c# render pdf : Moving pages in pdf Library control class asp.net web page html ajax USArmy-InternmentResettlement16-part70

Rehabilitation of U.S. Military Prisoners and Detainees 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
8-5 
may be used as assistant instructors to help other prisoners with academic work and vocational 
education or training. 
Note. Prisoners may work in exchanges, clubs, or other service-regulated activities on a military 
installation, provided such employment does not violate the prohibited practices listed above. 
Compensation 
8-17. Prisoners in a nonpay may be compensated for demonstrating excellence in work, as follows: 
Appropriated funds. When authorized by public law or an AR, appropriated funds available to 
the Army Corrections System facility may be used to pay prisoners for work performed. When 
pay is authorized, the Deputy of the Army PM will issue a specific pay-for-work policy. 
Good  conduct  time.  Good  conduct  time  is  accorded  each  prisoner  serving  a  sentence(s) 
imposed  by  a  court-martial  or  other  military  tribunal  for  a  definite  terms  of  confinement. 
Prisoners who are serving a life sentence will not receive good conduct time. Good conduct time 
is credited monthly with a deduction from the term of sentence(s) beginning with the day that the 
sentence  begins.  Military  services  may  elect  to  calculate  an  anticipated  release  date  at  the 
beginning of a prisoner’s sentence to confinement based on the regular good conduct time that 
could  be  earned for the entire period of  the  sentence A  parole/mandatory supervised  release 
violator who is returned to confinement earns good conduct time  at the rate  applicable to the 
sentence in effect at the time of violation of parole/mandatory supervised release. Good conduct 
time will be credited according to AR 633-30 and at the rates described below: 
„ 
Five days for each month of the sentence if the sentence is less than 1 year. 
„ 
Six days for each month of the sentence if the sentence is at least 1 year but less than 3 
years. 
„ 
Seven days for each month of the sentence if the sentence is at least 3 years, but less than 5 
years. 
„ 
Eight days for each month of the sentence if the sentence is at least 5 years but less than 10 
years. 
„ 
Ten days for each month of the sentence, if the sentence is 10 years or more. All sentence 
computations will follow  DODI  1325.7M except  for  inmates  adjudged before 1  January 
2005. Sentences are computed by according to AR 633-30 and DOD 1325.7M. 
Earned-time abatement. Facility commanders can grant earned time as an additional incentive 
to  prisoners  who  demonstrate  excellence  in  work,  educational,  and  or  vocational  training 
pursuits. The facility commander designates jobs in writing for which earned time is granted. 
Facility  commanders  require  work  supervisors  to  report  the  prisoner’s  conduct  and  work 
performance  at  least  quarterly,  and  these  work  evaluations  are  used  to  award  earned  time. 
Prisoners  enrolled  in  the  earned-time  program  who  receive  poor  evaluations  or  disciplinary 
measures  that prohibit them from working are not awarded earned  time. (See AR  190-47  for 
earned-time computation.) 
V
OCATIONAL 
T
RAINING AND 
E
DUCATION
8-18. Organized vocational training and academic classes will be conducted at Army Corrections System 
facilities  when  resources  are  available.  Facility  commanders  should  ensure  that  vocational  training 
programs are integrated with academic programs and are relevant to the vocational needs of prisoners and 
to employment opportunities in the community, such as— 
Vocational training. Vocational training includes the training in trades, industry, business, and 
other vocations  designed to assist prisoners in pursuing  employment  in private industry upon 
release. Vocational training and supporting academic instruction may include— 
„ 
Practical work or vocational training projects under the supervision of a trained instructor or 
a skilled employee of the DOD. The work/training is organized and operated per applicable 
educational,  military,  or  industrial  standards  and  should  be  designed  as  self-sustaining. 
Such programs may provide for practical and classroom instruction. 
Moving pages in pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pdf pages reader; reorder pdf pages online
Moving pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pages pdf file; reorder pages of pdf
Chapter 8 
8-6 
FM 3-10.40 
12 February 2010 
„ 
Maintenance  details  using  skilled  supervision  and  modern  equipment  available  on  the 
installation.  Detailed  training  objectives  are  developed  when  a  maintenance  detail  is  as 
designated  as a  vocational training  position.  Related  military  or  civilian correspondence 
course participation to supplement the work experience will be permitted. 
„ 
Individual  vocational/academic  counseling  closely  correlated  with  work  placement 
opportunities upon the prisoner’s release. 
Academic  vocational  programs.  Prisoners  may  be  permitted  to  pursue  other  nonmilitary 
correspondence courses at no expense to the Army. They may also be required to participate in 
formal, vocational training classes and correspondence courses at Army expense. 
Apprenticeship  Training  Program.  The  Apprenticeship  Training  Program  (in  coordination 
with the Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, and craft labor unions) 
may be established at Army Corrections System facilities. 
Textbook  and  teaching  aids.  When  applicable,  Army  publications  may  be  used.  When 
appropriate  and  available,  textbooks,  job  instruction sheets,  industry  standard  textbooks,  and 
teaching aids/devices may be furnished by the Army Corrections System facility. 
Vocational  training  funds.  Appropriated  funds  may  be  used  to  pay  for  vocational  training 
programs per AR 190-47 and may be supplemented with the use of nonappropriated funds per 
suitable nonappropriated fund regulations. 
A
CADEMIC 
I
NSTRUCTION
8-19. Another  element  of  the  correctional  program  involves  providing  instruction  to  U.S.  military 
prisoners. Considerations involved with instruction include— 
Program establishment. Facility commanders establish academic programs which ensure that 
eligible  prisoners  are  afforded  the  opportunity  to  participate.  Upon  availability  of  resources, 
community facilities, and local businesses, the program may contain the following: 
„ 
Educational philosophy and goals. 
„ 
Communication skills. 
„ 
General education. 
„ 
Basic academic skills. 
„ 
General education diploma preparation. 
„ 
Special education. 
„ 
Vocational education. 
„ 
Postsecondary education. 
„ 
Other educational programs as dictated by the needs of the prison population. 
Educational counseling. As an integral part of the initial assignment procedure, each prisoner is 
counseled with respect to educational opportunities/needs. A definitive education and career plan 
to  meet  personal  needs  is  established,  and  every  practicable  opportunity  to  complete  it  is 
provided. 
Prisoner  instructors.  The  facility  commander  may  approve  the  use  of  qualified  prisoner 
instructors when qualified military or civilian personnel are not available. In addition to full-time 
personnel, part-time services of qualified instructors recruited from the surrounding community, 
such as high school teachers and college professors, are used when possible. 
Testing.  Educational  testing,  diagnosis,  and  appraisal  of  factual  information  concerning  the 
prisoners’  academic  and  vocational  education  is  conducted  as  an  essential  part  of  planning 
academic and vocational training programs during in-processing, including the following: 
„ 
Prisoners are given educational achievement tests and tests to determine their  educational 
level  and  mechanical  aptitudes.  In  addition,  a  brief  presentation  of  educational  and 
vocational opportunities is given to each new prisoner. On the basis of resources available, a 
training program that is suited for each particular prisoner is recommended. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
In the following part, you will see a complete C# programming sample for moving the position of Tiff document pages. DLLs: Sort TIFF File Pages Order Using C#.
reorder pdf page; how to move pages within a pdf
C#: How to Edit XDoc.HTML5 Viewer Toolbar Commands
That is to say, if you are in need of moving a tab in front of another one, you may directly use _viewerTopToolbar var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf");
pdf rearrange pages; change pdf page order preview
Rehabilitation of U.S. Military Prisoners and Detainees 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
8-7 
„ 
Physical  handicaps  discovered  as  a  result  of  medical  examinations  and  their  bearing  on 
training are considered in formulating a prisoner’s academic training program. 
„ 
The proposed training recommendations are included in the prisoner’s admission summary 
and brief statements on testing and interviewing results. 
Academic  files.  The  facility  maintains  an  academic  file  on  each  prisoner,  to  include 
achievement test results, interview sheets, and school records. 
W
ELFARE 
A
CTIVITIES
8-20. Commanders establish welfare activities as part of confinement this as follows: 
Facility  commanders  establish  policies  and  procedures  and  implement  a  comprehensive 
recreational  program  that  includes  leisure  activities  and  outdoor  exercise.  The  program  will 
describe  policies  and  procedures  for  the  selection, training,  and  use  of  inmates  as  recreation 
program assistants. 
Welfare  activities  include  provisions  for  reading  material  and  physical  recreation  facilities. 
Prisoners  are  authorized  to  retain  the  following  welfare  items  in  their  possession,  with 
reasonable restrictions as to quantities and sizes as directed by the facility commander: 
„ 
Bibles, prayer books, and religious pamphlets and scriptures appropriate to the prisoner’s 
faith as recognized by the Office of the Chief of Chaplains. 
„ 
Textbooks and appropriate military and vocational training manuals. 
„ 
Books and magazines approved by the facility commander or a designee. 
„ 
Personal letters and photographs. 
„ 
Official and personal documents. 
„ 
Writing materials. Facility commanders may, for good cause, designate the type of writing 
instrument, such as a ballpoint pen or pencil. 
„ 
Library services, to include a reference section, MCM, and other legal resources. 
„ 
Prisoner recreation programs may include sporting events, hobby shops, radio, television, 
indoor  games,  motion  pictures,  videocassettes,  creative  writing,  painting,  and  other 
appropriate activities. (See AR 215-1.) 
Free admission motion picture or videocassette service may be provided to Army confinement 
and correctional facilities. 
American Red Cross assistance is requested from the American Red Cross representative serving 
the host installation. 
Religious services are provided to prisoners. Prisoners are allowed to worship according to their 
faith, subject to the security and safety of their confinement as highlighted in AR 190-47 and 
AR 600-20. 
SECTION II – DETAINEES 
PROGRAMS
8-21. The  strategic  importance  of  operations  in  fixed  I/R  facilities  should  not  be  underestimated. 
Information operations, continued support of multinational allies, U.S. popular opinion, and international 
scrutiny are influenced by events and processes or procedures that occur within fixed I/R facilities. The 
nature of field detention generally means that actual rehabilitation programs will not be conducted at levels 
below the TIF. Rehabilitation programs within fixed facilities and the associated internment process have 
strategic and international importance with long-term effects that influence policy and procedural decisions. 
8-22. The  complexity  of  TIF  operations  associated  with  long-term  rehabilitation  begins  with  the 
identification and assessment of who is being detained within the fixed I/R facilities. This assessment starts 
at the POC by conventional and special operations forces and continues throughout the internment of those 
detained,  up  to  and  through  the  reconciliation  process.  The  former  doctrinal  segregation  of  officers, 
enlisted, civilians, and females now extends to ethnic groups, tribes, behaviors, religious sects, juveniles, 
VB.NET Image: Add Callout Annotation on Document and Image in VB.
annotations on multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, Word, TIFF Support easily moving or resizing generated callout annotation using VB.NET code;
how to move pages in a pdf file; how to move pages in a pdf document
C#: Online Guide for Text Extraction from Tiff Using OCR SDK
Scan image and output OCR result to PDF document. Scan image and output OCR result to Word document. Before moving onto using C# demo codes below, please firstly
how to move pdf pages around; how to reorder pages in pdf file
Chapter 8 
8-8 
FM 3-10.40 
12 February 2010 
and other categories. An inaccurate assessment can have immediate and significant effects that could result 
in  injury  or  death  to  detainees,  contribute  to  insurgency  ideals,  and  cause  major  custody  and  control 
problems within the fixed I/R facilities. 
8-23. The numbers and categories of detainees have increased the complexity of operations in fixed I/R 
facilities and  the design of and required services to support and sustain the facilities. Fixed I/R facility 
complexity mirrors major civilian prison operations and must be resourced and treated as such to address 
many of the custody, control, and sustainment challenges associated with operating fixed I/R facilities. 
8-24. Throughout the custody process, the methods used  to identify and  segregate insurgents and those 
susceptible  to  their  recruiting  efforts  are  important.  Interrogators  and  investigators  should  realize  the 
operational  advantages that  can  be  gained  through  reengaging detainees and continuously  assessing  the 
information  available within  the  fixed  I/R facility. The development  of  enduring  processes that  exploit 
information  gleaned  from  the  population  inside  the  facility  is  critical  to  the  safety  and  security  of  the 
facility  cadre  and  detainees,  and  can  provide  information  actionable  intelligence  to  support  ongoing 
operations  outside  the  facility.  This  source  of  intelligence  can  be  especially  relevant  in  support  of  a 
counterinsurgency effort. 
8-25. U.S. forces conducting detention operations must balance several requirements for fair and humane 
treatment  with  security  and  protection  efforts  within  the  facility.  Cultural  considerations  may  further 
complicate the conduct of operations and how personnel interact with detainees. The following factors are 
considered when implementing detention policy: 
Consistency. Punishments and rewards should be meted out equitably. If a detainee receives a 
punishment for a certain offense, every similar offender should receive the same punishment. 
Discipline.  Strict  discipline  is  required  of  detainees  and  detention  personnel.  Detainees  will 
exploit  contradictions,  discrepancies,  and  double  standards  if  they  believe  that  detention 
personnel are not held to the standards established for them. 
Respect and dignity. Soldiers and guards should ensure that every aspect of their job is done 
with the preservation of dignity in mind. 
„ 
Autonomy. Decisions that do not have to be made by detention staff should be delegated to 
a detainee. These situations will be severely limited in a detention setting. However, when a 
detainee  is  anticipating  the  loss  of  all  freedoms,  token  or  fabricated  opportunities  for 
empowerment will go a long way in maintaining a level of dignity and self worth that is 
critical to maintaining order and, ultimately, rehabilitating detainees. 
„ 
Religious  tolerance.  Religious  services  are  provided  to  detainees.  They  are  allowed  to 
worship according to their faith, subject to the security and safety of their confinement. 
Transparency. 
„ 
Manage expectations. Detainees should know exactly what is expected of them at all times, 
and know what is expected of the detention personnel. 
„ 
Formal  charges.  It  is  imperative  that  apprehended  detainees  are  provided  a  degree  of 
transparency regarding the purpose for their apprehension. 
„ 
Promises. Do not make promises that cannot be kept. Do not break promises that have been 
made.  Negotiate  alternate  courses  if  the  position  requires  a  modification  to  a  previous 
commitment. 
Visitation.  Detainee  visitation  provides  an  excellent  opportunity  to  propagate  a  favorable 
message about U.S. and multinational forces. These measures mitigate the anxiety surrounding a 
detainee’s detention, and their vast social networks will hear of the care afforded to them. 
8-26. Beyond these general guidelines, a number of specific policies or approaches to the detention process 
will  increase  opportunities  to  exploit  relevant  cultural  factors.  The  detention  facilities  should  take 
advantage of the fact that they have a population of mostly military-aged men in a controlled environment. 
This is  an excellent opportunity to address  and  reverse some  of  the  factors  that  contribute  to  criminal 
behavior, antisocial activity, or support to indigenous insurgency efforts within or outside the facility. 
8-27. Detention facility commanders and detention cadre should ensure that detainee schedules are rigid, 
predictable,  and  filled  with  educational,  life  skills,  and  vocational  instruction.  Account  for  time  for 
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
or image type, please see these pages respectively: C# multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word Resizing, burning, deleting and moving are all built in.
change page order in pdf online; pdf reorder pages
VB.NET Image: Draw Linear RM4SCC Barcode on Document Image Using
item) rePage.MergeItemsToPage() REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/rm4scc.pdf", New PDFEncoder certain API, you can read detailed illustration by moving the mouse
move pdf pages; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
Rehabilitation of U.S. Military Prisoners and Detainees 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
8-9 
interrogations (when required), counseling, and recreation. Typically, schedules should not allow for naps 
or extended periods of idleness. Individuals thrive on having a purpose, status, mission, relevance, dignity, 
importance, and honor and on being honored. It is imperative that the source of the fulfillment of those 
needs  transition,  at  least  in  part,  to  education  and  occupation.  There  are  several  areas  to  consider  in 
executing a holistic rehabilitation program, to include— 
Education, training, and self-development. 
„ 
Evaluation  and  assessment.  Factors  such  as  detainee  literacy,  education,  geographical 
origin,  vocational  skills,  professional  skills,  military experience, construction  skills,  and 
management experience should be considered. 
„ 
Academic  education.  After  separating  detainees  by  literacy,  detainees  can  receive 
instruction  on  a  broad  range  of  subjects,  with  a  curriculum  coordinated  with  the  HN. 
Beyond basic education for the younger or poorly educated detainees, the curriculum may 
also include HN politics, HN constitution, and the structure of the HN government. Other 
worthwhile periods of instruction may include money management, job applications, basic 
computer  skills,  basic  communication  skills,  hygiene,  first  aid,  reporting  crimes  and 
suspicious activity reporting, and community familiarization and awareness. 
„ 
Vocational, occupational, and professional training. As a result of the initial assessment 
and evaluation, the detainee may be enrolled in a vocational track. The track should mirror 
the  local  industry  to ensure that skills developed in detention are  relevant  upon  detainee 
release.  The  detention  facility  commander  may  approve  the use  of  local  community  or 
skilled detainees to teach these skills. 
„ 
Religious discussion. Religious discussion programs may be made available upon approval 
of the detention facility commander. 
Teaming.  Detainees  may  break  up  into  small  groups  or teams.  This  will  allow  detainees  the 
opportunity  for  social  development,  integration,  and  exposure  to  the  perspectives  of  others. 
These  teams should be a cross-sectarian mix; represent the spectrum  of ages, experience, and 
education; and be balanced to meet the needs of the detention system and contribute to order and 
civility. The  team will  be the detention  facility’s  unit  and do everything  together.  The team 
leader may serve as the liaison with detention staff and convey fellow detainees’ sentiments. 
Recreation. Detention facility commanders establish policies and procedures and implement a 
comprehensive recreational  program that includes leisure activities and outdoor exercise. One 
example of this may be organized soccer matches to allow physical activity and team building 
for detainees. 
Leadership visibility. Senior leader should make frequent appearances. The display of concern 
for order and control will resonate among the facility because detainees will know that order is 
being maintained at the highest levels and that the guards are being supervised appropriately. 
Detention support personnel. Aside from traditional functions that need to be performed in a 
detention  setting,  several  support  functions  should  be  considered  to  facilitate  the  successful 
functioning of the system and to drastically improve the detention system’s image and ability to 
gather useful information. These additional support positions (to include  counselors,  detainee 
advocates/liaisons, and reintegration facilitators) may be provided by HN personnel. 
Information  operations.  Robust  information  operations,  to  include  police  engagement 
strategies,  may  be  implemented  within,  and  associated  with,  the  detention  system.  These 
operations should target the detainees, detention staff, local community, and society at large. 
Sponsorship  program.  The  system  of  vouching  for  others’  credibility  and  character  is  a  
long-established system in most societies. These unofficial contracts may not be legally binding, 
but they do have some significance to the parties. Sponsors may be one of the justice system’s 
proxy parole officers, monitoring the released detainee and ensuring that he or she is honoring 
the terms of release. 
Community centers. If programs similar to those outlined above are implemented in the HN 
penal system, it may be necessary to establish community centers that offer the same services. 
These  centers  will  provide  the  released  detainee  a  venue  where  he  or  she  can  continue  the 
education  and  training he  or  she  was receiving.  Community  centers  will  also  allow  services 
C# Excel: View Excel File in Window Document Viewer Control
Resizing, burning, deleting and moving are all built in We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
reorder pdf pages; how to move pages around in a pdf document
Chapter 8 
8-10 
FM 3-10.40 
12 February 2010 
(such as literacy, adult education, life skills, vocational skills, and computer skills) to everyone 
in the community, rather than being limited to just to those who were incarcerated. 
Separation of detention from imprisonment. The ultimate objective of stability operations is 
the transition of operations to HN control under the rule of law. As this transition matures, the 
population within detention facilities will change from detainees  who are held as combatants, 
CIs, or RP to facilities that hold those who are truly criminals. Every effort must be made to 
maintain the physical  separation of detainees  (which may be detained for other than  criminal 
activity), accused criminals who have not been tried and convicted in the courts, and criminals 
who have been sentenced subsequent to court proceedings within the government legal system. 
8-28. Circumstances  may  warrant  the  preclusion  or  compromise  of  some  of  the  above  considerations; 
however, the above guidelines will facilitate positive perceptions, cooperation, and assistance. 
REHABILITATION PROGRAMS 
8-29. Rehabilitation programs are  not mandatory,  but they should be encouraged for  detainees  who are 
assessed  to be  appropriate candidates  for  rehabilitation. Rehabilitation  programs  should  be constructed 
based on the specific needs of detainees and the environment into which they will be released. In some OEs 
the  detainees may  be  almost totally  illiterate,  requiring  extensive baseline academic training  to increase 
literacy.  Other  populations  may  be  very  literate,  but  live  within  environments  that  are  economically 
challenged,  requiring  vocational  training  or  education  to  develop  skills  that  can  result  in  economic 
prosperity  for  individuals  and  the  HN.  There  are  any  number  of  environmental  considerations  and 
combinations of factors that must be weighed when developing a relevant rehabilitation program. 
E
VALUATION AND 
A
SSESSMENT
8-30. Throughout capture, processing, and  orientation  to  the  detention  system,  each detainee should  be 
carefully evaluated. This evaluation is used to place the detainee appropriately within specific rehabilitation 
programs. Factors  such as  literacy,  education, geographical  origin,  vocational  skills,  professional skills, 
military experience, construction skills, and management experience are considered. Religious affiliation 
should only be used in the context of appropriate placement. Detention and prison environments may serve 
as optimal arenas to remove sectarian biases and the pervasive sense of sect-based quotas. The assessment 
of detainees’ backgrounds allows the detention staff to use resources properly, mitigating the burden on the 
detention staff and state. 
8-31. Some  detained  personnel,  specifically  during  stability  operations,  may  be  detained  for  criminal 
activity that is deemed a threat to U.S. assets or to HN or multinational partners. Though the crimes they 
are alleged to  have committed should not be a consideration in their  treatment, the assessment of  these 
factors may help to strategize the appropriate placement of detainees. A detainee may be a combatant who 
meets  all  criteria  under  the Geneva  Conventions  as  an  EPW  and  may  benefit  from  some  level  of  job 
training that is consistent with rehabilitation programs. While EPWs may not require rehabilitation in the 
strictest  sense,  training  them  with  a  skill  that  they  can  apply  upon  release  may  provide  them  with 
nonmilitary-related opportunities that  can  contribute to  their  economies and  support their families upon 
release. Further, these programs keep them actively engaged in a constructive activity making them less 
likely to cause disruptions within the facility. All of these things must be considered when evaluating and 
assessing requirements. 
V
OCATIONAL 
T
RAINING AND 
E
DUCATION
8-32. While a strong liberal arts education may be considered the foundation of a rehabilitation process, a 
vocational  education  is  generally  the  core  of  a  successful  rehabilitation  process.  Vocational  training 
potentially  provides  the  skills  for  immediate  employment  and  economic  viability  for  a  detainee  upon 
reintegration into the population. After initial assessment and evaluation, detainees may be enrolled in a 
vocational track. These tracks should mirror the local industry so that the skills developed in detention are 
relevant upon release. The initial evaluation and assessment considers the detainee’s prior work history, 
occupational  interests,  occupational  aptitudes,  and  employment  opportunities  offered  in  his  or  her 
community.  It  also  provides  for  occupations  that  are  personally  meaningful  to  the  detainee,  while 
Rehabilitation of U.S. Military Prisoners and Detainees 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
8-11 
supporting  the  detainee’s  academic  and  resocialization  needs.  Following  the  initial  evaluation  and 
assessment, the detention staff compiles a list of tracks that are consistent with the detainee’s abilities and 
interests. The detainee is given the opportunity to choose his/her preference from that list. This process is 
important  to  the  overall  rehabilitation  strategy  because  the  opportunity  to  make  choices  provides  an 
opportunity for detainees to exercise a level of autonomy. Introducing the ability to make choices regarding 
their future allows for the preservation of dignity and control in a relatively powerless environment. 
8-33. Local businesses are typically consulted to determine what skills are in demand, and vetted members 
of the local community may be used to teach these skills at the detention facility. This allows the detainees 
to learn a skill as it is practiced in the community and also establishes points of contact within the industry. 
The  proactive  enlistment  of  community  involvement  is  very  beneficial  to  the  detainee’s  reintegration, 
allowing  acceptance  and  reintegration  to  begin  before  the  detainee  is  released.  Strong  community 
involvement and support also provides potential employers with a pool of skilled laborers in which they 
have established a relationship. Detainees may possess skills of their own that can be exploited to instruct 
other  detainees.  With  the  wise  use  of  resources  and  the  incorporation  of  vocational  training  in  the 
rehabilitation system, detainees can become some of the most useful and potentially productive members of 
society. Vocational and professional training may be made available for— 
Management. 
Fireman. 
Entrepreneurship. 
Medical specialties. 
Construction specialties. 
8-34. Coordination with the local HN business community can provide opportunities for work programs in 
which the detainees can gain hands-on experience in their chosen vocation. These opportunities depend on 
the local economic environment and the economy’s ability to absorb the workforce. These work programs 
must be carefully controlled,  and participants (detainee and sponsoring  business)  must be evaluated  for 
security risks. 
8-35. Transition programs may be integrated for detainees who have received release documentation and 
are awaiting reintegration by the appropriate HN authority. This provides for the continuing education of 
the detainee to reinforce structure and self-improvement, increasing the probability for success when they 
are integrated back into society. 
A
CADEMIC 
I
NSTRUCTION
8-36. A  facility  may  require  the  implementation  of  educational  programs  that  are  geared  to  benefit 
detainees—coupled  with  other  rehabilitation efforts outlined in the  following paragraphs. The detention 
facility is not only dedicated to sustaining good order and discipline, but also attempts to better individual 
detainees in preparing for future reintegration into society. 
8-37. The  TIF reconciliation center is responsible for ensuring that each program of instruction has the 
potential  to  provide  a  substantial  impact  on  detainees  participating  in  the  programs.  Rehabilitation 
programs are self-improvement programs where each willing detainee has the opportunity to better himself 
or herself and achieve program outcomes. These programs are critical for reintegration into the population. 
Self-improvement programs (literacy, life skills) offered by the TIF reconciliation center and coupled with 
additional  programs  (vocational,  information  operations,  economic  programs)  that  support  the  civilian 
population and economy can achieve a substantial level of success. 
8-38. Educational programs developed and offered by the TIF reconciliation center should be based on the 
literacy rate of detainees within the facility. Illiterate detainees are separated from those who are literate, 
and  the  curriculum  is devised  accordingly.  The  educational  programs  supporting  higher  learning  skills 
should be approved by the HN and monitored for proper curriculum development that is consistent with, at 
a minimum, HN educational standards. These services may need to be designed to teach a person who had 
little or no educational background before internment. 
8-39. The lack of basic reading, writing, and math skills may be a major contributing factor to why a high 
number  of  illiterate  males  participate  in  combatant  or  illegal  activities.  The  diminished  opportunity  to 
Chapter 8 
8-12 
FM 3-10.40 
12 February 2010 
obtain profitable employment needed to support families may cause some to support criminal or insurgent 
elements for employment. The lack of education can be a major contributor, causing moderate males to 
turn to combatant, criminal, or insurgent activities for monetary reasons, even though they do not believe in 
or personally support the activities or cause. Moderate detainees who participated in combatant, criminal, 
or insurgent acts because of little or no opportunity to provide for their families, may be discouraged from 
rejoining  combat,  criminal,  or  insurgent  organizations  through  education  programs  and  the  subsequent 
opportunities that education provides. 
8-40. The  TIF  reconciliation  center  may  focus  on  elementary  education  if  detainees  possess  only 
rudimentary education skills. Detainees attending these classes may have no formal education experiences 
and may be illiterate. Illiteracy can lead to desperation that fuels adverse motivations in otherwise moderate 
detainees.  Detainees  participating  in  rehabilitation  programs  may  be  scheduled  to  attend  school  for  a 
predetermined period and be tested at the end of the period to measure their comprehension. If a detainee 
meets  program standards,  that individual  receives credit for  the program;  if the detainee does not  pass 
program standards (as set by the TIF reconciliation center and HN), the individual does not receive credit. 
The educational programs may  be  taught  by  HN  teachers  who are employed by the TIF  reconciliation 
center services.  Some  program  teachers  may  be  detainees  or  RP  with  specific  skills. Teachers  develop 
educational programs based on detainee constraints, time available, and security requirements. 
8-41. Religious  discussion  groups  may  also  be  offered  to  detainees  as  a  program  to  educate  them  on 
specific aspects of their religion. The program  should be taught by vetted religious leaders of the same 
religious affiliation as the detainees. The program educates detainees on the nationally accepted teachings 
of their religion as viewed by the HN  society. During the program,  detainees are brought together with 
religious leaders and scholars to focus on major teaching points of dogma. The program may be valuable in 
curbing extreme fanaticism that may be a catalyst for violence within the detainees’ world view. 
8-42. A  liberal  arts  education  has  been  described  as  “the  foundation  of  the  rehabilitation  process.”  A 
curriculum  such  as  politics,  HN  constitution,  and  the  structure  of  the  HN  government  provides  more 
fluency in discussing these topics, and detainees will better  appreciate their  situation and how  they  can 
peacefully contribute to its success. Other worthwhile periods of instruction may include managing money, 
job applications, basic computer skills, basic communication skills, hygiene, first aid, crime and suspicious 
activity reporting, and community familiarization and awareness. 
R
ELIGIOUS 
D
ISCUSSION 
G
ROUPS
8-43. The detention facility commander may approve religious discussion groups within the facility. The 
goal for religious groups is to provide religious support to detainees and moderate extremists within the 
facility. This is above and beyond the standard clerical support that is required and provided in the course 
of normal detention operations. Clerical leaders who are chosen to participate must be carefully vetted and 
are typically selected from moderate elements of their respective religions. Religious discussion is never 
forced on a detainee; participation in this program is voluntary. 
8-44. Extremists  participating  in  religious  discussion  groups  may  be  tempered  by  the  more  moderate 
philosophy  and  reinforced by socialization with  other  more  moderate  detainees. It  is also possible  that 
religious extremists may reject a moderate interpretation of their religion and detract from efforts to present 
a moderate approach. Many extremists may not participate, fearing that the facility-sanctioned advocate is a 
cooperative  spiritual  leader.  Detention  facility  commanders  must  allow  autonomy,  within  established 
security  requirements,  for  religious  leaders  and  instructors.  The  only  way  that  moderate  leaders retain 
credibility  is  by  operating  on  their  own—forced  sessions  of  “religious  reeducation”  only  discredit  a 
religious leader  to  those  who are receptive  and  have  little  impact  on  those  who are  inherently  beyond 
reconciliation. Detainees may also use personal time to engage in worship or religious study on their own. 
The detention system may wish to implement instruction in “social intervention” based on HN principles, 
rather than straight doctrinal dogma. 
T
EAMING
8-45. Socialization is an important component of prison populations. The detention system is composed of 
teams to mitigate the potential for socialization and indoctrination that is counter to U.S. and HN interests 
Rehabilitation of U.S. Military Prisoners and Detainees 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
8-13 
and  to  shape  positive  socialization  and  influence.  This  allows  detainee  opportunities  for  social 
development, integration, and exposure to the perspectives of others within a group that is populated in a 
manner  which  reduces  the  likelihood  of  disruptive,  criminal,  or  antisocial  behavior.  Following  initial 
evaluation and  assessment,  detainees  are  placed  on  an  existing team. Just as  individuals are segregated 
upon apprehension for security and information-gathering purposes, the detention population is similarly 
segregated and recombined in elements that facilitate security and information gathering and shaping of the 
detainee social network. 
8-46. A team established within the detention facility conducts all activities as a group. The team leader 
serves as the liaison with detention staff and conveys fellow detainees’ sentiments. Teams aid in converting 
detention into a rehabilitative environment, rather than one that is punitive or idle. Teams do not eliminate 
extremism or recidivism, nor do they create jobs. However, they may diminish the prevalence or need to 
engage  in  profitable  criminal  behavior  because  released  detainees  are  better  equipped  to  function 
appropriately in society. 
R
ECREATION
8-47. Many military  police  express support for physically exhausting activity in detention as  a  positive 
outlet  for  energy  that  may  otherwise  be  used  for  counterproductive  purposes.  Sports  clubs  may  be 
organized within the facility for this purpose. Time and space are  set  aside  to accommodate  detainees’ 
physical  exercise.  This  also  contributes  to  the  socialization  of  the  detention  population.  Teams  are 
cross-sectarian, and military police foster the right messages within this context. 
L
EADERSHIP 
V
ISIBILITY
8-48. Detainees may have a heightened respect for high-ranking officials. Order within a facility is likely 
to  increase  with  increased  leadership  visibility.  Therefore,  senior  leadership  should  make  frequent 
appearances  throughout  the facility.  This display of  concern for order and  control  resonates among  the 
facility as the detainees know that order is being maintained at the highest level and that guards are being 
supervised appropriately. However, leaders should ensure that guard force duties and responsibilities are 
not  undermined. Leadership  needs  no  specific  reason to  make rounds and  conduct  random  inspections. 
Detainees typically feel secure from abuse (from guards and other detainees) and may be discouraged from 
inciting unrest. When senior leadership enforces even the most trivial infraction among the detention staff, 
it sends a clear message to the detention population that order is to be maintained in the facility. 
D
ETENTION 
S
UPPORT 
P
ERSONNEL
8-49. Several support functions should be considered to facilitate the ability to gather useful information to 
further the rehabilitation process, and identify rehabilitation failures or setbacks. This support may include 
behavioral health personnel, detainee advocates/liaisons, and reintegration facilitators. 
Behavorial Health Personnel 
8-50. Behavioral  health  services  will  be  provided  to  detainees,  based  on  the  availability  of  medical 
resources  and patient  workload.  Resources  to provide this  care may be task-organized and  may  include 
inpatient and outpatient care. Health care personnel providing behavioral health services to detainees may 
include  a  psychiatrist,  psychologist,  social  worker,  behavioral  health  nurse,  occupational  therapist,  and 
behavioral health specialist. 
8-51. All detainees will receive a behavioral health screen when in-processing and before distribution into 
the general population. A translator will be used to translate between the screener and the detainee. The 
behavioral  health  screen will  be  conducted by a  behavioral health team  member.  Each  detainee will be 
screened individually to maximize privacy. The behavioral health screen will include whether the detainee 
has a  present  suicide ideation, the  history of suicidal behavior,  the history  of  (or  current) psychotropic 
medication use, current behavioral health complaints, the history of behavioral health treatment, and/or the 
history  of  treatment  for  substance  abuse.  During  the  behavioral  health  screen,  each  detainee  will  be 
observed for general appearance and behavior; evidence of abuse and/or trauma; and current symptoms of 
Chapter 8 
8-14 
FM 3-10.40 
12 February 2010 
psychosis, depression, anxiety, and/or aggression. After screening, each detainee will be recommended for 
placement into the general population, placement into the general population with appropriate referral to 
behavioral health, or referral to behavioral health for an emergency assessment prior to placement into the 
general  population.  The  screening  will  begin  with  an  introduction  and  explanation  of  the  nature  and 
purpose of the screen. Each question will be asked by the screener and translated by the translator. Under 
no  circumstance  will  a  translator  conduct  the  screen.  Behavioral  health  screening  forms  will  not  be 
presigned, and detainees will not be screened in groups. The original completed screen will be placed in the 
detainee’s individual medical record.  
Detainee Advocates/Liaisons 
8-52. Detainee  advocates  may  be  used  by  detention  facility  commanders  to  serve  as  liaisons  between 
detainees and facility leaders. The detainee advocates serve as sympathizers and mediators in a facility. 
Many of these positions may be filled by vetted HN personnel. The difference in rehabilitative effect by 
having an indigenous person perform this function, rather than even the most concerned U.S. leader, can be 
profound. Their primary responsibility is addressing detainees’ concerns and finding resolutions that are 
mutually  acceptable  to  detainees  and  facility  leadership.  Advocates  address  all  detainee  concerns, 
regardless of how unfounded, baseless, or improbable the allegation. The advocates liaise with team leaders 
and are responsible for investigating claims and discussing reasonable solutions with facility leadership. 
This advocate-team leader channel should be strictly followed. Having concerns and complaints addressed 
also gives the detainees another degree of autonomy. Advocates have no decisionmaking authority, only 
the capacity to pass on decisions that have been made by facility leaders. Detainees may view sympathetic 
decisionmakers as targets of pressure and manipulation. The role of an advocate provides a buffer for that 
very reason.  Detainees are made  aware  of  the  decisionmaking  limitations of  the  advocates  to  limit  the 
extent to which they are manipulated. 
8-53. Advocates are also responsible for facilitating individual religious worship (such as providing prayer 
rugs, Qur’ans, Bibles, or other religious literature and accoutrements). Another function of the advocates 
includes liaising with detainee families to ensure that they have the most accurate and current information 
regarding their loved one. They are also involved in scheduling and managing visitation. Recently released 
or soon-to-be released detainees are prime candidates for this intermediary role. 
Reintegration Facilitators 
8-54. Not all detainees commit crimes for motives relating to economic or social  desperation; however, 
these may be important underlying motivations for a significant number of them. For these detainees, no 
amount of exposure to military police, broadening of perspective, or increased understanding is going to 
address the fundamental need that was the impetus for the crime. The detention system must reach beyond 
the detention facility as halfway houses, convict-to-work programs, and parole officers do in the American 
justice  system.  Much  like  a  U.S.  parole  officer,  a  reintegration  facilitator  coordinates  release  and 
reintegration  functions  for  detainees.  These  facilitators  are  typically  vetted  HN  personnel  who  are 
employed to act in this capacity. 
8-55. Reintegration  facilitators  establish  a  relationship  with  the  detainee  as  release  approaches.  They 
review  the  detainee’s  file  and  make appropriate  recommendations, referrals,  and  placements  within  the 
community that take advantage of education and skills acquired in detention. Reintegration facilitators are 
responsible for networking with organizations and persons, to include— 
Local business. 
Vocational schools. 
Colleges. 
Law enforcement offices. 
Prison and detention facilities (for released detainees who could fill detainee support positions 
within detention/prison facilities). 
Medical community. 
Local contractors. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested