c# render pdf : How to move pages in pdf reader control software system azure html windows console USArmy-InternmentResettlement18-part72

Parole, Transfer, or Release of U.S. Military Prisoners and Detainees 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
9-9 
Legend: 
HN 
host nation 
IO 
information operations
Figure 9-1. Detainee reintegration considerations 
TRANSITION OF DETAINEE OPERATIONS TO CIVIL AUTHORITY 
PENAL SYSTEMS 
9-45. Strategic-level priorities and conditions within the OE will dictate the long-term direction of theater 
level  detainee  operations.  At  some  point,  when combat  actions have subsided and some  predetermined 
level  of stability  is  achieved,  most detainees  will be released,  transferred,  or  repatriated.  Detainees  are 
traditionally  released  or  repatriated.  Various  categories  of  interned  civilians  may  be  released  once  the 
strategic  conditions  which  led  to  their  internment  have  changed.  Members  of  armed  groups  may  be 
transferred to external facilities for strategic intelligence screening or for long-term internment. However, 
detainees who are suspected or convicted of committing crimes that initially resulted in their internment, or 
who committed serious crimes while interned, will not be released in the same manner. They may, instead, 
be tried as criminals in duly established military proceedings or turned over to indigenous civil courts for 
prosecution and adjudication. It is critical that military police plan for and position detainees for eventual 
release or transfer to emerging civil authority penal systems. 
9-46. The  permanent  transfer  of  detainees  from  the  custody  of  U.S.  armed  forces  to  HN  or  other 
multinational  forces  requires  the  approval of  the  Secretary of  Defense or his  designee. The  permanent 
transfer of detainees to foreign national control will be governed by bilateral national agreements. Before 
transfer,  the  appropriate  U.S.  government  representative  will  ensure  that  the  receiving  government  is 
willing and able  to  apply the  Geneva Conventions to transferred detainees  and will  gain assurances  of 
humane treatment for persons convicted or pending trial for criminal activity. At the conclusion of military 
or stability operations, a key element that must be considered is the transfer of detainees from U.S. and/or 
multinational control to HN control. A myriad of factors (law enforcement, military, or judicial assets)  
Local 
Support 
Local leaders not in favor of detainee release 
program. 
Local  leaders engaged to  accept  detainees 
as source of reformed citizens. 
Former detainee population relatively high in 
an area, giving rise to potential organization 
as insurgents, extremists, or criminals. 
Aggressive  IO  and  reintegration  programs 
with strict  enforcement  to reduce  recapture 
and ensure minimal detainee migration. 
Job 
Prospects 
Successful  extremist  recruiting  operations 
(assume they target detainees). 
Jobs  and  job  training  programs  increased 
skills and abilities. 
Lack of jobs, especially in view of returning 
refugees also looking for work. 
HN  provides  additional  funding  for  creating 
adequate  numbers  of  meaningful  jobs 
(economic stimulation). 
Security 
Environment 
Insufficient law enforcement presence; lack of 
adequate security. 
HN provides additional funding for increased 
(adequate) security forces. 
Incidents of  sectarian  violence  attributed to 
detainees  (need  detainee  origin,  tribal  and 
religious  affiliation,  release  point,  and  last 
known location). 
Detainee  alignment  with  (and  oversight  by) 
reintegration  facilitators,  informant  reward 
programs  and  tip  hotlines,  and  maximum 
local control. 
Balance 
Risks 
Benefits 
How to move pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
change page order in pdf reader; switch page order pdf
How to move pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf rearrange pages; reorder pdf pages in preview
Chapter 9 
9-10 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
affect when transitions can occur with limited disruption to current operations of the U.S. and the receiving 
government. The following factors must be considered before releasing detainees back to the HN: 
Publish the release order and inform the detainees so that can notify their next of kin of their new 
location, when required by applicable Geneva Conventions. 
Verify  the accuracy of  the detainee’s personnel and medical records and provide copies (in a 
sealed envelope) to the transporting unit. 
Account for and prepare impounded personal property for shipment with the escorting unit. 
Ensure that logistic resources (food and water) are adequate. 
Ensure that detainees are documented on a list by name, rank, and/or status; ISN; power served; 
nationality; and physical condition. Attach the list to the DD Form 2745 and provide a copy to 
the NDRC. (See table 4-1, page 4-6.) 
Prepare paperwork in English and other applicable languages before releasing detainees. 
Verify collected biometric data. 
Coordinate with legal, police, and  penal  administrative officials of the HN for the transfer of 
detainees. 
Coordinate with the media for press coverage of the transfer. 
9-47. When I/R operations are conducted in an environment in which a state has failed or will continue to 
be occupied, leaders consider the following when releasing detainees back into the community: 
Assist in the establishment of internment facilities for the eventual transition of detainees to the 
HN penal operation. 
Assist with training HN and/or new government personnel in penal and/or detention operations. 
Coordinate with judicial and administrative personnel for the transfer of evidentiary documents 
and/or materials. 
Establish clear and agreed-upon standards for the release and/or transfer of detainees back to the 
HN and/or new government. 
9-48. Planning considerations for transitioning detainee operations to a HN penal system may include: 
Penal  system  template.  Strategic  planners  and  leaders  determine  the  current  state  of  the 
developing indigenous penal system and the necessary additions or adjustments to be made to 
achieve a functioning system. A regional penal system template is developed for planners to use 
to determine the amount of penal system infrastructure and associated resources needed based on 
the population and regional characteristics of a given area. Planning considerations for regional 
penal systems range from comparative analysis of existing structures to historical examples used 
for development purposes and may include the following: 
„ 
Compare the populations of similar regions to the number of persons detained to obtain a 
holistic analysis which will determine large-scale indigenous penal system requirements. 
„ 
Use  lessons  learned  in  historic detainee levels  to  form  detainee-to-population ratios  as a 
functional  starting  basis  for  further  refinement.  A  sample  template  might  be  a regional 
facility with  5,000 bed spaces  for  every  1 million  inhabitants.  Additionally, the same 1 
million inhabitants planning number may lead to a requirement for 200 of the 5,000 bed 
spaces to be designated for female detainees. 
„ 
Develop templates to capture layered or “bottom up” requirements. For every three 400-bed 
space, local facilities require one regional level facility in support. The template should also 
be scalable  and  account  for  the  various levels  of confinement  facilities needed within a 
functional span of control. 
„ 
Adjust templates based on the unique characteristics of the operating environment. 
Academy  organizational  structure  design  template.  Significant  preplanning  is  required  to 
efficiently establish the educational institutions required to train indigenous personnel in penal 
operations. Planners develop templates early to capture the requirements for standing up training 
academies that can properly train large numbers of people for sustained periods of time. Military 
advanced individual training institutions should be modified, as needed, and used as a model for 
creating academy templates. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
change pdf page order online; pdf reorder pages
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
move pages within pdf; reorder pdf pages online
Parole, Transfer, or Release of U.S. Military Prisoners and Detainees 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
9-11 
Juvenile justice/penal program. Most developed nations recognize the need to handle and treat 
juvenile offenders differently from other criminals. U.S. policy requires that juvenile detainees 
be  segregated from adult detainees and protected based on  their minor status. Early planning 
must incorporate the requirements to resource, establish, and transition civil juvenile justice and 
correctional systems according to generally accepted international standards. 
Assistance  and  liaison  teams.  Once  civil  authority  begins  to  take  shape,  the  I/R-focused 
military police should plan to ease out of the “doing” role and into a “teaching, coaching, and 
mentoring”  role.  The  assistance  teams  that  work  with  emerging  civil  authorities  require 
considerable  planning  and  resourcing  efforts.  Additionally,  planners  anticipate  increased 
requirements for effective liaison activities at every level of emerging civil penal systems and 
infrastructure. 
Indigenous  penal  system  resource  planning  estimates.  Resource  requirements  must  be 
developed  early  regarding  the  necessary  systems,  equipment,  and  infrastructure  needed  to 
establish and operate regional penal systems. Military police with I/R expertise provide planners 
and resource directors with accurate planning  estimates  for  the  establishment  and day-to-day 
sustainment of all aspects of penal system administration and operation. 
Detainee information management system. Preserving critical information on detainees and, 
ultimately, transferring that information to civil authorities requires robust detainee management 
data  systems.  Criminal  information  systems  capable  of  tracking corrections based  on  inmate 
management information in penal environment applications are critical. Capabilities provided by 
such  systems  must  meet  military  police  and  HUMINT  collection  requirements  (including 
biometrics)  and  must  be  scalable  from  the  local  to  national  level.  The  system  must  be 
unclassified and transferable to civil authorities for criminal and penal applications. 
9-49. The key objectives of the transition of detainee operations are numerous and complex. Key players 
within this transition plan include— 
Department of the State officials, to include public diplomacy personnel. 
Department of Justice. 
DOD. 
U.S. Agency for International Development. 
Foreign governments. 
NGOs and international organizations. 
Private contractors. 
Ministry of interior and local justice and police personnel. 
9-50. Key U.S. military considerations include— 
Constructing facilities to ensure that they meet humane treatment standards. 
Estimating fund for infrastructure construction or upgrade. 
Identifying equipment issues for the gaining facility. 
Identifying a transition team to provide oversight. 
Developing a public affairs plan. 
9-51. Transition criteria must also be established to determine at what point detainees should be handed 
over to the HN or a fledgling government. From a penal standpoint, the criteria includes— 
Number and quality of corrections officers trained. 
Number and quality of penal facilities built or refurbished. 
Institutional development. 
Crime rates, especially violent crimes. 
Other crime indicators, such as illegal drug trade. 
Public perception of security and performance of corrections officers. 
9-52. From the standpoint of the military and similar organizations, the transition criteria may include— 
Number and quality of personnel trained and institutional facilities built or refurbished. 
Development of reliable local intelligence. 
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
pdf move pages; how to move pages around in pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including
rearrange pdf pages; move pages in pdf reader
Chapter 9 
9-12 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Number  of  former  combatants  who  have  completed  disarmament,  demobilization,  and 
reintegration. 
Number and quality of intelligence officials trained, facilities built, and institutions developed. 
The level of political violence and insurgency. 
Public perception of security. 
International military casualties.
9-53. The justice system within the government is another critical component when developing a transition 
plan. A set of criteria as to when to conduct transition operations may depend on the following standards: 
Number and quality of judges, prosecutors, and trained corrections officers. 
Number and quality of judicial facilities built or refurbished. 
Institutional development of justice bodies, such as a ministry of justice and local and national 
courts. 
Public perception of justice system effectiveness. 
Public perception of corruption in the justice system. 
Duration of pretrial detention. 
Duration of case movement through the court system. 
Established right to legal advice and due process. 
9-54. A detailed plan is critical for ensuring the long-term success of transition operations. 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save
pdf reverse page order online; moving pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
PDF in preview without adobe reader component installed. Dim pageIndex As Integer = 0 ' Move cursor to String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
rearrange pages in pdf reader; rearrange pdf pages online
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
10-1 
Chapter 10 
Resettlement Operations 
Resettlement  operations  occur  across  the  spectrum  of  military  operations.  Such 
operations  include  civil  support  operations  and  foreign  humanitarian  assistance 
operations.  Events  under  the  category  of  resettlement  operations  include  relief, 
CBRNE, civil laws, and community assistance operations. Military police provide 
support to resettlement operations, which include establishing and operating facilities 
and supporting CA efforts to ensure that supply routes remain open (mainly linked to 
the maneuver and mobility support function) and clear to the maneuver commander. 
Additional tasks that support resettlement operations (conducted within the law and 
order function) include curfew enforcement, movement restrictions, the use of travel 
permits and registration cards, proper checkpoint operations, amnesty programs, and 
inspections. The level of control is typically drastically different from that of most 
interned persons during detainee operations. During detainee operations, the level of 
control and supervision is high, based on the significant and evident security risks. 
During resettlement operations, DCs are allowed freedom of movement as long as 
such movement does not impede operations. Security risks will always be present, 
but  they  should  be  reduced  in  most  resettlement  operations.  Counterinsurgency 
operations  may  affect,  or  be  affected  by,  resettlement  operations;  and  ongoing 
insurgency operations will tend to blur the lines between internment operations and 
resettlement operations. 
INTRODUCTION 
10-1. Resettlement operations are conducted to provide security and support for DCs, in conjunction with 
CA/civil-military operations and HN, NGO, and other military specialties. CA personnel typically lead the 
initial analysis and assessment, coordination, and liaison with the HN and NGOs regarding resettlement 
operations.  In  some  instances,  conducting  resettlement  operations  minimizes  civilian  interference  with 
military  operations  and  protects  civilians  from  combat  operations.  In  other  instances,  resettlement 
operations may be the main effort, such as during humanitarian relief missions. Resettlement operations are 
ideally performed with minimal military resources. Nonmilitary international aid organizations, NGOs, and 
international humanitarian organizations are the preferred resources used to assist CA forces. However, CA 
forces  typically  depend  on  other  military  units,  such  as  military  police,  to  assist  with  controlling  and 
securing DCs. 
OBJECTIVES AND CONSIDERATIONS 
10-2. Often,  the  primary  objective  of  resettlement  operations  is  to  minimize  civilian  interference  with 
military operations, and this is typically linked to the maneuver and mobility support function. However, 
the primary or supporting objectives of resettlement operations may also be to— 
Protect DCs from combat operations. 
Prevent and control the outbreak of disease. 
Relieve human suffering. 
Centralize masses of DCs. 
10-3. The specific planning focus of resettlement operations may differ at each level of command and will 
vary depending on the type and nature of detainee operation being performed and other relevant aspects of 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
how to reorder pages in a pdf document; how to reorder pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
rearrange pdf pages in reader; reorder pages in a pdf
Chapter 10 
10-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
the  OE.  All  commands  and  national  and  international  agencies  involved  must  have  clearly  defined 
responsibilities. When planning and executing resettlement operations, consider the following actions: 
Coordinate with the Department of State, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian 
Affairs, and HN civil and military authorities to determine the appropriate levels and types of aid 
required and available. 
Minimize outside contributions (issue basic needs items only) until DCs become self-sufficient, 
and encourage DCs to become as independent as possible. 
Review the effectiveness of humanitarian responses, and adjust relief activities as necessary. 
Coordinate with CA units to ensure the use of U.S., HN, international, and other organizations 
(UN Children’s Fund, Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere). Receiving assistance 
from these organizations capitalizes on their experience and reduces the requirements placed on 
U.S. armed forces. 
Apply security restrictions, as required, for DCs. Under international laws, DCs have the right to 
freedom of movement; but in the event of a mass influx of DCs, security considerations may 
require restrictions. 
CIVIL-MILITARY AND RESETTLEMENT OPERATIONS 
10-4. Resettlement operations typically require integrated and synchronized civil-military operations. The 
situation  will  determine  if  civil-military  operations  are  supporting  resettlement  or  if  resettlement  is 
supporting  civil-military operations. CA forces are specially organized, trained, equipped,  and suited  to 
perform civil-military operations liaison, to include providing support to resettlement operations, with the 
varied civil agencies and multinational partners in an operational area. CA forces bridge the gap between 
U.S. armed forces and HN military and civilian authorities in support of military objectives. They can also 
provide  support to  non-U.S.  units  in  multinational operations.  (CA  participation  in  detainee operations 
within  the  United  States  may  have  limitations,  and  the  roles  they  perform  in  non-U.S.  territories  will 
typically be performed by other U.S. governmental agencies in U.S. territories.) 
10-5. Civil-military operations are the activities of a commander that establish, maintain, influence, or 
exploit relations between U.S. armed forces, governmental and nongovernmental civilian organizations and 
authorities, and the civilian population in a friendly, neutral, or hostile operational area to facilitate military 
operations and consolidate and achieve U.S. objectives. Activities conducted by CA personnel enhance the 
relationship between U.S. armed forces and civil authorities in areas where U.S. armed forces are present. 
Support by CA personnel also involves the application of their functional specialty skills that are normally 
the responsibility of the civil government to enhance the conduct of civil-military operations. The 
contribution of CA forces to an operation centers on their ability to rapidly analyze key civil aspects of the 
operational area, develop an implementing concept, and assess its impact throughout the operation. (See 
FM 3-05.40 for more information about CA.) 
RESPONSIBILITIES FOR CIVIL AFFAIRS ACTIVITIES 
10-6. The  President and the Secretary  of  Defense  develop  and  promulgate  the  policy  that  governs CA 
activities that U.S. commanders perform (in joint and multinational contexts) due to the politico-military 
nature and sensitivity of these activities. 
10-7. CA  planning  is  based  on  national  military  strategy  and  is  consistent  with  a  variety  of  legal 
obligations,  such  as  those  provided  for  in  the  U.S.  Constitution,  statutory  laws,  judicial  decisions, 
Presidential  directives,  departmental  regulations,  and  the  rules  and  principles  of  international  laws 
(especially those incorporated in treaties and agreements applicable to areas where U.S. armed forces are 
employed). 
10-8. CA forces are made available to commanders to maintain proper, prudent, and lawful relations with 
the civilian population and government indigenous in the operational area. When commanders’ operations 
affect,  or  are  affected  by,  the  indigenous  civilian  population,  resources,  government,  or  other  civil 
institutions or organizations in the operational area, CA forces will be assigned to assist in civil-military 
operations. (See DODD 2000.13.) 
Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
10-3 
10-9. U.S.  Army  CA  forces  are  designated  as  special  operations  forces.  (See  Title  10,  USC.)  All 
CONUS-based special operations forces are assigned to the U.S. Special Operations Command. CA units 
are under the combatant command of U.S. Special Operations Command until operational control is given 
to  one  of  the  geographic  combatant commanders.  U.S.  Special  Operations Command  is the combatant 
command for special operations forces. 
C
IVIL 
A
FFAIRS 
S
UPPORT
10-10.  The U.S. Special Operations  Command  coordinates  with  geographic combatant commanders  to 
validate  all  requests  for  CA  units  and  individuals  during  peace  and  war.  The  U.S.  Special  Operations 
Command coordinates with each of the Services and then provides CA forces that are organized, trained, 
and  equipped  to  plan  and  conduct  CA  activities  in  support  of  a  geographic  combatant  commander’s 
mission.  The  U.S.  Special  Operations  Command  commander  has  the  capability  of  providing  one 
airborne-qualified CA battalion that— 
Is an Active Army unit that consists of regionally oriented companies. 
Is structured to deploy rapidly. 
Provides initial CA support to military operations. 
Is  primarily  used  to  provide rapid,  short-duration CA  generalist  support  for nonmobilization 
contingency operations worldwide. 
Is not designed or resourced to provide the full range of CA functional specialty skills. 
10-11.  The  U.S.  Army  Special  Operations  Command  is  the  Army  component  of  the  U.S.  Special 
Operations Command. Its mission is to command and support and ensure combat readiness of assigned and 
attached  Army  Special  Operations  Forces.  The  U.S.  Army  Special  Operations  Command  has  the 
responsibility, in conjunction with U.S.  Special Operations Command, to recruit, organize, train, equip, 
mobilize, and sustain the Regular Army’s only CA brigade. As an Army Service component command, the 
U.S. Army Special Operations Command’s primary missions are— 
Policy development. 
Long-range planning. 
Programming and budgeting. 
Management and distribution of resources. 
Program performance review and evaluation. 
10-12.  The  U.S.  Army  Civil  Affairs  and  Psychological  Operations  Command  headquarters  is  a 
nondeploying, direct-reporting  unit  to  the  U.S.  Army  Reserve  Command  with  the mission  to  organize, 
train, equip, monitor the readiness of, validate, and prepare assigned Active Army and U.S. Army Reserve 
CA forces for  deployment. These  forces  conduct  worldwide  CA  operations  in  support  of  civil-military 
operations, across the spectrum of operations, and in support of the geographic combatant commanders, 
U.S. Ambassadors, and other agencies as directed by the U.S. Army Special Operations Command. 
10-13.  The  geographic  combatant  commander  organizes  the  staff  to  orchestrate  joint  operations  with 
multinational  and interagency activities. Geographic  combatant  commanders  plan, support,  and  conduct 
CA  activities.  They  designate  a  staff  element  within  the  headquarters  that  has  the  responsibility  for 
coordinating CA activities; combatant commanders receive CA support from the Commander U.S. Special 
Operations Command.  The civil-military operations  staff  element  on  the  theater  echelon staff  plays an 
integral part in this organization. The civil-military operations staff cell of the Theater Special Operations 
Command provides deliberate and contingency planning, maintenance of existing plans, assessments, and 
support  to  the  geographic  combatant  commander.  The  CA  commander  supporting  each  geographic 
combatant commander  serves  as the geographic  combatant  commander’s senior CA advisor and  as  the 
focal point for civil-military operations, coordination, collaboration, and consensus. 
10-14.  Normally, C2 of special operations forces is executed within the special operations forces chain of 
command.  The identification  of  a  C2  organizational  structure for  special operations  forces depends  on 
specific objectives, security requirements, and the OE. The Theater Special Operations Command is the 
joint special operations command through which the geographic combatant commander normally exercises 
operational control of special operations forces within the area of responsibility (the exceptions are the U.S. 
Chapter 10 
10-4 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Central  Command  and  U.S.  European  Command  areas  of  responsibility  where  the  Theater  Special 
Operations Command exercises operational control of CA forces). 
10-15.  Civil-military  operations  (assistant  chief  of staff, civil affairs  operations  [G-9]/civil affairs staff 
officer [S-9]) staff elements are typically embedded within the echelon staffs requiring CA support. These 
staff  elements  will  normally  be  provided  to  brigade  level,  based  on  specific  mission  variables  and 
requirements. The civil-military operations staff officer/planner (G-9/S-9) is the principal staff officer for 
all  civil-military  operations  matters  and  conducts  the  initial  assessment  that  determines  CA  force 
augmentation. The relationship between the G-9/S-9 primary staff officer to the supporting CA unit is the 
same  relationship  as  the  G-2  to  a  supporting  MI  unit.  The  G-9/S-9  enhances  the  relationship  between 
military forces and civilian authorities and personnel in the AO to ensure mission success. Responsibilities 
and functions of the G-9  and S-9 differ due to the  operational echelon. The  G-9 has staff planning and 
oversight to— 
Manage assigned and attached CA forces. 
Coordinate all aspects of the relationship between the military force and the civil component in 
the environment of the supported commander. 
Advise the commander on the effect of military operations on the civilian populations. 
Minimize civilian interference with operations. This includes monitoring resettlement operation 
curfew,  and  movement  restrictions  or  deconflicting  civilian  and  military  activities  with  due 
regard for the safety and rights of refugees and internally displaced persons. 
Advise the commander on legal and moral obligations incurred from the long- and short-term 
effects (economic, environmental, health) of military operations on civilian populations. 
Coordinate,  synchronizing,  and  integrating  civil-military  plans,  programs,  and  policies  with 
national and combatant command strategic objectives. 
Advise  on  the  prioritizing  and  monitoring  expenditures  of  allocated  overseas  humanitarian 
disaster and civic aid, commanders emergency response plan, payroll, and other funds dedicated 
to civil-military operations. The G-9 ensures that subordinate units understand the movement, 
security, and control of funds. The G-9 coordinates with the funds controlling authority/financial 
manager to meet the commander’s objectives. 
Coordinate and integrating deliberate planning for civil-military operations-related products. 
Augmenting civil-military operations staff. 
Coordinate  and  integrating  area  assessments  and  area  studies  in  support  of  civil-military 
operations. 
Support emergency defense and civic-action projects. 
Support the protection of culturally significant sites. 
Support foreign humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. 
Support emergency food, shelter, clothing, and fuel for local civilians. 
Support public order and safety applicable to military operations. 
10-16.  The functions of the brigade S-9 are to— 
Serve as the staff proponent for the organization, use, and integration of attached CA forces. 
Develop plans, policies, and programs to further the relationship between the brigade and the 
civil component in the brigade AO. 
Serve as the primary advisor to the brigade commander on the effect of brigade populations on 
brigade operations. 
Assist in the development of plans, policies, and programs to deconflict civilian activities with 
military  operations  within  the  brigade  area  of  responsibility.  This  includes  resettlement 
operations, curfews, and movement restrictions. 
Advise  the  brigade  commander  on  legal  and  moral  obligations  incurred  from  the  long-  and 
short-term  effects  (economic,  environmental,  health)  of  brigade  operations  on  civilian 
populations. 
Coordinate,  synchronize,  and  integrate  civil-military  plans,  programs,  and  policies  with 
operational objectives. 
Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
10-5 
Advise on the prioritizing and monitoring of expenditures of allocated funds that are dedicated to 
civil-military operations and facilitates movement, security, and control of funds to subordinate 
units. The S-9 coordinates with the funds controlling authority/financial manager to  meet the 
commander’s objectives. 
Conduct, coordinate, and integrate deliberate planning for civil-military operations in support of 
brigade operations. 
Coordinate  and  integrate  area  assessments  and  area  studies  in  support  of  civil-military 
operations. 
Advise the brigade commander and staff on the protection of culturally significant sites. 
Facilitate the integration of civil inputs to the brigade common operational picture. 
Advise  the  brigade  commander  on  the  use  of  military  units  and  assets  that  can  perform 
civil-military operation missions. 
C
IVIL 
A
FFAIRS 
A
CTIVITIES
10-17.  Under the umbrella of civil-military operations, CA forces perform the following activities: 
Foreign nation support. 
Civil-military actions. 
Support to civil administrations. 
Population and resource control. 
Humanitarian assistance. 
Emergency services. 
10-18.  Military  police  units  may  be  deployed  and  employed  in  support  of  civil-military  operations 
anywhere in the world. Military police who are supporting civil-military operations must be briefed and 
understand the  intent  of  these  operations.  Police  intelligence  operations  are  significant  enablers  during 
civil-military operations as is the proper treatment of all categories of detainees and DCs. Having a proper 
mind set and good situational awareness is critical. U.S. armed forces may be called upon to relieve human 
suffering  (such  as  that  encountered  after  a  natural  disaster),  and  appropriate  discipline  measures  and 
controls are enacted to meet each situation. 
10-19.  MI units obtain CA-relevant information gathered in interrogations, and they provide information 
of  intelligence  value  that  is  gained  from  passive  collection  by  CA  personnel.  Police  information  and 
intelligence are also integrated. 
10-20.  The  expertise  of  CA  forces  in  working  crisis  situations  (conduct  of  assessments,  transition 
planning, and skills in functions that are normally civil in nature) and their ability to operate with civilian 
organizations may make them ideal for civil support operations. CA forces should never be considered as a 
substitute for other U.S. armed forces. 
10-21.  The information that friendly, adversary, and neutral parties provide has a significant effect on the 
ability of civil-military operations planners’ ability to establish and maintain relations between joint forces; 
civil authorities; and the general population, resources, and institutions in friendly, neutral, or hostile areas. 
10-22.  CA forces have the inherent responsibility of population and resource control due to the impact on 
the  civilian  population  and  movement  of HN  assets  and  personnel.  Population  and  resource  control  is 
conducted through the coordination and synchronization of the activities of multiple civilian agencies and 
military  organizations,  to  include  extensive  military  police  operations.  Successfully  coordinated  and 
executed population and resource control operations— 
Provide security for the population. 
Deny personnel and material to the enemy. 
Mobilize population and material resources. 
Detect and reduce the effectiveness of enemy agents. 
10-23.  Population control measures include curfews, movement  restrictions, travel permits, registration 
cards, and resettlement operations. Resource control measures include licensing, regulations or guidelines, 
Chapter 10 
10-6 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
checkpoints, ration controls, amnesty programs, and facility inspections. Most military operations employ 
some type of population and resource control measures. Resettlement operations are often conducted under 
the auspices of population and resource control. 
SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS 
10-24.  Organizations  supporting  resettlement  operations  include  numerous  participants  (military  and 
nonmilitary) with divergent missions. Agencies involved in resettlement operations typically come from the 
joint  community,  interagency  organizations,  NGOs,  international  organizations,  and  HN/multinational 
organizations. The environment exists for potential duplication of effort. Achieving a unified effort requires 
close  coordination,  liaison,  and  common  purpose  for  mission  success.  (See  appendix  E  for  more 
information.) 
PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS 
10-25.  The planning scope for resettlement operations and the actual task implementation typically differ 
depending on  the  command  level, and vary depend on  the  type  and  nature of  detainee  operation being 
performed  and other relevant aspects of the OE. Military police must have a basic understanding of the 
planning  CA  units  conduct  for  resettlement  operations.  Except  as  specifically  noted,  planning 
considerations discussed are applicable to all tactical scenarios. 
10-26.  Based on national policy directives  and other political efforts, the  theater  commander provides 
directives on the care, control, and disposition of DCs. The resettlement operation plan— 
Includes migration and evacuation procedures. 
Establishes minimum standards of care. 
Defines the status and disposition of DCs. 
Designates routes and movement control measures. 
Identifies cultural and dietary considerations. 
Includes information on DC plans, routes, and areas of concentration. 
Provides measures to relieve suffering. 
Establishes proper order and discipline measures within the facility for the security and safety of 
DCs and Soldiers. 
Provides an aggressive information program by using support agencies and DC leadership. 
I
NFRASTRUCTURE
10-27.  Resettlement operations may require  large  groups  of civilians  to be quartered temporarily  (less 
than  6  months)  or  semipermanently  (more  than  6  months).  Military  police  may  be  tasked  to  set  up, 
administer, and operate facilities in close coordination with CA forces, HN or U.S. governmental agencies, 
PSYOP  units,  NGOs,  international  humanitarian  organizations,  international  organizations,  and  other 
interested  organizations.  A  military  police  unit  commander  typically  becomes  the  facility  commander 
(although there may be exceptions to this in the case of resettlement operations conducted as part of civil 
support). 
10-28.  When  possible,  facilities are  modified or constructed  using  local agencies, local  or  supporting 
governmental  employees,  and  selected  DCs  as  appropriate.  The  supporting  command’s  logistic  and 
transportation assets acquire and transport materials to build or modify existing facilities, and local sources 
may  provide  materials  within  legal  limitations.  The  supporting  command  also  furnishes  medical, 
subsistence, and other supporting assets to establish resettlement facilities. Engineer support and military 
construction  materials  will  be  necessary  in  situations  where  new  facilities  are  established  and  may  be 
necessary when resettlement facilities are set up in areas where local facilities are unavailable; for example, 
hotels, schools, halls, theaters, vacant warehouses, and factories identified for use as holding sites for DCs. 
(See chapter 6 and appendix J.) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested