members. 
Cut the item by which the detainee is hanging. Cut it above or below the knot if possible, so that 
the knot can be preserved as evidence. 
Provide first aid as necessary. 
VB.NET PDF: Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET for Document
Support navigating to the previous or next page of the PDF document; Able to insert, delete or reorder PDF document page in VB.NET document viewer;
how to move pages around in a pdf document; change pdf page order
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB.NET PPT PPT Page Extracting. dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change pdf page order preview; move pages in pdf acrobat
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-35 
6-124.  If a detainee has made a suicide attempt by another method, procedures will depend on the specific 
suicide attempt. If the detainee— 
Has made a cutting attempt, try to control bleeding with direct pressure first. Call emergency 
medical treatment  personnel to further evaluate the  detainee and  determine if  evacuation  to a 
medical treatment facility is required for treatment. After medical treatment has been rendered, 
observe  the  detainee  in  the  observation  cell  until  a  mental  health  evaluation  can  be 
accomplished. 
Took an overdose of medication, immediately call emergency medical treatment personnel so 
that proper care can be  rendered once the security  force has been notified. Notify the  mental 
health team that medical clearance has been granted. 
Note. Immediately notify the mental health team regardless of the time of day, following any 
suicide attempt by a detainee. 
H
UMAN 
I
NTELLIGENCE 
S
UPPORT
6-125.  At  the  TIF, HUMINT collectors conduct interrogation operations from  within the interrogation 
area. The JIDC or MI battalion is normally found within the boundaries of the TIF. When operating within 
the TIF, HUMINT collectors are tactical control to the I/R battalion commander for the humane treatment, 
evacuation,  custody,  and  control  (reception,  processing,  administration,  internment,  and  safety)  of 
detainees; protection measures; and the operation of the internment facility. For HUMINT support at the 
TIF,  the  JIDC  commander  is  responsible  for  conducting  interrogation  operations  (including  the 
prioritization  of  effort),  and  controlling  the  technical  aspects  of  interrogation  and  other  intelligence 
operations.  The  intelligence  staff  maintains  control  over  interrogation  operations  through  technical 
channels to ensure adherence to applicable laws and policies, ensure the proper use of doctrinal approaches 
and techniques, and provide technical guidance for interrogation activities. Applicable laws and policies 
include  U.S.  laws,  the  law  of  war,  relevant  international  laws,  relevant  directives  (including  DODD 
3115.09 and DODD 2310.01E), DODIs, execution orders, and FRAGOs. The C-2X and/or J-2X provide 
technical direction and control to the JIDC. (See FM 2-22.3 for additional details on HUMINT operations 
in conjunction with detainee operations.) 
6-126.  The tactical  control relationship  is geared primarily toward ensuring proper protection and base 
defense and  that the JIDC  commander is responsible  for conducting interrogation operations (including 
prioritization of  effort) and  controlling interrogation and other intelligence  operations  through  technical 
channels. 
Note. Under no circumstances will military police set the conditions for detainee interrogations. 
Military  police  only  provide  information  based on  passive  observation  of  detainees.  Passive 
information  collection  may  include  observing  (during  transport  to  a  medical  tent,  during 
recreation time) detainees. 
M
EDICAL 
O
PERATIONS
6-127.  Medical support at  a  TIF  address medical  care  and  sanitation requirements.  Medical care  may 
include  medical  evaluations,  routine  treatment,  detainee  sick  call,  hunger  strikes,  preventive  medicine, 
inspections, and associated medical documentation. Sanitation requirements include disease prevention and 
facility cleanliness, among others. (See appendix I.) 
Medical and Dental Care 
6-128.  Commanders  must  consider  the  following  when  establishing  medical  care  for  the  TIF  (see  
AR 190-8): 
Examinations  must  be  provided  for  detainees  from  a  credentialed  health  care  provider  each 
month. The  examiner records detainee weight  on DA Form 2664-R.  The Detainee  Reporting 
System also requires weight data from the medical community. 
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
PDF document page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF
move pages in a pdf file; rearrange pages in pdf file
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages from VB.NET programming, this TIFF page processing control powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reorder pages in pdf reader; how to reorder pages in pdf file
Chapter 6 
6-36 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
The  general  health  of  detainees,  their  nutrition,  and  their  cleanliness  are  monitored  during 
inspections. 
Detainees  are  examined  for  contagious  diseases,  especially  tuberculosis,  lice,  louse-borne 
diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV. 
Medical  treatment  facilities  must  provide  for  immunization  the  isolation  of  detainees  with 
communicable diseases. 
Retained medical  personnel  and detainees with medical training are used to the fullest extent 
possible when caring for sick and wounded detainees. 
Detainees  requiring  a  higher  level  of  care  are  transferred  to  military  or  civilian  medical 
installations  where  the  required  treatment  is  available.  The  United  States  will  not  evacuate 
detainees out of country/theater for care that is not available in the theater. 
Military  police  escort  detainees  to  medical  facilities  and  remain  with  the  until  medical 
examinations are complete. 
6-129.  Patient services for detainees at a TIF should include the following, as a minimum: 
Daily sick call. 
Biweekly diabetic clinic. 
A dental clinic. 
Medication. 
Wound care. 
Physical therapy. 
24-hour emergency room. 
Optometric services. 
Orthopedic services. 
Surgical facilities. 
Prosthesis clinic. 
Mental health clinic. 
Laboratory services. 
Sanitation/Preventive Medicine 
6-130.  Detention facilities may serve as a breeding ground for pests and diseases.  Sanitation standards 
must be met  to  prevent these  conditions  and  ensure the  cleanliness of the  facility. Unit field sanitation 
teams, according to AR 40-5 and FM 4-25.12, are the first line of defense for ensuring that these standards 
are properly maintained. The standards are as follows: 
Provide adequate space within housing units to prevent overcrowding. 
Provide sufficient showers and latrines for detainees, and ensure that showers and latrines are 
cleaned and sanitized daily. 
Teach detainees working in the dining facility the rules of proper food sanitation, and ensure that 
they are observed and practiced. 
Properly  dispose  of  human  waste  to  protect  the  health  of  detainees  and  U.S.  armed  forces 
associated with the facility according to the guidelines established by preventive medicine. 
Provide  sufficient  potable  water  for  drinking  and  food  service  purposes.  At  a  minimum, 
detainees should receive the same amount of water that is afforded U.S. military personnel. 
Provide sufficient water for bathing and laundry. 
Provide necessary materials for detainee personal hygiene. 
Train  U.S.  military  personnel  on  the  proper  disposition  of  dining  facility  and  personally 
generated garbage so as not to breed insects and rodents that can contribute to health hazards. 
Institute measures against standing water within the facility. 
Conduct pest control activities as required. 
Conduct medical-, occupational-, and environmental-health surveillance. 
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-37 
STRATEGIC INTERNMENT FACILITY 
6-131.  A SIF is a facility, designated by the Secretary of Defense or a designee, with the capability to 
further detain and/or exploit detainees who hold strategic intelligence or who pose a continuing threat to the 
U.S. or U.S. interests. Detainees are normally noncompliant and may pose a high security risk to the United 
States. A SIF will usually resemble a TIF with respect to the operating procedures implemented and stated 
in the section above, but it is task-organized for a specific detainees. 
L
OCATION
6-132.  The SIF is a long-term or semipermanent facility with the capability of holding detainees for an 
extended period of time. The location of SIF will be depends on the orders and directives published from 
the highest levels of  the national government. A SIF is normally located outside  a  joint operations area 
where combat and/or stability operations are ongoing. SIFs fall under the C2 of combatant commanders. 
A
DDITIONAL 
P
LANNING 
C
ONSIDERATIONS
6-133.  A SIF will normally have a higher mix of forces involved as compared to operations at a TIF. For 
example, the Navy may completely run the hospital operations. Key organizational elements within a SIF 
may include— 
Joint security group. 
Joint interrogation group. 
Detainee hospital. 
Joint logistics group. 
Joint interrogation operations group. 
6-134.  Special staff considerations may include— 
Joint visitor’s bureau. 
Chaplain. 
Inspector general. 
SJA. 
Public affairs support. 
Surgeon. 
Forensic psychologist. 
Forensic psychiatrist. 
Medical plans and operations officer. 
Environmental health officer. 
6-135.  Additional considerations at the SIF may also include— 
Religion.  Detainees are allowed the  freedom  of  worship, including attendance  at services  of 
their respective faith held within the internment facility. Detainees are not entitled to privileged 
communication with  U.S.  chaplains.  However,  commanders who  do  not  wish  to  broach  that 
privileged  communications  status  should  not  place  U.S.  chaplains  in  situations  where  that 
privilege may be questioned. Retained chaplains and clergymen are permitted to devote their full 
time  to  ministering  members  of their faith within the internment facility.  The military police 
commander may permit other ordained clergymen, theological students, or chaplains to conduct 
services within the compound. U.S. military personnel (such as guards and staff) will not attend 
services with  detainees.  However,  guards  should  be present  to  ensure  security  and  maintain 
custody and control of detainees. 
Recreation. For detainees, their active participation in recreational activities will, in addition to 
promoting general health and welfare, serve to alleviate the tensions and boredom of extended 
detention. In addition to athletic contests, group entertainment may be provided in the forms of 
concerts, plays, recorded music, and selected motion pictures. 
Chapter 6 
6-38 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Safety. A safety program for detainees is set up and administered in each internment facility. 
ARs,  circulars,  and  DA  pamphlets  are  used  as  guides  for  establishing  the  safety  program. 
Records and reports used to support the detainee safety program are maintained separately from 
those that support the Army Safety Program. 
Agriculture. Some detainees, depending on their category, may be allowed to raise vegetables 
for their own use. Subsequently, commanders must be aware of resources, procedures, and HN 
guidelines applicable to this program.
6-136.  Article 5 tribunals and enemy combatant review boards are normally conducted at the SIF. These 
formal processes assist commanders and personnel in DOD with determining whether to release or detain a 
detainee. 
H
UMAN 
I
NTELLIGENCE 
S
UPPORT
6-137.  A joint interrogation group which may include uniformed DOD personnel and other government 
agencies that may be involved in the collection of intelligence, will normally be located at the SIF,  The 
intelligence efforts at the SIF focus primarily on intelligence at the highest national security levels. 
M
EDICAL 
O
PERATIONS
6-138.  A detainee hospital with the capability to perform all levels of medical care is normally found at a 
SIF. The detainee hospital may also include personnel who can provide basic medical care to psychological 
and psychiatric experts. 
S
ECURITY 
C
ONSIDERATIONS
6-139.  Security  measures  will closely resemble those at a TIF,  but may vary in  certain aspects. These 
differences include— 
Higher security level. 
Enhanced access/entry control. 
Higher risk level. 
Geographic location. 
Inter-theater transportation considerations. 
Increased media attention. 
Interagency and international visitation policies. 
Strategic level of interrogations. 
6-140.  Due  to  operation  security  concerns,  only  make  public  notification  of  a  release  or  transfer  in 
consultation and coordination with the Office of the Secretary of Defense. 
TRANSFERS OR RELEASES 
6-141.  Transfers or releases may be a result of reclassification or other situations requiring the movement 
of  detainees.  The  transfer  of  detainees  from  one  facility  to  another  is  conducted  under  conditions 
comparable  to  those  for members  of  the  U.S. armed forces  when possible. Moreover,  detainee  release 
procedures  are  similar  to  transfer  procedures  from  one  facility  to  another.  The  only  difference  is 
coordination between HN assets and/or the protecting power (release to the ICRC). Security measures are 
determined  by  the  military  police  and  can  be  influenced  by  the  type  of  detainee  being  transferred  or 
released,  the  mode  of  transportation  used,  and  other  pertinent  conditions.  AR 190-8  prescribes  the 
procedures  governing  detainee  transfers  and  releases.  All  proposed  transfers  and  releases  should  be 
reviewed by the legal advisor (at the Office of the Secretary of Defense level for SIF-related actions) to 
ensure compliance with applicable laws and policies. A detainee may not be released to a nation or force if 
it  is  known  that  the  detainee  will  be  subject  to  death,  torture,  or  inhumane  treatment  based  on  the 
individual’s detention by U.S. or multinational authorities. Due to operation security concerns, only make 
public  notification  of  a  release  and/or  transfer  in  consultation  and  coordination  with  the  Office  of  the 
Secretary of Defense. 
Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-39 
6-142.  The facility commander who is transferring or releasing a detainee (see table 6-2) is responsible 
for— 
Publishing a transfer or release order using the Detainee Reporting System, informing detainees 
of their new  postal  addresses in time for them to notify their next of  kin,  and informing  the 
TDRC or NDRC of the transfer. 
Notifying the gaining facility or HN of impending detainee transfers or releases. 
Verifying  the  accuracy  and  completeness  of  the  personnel  records  of  each  detainee  and 
providing the record, in a sealed envelope, to the military police accompanying the movement. 
The  TIF  commander  must  ensure  that  a  copy  of  detainee  medical  and  personnel  records  is 
maintained at the TIF when a transfer or release occurs. 
Verifying that detainees have authorized clothing and equipment in their possession. 
Segregating,  out-briefing,  performing  a  medical  screening  on,  and  administering  conditional 
release statements for detainees being released. 
Preparing the detainee’s impounded personal property for shipment or return as appropriate. 
Briefing  the  escort  military  police  Soldiers  concerning  their  duties  and  responsibilities,  to 
include procedures to be followed in case of an escape, death, or another emergency. 
Providing or arranging for rations, transportation, and transmission of appropriate notifications 
according to prescribed procedures. 
Preparing  paperwork  in  English  and  the  HN  language  (if  required)  before  transferring  or 
releasing detainees. 
Table 6-2. Detainee transfer or release process from a TIF/SIF 
Procedure 
Action 
Control and 
accountability 
procedures 
•  Maintain control and accountability of detainees until transferred to a 
gaining facility or released to the designated protecting power. 
•  Conduct a medical exam of detainees within 24 hours of their transfer or 
release. 
•  Provide detainees with enough personal medication to last throughout the 
transfer or release. 
•  Use a transfer or release order to maintain accountability. It must contain, 
at a minimum, the following for each detainee: 
ƒ  Name. 
ƒ  Grade and/or status. 
ƒ  ISN. 
ƒ  Power served or nationality. 
ƒ  Physical condition. 
•  Use a transfer or release order as an official receipt of transfer or release. 
It will become a permanent record to ensure that each detainee is 
accounted for until final transfer or release. 
Detainee record 
procedures 
•  Transfer copies of the detainee personnel, financial, and medical records. 
•  Transfer records to the custody of the designated official receiving the 
detainee. 
•  Transmit digital copies, if available, of the detainee’s record to the gaining 
location or HN/protecting power. 
•  Keep copies of all records. 
Detainee personal 
property procedures 
•  Transfer confiscated personal property that can be released to the gaining 
facility, gaining HN, or protecting power. 
•  Conduct an inventory and identify discrepancies. 
•  Have detainees sign DA Form 4137 for their personal items. 
Chapter 6 
6-40 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Table 6-2. Detainee transfer or release process from a TIF/SIF (continued) 
Procedure 
Action 
Completion of 
transfer procedures 
•  Forward the manifest to the TDRC. 
Transfer procedures 
•  Ensure that the transferring TIF forwards official records and confiscated 
property (which cannot be released) to the TDRC for final disposition once 
the TDRC notifies them that the transfer or release is complete. 
Legend: 
DA 
Department of the Army 
HN 
host nation 
ISN 
internment serial number 
TIF 
theater internment facility 
TDRC 
theater detainee reporting center 
Note. Each detainee can ship personal property that does not exceed 55 pounds. Chaplains or 
detainees who have been serving as clergymen are permitted to transfer (at government expense) 
an  additional  110  pounds  to  cover  communion  sets,  theological  books,  and  other  religious 
material. If the detainee possesses personal property in excess of 55 pounds, have the detainee 
select which personal items are going to be transferred. (See AR 190-8.) 
6-143.  The  temporary transfer  of  detainees  is  authorized when  the  detainee  population  is beyond  the 
immediate  capability  of  U.S. armed  forces to manage.  The CDO  will develop measures  to  ensure  that 
transferred  detainees  are  accounted  for  and  treated  humanely. Detainees  captured  or detained  by  other 
branches  of Service  are turned  over to  the U.S. Army at receiving points designated by the joint  force 
commander. All inter-Service transfers should be affected as soon as possible after initial classification and 
administrative processing have been accomplished. 
6-144.  Other  informational  requirements  to  consider  when  transferring  or  releasing  detainees  may 
include— 
The  capability  of  the police and prison organizations to properly  maintain structurally sound 
facilities and ensure the humane treatment of detainees. 
The status of organized crime within the area that may influence when and how detainees are 
released (for detainee and escorting unit safety). 
The status of the national legal systems and their ability to properly receive detainee paperwork 
and material properly. 
C
ONSTRUCTION
/M
ODERNIZATION OF 
P
ENAL 
F
ACILITIES
6-145.  It is entirely possible over the course of operations for DHAs to evolve into long-term internment 
facilities and, ultimately, transform into civil authority penal institutions. Great care should be taken during 
planning stages to ensure that new construction is designed and built in such a way that internment facilities 
can be converted into acceptable penal institutions. Military police with I/R expertise assist planners with 
design requirements for long-term construction projects to ensure international acceptability and effective 
and efficient security designs. (See appendix J.) 
T
RAINING 
R
EQUIREMENTS
,
T
RAINING 
S
TANDARDS
,
AND 
P
ROFESSIONAL 
D
EVELOPMENT OF 
C
IVIL 
A
UTHORITIES
6-146.  Military  police  with  I/R  expertise  are  an  integral  part  of  the  assessment  and  subsequent 
development of training requirements necessary for preparing local nationals to perform civil penal system 
functions. Training support packages and programs of instruction used to train I/R units and in-lieu-of units 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested