c# render pdf : Change page order pdf preview SDK control project wpf web page windows UWP USArmy-InternmentResettlement14-part68

Detainee Facilities 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
6-41 
should  be  properly  modified  and  refined  to  enable  the  trainers  to  conduct  high-quality,  standardized 
training for the conduct of penal operations. 
Change page order pdf preview - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
change page order in pdf online; how to reorder pages in pdf online
Change page order pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf move pages; how to reorder pdf pages
This page intentionally left blank.  
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
various Word document processing implementations using C# demo codes, such as add or delete Word document page, change Word document pages order, merge or
change page order pdf; change pdf page order
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
how to move pages in pdf; how to change page order in pdf document
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
7-1 
Chapter 7 
Confinement of U.S. Military Prisoners 
Aside  from  the  normal  and  continuing  mission  for  confinement  of  U.S.  military 
prisoners at Fort Leavenworth and other permanent locations, there is a requirement 
to  be  prepared for confinement  outside  established  facilities.  In  a  mature  theater, 
military police may be required to operate a field detention facility (FDF) and/or a 
field confinement facility (FCF) to hold or confine U.S. military prisoners for short 
terms. This short term may be as part of pretrial or posttrial confinement. Posttrial 
confinement may include temporary custody until the prisoner is evacuated from the 
theater to a permanent confinement facility or short-term sentences as determined by 
the  combatant  commander.  Military  police  leaders  tasked  with  conducting  U.S. 
military  prisoner  operations  must  be  familiar  with  the  doctrine  described  in  this 
chapter,  the  policies  outlined  in  AR  190-47,  and  the  tasks  described  in  Soldier 
Training  Publication    (STP) 19-31E1-SM  and  STP  19-31E24-SM-TG.  The  U.S. 
Army Corrections Command, a field-operating agency of the PMG, is responsible for 
confinement/corrections  policy  development  and  operational  implementation. 
Additional  questions  about  confinement  of  U.S.  military  prisoners  should  be 
addressed to the U.S. Army Corrections Command. U.S. military prisoner operations 
are a subelement of I/R operations and may need to be performed across the spectrum 
of  operations.  Senior  military  police  commanders  are  informed  and  prepared  to 
provide retention and subsequent battlefield confinement of U.S. military prisoners. 
PMs at all echelons must be prepared to provide staff expertise to their respective 
commanders to ensure adequate and proper confinement of U.S. military prisoners. 
The same standards of humane treatment apply in this environment as in other areas 
of I/R operations. 
Note. The rights of U.S. military prisoners are outlined in AR 190-47 and DODD 1325.4. 
U.S. BATTLEFIELD CONFINEMENT OPERATIONS PRINCIPLES 
7-1.  The FCF/FDF is an integral part of the U.S.  military justice system that commanders use to help 
maintain disciple, law, and order. The FCF/FDF provides a uniform system for incarcerating and providing 
correctional services for those who have failed to adhere to legally established rules of discipline. When 
conducting confinement operations for U.S. military prisoners, units— 
Foster a safe and secure environment while maintaining custody and control. 
Prepare prisoners for release, whether returning to duty or to a civilian status. 
Provide administrative services and limited counseling support. 
Ensure that prisoners are provided adequate access to the courts. 
Transfer U.S. military prisoners to Army Corrections System facilities as required. 
PLANNING PROCESS FOR U.S. MILITARY PRISONERS 
7-2.  Military  police  plan  U.S.  military  prisoner  operations  to  meet  the  needs  of  the  combatant 
commander. The commander may decide to establish U.S. military prisoner facilities within the theater if 
the— 
Projected or actual number of U.S. military prisoners exceeds the unit handling capability and 
has the potential of interfering with the pace of military operations. 
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
how to move pages in pdf converter professional; how to rearrange pdf pages online
C# Image: View & Operate Web Page Using .NET Doc Image Web Viewer
Support multiple document and image formats, like PDF and TIFF; Thumbnail images will be automatically created once the Change Web Document Page Order.
reordering pages in pdf; how to rearrange pages in pdf document
Chapter 7 
7-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Distance  from  the  theater  to  confinement  facilities  outside  the  continental  United  States 
(OCONUS)/CONUS is too great, making the evacuation of prisoners impractical. 
Necessary transportation assets are not available to evacuate U.S. military prisoners quickly to 
other confinement facilities. 
Length  of  military  operations  and  the  maturity  of  the  theater  enable  the  establishment  of 
confinement facilities within the theater. 
Establishment of a confinement facility does not interfere with the commander’s ability to meet 
other operational needs. 
7-3.  The PM assumes an important role in keeping the combatant commander informed throughout the 
planning of U.S. military prisoner operations. The PM coordinates closely with SJA, CA, HN authorities, 
appropriate echelon coordinating staff (such as the assistant chief of staff, personnel [G-1] and G-2), and 
major  subordinate  commands  before  recommending  the  establishment  of  U.S.  military  prisoner 
confinement facilities within the theater of operations. During the planning process, the PM determines— 
Availability of confinement facilities. 
Location of an FCF in the theater. 
Availability  of  resources  and  sustainment  support  needed  to  construct  and  operate  the 
confinement facility. 
Availability of adequate and technically appropriate military police forces (I/R augmentation or 
selective task organization may be required). 
Classification and type of prisoner to be interned (pretrial, posttrial, and/or inter-Service). 
Requirements for prisoner evacuation. 
Requirements of supported forces. 
Requirements that may impact the overall U.S. military prisoner operation. 
BATTLEFIELD FACILITIES 
7-4.  There are two types of battlefield facilities—FDF and FCF. When the combatant commander makes 
the decision to retain U.S. military prisoners in the theater, FDFs are possible as low as  the BCT level, 
while an FCF is typically established at theater level and is responsible for longer-term confinement before 
the evacuation of U.S. military prisoner from theater. The evacuation of U.S. military prisoners from an 
FDF to an FCF, or from an FCF to a permanent facility, is completed according to established guidelines 
and available facilities. 
F
IELD 
D
ETENTION 
F
ACILITY
7-5.  Military police use FDFs to detain prisoners placed in custody for a short term. FDFs are used to 
hold prisoners in custody only until they can be tried and sentenced to confinement and evacuated from the 
immediate area. When possible, prisoners awaiting trial remain in their units and not at an FDF. Only when 
the legal requirements of Rules for Court-Martial 305k. Prisoners will be placed in pretrial confinement and 
retained by military police. Rules for Court-Martial 305k requires probable cause belief that a court-martial 
offense has been committed,  that the prisoner  committed it, and that  a more severe  form of restraint is 
necessary to ensure that the prisoner will appear at pretrial proceedings or the trial or to prevent serious 
criminal misconduct. PMs are responsible for the location, setup, and operation of FDFs. 
7-6.  When operating an FDF, military police sign for each prisoner using DD Form 2707 (Confinement 
Order) and sign for each prisoner’s property using DA Form 4137. Policies and procedures on the care and 
treatment of prisoners and the safeguarding of a prisoners’ personal effects apply to FDFs and FCFs. If 
preexisting structures are available, use them as FDFs. If tents are used, they should not be smaller than the 
general purpose, medium tent. Probable equipment and supplies required for the establishment of an FDF 
include, but are not limited to— 
Barbed wire (roll and concertina). 
Fence posts. 
Gates and doors. 
C# Excel - Sort Excel Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Excel document pages, or just change the position of certain one Excel page in an
how to reorder pages in pdf preview; move pdf pages
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Ability to change text font, color, size and location and string to a certain position of PDF document page. In order to run the sample code, the following
change page order pdf preview; how to reverse pages in pdf
Confinement of U.S. Military Prisoners 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
7-3 
Floodlights and spotlights. 
Generator(s). 
Food service and cleaning equipment. 
Water cans and/or lister bags. 
First aid equipment and supplies. 
Clothing and bedding. 
F
IELD 
C
ONFINEMENT 
F
ACILITY
7-7.  Military  police  may  be  required  to  establish  an  FCF in  the  theater  to  detain prisoners  placed  in 
custody for a short term (pretrial, posttrial, or until transferred to another facility outside the theater). The 
prisoner  is  transferred  from  an  FDF  to  the  FCF  using  DD  Form  2708.  DD Form 2707  (on  which  the 
prisoner  was  signed  for)  and  DA Form 4137  (on  which  the  prisoner’s  property  was  signed  for)  also 
accompany the prisoner. The FCF may be a semipermanent or permanent facility that is better equipped 
and  resourced than  an FDF.  The respective  unit commander  and  staff use  the  military  decisionmaking 
process to determine the specific tasks that must be performed to accomplish the mission. Some of these 
tasks include— 
Selecting a facility location and constructing the facility. 
Determining processing, classification, and identification requirements. 
Providing clothing and meals. 
Providing medical care and sanitation facilities. 
Exercising discipline, control, and administration. 
Conducting emergency planning and investigations. 
Enforcing ROI and RUF. 
Providing transportation. 
Overseeing the transfer and disposition of U.S. military prisoners. 
7-8.  The  location  of  the  FCF  depends  on  several  factors⎯sustainment  assets  (availability  of 
transportation,  medical  facilities),  terrain  and  preexisting  structures,  enemy  situation,  existing  LOCs, 
battlefield layout, and mission variables. The PM must coordinate with engineers, SJA, HN authorities, and 
coordinating staff before a site is selected. The FCF should be located away from perimeter fences, public 
thoroughfares, gates, headquarters, troop areas, dense cover, and wooded areas. 
7-9.  The  construction  of  the  FCF  depends  on  the  availability  of  existing  structures,  work  force,  and 
material. Preexisting  facilities are used to the  maximum extent possible. If preexisting facilities are not 
available, the PM will coordinate with the engineer coordinator for the construction of a facility based on 
existing designs in the Theater Construction Management System database. (See appendix J.) 
PROCESSING, CLASSIFICATION, AND IDENTIFICATION 
REQUIREMENTS 
7-10. Processing,  classification,  and  identification  requirements  for  U.S.  military  prisoners  are  critical 
when operating a confinement facility. Accurate documentation allows the classification and identification 
process to run smoothly. 
P
ROCESSING
7-11. .  Each  time  the  control  of  a  U.S.  military  prisoner  is  transferred,  the  receiving  organization 
acknowledges receipt of the prisoner and his property using DD Form 2708 and DA Form 4137. 
7-12. Prisoners  begin  their  confinement  by  in-processing  into  the  FCF.  In-processing  is  typically 
conducted by an I/R company prisoner operations section. Part of the in-processing procedure is to assist 
the  prisoners’  integration  into  the  confinement  environment.  Newly  confined  prisoners  are  processed 
according to guidelines to ensure that— 
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
image and outline preview for quick PDF document page navigation; requirement of this C#.NET PDF document viewer that should be installed in order to implement
reorder pages in pdf preview; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
For developers who want to delete unnecessary page from PowerPoint document, this C#.NET PowerPoint processing control is quite C# Codes to Sort Slides Order.
rearrange pages in pdf document; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
Chapter 7 
7-4 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
DD Form 2707 is accurate. 
Property is searched and segregated (authorized and unauthorized). 
Prisoners are strip-searched. 
Prisoners are issued the appropriate health and comfort supplies and complete a DD Form 504 
(Request and Receipt for Health and Comfort Supplies). 
Prisoners are photographed and fingerprinted. 
All  documentation  is  complete.  If  available,  use  the  Army  Corrections  Information  System 
Centralized Operations Police Suite. (See AR 190-47.) 
Prisoners are informed of mail and visitation rights. 
7-13. A  medical  officer  examines  each  prisoner  within  24  hours  of  confinement  and  completes 
DD Form 503.  Newly confined prisoners  are segregated from  other prisoners  while they  undergo initial 
processing.  Tattoos,  scars,  and  identifying  marks  are  noted  on  DD Form 2710  (Inmate  Background 
Summary). The prisoner’s personal property (such as clothing, money, official papers, and documents) is 
examined. 
7-14. Newly confined prisoners complete training that is designed to explain facility rules and regulations, 
counseling procedures, UCMJ disciplinary authority and procedures, and work assignment procedures as 
soon as possible. The rights of prisoners and the procedures governing the presentation of complaints and 
grievances according to AR 20-1 are fully and clearly explained. Pretrial prisoners are carefully instructed 
as  to  their  status,  rights,  and  privileges.  They  participate  in  the  correctional  orientation  or  treatment 
program phases that are determined necessary by the facility commander to ensure custody and control, 
employment,  training,  health,  and  welfare.  Confined  officers  and  NCOs  do  not  exercise  command  or 
supervisory authority over other individuals while confined, and they comply with the same facility rules 
and regulations as other prisoners. They are not permitted special privileges that are normally associated 
with their former rank. 
C
LASSIFICATION
7-15. U.S. military prisoners in an FCF are classified into two categories⎯pretrial and posttrial: 
Pretrial prisoners must be segregated from posttrial prisoners. Pretrial prisoners must be further 
segregated,  by  gender,  into  the  following  categories:  officers,  NCOs,  and  enlisted.  Pretrial 
prisoners  are  individuals  who are subject  to  trial  by  court-martial  and  have  been ordered  by 
competent authority into pretrial confinement pending disposition of charges. 
Posttrial prisoners are individuals who are found guilty and sentenced to confinement. Posttrial 
prisoners include in-transit prisoners who are evacuated to another facility and prisoners retained 
at the FCF during short-term sentences. 
I
DENTIFICATION
7-16. Individual identification photographs are taken of all prisoners. The prisoner’s last name, first name, 
and middle initial are placed on the first line of a name board, and the prisoner’s social security number is 
placed on the second line. A prisoner registration number may be added on the third line. Two front and 
two profile pictures are taken of the prisoner. Fingerprints are obtained according to AR 190-47. 
CLOTHING, MEALS, AND DINING FACILITIES 
7-17. One of the many  challenges  that military  police  commanders and leaders  face  when  operating  a 
facility is ensuring that the basic treatment standards for U.S. military prisoners are met and sustained to 
include, but not limited to— 
Proper clothing for all seasons and types of weather. 
Meals that are properly rationed and distributed. 
7-18. Special security  concerns are  a factor  for  dining facilities. Military police who  are  guarding U.S. 
military prisoners must always be vigilant in areas where prisoners congregate, such as a dining facility.  
Confinement of U.S. Military Prisoners 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
7-5 
7-19. Prior planning is critical to establishing a good system of supply needs and demands to ensure that 
those requirements are fulfilled. 
C
LOTHING
7-20. Prisoners confined in an FCF wear the uniform of their respective military service. Certain items of 
clothing (as  prescribed in AR 700-84) and  other articles (as determined by  the facility commander) are 
returned to the prisoner. Rank insignia is not worn at the place of confinement. The issue and expense of 
clothing  supplied  to  prisoners,  except  officers,  is  according  to  AR 700-84  and  Common  Table  of 
Allowance (CTA) 50-900. DA Form 3078 (Personal Clothing Request) is maintained for personnel with 
less  than  6  months  of  active  duty  service  and  personnel  receiving  clothing  on  an  issue-in-kind  basis. 
Organizational clothing, within the allowances prescribed in CTA 50-900, may  be provided to prisoners 
according to AR 710-2. Prisoner clothing, except for officers on pay status, is  laundered or dry cleaned 
without  charge.  (See  AR 210-130.)  (Clothing  and  personal  property  is  dispositioned  according  to  
AR 190-47.) 
M
EALS
7-21. Prisoners are provided with wholesome and sufficient food prepared from the Army Master Menu. 
They  are  normally  supplied  with  the  full  complement  of  eating  utensils.  (The  FCF  commander  must 
approve the nonissue of eating utensils for security or other reasons. Prisoners in close confinement and 
those with loss of privileges associated who have approved disciplinary action may be denied supplemental 
rations described on the Army Master Menu.) Alternate meal control procedures may be authorized by the 
FCF commander or a designated  representative  as a means  to prevent staff and  prisoner  injury  when a 
prisoner may have tampered with food. These procedures require documentation on DA Form 3997 and the 
concurrence of a medical officer. Meal control procedures will not exceed 7 days. 
D
INING 
F
ACILITIES
7-22. Dining  facilities  may  be  organic  to  the  unit  operating  the  FCF  or  set  up  through  appropriate 
contracting procedures. The FCF commander decides the best method for feeding the prisoners based on 
the available dining facilities and logistical and HN support. 
MEDICAL CARE AND SANITATION 
7-23. Medical personnel supporting an FCF assist in providing medical and mental health care, referrals, 
limited counseling, and social services. Medical officers, clinician nurses, or physician’s assistants perform 
medical examinations to determine the fitness of newly confined prisoners and prisoners who have been 
outside military control for more than 24 hours. These examinations are completed within 24 hours of a 
prisoner’s  initial arrival or return to confinement. Examinations normally take place at  the FCF. Dental 
services  are  provided,  as  required,  for  all  prisoners.  A  medical  officer,  clinician  nurse,  or  physician’s 
assistant examines each prisoner in close confinement daily. Except in matters requiring the protection of 
medical information, the facility commander is provided with medical observations and recommendations 
concerning individual prisoner’s correctional treatment requirements. 
7-24. Prisoners  are  tested  for  HIV  and  screened  for  tuberculosis  within  3  duty  days  of  their  initial 
confinement. The results of the HIV test and the tuberculosis screening are recorded on DD Form 503. 
7-25. The medical commander or a designated representative (typically, a preventive medicine personal) 
performs  a  monthly  inspection  of  the  FCF.  This  inspection  ensures  that  the  operation  of  the  FCF  is 
consistent with accepted preventive medicine standards. The FCF commander is provided with a copy of 
the  inspection  results  at  the  time  of  the  inspection.  (Additional  medical  guidance  is  provided  in  
AR 190-47.) 
7-26. The FCF commander must enforce high sanitation standards within the facility. Preventive medicine 
personnel will provide direct oversight and support to field sanitation teams as necessary. 
Chapter 7 
7-6 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
7-27. All prisoners are required to bathe and follow basic personal hygiene practices while in custody to 
prevent  communicable  diseases.  The  FCF  commander  must  enforce  high  sanitation  standards  in  FCFs 
where prisoners are required to share common latrines and showers. 
DISCIPLINE, CONTROL, AND ADMINISTRATION 
7-28. Developing  discipline,  control,  and  administrative  procedures  for  military  police  operating 
confinement facilities is crucial to the success of U.S. military prisoner operations. Military police leaders 
ensure that appropriate procedures, consistent with U.S. laws and policies, are in place to guide and direct 
personnel operating those facilities.  Such  procedures ensure  that  prisoners are allowed  the full range of 
privileges  afforded  to  persons with  their  status  when the  consistent  application  of  facility  standards  is 
applied. 
D
ISCIPLINE
7-29. FCF commanders are authorized by public law and AR 190-47 to restrict the movement and actions 
of prisoners, take other actions required to maintain control, protect the safety and welfare of prisoners and 
other personnel, and ensure orderly FCF operation and administration. 
Note. A prisoner is considered to be in an on-duty status except for periods of mandatory sleep 
and meals and during reasonable periods of voluntary religious observation as determined by the 
facility commander and in coordination with the facility chaplain. Therefore, a prisoner who, as 
part of an administrative disciplinary action, has been determined undeserving of recreation time 
privileges may be required to perform other duties during such time. Such performance of duties 
is not considered a performance of extra duty. Privileges will be withheld from prisoners on an 
individual basis, without regard to custody requirements or grade and only as an administrative 
disciplinary measure authorized by AR 190-47. The attractiveness of living quarters and the type 
or amount of material items that may be possessed by prisoners may differ by custody grade to 
provide  incentives  for  custody  elevation.  Prisoners  are  denied the  privilege  of  rendering  the 
military salute. Pretrial prisoners salute when they are in an appropriate Service uniform. 
7-30. The  only  authorized  forms  of  administrative  disciplinary  action  and  punishment  administered  to 
military  prisoners  are  described  in  AR 190-47  and  the  UCMJ.  Procedures,  rules,  regulations,  living 
conditions, and similar factors affecting discipline are constantly reviewed to determine disciplinary action. 
Physical  or  mental  punishments  are  strictly  prohibited.  Authorized  administrative  disciplinary  actions 
include— 
Written or oral reprimand or warning. 
Deprivation of one or more privileges. Visits may be denied or restricted as a disciplinary action 
only when the offense involves violations of visitation privileges. Restrictions on mail will not 
be imposed as a disciplinary measure. 
Extra duty on work projects that may not exceed 2 hours per day for 14 consecutive days. Extra 
duty will not conflict with regular meals, sleeping hours, or attendance at regularly scheduled 
religious services. 
Reduction of custody grade. 
Disciplinary segregation that does not exceed 60 consecutive days. Prisoners are told why they 
are being placed in segregation and that they will be released when the segregation has served its 
intended  purpose.  Segregated  prisoners  receive  the  same  diet  as  prisoners  who  are  not 
segregated. Nonessential items, such as soft drinks and candy, in addition to the diet stipulated 
by the Army Master Menu are not provided. 
Forfeiture  of  all  or  part  of  earned  military  good  conduct  time  or  extra  good  conduct  time 
according  to  AR 633-30  and  DOD 1325.7.  A  forfeiture  of  good  conduct  time  need  not  be 
specified as to whether it is from good conduct time or extra good conduct time. 
7-31. The FCF commander is authorized to administer punishment, he or she may delegate this authority to 
a subordinate officer  (captain or above)  for minor punishments. The first field-grade commander in  the 
Confinement of U.S. Military Prisoners 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
7-7 
chain of command imposes major punishment when delegated authority by the first general officer in the 
chain of command. Prohibited punitive measures include, but are not limited to— 
Clipping a prisoner’s hair excessively close. 
Instituting the lockstep. 
Requiring silence at meals. 
Having prisoners break rocks. 
Using restraining straps and jackets, shackles, or hand or leg irons as punishment. 
Removing a prisoner’s underclothing or clothing and instituting other debasing practices. 
Flogging, branding, tattooing, or any other cruel or unusual punishment. 
Requiring strenuous physical activity or requiring a prisoner to hold a body position designed to 
place undue stress on the body. 
Using hand or leg irons, belly chains, or similar means  to create or give the appearance of a 
chain gang. 
WARNING 
Prisoners will not be fastened to a fixed or stationary object 
7-32. Prohibited security measures include, but are not limited to— 
Employing chemicals (except riot control agents). 
Employing machine guns, rifles, or automatic weapons at guard towers, except as a means to 
protect the FCF from enemy or hostile fire. Selected marksmen, equipped with rifles, may be 
used as part of a disorder plan when specifically authorized by the higher echelon commander 
(other than the FCF commander). 
Using electrically charged fencing. 
Securing  a  prisoner  to  a  fixed  object.  This  is  prohibited  except  in  emergencies  or  when 
specifically approved by the facility commander to prevent potential danger to FCF staff and/or 
the  outside  community.  Medical  authorities  should  be  consulted  to  assess  the  health  risk  to 
prisoners. 
Using MWDs to guard prisoners. 
Note.  The  FCF  commander must  follow  additional  guidance  and  procedures  for  disciplinary 
measures as outlined in AR 190-47. 
C
ONTROL
7-33. The FCF commander follows the custody and control guidelines outlined in AR 190-47. The facility 
commander  or  a  designated  representative  conducts  physical  counts  of  prisoners  each  day.  The  report 
rendered  by  the  inspecting  officer  includes  verification  of  DD Form 506  (Daily  Strength  Record  of 
Prisoners). Physical counts will at a minimum include— 
Roll call or a similarly accurate accounting method at morning, noon, and evening formations. 
Head count immediately on the return of prisoners from work details. 
Bed checks between 2300 and 2400 and between 2400 and 0600. 
7-34. The appropriate degree of custodial supervision for individual prisoners is based on a review of all 
available records pertaining to the prisoner, including DD Form 2713, DD Form 2714, DODI 1325.7, and 
the recommendations of correctional supervisors and professional services support personnel. Prisoners are 
not assigned  to  a  permanent custody grade based solely on the  offenses for which they  were confined. 
Classification  is  to  the  minimum  custody  grade  necessary  and  is  consistent  with  sound  security 
requirements and DODI 1325.7. Custody grades  include  trustee  and  minimum,  medium, and  maximum 
security. FCF commanders may subdivide these custody grades to facilitate additional security controls. 
Chapter 7 
7-8 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
A
DMINISTRATION
7-35. The  commander  and  staff  of  an  I/R  company  or  battalion  will  typically  operate  an  FCF.  The 
following duties are performed in addition to the personnel and services requirements during processing: 
Shift  supervisor.  The  shift  supervisor  keeps  the  FCF  commander  informed  on  matters  that 
affect the custody,  control, and security of  the FCF. The FCF commander must select a shift 
supervisor who has direct supervision over correctional and custodial personnel within the FCF. 
Shift  supervisors  ensure  that  rules,  regulations,  and  SOPs  are  followed  and  enforced.  They 
directly  supervise  facility  guards  and  are  responsible  for  prisoner  activities.  They  monitor 
custody and control and security measures, ensure compliance with the scheduled calls, initiate 
emergency  control  measures,  and  are  responsible  for  the  FCF  DA Form 3997.  Supervisory 
personnel assigned to the FCF may also perform these duties. 
Facility  guards.  Facility  guards  work  for  the  shift  supervisor  and  are  responsible  for  the 
custody,  control, and discipline of prisoners under  their supervision. They supervise activities 
according to the schedule of calls and supervise the execution of emergency action plans. They 
conduct periodic inspections, searches, head counts, roll calls, and bed checks. Table 7-1 depicts 
the duties that facility guards must perform. 
7-36. The FCF commander ensures that a complete and current set of regulations governing corrections 
and confinement facilities is available. These regulations include, but are not limited to— 
AR 15-130. 
AR 190-14. 
AR 190-47. 
AR 633-30. 
DODI 1325.7-M. 
DODI 7000.14-R. 
MCM. 
UCMJ. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested