Confinement of U.S. Military Prisoners 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
7-9 
Table 7-1. Facility guards’ duties and actions 
Duties 
Actions 
Close-
confinement  
Close-confinement Soldiers maintain custody and control of prisoners who are segregated from 
the general population due to inprocessing, administrative reasons, or disciplinary reasons. They 
ensure that activities are accomplished within the schedule of calls applicable to the  
close-confinement area. When DD Form 509 is required, close-confinement Soldiers are 
responsible for ensuring that 30-minute checks are conducted. Special-status prisoners are 
checked every 15 minutes. Prisoners considered suicide risks are observed continuously. 
Guards ensure that all required signatures for DD Form 509 are obtained on a daily basis. 
Dining facility  
Dining facility Soldiers are responsible for the custody and control of prisoners during mealtimes. 
They ensure that the dining facility traffic plan is followed to prevent prisoner congestion at  
high-traffic areas. Silverware is counted before and after the meal. Prisoners are searched before 
leaving the dining facility. 
Detail 
supervisors 
Detail supervisors maintain custody, control, and supervision of prisoners while on assigned 
details. They ensure that work is completed and that safety precautions are observed. They 
maintain strict accountability of equipment and tools. Detail supervisors assist with frisking and/or 
strip-searching prisoners who are returning from details. They account for prisoners on details 
according to the schedule of calls. They track the prisoners’ locations at all times while they are 
on a detail. 
Prisoner 
escorts 
Prisoner escorts provide custody and control while moving prisoners to and from designated 
places. If required and authorized by the facility commander, each may be armed with a pistol. If 
available, a guard company may perform these duties. If armed, escorts will be qualified with a 
pistol and trained in the UOF; ROE; and firearms safety procedures for transporting prisoners by 
land, air, and sea. 
Main gate 
and/or sally 
port  
Soldiers assigned to the main gate and/or sally port ensure that only authorized persons enter 
the FCF, provide custody and control of prisoners, and inspect vehicles entering and leaving the 
FCF. They provide security by inspecting packages, conducting inventories of items entering and 
exiting the facility, and requiring noncustodial personnel to register on sign-in logs. A guard 
company may perform these duties if available 
Visitor room  
Visitor room Soldiers are responsible for the custody and control of prisoners during visits 
authorized by the FCF commander. They are to detect violations of rules and regulations, 
improper behavior, and contraband delivery. They position themselves in an inconspicuous place 
and observe the conversations rather than listen to them. Any identified infractions are reported 
to the shift supervisor and may be grounds for termination of the visit. 
Hospital  
Hospital Soldiers provide custody and control while escorting prisoners to and from medical 
appointments and during specified hospitalization. They ensure that rooms are clear of 
contraband and prevent unauthorized communications with other individuals. A guard company 
may perform these duties if available. 
Tower watch 
Soldiers assigned to duty in towers provide custody and control by observing specific sectors of 
the perimeter. They Soldiers are briefed on the UOF and are qualified with the 12-gauge shotgun 
and/or their assigned weapon. They ensure that contraband is not passed through the fence and 
provide protection for Soldiers in the compound/enclosure. 
Note. The facility commander may adjust the number and types of guards based on available personnel. 
Legend: 
DD 
Department of Defense 
FCF 
field confinement facility 
ROE 
rules of engagement 
UOF 
use of force 
7-37. The  FCF  commander  must  maintain  a  number  of  records  and reports  to facilitate  administrative 
operations. (See appendix G for a complete list of records and reports.) 
7-38. A  correctional  treatment  file  is  established  within  the  first  72  hours  of  initial  confinement  and 
maintained throughout a prisoner’s confinement period. If a prisoner is transferred, this file accompanies 
Pdf change page order acrobat - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages in pdf converter professional; pdf rearrange pages
Pdf change page order acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pages in pdf file; how to move pages in pdf files
Chapter 7 
7-10 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
him  or  her  to  the  next  facility.  AR 190-47  establishes  the  minimal  requirements  for  the  correctional 
treatment file. 
7-39. The  FCF  commander  may  have  to  consider  sentence  computations  if  the  theater  commander 
determines that certain sentences will be served within the theater. This decision is based on the type of 
operation  and  its  projected  duration.  Sentence  computation  is  conducted  according  to  AR 633-30  and 
DOD 1325.7-M. The FCF commander ensures that the personnel services NCO working in the personnel 
staff officer is properly trained to do sentence computations. Incorrect computations will result in incorrect 
release  dates  and  can  violate  a  prisoner’s  legal  rights.  The  rate  of  earnings  for  good  conduct  time  is 
calculated based on the prisoner’s length of confinement, to include any pretrial time. (See Table 7-2 for 
information on good conduct time for prisoners who have been found guilty of an offense that occurred on 
or after 1 October 2004.) 
Table 7-2. Good conduct time 
Sentence 
Good Conduct Time 
<1 year 
5 days for each month 
>
1 year to <3 years 
6 days for each month 
>
3 years to <5 years 
7 days for each month 
>
5 years to <10 years 
8 days for each month 
>
10 years (excluding life) 
10 days for each month 
Note. If the term of confinement is reduced or increased, 
time for good conduct is recomputed at the rate appropriate 
to the new term of confinement. 
Mail and Correspondence 
7-40. The  FCF  staff  records  the  inspection  of  each  prisoner’s  mail,  correspondence,  and  authorized 
correspondents  on  DD  Form  499  (Prisoner’s  Mail  and  Correspondence  Record)  .  The  mail  and 
correspondence guidance outlined  in  AR 190-47 applies  to  the  battlefield confinement  of  U.S.  military 
prisoners. 
Prisoner Personal Property and Funds 
7-41. Prisoners  in  the  FCF  are  allowed  to  place  personal  property  that  the  FCF  commander  has  not 
authorized for personal retention in safekeeping. Prisoner personal property and funds guidance outlined in 
AR 190-47 applies to the battlefield confinement of U.S. military prisoners. 
Support Personnel 
7-42. Support personnel organic to the unit operating the FCF are tasked with providing support to the 
FCF. Special personnel (medical officer, chaplain, social service worker), may also be available to assist 
with the administration of the facility. Support personnel assigned to an FCF are oriented and trained in the 
procedures of custody and control. A formal training program is established that may include, but is not 
limited to— 
Supervisory and interpersonal communication skills. 
Self-defense techniques. 
Use of force. 
Weapons qualifications. (See DA Pamphlet 350-38.) 
First aid. 
Emergency plans. 
FCF regulations. 
Riot control techniques. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Insert, delete PDF pages. Re-order, rotate PDF pages. PDF Read. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF. Print only specified page ranges.
reorder pages in a pdf; how to move pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
create a watermark to PDF file in order to help or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
rearrange pages in pdf online; how to move pages within a pdf
Confinement of U.S. Military Prisoners 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
7-11 
Supply Services 
7-43. Supply functions for units operating the FCF are the same as in other military operations. However, 
more emphasis is placed on security measures and accountability procedures that are necessary to prevent 
certain supplies and equipment from falling into the hands of prisoners. 
7-44. Weapons, ammunition, and emergency equipment  (such as hand  and leg  irons) must be stored in 
maximum-security, locked racks and cabinets. These racks and cabinets are then placed in a room that is 
located away from prisoner areas. 
7-45. The  unit logistics officer  ensures that  a sufficient amount  of  general use  and  janitorial items  are 
available to keep the FCF sanitary and free of potential diseases. General-use items include mops, buckets, 
brooms, toiletries, and office supplies. These items are  issued under strict control procedures  and on an  
as-needed basis to prisoners and staff.  Health and comfort items are issued to new prisoners during the 
initial  processing  and  regularly  thereafter.  Prisoners  request  additional  supplies  using  DD Form 504. 
Prisoners in a nonpay status receive these items free of charge. Basic health and comfort supplies include, 
but are not limited to, safety razor, bath soap, toothbrush, toothpaste, and shoe polish. 
7-46. Physical  inventories  are  conducted  at  least  monthly  to  reconcile  and  balance  the  records  of  the 
previous  inventory,  supplies  received,  and  supplies  issued  to  prisoners.  The  FCF  commander  or  a 
designated representative verifies the inventory in writing. 
EMERGENCY PLANNING AND INVESTIGATIONS 
7-47. The  FCF  commander  publishes  formal plans  for  apprehending  escaped  prisoners,  protecting  and 
preventing  fires,  evacuating  the  FCF  (in  CBRNE  and  regular  scenarios),  quelling  prisoner  riots  and 
disorders,  evacuating  mass  casualties,  quarantining  U.S.  military  prisoners,  and  conducting  special 
confinement and U.S. military prisoner processing operations. These plans must form part of the unit SOP 
and be tailored to the physical environment where the FCF is located. Emergency action plans are tested at 
least  every  6  months.  Evacuation  drills  (such  as  fire  drills)  are  conducted  monthly.  All  tests  of  the 
emergency action plans in the FCF are recorded on DA Form 3997. (See DODI 6055.6 and FM 5-415.) The 
essential elements of these plans include— 
Providing notification by alarm and confirming the nature of the situation. 
Providing procedures for manning critical locations on the exterior of the FCF (control points, 
escape routes, observation points, defensive positions). 
Providing procedures to secure the prisoner population during the execution of emergency action 
plans. 
Instituting prisoner and cadre recall procedures and developing a means of organizing forces (for 
example, search parties and riot control teams). 
Implementing  procedures  to  terminate  the  emergency  action  plan  and  conducting  follow-up 
actions (submitting reports, conducting an investigation). 
Providing procedures for evacuating mass casualties and securing prisoners. 
7-48. The FCF commander is responsible for organizing a reaction force that is trained in the use of force, 
riot control formations, and other emergency actions. The size of the reaction force depends on available 
personnel assets and the nature of the emergency. 
7-49. Where appropriate or legally required, incidents of misconduct, breaches of discipline, or violations 
of the UCMJ are investigated using the procedures established in AR 15-6. Before prisoners suspected or 
accused of violations are interviewed, advised of  their rights against self-incrimination under Article 31, 
UCMJ, and told that any statement they make may be used as evidence against them in a criminal trial or in 
a disciplinary and adjustment board proceeding. They are told that they have the right to counsel and to 
have counsel present during questioning. Requests to consult with counsel will not automatically result in 
the case being referred to a three-member board. If requested, arrangements are made for the prisoner to 
meet with an attorney as soon as practical. Relevant witnesses, including those identified by U.S. military 
prisoners,  are  interviewed  as  deemed  appropriate  by  the  investigator.  Written,  sworn  statements  are 
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
as easy as printing; Support both single-page and batch Drop image to process GIF to PDF image conversion; Provide filter option to change brightness, color and
move pages within pdf; change page order in pdf file
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
rearrange pages in pdf file; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
Chapter 7 
7-12 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
obtained when possible. The investigation is completed expeditiously, and a disciplinary report is submitted 
to the FCF commander or a designated representative. 
7-50. Upon receipt of the disciplinary and adjustment board report, the senior board member takes action 
to reduce the report to a memorandum for record, refers the case for counseling and/or reprimand, or takes 
other appropriate action. (Refer to AR 190-47 for further guidance on a disciplinary and adjustment board.) 
RULES OF INTERACTION 
7-51. The FCF commander must establish and enforce the ROI that allow for the humane treatment and 
care of prisoners, regardless of the reason they are confined ROI include, but are not limited to— 
Being professional and serving as positive role models for prisoners. 
Being firm, fair, and decisive. 
Refraining from being too familiar or too belligerent with prisoners. 
Avoiding becoming emotionally or personally involved with prisoners. 
Not gambling, fraternizing, or engaging in any commercial activities with prisoners. 
Not playing favorites with any prisoners. 
Not giving gifts to prisoners or accepting gifts from them. 
USE OF FORCE 
7-52. Guidelines on the use of force are incorporated into orders, plans, SOPs, and instructions at FDFs 
and FCFs. In all circumstances, employ only the minimum amount of force necessary. The use of firearms 
or other means of deadly force is justified only under conditions of extreme necessity and as a last resort. 
No person will use physical force against a prisoner except as necessary to defend themselves, prevent an 
escape, prevent injury to persons or damage to property, quell a disturbance, move an unruly prisoner, or as 
otherwise authorized in AR 190-47. 
7-53. In the event of an imminent group or mass breakout from the FCF or another general disorder, it 
should be made clear to prisoners that order will be restored, by force if necessary. If the situation permits, 
a qualified senior NCO or  the facility commander will attempt  to reason with prisoners engaged in  the 
disorder  before  the  application  of  force.  If  reasoning  fails  or  if  the  existing  situation  does  not  permit 
reasoning, a direct order will be given to prisoners to terminate the disorder. Before escalating beyond a 
show  of  force,  prisoners  not  involved  in  the  disturbance  may  be  given  an  opportunity  to  voluntarily 
assemble in a controlled area away from the disturbance. (See appendix H.) 
ESCAPE 
7-54. Each guard is provided with a whistle or another suitable means of audible alarm. Using firearms to 
prevent  an  escape  is  justified  only  when  there  is  no  other  reasonable  means  to  prevent  escape.  (See 
AR 190-14.) In the event that a prisoner attempts to escape from the confines of the FCF, the guard takes 
action according to the following priorities: 
Alerts other guard personnel of the attempted escape by blowing three short blasts on a whistle 
or by sounding another suitable alarm signal. 
Orders the prisoner to halt three times in a loud voice. 
Fires only when the prisoner has passed all barriers of the FCF and is continuing the attempt to 
escape. 
7-55. The location of barriers is determined by the physical arrangement of the FCF. Normally, barriers 
include fences or walls enclosing athletic, drill, recreational, and prisoner housing areas and administrative 
buildings. 
7-56. A guard does not fire on an escapee if the action of firing will endanger the lives of other persons. 
When firing is necessary, the guard directs shots at the prisoner with the intent to disable rather than to kill. 
Guidelines for the use of firearms by guards escorting prisoners outside the FCF are generally the same as 
those for the use of firearms at the FCF. (See AR 190-47.) 
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
rearrange pages in pdf reader; change page order in pdf online
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
PDF to TIFF Converter doesn't require other third-party such as Adobe Acrobat. Completely free for use and upgrade; Easy to convert multi-page PDF files to multi
how to rearrange pdf pages online; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
Confinement of U.S. Military Prisoners 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
7-13 
7-57. The FCF commander ensures that guards are trained to use the weapons with which they are armed. 
All personnel are thoroughly trained on policies regarding the use of force and the provisions of AR 190-
14. Only 12-gauge shotguns with cylinder (unchoked) barrels are issued for use by FCF guards, and barrels 
will not exceed 20 inches in length. Authorized ammunition for armed guards (perimeter and escort guards) 
is Number 9 shot in trap loads of 2¾ drams equivalent of power and 1⅛ ounces of shot. Tower guards may 
use 00 buckshot ammunition. 
7-58. Tower guards and escort guards are instructed that the shotgun will not be fired at a range of less 
than  20  meters  to  prevent  prisoner  escapes.  Such  instructions  will  appear  in  prisoner  guard  training 
programs and in special instructions prepared for guard personnel. 
7-59. The M9 pistol and M16 and/or M4 rifles are used when prisoners are under escort. Machine guns and 
submachine guns are not to guard U.S. military prisoners. Weapons are not taken inside controlled areas of 
the FCF, except at the expressed direction of the FCF commander. 
TRANSPORTATION 
7-60. The FCF commander is responsible for prisoner transportation requirements, to include safety and 
security once a prisoner is under the FCF commander’s direct custody. (See chapter 4 for more information 
on  transportation  considerations.)  The FCF  commander  must ensure  that  the  guard  and  escort  force  is 
thoroughly  familiar  with  the  RUF  and  the  movement  tasks  outlined  in  STP 19-31E1-SM.  The  FCF 
commander ensures that escort guards— 
Know the type of vehicle being used, departure time, number of prisoners and their status, the 
number of assigned escorts, the type of weapons they are armed with, type of restraints used (if 
applicable), and transfer procedures at the final destination. 
Know the actions to take in the event of a disorder or an escape attempt. 
Conduct a thorough vehicle search and ensure that items which could be used as weapons are 
removed or secured. 
Do not handcuff two prisoners together if they are both at risk for escape. 
Do not handcuff prisoners to any part of a vehicle. 
Sign a DD Form 2708 for each prisoner escorted out of the FCF and frisk the prisoners before 
loading them into the vehicle. 
Follow loading procedures based on the type of transport available. 
Know emergency, loading, unloading, latrine, and meal procedures. 
TRANSFER AND DISPOSITION OF U.S. MILITARY PRISONERS 
7-61. The  FCF commander  must be prepared to transfer U.S.  military prisoners  from their facilities  to 
other confinement facilities outside the theater or back to their units. Receiving units are responsible for the 
movement of prisoners. Prisoners are only released from confinement with proper authorization. The FCF 
commander  coordinates  with  SJA  and  the  next  higher  commander  to  determine  release  authority  and 
authenticate  DD Form 2718  (Inmate’s  Release  Order).  (Detailed  guidance  on  the  administrative  and 
operational processing required for prisoner transfer is outlined in AR 190-47.) 
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
Adobe Acrobat or any other print drivers when they use DICOM to PDF Converter. Additionally, high-quality image conversion of DICOM & PDF files in single page
pdf change page order online; pdf reverse page order preview
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
interface; Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support
rearrange pdf pages reader; reverse pdf page order online
This page intentionally left blank.  
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
8-1 
Chapter 8 
Rehabilitation of U.S. Military Prisoners and Detainees 
The rehabilitation of U.S. military prisoners has long been practiced, but it has only 
recently become a focus for detainees. Lessons learned have highlighted this critical 
requirement,  and  military  police  have  been  actively  involved  in  a  complete 
reengineering of apprehension, detention, and release procedures for detainees as a 
result. These new detention procedures are based on rehabilitation and reeducation 
programs  for  Islamic  extremists  developed  in  Singapore  and  Saudi  Arabia  and 
incorporate lessons  learned from Abu  Ghraib  and other  recent  and historical U.S. 
involvement with detainee operations. The rehabilitation procedures also draw from 
established  policies  and  procedures  for  rehabilitation  that  are  already  effectively 
employed for U.S. military prisoners. The rehabilitation of detainees plays a critical 
role  in  counterinsurgency  operations  and  benefits  the  overall  counterinsurgency 
strategy. 
REHABILITATION 
8-1.  Issues of apprehension, incarceration, recidivism, and programs to curb violent behavior in released 
persons is a long-studied subject by generations  of scholars. Entire organizations are  built around  these 
issues  and  take  years  of  in-depth  analysis  to  reach  conclusions  for  policy  application.  This  is  further 
complicated by the conditions in a combat zone. 
8-2.  Detention provides military police with an opportunity for interaction and positive influence on U.S. 
military prisoners and detainees. Military police provide humane and even-handed treatment to prisoners 
and detainees in their care. These persons are within the control of military police under circumstances that, 
unchecked,  could  cause  military  police  to  regard  them  great  animosity.  It  is  the  professionalism  and 
discipline of military police that facilitates impartial conduct toward prisoners and detainees and prevent 
animosity from manifesting itself. This, in turn, sends a clear message of fairness and impartiality toward 
the indigenous people. Military police internment operations in support of long-term stability operations, 
particularly  within  the  context of  counterinsurgency, must  be  deliberately and professionally conducted 
with an understanding of the impact of perception and subsequent negative information operations used by 
the threat to discredit the U.S. military.  
8-3.  Detention or imprisonment can be a period of transitory idleness where the U.S. military prisoner or 
detainee  simply  endures  the  period  of  his  internment  and  contemplates  the  humiliation  or  perceived 
injustice of his condition. Conversely, it can be one of the most productive and auspicious rehabilitative 
measures that society can provide the individual and his respective society. Rehabilitative measures have 
resulted in decreased recidivism and should begin the moment the individual is apprehended or captured 
and fully implemented upon transfer to a fixed facility. 
8-4.  U.S. military prisoners and detainees are afforded selected privileges, such as sending and receiving 
correspondence  or  employment  opportunities  for  compensation.  The  presumption  is  that  U.S.  military 
prisoners and detainees receive these benefits unless the commander determines that a modification of the 
privileges is required by a violation of camp discipline or (in the case of CIs, unlawful enemy combatants 
or U.S. military prisoners) for imperative reasons of security. Commanders and operation officers consult 
with  the  local  servicing  SJA  or  legal  advisor  when  determining  whether  to  withhold  the  above  stated 
activities from any U.S. military prisoner or detainee. 
Chapter 8 
8-2 
FM 3-10.40 
12 February 2010 
SECTION I – U.S. MILITARY PRISONERS 
PROGRAMS 
8-5.  All  prisoners  (unless  precluded  because  of  disciplinary,  medical,  or  other  reasons  determined 
appropriate by the facility commander) engage in useful employment that is supplemented by appropriate 
supervision, mental  health  programs, professional evaluation,  education, training,  and welfare  activities. 
Activities established and resources allocated to meet these requirements are not to be less arduous or more 
generous than for military personnel who are not incarcerated. 
C
LASSIFICATION
8-6.  Correctional  evaluation  and  classification  are  based  (at  a  minimum)  on  an  individual  prisoner’s 
offense,  attitude,  aptitude,  intelligence,  personality,  adaptation  to  incarceration,  record  of  performance 
before incarceration, and potential for further military service. (See DODI 1325.7.) 
P
LANS
,
P
OLICIES
,
AND 
P
ROCEDURES
8-7.  The facility commander establishes an inmate classification plan that covers policies and procedures 
for  inmate  classification.  The  plan  specifies  objectives  and  methods  for  achieving  goals,  to  include 
monitoring  and  evaluating  the  classification  process.  The  plan  is  reviewed  and  updated  annually.  The 
classification plan, at a minimum, contains and/or implements the following: 
Assessment of a prisoner’s adjustment to and progress of confinement. 
Assignment to a staff member/team to ensure supervision and personal contact. 
Review of prisoner’s classification at least annually. 
Criteria  and  procedures  for  determining  and  changing  an  inmate’s  classification  status,  to 
include at least one level of appeal. 
Notice to all prisoners 48 hours in advance to appear at their classification hearing and are given 
notice before the hearing, unless the potential security of the facility or others is at serious risk. 
Opportunity for prisoners to request and receive authorization from the facility commander or 
his designated representative to review the progress and classification status as noted on the DD 
Form 2712 (Inmate Work and Training Evaluation). 
Risk assessment of the inmate. 
Review Board 
8-8.  The facility commander establishes classification review boards that— 
Consider and make recommendations to the facility commander or a designated representative 
regarding  each  prisoner’s  correctional  treatment  program,  including  custody  grade,  quarters, 
training, work, planned disposition, and special treatment. 
Review  background information and consider  cases of prisoners to determine their individual 
correctional treatment program and initial assignment. 
Conduct special reviews when directed by the facility commander. 
Report findings, recommendations, and actions taken by the facility commander or a designee by 
using the prisoner classification review and DD Form 2711-1 (Custody Reclassification). 
Divulge recommendations only to persons with a need to know. 
8-9.  Classification review boards consist of an E-8/general schedule (GS)-12 or above with two enlisted 
members (E-6 or above). A GS-7 may be substituted for one of the NCO members. (See AR 190-47.) 
DISPOSITION BOARDS 
8-10. The facility commander establishes disposition boards to perform functions that include— 
Considering  and  making  recommendations  to  the  facility  commander  regarding  clemency 
actions and requests for parole. 
Conducting work per policies established in AR 190-47. 
Rehabilitation of U.S. Military Prisoners and Detainees 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
8-3 
Following procedures established by the facility commander. 
Preparing a  mental  health report  (documented  by  mental  health  personnel)  for each prisoner 
appearing  before the board who  is  confined for murder, rape, aggravated assault,  aggravated 
arson, sexual offenses, child abuse, or an attempt to commit any of these offenses. 
Ensuring  receipt  of  current  recommendations  by  the  disposition  board  and  the  facility 
commander  not  earlier  than  30  days  in  advance  a  prisoner’s  maximum  eligibility  date  for 
consideration  by  the  secretary  of  the  Service  concerned.  Disposition  evaluations  and 
recommendations  being  submitted  for  annual  consideration  will  be  forwarded  30  days  in 
advance  of  annual  consideration  dates.  Minimum  eligibility  dates  for  consideration  will  be 
determined per references cited in DODI 1325.7. The disposition board will consider prisoners 
for restoration or reenlistment, clemency, and parole. The board will make a recommendation 
regarding  restoration  or  reenlistment  only  if  the  prisoner  has  applied  for  restoration  or 
reenlistment. 
Making  recommendations  regarding  clemency  for  each  prisoner  requesting  consideration. 
Consideration for parole will be per AR 15-130 and chapter 8 of AR 190-47. Annual clemency 
and parole review dates will occur per AR  15-130, except when an interim consideration for 
parole or clemency is directed. When interim consideration occurs, a new annual review date 
will  be  established  as  of  the  date  of  the  interim  consideration.  When  action  on 
restoration/reenlistment,  clemency,  or  parole  has  been  taken,  the  prisoner  will  be  promptly 
informed of the decision. 
8-11. Disposition boards consist of an E-8/GS-10 or above with two enlisted members (E-6 or above). A 
GS-7  may  be  substituted  for  one  of  the  NCO  members.  When  requested  by  the  respective  Service,  a 
member of the prisoner’s Service will be a board member. If a member of the Navy or Coast Guard is not 
available,  a  Marine  will  usually  sit  as  a  board  member.  (See  AR  190-47  for  more  information  on 
disposition boards.) 
C
OUNSELING
8-12. Counseling is a continuous process, that often involves every member of the staff and cadre. While 
various  counseling  programs  may  be  available,  no  prisoner  is  guaranteed  participation  in  any  specific 
counseling or treatment program. 
8-13. Army Corrections System facilities  establish prisoner counseling programs that are commensurate 
with staffing levels and the  policies set forth  in AR 190-47.  Counseling  is  available in all facilities  for 
immediate  problem solving and crisis  intervention. Army Corrections System regional facilities and  the 
U.S. disciplinary barracks provide the following counseling/treatment programs: 
Chemical abuse counseling. 
Anger management counseling. 
Stress management training. 
Adjunct therapy programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. 
Impact of crimes on victims training. 
Other programs consistent with staffing, professional support, and prisoner needs. 
8-14. Regional corrections facilities will rely primarily on those counseling/treatment programs available 
to all Soldiers. Installations unable to provide basic regional counseling services will request a waiver from 
the OPMG. 
E
MPLOYMENT
8-15. Another  element  of  the  correctional  program  involves  employing  U.S.  military  prisoners.  (See 
AR 190-47 for more information on U.S. military prisoner employment.) Several considerations involved 
with employment include— 
Nature of work.  Prisoners  are  employed  in maintenance  and  support activities  that  provide 
work of a useful, constructive nature that is consistent with their  custody grade, physical and 
Chapter 8 
8-4 
FM 3-10.40 
12 February 2010 
mental  condition,  behavior,  confining  offense,  sentence  status,  previous  training,  individual 
correctional requirements, and installation or facility needs. 
Coordination of work projects. Close coordination between the facility commander and the 
garrison commander or equivalent is maintained to establish worthwhile work projects for the 
employment of prisoners. Approval for, and assignment of, prisoners to work on projects are the 
responsibilities of the facility commander. 
Employment  activities.  Prisoners may  be  employed in the  manufacturing and processing  of 
equipment, clothing, and other useful products and supplies for DOD activities or other federal 
agencies;  in  agricultural  programs;  manufacturing;  or  the  preparation  of  items  to  meet 
institutional or installation needs. 
Vicinity of work. Prisoners cannot work away from the installation or subinstallation on which 
the facility is located, except as part of an approved work release program, or upon the facility 
commander’s approval. 
Length  of  workday.  When  not  engaged  in  prescribed  training  or  counseling,  prisoners  are 
required to perform a full day of useful, constructive work. In general, prisoners are employed 
through a standard 40-hour workweek. Supervisors may determine that failure to complete 40 
hours was due to factors outside the control of the prisoner, such as weather, sickness, and so on. 
This restriction is not intended to limit the authority of commanders to direct extra work during 
emergencies,  to  prevent  the  assignment  of  prisoners  to  details  that  normally  encompass 
weekends, or to prevent prisoners from volunteering for extra work. 
Work Restrictions 
8-16. Commanders are aware of the following restrictions while employing military prisoners: 
A pretrial prisoner will not be assigned work details with posttrial prisoners. 
Prisoners will not perform the following work detail: 
„ 
Attend children. 
„ 
Exercise dogs (except as part of authorized duties on properly established and recognized 
work details). 
„ 
Clean and polish others’ shoes (except in shoe repair and shoe shine projects operated by an 
Army Corrections System facility). 
„ 
Perform  laundry  work  (except  in  the  installation  or  Army  Corrections  System  facility 
laundry). 
„ 
Act as cooks or serve meals in individual quarters. 
„ 
Cultivate or maintain private lawns or gardens. 
„ 
Make beds or perform orderly or housekeeping duties in government  or privately  owned 
quarters. 
Prisoners will not perform labor that results in financial gain to prisoners or other individuals, 
except  as  specifically  authorized  by  the  garrison  or  Army  Corrections  System  facility 
commander. 
Prisoners will not be given work assignments that require the handling of, or access to, personnel 
records,  classified  information,  drugs,  narcotics,  intoxicants,  arms,  ammunition,  explosives, 
money, or institutional keys. 
Prisoners  will  not  have  access  to  automation  equipment  unless  approved  by  the  Army 
Corrections System facility commander and properly supervised. 
Prisoners are required to perform useful work to the same extent as Soldiers who are available 
for  general troop duty.  However,  they will not  be used on work such as  police details,  area 
maintenance, janitorial duties, or kitchen police within unit areas. Such work projects may be 
performed  in  direct  support  of  the  Army  Corrections  System  facility  and  other  installation 
functions when approved by the garrison commander or equivalent. 
Prisoners will not be placed in any position where the discharge of duties may reasonably be 
expected to involve the exercise of authority  over other prisoners. However, skilled prisoners 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested