c# render pdf : Change page order in pdf reader Library SDK class asp.net .net wpf ajax USArmy-InternmentResettlement19-part73

Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
10-7 
10-29.  If  necessary,  military  police  units  set  up  the  facility  using  acquisitioned  tentage  and  other 
materials. The facility commander considers the type of construction necessary to satisfy the needs of the 
resettlement operation. Considerations may include the— 
Local climate. 
Anticipated permanency of the facility. 
Number of facilities to be constructed. 
Availability of local materials. 
Extent of available military resources and assistance. 
S
ECURITY
10-30.  The resettlement facility commander is responsible for safety and security. In any size facility, the 
commander addresses crimes against persons and property, ensures that security patrols are conducted, and 
conducts  necessary  quick-reaction  force  operations.  If  the  commander  has  a  law  and  order  asset 
task-organized, it typically performs necessary security-related functions. If not, other task-organized assets 
(a guard company) typically provide the means to conduct necessary security-related tasks. 
M
EDICAL 
C
ARE AND 
S
ANITATION 
F
ACILITIES
10-31.  Due to the temporary nature of a resettlement facility,  the need for medical care and sanitation 
facilities increases. If possible, locate a sick call tent adjacent to each major compound inside the facility to 
ensure  prompt  medical  screening  and  treatment.  Enforcement  and  education  measures  ensure  that  the 
facility population complies with basic sanitation measures. Provide medical care via organic I/R medical 
personnel, or coordinate with the appropriate HN medical authorities. To prevent communicable diseases, 
follow the guidance in FM 21-10 and other applicable publications. Coordinate with preventive medicine 
specialists  to  conduct  routine,  preplanned  health,  comfort,  and  welfare  inspections.  Inspections  are 
performed to ensure that the facility is safe, sanitary, and hazard-free. (See appendix I.) When conducting 
inspections— 
Ensure that the purpose of the inspection is conveyed and emphasized to DC leaders. 
Respect cultural beliefs, such as religious tenets and shrines. ICE, international support groups, 
community  leaders,  CA  forces,  and  DC  leaders  are  good  sources  for  information  regarding 
cultural sensitivities. 
Treat DCs and their possessions respectfully. 
S
CREENING
10-32.  Screening prevents infiltration by insurgents, enemy agents, or escaped members of hostile armed 
forces. Although  intelligence  and  other  units may  screen  DCs, friendly and reliable  local  civilians can 
perform this  function under the supervision of military  police and CA  forces. Screeners carefully apply 
administrative controls to prevent infiltration and preclude the alienation of people who are sympathetic to 
U.S. objectives. The screening process also identifies technicians and professionals to help administer the 
facility;  for  example,  policemen, teachers, doctors, dentists,  nurses, lawyers, mechanics, carpenters,  and 
cooks. 
S
TRATEGIC 
R
EPORTING
10-33.  Military police  will typically be required to account for DCs and report to higher headquarters. 
This  may  require  the  issuance  of  ISNs  or  control  numbers  that  are  specific  to  DCs.  Commanders 
conducting  resettlement  operations  ensure  a  proper  understanding  of  the  ISN  issuance  policy  before 
assigning an ISN to a DC. Even in civil support operations where social security numbers may be used, a 
supporting system will be required for those without social security numbers. 
Change page order in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pages in pdf reader; change pdf page order
Change page order in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to rearrange pages in a pdf file; how to move pages in a pdf
Chapter 10 
10-8 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
L
EGAL 
O
BLIGATIONS
10-34.  All  commanders  are  under  the  legal  obligation  imposed  by  international  laws,  including  the 
Geneva Conventions and other applicable international humanitarian laws. In particular, commanders must 
comply with the law of land warfare during all armed conflicts; however, such conflicts are characterized, 
and during all other military operations. (See FM 27-10.) Within U.S. territories, there are specific legal 
restrictions governing the use of U.S. military forces. (See JP 3-28.) 
L
IAISON
10-35.  Military police plan liaison with multiple organizations and agencies. Liaison established with all 
participating agencies (international organizations, NGOs, HN organizations, CA organizations) ensures a 
unified effort. Liaison elements must be properly trained and equipped to accomplish these necessary tasks. 
T
RANSPORTATION
10-36.  The efficient administration of a resettlement facility requires adequate transportation assets. Since 
military  police  units  have  limited  organic  transportation  assets,  the  I/R  unit  movement  officer  and 
intergovernmental transportation specialist must coordinate with the HN, NGOs, international humanitarian 
organizations, or appropriate U.S. governmental agency to determine the  types and numbers of vehicles 
required/available and make provisions to have them on hand and properly supported. 
10-37.  Directing and controlling movement is vital when handling masses of DCs. CA and HN or U.S. 
government authorities are responsible for mass resettlement operations, and the military police may help 
direct DCs to alternate routes. If possible, incorporate HN assets in planning and implementing. This will 
also be a requirement in civil support operations. Consider the following: 
Route selection. When selecting routes for civilian movement, CA personnel consider the types 
of transportation common to the area. They coordinate the proposed traffic circulation plan with 
the  transportation  officer  and  the  PM.  All  DC  movements  take  place  on  designated  civilian 
evacuation routes. 
Route identification. After  designating  movement routes,  CA  personnel  ensure that they  are 
marked in languages and  symbols  that civilians, U.S.  armed forces,  and  multinational  forces 
understand.  PSYOP  units,  military  police  units,  HN  military  forces,  and  other  multinational 
military units can help mark routes using agreed upon standards. 
Control  and  assembly  points.  After  selecting  and  marking  movement  routes,  CA  and  HN 
authorities  establish  control  and  assembly  points at  selected key  intersections.  CA personnel 
coordinate locations with the PM, the movement control center, and S-4/assistant chief of staff, 
sustainment (G-4) to include control and assembly points in the traffic circulation plan. 
Emergency rest areas. CA personnel set up emergency rest areas at congested points to provide 
immediate needs (water, food, fuel, maintenance, and medical services). Notify the PM to ensure 
that these areas are included in military police area security operations. 
Local  and national agencies. Using local and national  agencies conserves  military resources 
and reduces the need  for  interpreters and translators. Civilian authorities normally  have legal 
status and are best-equipped to handle their own people. 
R
ELOCATION OF 
P
OPULATION
10-38.  The final step in resettlement operations is the disposition of DCs. Allowing DCs to return to their 
homes as quickly as tactical (or other situational) considerations permit lessens the burden on military and 
civilian economies. It also reduces the danger of diseases that are common among people in confined areas. 
When DCs return home, they can help restore their towns and can better contribute to their own support. If 
DCs cannot return home, they may resettle elsewhere in their country or in a country that accepts them. 
Guidance  on  the  disposition  of  DCs  comes  from  higher  authority  upon  coordination  with  U.S.  armed 
forces, national authorities, and international agencies. 
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
Note: if you are trying to change the order of a you want to see other VB.NET Word document editing controls, please read this Word reading page which has
rearrange pdf pages reader; reorder pages pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc
move pages in pdf; move pdf pages in preview
Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
10-9 
10-39.   The most important step in the disposition of DCs is the final handling of personnel and property. 
Before  the  DC  operation  is  terminated,  the  resettlement  facility  commander  consults  with  higher 
headquarters, the SJA, and other pertinent agencies to determine the proper disposition of records. 
MILITARY POLICE SUPPORT TO RESETTLEMENT OPERATIONS 
10-40.  Resettlement operations typically include controlling civilian  movement and providing relief  to 
human suffering. These operations may be performed as domestic civil support operations (due to natural 
or  man-made disasters),  stability operations (due  to noncombatant  evacuation  operations, humanitarian-
assistance operations), or DC operations (due to combat operations). The authority to approve resettlement 
such  operations  within  U.S.  territories  is  at  the  Secretary  of  Defense  level  and  may  require  a  special 
exception to Title 18, USC (Posse Comitatus Act). The Posse Comitatus Act prohibits the U.S. military 
from enforcing civilian laws within the United States or its territories without specific authorization. The 
U.S. Constitution and other federal, state, and local laws may directly and significantly affect operations in 
the U.S. and its territories if the enforcement of civilian laws are required according to Title 10, USC. U.S. 
military  forces conducting  law  enforcement  functions  in  such  cases  require an  authorization  through  a 
congressional  act  (for  example,  Title  10  USC,  Sections  331  through  334  [Insurrection  Statues])  or  a 
constitutional authorization (for example the President invoking his executive authority under Article 2 of 
the Constitution). U.S. Army National Guard Soldiers operating in a nonfederal status are not restricted by 
the Posse Comitatus Act. (See Title 32, USC, and JP 3-28.) 
10-41.  Military police  support these operations predominately  by  decreasing civilian  interference with 
military operations, by protecting civilians from combat operations or other threats (including natural and 
man-made disasters), and by establishing resettlement facilities in support of CA operations. When the joint 
force commander determines that there is a need, a variety of military police units may be deployed  to 
assist in accomplishing the resettlement mission. 
10-42.  Once the decision is made to employ a military police unit to support resettlement operations, the 
military  police  commander  becomes  the  resettlement  facility  commander.  The  resettlement  facility 
commander  and  staff  must  have  a  thorough  understanding  of  the  legal  considerations,  the  joint  force 
commander’s concept of operations, and how each applies to the military police mission. If time permits, 
the  resettlement  facility  commander  makes contact  with  the joint  force  commander  plans  officer, civil 
affairs staff officer, SJA, and other organizations that may have a role in the operation. Intergovernmental 
agencies  can  provide  resettlement  facility  personnel  with  expertise  on  factors  that  directly  affect  the 
operation. 
10-43.  A properly configured modular I/R battalion can support, safeguard, account for, and guard 8,000 
DCs while ensuring that they are treated humanely. The support of resettlement operations begins before a 
military police unit arrives in the theater or is tasked with the mission. CA forces provide military police 
leaders and  Soldiers with expertise  on  factors that  directly  affect  resettlement operations.  These  factors 
include, but are not limited to— 
HN agencies. 
Status of infrastructure that will hold DCs. 
Ethnic differences and resentments. 
Social structures (family and regional). 
Religious and cultural systems (beliefs and behaviors). 
Political systems (distribution of power). 
Economic systems (sources and distribution of wealth). 
Links between social, religious, political, and economic systems. 
Cultural history of the area. 
Attitudes toward U.S. armed forces. 
Sustainment requirements. 
10-44.  Military  police  leaders  remain  in  close  coordination  and  continuous  liaison  with  the  agencies 
involved in operating the resettlement facility. Responsibilities may include— 
Selecting the facility location, constructing it, and setting it up. 
Determining processing, screening, classification, and identification requirements. 
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
various Word document processing implementations using C# demo codes, such as add or delete Word document page, change Word document pages order, merge or
change page order pdf reader; move pdf pages
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
VB.NET PDF - How to Modify PDF Document Page in VB.NET. VB.NET Guide for Processing PDF Document Page and Sorting PDF Pages Order.
pdf rearrange pages online; how to rearrange pdf pages online
Chapter 10 
10-10 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Providing clothing, equipment, and subsistence. 
Providing medical care, veterinary support, and sanitation facilities. 
Maintaining discipline, control, administration, and law and order. 
Determining ROI and ROE. 
Determining transportation requirements. 
10-45.  Major sections  of a resettlement facility normally  include a  headquarters facility,  clinic, dining 
facility,  personal  hygiene  facilities,  sleeping  areas,  and  animal  compounds.  Sleeping  areas  must  be 
segregated for families, unaccompanied children, unattached females, and unattached males. Cultural and 
religious  practices  may  be  important  considerations.  Efforts  are  made  to  keep  families  together  when 
assigning billets. Appendix J shows a sample DC resettlement facility. Additional facilities, fencing, and 
other requirements are based on the— 
Number of civilians housed. 
Diversity of the population housed. 
Resources available. 
Need for a reactionary force. 
Need for an animal compound. 
Facility duration. 
P
ROCESSING
10-46.  The initial processing begins with the transport of civilians to the resettlement facility. The HN (in 
coordination  with  NGOs,  international  organizations,  and/or  international  humanitarian  organizations) 
normally assists in arranging transportation for DCs. The processing is done in a positive manner because 
these  civilians  may  be  fearful  and  in a  state  of shock. Civilians  should  understand  why they  are being 
processed  and  know  what  to  expect  at  each  station.  This  is  accomplished  by  the  facility  commander 
ensuring that all DCs, HN representatives, other officials receive an entrance briefing upon their arrival. 
The briefing is provided in the native language of the DCs. If there is more than one language represented, 
the briefing is provided in multiple languages to meet all language requirements. 
10-47.  While the processing procedures discussed in chapters 4 and 5 provide a foundation, I/R personnel 
must be aware of unique aspects to consider when processing DCs. Military personnel provide training and 
support, while NGOs, international humanitarian organizations, international organizations, or other U.S. 
agencies  typically  process  DCs.  In  the  absence  of  NGOs,  international  humanitarian  organizations, 
international  organizations,  or  other  appropriate  U.S.  agencies,  military  personnel  may  perform  the 
functions  in  table 10-1.  The number  and  type  of  processing  stations  vary  from  operation  to operation. 
Table 10-1 shows stations that are typically required during resettlement operations. 
Table 10-1. Actions during inprocessing 
Station 
Purpose 
Responsible Individuals* 
Actions 
Search and 
screen 
I/R staff, MI personnel, 
NGOs, IHOs, and IOs 
Conduct a pat-down search to ensure that weapons 
are not brought into the facility and that the facility is 
not infiltrated by insurgents. 
Accountability 
I/R staff 
Prepare forms and records to maintain the 
accountability of DCs. Use forms and records provided 
by the HN or CA personnel or forms and records used 
for detainee operations that may apply to DCs. 
Identification 
card or band 
I/R staff 
Issue an identification card or band to each DC, if 
required, to ease facility administration and control. 
Medical 
evaluation 
Medical personnel 
Evaluate DCs for signs of illness or injury, and treat 
them as necessary. 
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
pdf change page order online; reorder pages in pdf online
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
reorder pages in pdf preview; reorder pages in a pdf
Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
10-11 
Table 10-1. Actions during inprocessing (continued) 
Station 
Purpose 
Responsible Individuals* 
Actions 
Assignment 
I/R staff 
Assign a sleeping area to each DC. 
Personal items 
I/R staff 
Issue personal-comfort items and clothing if available. 
* The number of people performing these tasks depends on the number of DCs and the time available. Allow HN 
authorities to conduct most of the processing when possible. 
Legend: 
CA 
civil affairs 
DC 
dislocated civilian 
HN 
host nation 
IHO 
international humanitarian organization 
IO 
international organization 
I/R 
internment and resettlement 
MI 
military intelligence 
NGO 
nongovernmental organization 
10-48.  The resettlement facility commander determines the accountability procedures and requirements 
necessary for resettlement operations. Translators are present throughout processing. A senior member of 
the facility staff greets new arrivals and makes them feel welcome. DCs are briefed on resettlement facility 
policies and procedures and screened to identify security and medical concerns. They are offered the use of 
personal hygiene facilities. Family integrity is always maintained if possible. 
10-49.  Searches  are  conducted  of  arriving  DCs  to  ensure  that  weapons  are  not  brought  into  the 
resettlement  facility.  Same-gender  searches  are  conducted  when  possible,  and  strip  searches  are  never 
conducted without special authority and only in unique situations. Speed and security considerations may 
require mixed-gender searches. If so, perform them in a respectful manner, using all possible measures to 
prevent any action that could be interpreted as sexual molestation or assault. The onsite supervisor carefully 
controls  Soldiers  doing  mixed-gender searches to prevent  allegations of  sexual  misconduct. Using HN, 
NGO,  or  international  humanitarian  organization  personnel  to  conduct  searches  may  prevent  negative 
situations from developing. 
DISLOCATED CIVILIAN OPERATIONS 
10-50.  Resettlement operations are performed across  the spectrum of  operations, especially in stability 
and civil support operations. Planning and conducting resettlement operations is the most basic collective 
task performed by CA forces.  Additional agencies  (such as  nonmilitary  international  aid  organizations, 
NGOs,  and  international  humanitarian  organizations)  are  the  primary  resources  that  CA  forces  use. 
However, when needed, CA forces may depend on other military units (military police assets) to assist with 
a particular category of civilians during resettlement operations. 
10-51.  Controlling DCs is essential during military operations because uncontrolled masses of people can 
seriously impair the military mission. Commanders plan measures to protect DCs in the operational area or 
AO to prevent their interference with the mission. Major natural and man-made disasters, large numbers of 
refugees or migrants crossing international borders, and other situations resulting in significant personnel 
displacement may quickly overwhelm local logistics capabilities, requiring a significant military response 
to prevent human suffering. The military police commander and staff must have a clear understanding of 
the OE, ROE, and legal considerations before establishing a resettlement facility in support of resettlement 
operations. 
10-52.  During military operations, U.S. armed forces must consider two distinct categories of civilians— 
Those who remain in place. This category includes individuals who are indigenous to the area 
and the local population, including individuals from other countries. These persons may or may 
not require assistance. If no assistance is required and the safety of the civilians is not an issue, 
they should remain in place. 
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Enable C#.NET developers to change the page order of source PDF document file; Allow C#.NET developers to add image to specified area of source PDF document
how to move pages within a pdf document; how to reorder pages in pdf preview
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File DLLs for PDF Page Rotation in C#.NET Project. In order to run the sample code, the following steps
how to move pages within a pdf; change page order pdf
Chapter 10 
10-12 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Those who are dislocated. This category includes individuals who have left their homes for 
various reasons. They are categorized as DCs, and their movement and physical presence can 
hinder military operations. They probably require some degree of aid (medicine, food, clothing, 
water, shelter) and may not be native to the area or the country. 
Note. Categories of DCs are discussed in depth in chapter 1. 
P
LANNING 
R
ESETTLEMENT 
O
PERATIONS
10-53.  The  planning  scope  for  resettlement  operations  and  the  actual  task  implementation  differ, 
depending on the command level and the theater of operations. Before conducting resettlement operations, 
military police leaders must have a basic understanding of how  CA forces plan resettlement operations. 
Except as specifically noted, planning considerations discussed in this manual are also applicable to tactical 
scenarios. 
10-54.  Military  police  classify  DCs  during  processing.  They  coordinate  with  CA  personnel,  NGOs, 
international  humanitarian  organizations,  and  international  organizations  to  determine  proper 
classifications. I/R personnel can expect a continuing need for reclassification and reassignment of DCs. 
Statements  made  by  DCs  and  the  information  on  their  identification  papers  determine  their  initial 
classifications. Agitators, enemy plants, and individuals who may be classified as detainees are identified 
by their activities. DCs may be reclassified according to their proper identity and/or ideology through a CI 
review tribunal. If a DC is reclassified as a detainee, he or she will be transferred to a TIF or SIF. 
10-55.  Active police  intelligence  operations  conducted  within  and  around the resettlement facility  are 
critical  to  maintaining  order  and  security.  Through  active  and  passive  collection  activities,  criminals, 
agitators,  enemy  plants,  and  other  disruptive  elements  can  be  identified  early  and  measures  taken  to 
mitigate (or remove) these elements and their activities prior to significant negative impacts on the facility 
and the personnel living and operating within the facility. 
10-56.  Identifying DCs may or may not be necessary; it depends on guidance from higher headquarters, 
CA units, the HN, and other agencies. The need to identify DCs varies from operation to operation. DC 
identification may be necessary for the following reasons: 
To verify rosters against the actual population. 
To provide timely reunification of family members. 
To match DCs with their medical records in case of a medical emergency or evacuation. 
To check the identities of DCs against the transfer roster. 
To identify personnel being sought by HN, multinational, or U.S. forces. 
10-57.  The NDRC has the ability to assist commanders in establishing an automated Detainee Reporting 
System to process DCs. (See chapter 1.) This portable Detainee Reporting System (jump kits) will assist in 
processing  identification  cards,  ISNs,  and  demographic  information.  An  identification  card  is  used  to 
facilitate  the  identification  of  a  DC.  It  contains the  DC’s  name,  photograph, and  control  number.  The 
control number may be an ISN or a sequenced control number specific to the DC. Identification cards or 
bands permit identification by categories. (See chapter 1.) An identification band permits rapid, reliable 
identification  of  an individual  and may  also  be  used  in  resettlement operations.  While DCs  cannot be 
prevented from removing or destroying identification bands, most will accept their use for identification 
purposes. When identification bands or cards deteriorate, replace them immediately. 
C
LOTHING AND 
E
QUIPMENT
10-58.  DCs should be supplied with  adequate, suitable clothing and sleeping equipment if  they do not 
have supplies with them. Requisition clothing and equipment through NGOs, international humanitarian 
organizations, international organizations, and HN sources when possible. In a combat environment, use 
available captured clothing and equipment.  Ensure that DCs wear clothing until it is unserviceable, and 
replace it as necessary. 
Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
10-13 
S
UBSISTENCE
10-59.  Ensure  that  food  rations  are  sufficient  in  quantity,  quality,  and variety  to  maintain  health  and 
prevent weight loss and nutritional deficiencies. Consider the habitual diet of the DC population, and be 
aware that DCs may bring their own rations and cooking utensils. Allow DCs to prepare their own meals 
after  coordination  with  CA  personnel,  the  HN,  NGOs,  international  humanitarian  organizations,  and 
international organizations. 
10-60.  Ensure that expectant and nursing mothers and children under the age of 15 receive additional food 
in proportion to their needs. Increase the rations of workers based on the type of labor they are performing. 
Provide plenty of fresh water. 
10-61.  Make minimal menu and feeding schedule changes to prevent unrest among the DC population. 
Inform the DC leadership when changes must be made. 
D
INING 
F
ACILITIES
10-62.  Dining  facility  requirements  vary  depending  on  the  number  of  DCs  and  the  availability  of 
equipment. If deemed necessary, the resettlement facility commander can authorize the local procurement 
of cooking equipment. Consult with the SJA to determine the purchasing mechanism and the legality of 
items being purchased. Coordinate with NGOs, international humanitarian organizations, and international 
organizations for food service support. Train selected DCs to perform food service operations, and ensure 
that they are constantly supervised by U.S. food service personnel. 
S
ELF
-G
OVERNMENT
10-63.  The  resettlement  facility  commander  must  determine  whether  the  establishment  of 
self-government is required and appropriate. If responding to a natural disaster, such as an earthquake, the 
civilian  government  may  not  be  affected  and  the  resettlement  facility  may  be  solely  used  as  shelter. 
However, if the civilian government cannot be established or is nonoperational, the resettlement facility 
commander must determine if the implementation of self-government is appropriate. 
10-64.  If  needed,  self-government  leaders  can  greatly  assist  in  solving  problems  before  they  become 
major events. An infrastructure of self-government also helps promote a stable environment where rapport 
can be built between the facility commander, the civilian leadership, and the general civilian population. 
This, in turn, will provide an  effective means of communicating reliable information to the resettlement 
facility population, thus reducing tension. 
10-65.  DCs may make complaints and requests to the resettlement facility commander, who will try to 
resolve the issue. These complaints may be voiced by— 
Elected civilian representatives. 
A written complaint addressed to the resettlement facility commander. 
A visiting representative of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees or other agencies. 
C
ONTROL AND 
D
ISCIPLINE
10-66.  Controlling  of  the  population  is  key  to  successful  facility  operations.  Civilians  housed  in 
resettlement  facilities  during  resettlement  operations  are  not  prisoners,  and  this  affects  the  rules  and 
guidelines drafted  to  support these operations. Measures  needed to  maintain discipline and security  are 
established  and  rigidly  enforced  in  each  resettlement  facility  to  ensure  good  order  and  discipline  and 
minimize the possibility of unstable conditions that would negatively affect efforts to assist the DCs. The 
resettlement facility commander establishes rules that can be easily followed by everyone in the facility and 
ensures that they are understood. The resettlement facility commander coordinates with the SJA and HN or 
U.S. government authorities to determine how to enforce the rules and how to deal with DCs that violate 
facility rules. 
10-67.  The  resettlement  facility  commander  publishes,  enforces,  and  updates  the  rules  of  conduct  as 
necessary.  The  commander  serves  as  the  single  point  of  contact,  coordinating  all  matters  within  the 
Chapter 10 
10-14 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
resettlement facility and with outside organizations or agencies. Facility rules are brief, but clear, and kept 
to a minimum. The rules in figure 10-1 are similar to those used in support of Operation New Arrivals in 
August 1975 at Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania. They also parallel the rules posted in support of Panama’s 
Operations Just Cause and Promote Liberty and Hurricane Katrina relief operations in New Orleans. 
1.  Do not move from assigned barracks without permission. 
Note. Military police in an I/R facility assign individuals to designated barracks. Only the administrative 
staff can change barracks assignments. Occupants desiring to change barracks must request permission 
from the area office. 
2.  Maintain the sanitary and physical condition of the barracks. 
Note. Barracks chiefs organize occupants to perform these tasks. 
3.  Empty and wash trash cans daily, and put the trash into the trash dumpsters in the barracks area. 
4.  Do not bring food or cooking utensils into the barracks. Do not take food from the dining area 
(other than baby food and fruit). 
5.  Do not have weapons of any kind in the barracks and in the surrounding facility. 
6.  Do not have pets in the barracks. Pets are contained in the animal compound. 
7.  Observe the barracks lights-out time of 2300. Barracks indoor lights are turned out at 2300 each 
night. Do not play radios or compact disc players after 2300. 
8.  Do not allow children to play on the fire escape because it is very dangerous. 
9.  Watch children carefully, and do not allow them to wander out of the residence areas. 
10.  Do not throw diapers or sanitary napkins in toilets. Place these items in trash cans. 
11.  Do not allow children to chase or play with wild animals. These animals may bite and carry 
diseases. 
12.  Obtain necessary barracks supplies from the barracks chief. 
13.  Do not smoke, use electrical appliances for heating or cooking, or have open fires in the barracks. 
Military police should designate a location for cooking and/or heating food. 
Figure 10-1. Sample facility rules 
10-68.  Control and discipline also apply to resettlement facility personnel. They must quickly and fairly 
establish  and  maintain  rigorous  self-discipline  when  operating  in  resettlement  facilities.  Resettlement 
facility personnel— 
Maintain a professional, but impartial, attitude. 
Follow the guidelines established in the ROI and/or ROE. 
Cope calmly with hostile or unruly behavior or incidents. 
Take fair, yet immediate, decisive action. 
10-69.  The resettlement facility commander takes positive action to establish daily or periodic routines 
and responses that are conducive to good discipline and control. Resettlement facility personnel— 
Enforce policies and procedures that provide the control of facility residents. 
Give reasonable, decisive orders to DCs in a language they understand. 
Post  facility  rules,  regulations,  instructions,  notices,  orders,  and  announcements  that  facility 
residents  are  expected  to obey  in an  easily  accessible  area.  This  information  is  printed  in  a 
language understood by the DCs. Those individuals who do not have access to the posted copies 
will be given a copy. 
Ensure that DCs obey orders, rules, and directives. 
Report DCs who refuse or fail to obey an order or regulation. 
Not fraternize with DCs. 
Not donate gifts or receive gifts from or engage in any commercial activity with DCs. 
Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
10-15 
A
DMINISTRATION
10-70.  DCs  should  become  involved  in  facility  administration.  With  the  large  numbers  of  civilians 
requiring  control  and  care,  it  is  preferred  that  they  assist  as  cadre  for  facility  administration.  Civilian 
personnel  performing  cadre  functions  are  trained  and  organized  by  resettlement  facility  personnel. 
Problems might arise as a result of the state of mind of the civilians. The difficulties they have experienced 
may affect their acceptance of authority. The facility commander can minimize difficulties by— 
Maintaining different national and cultural groups in separate facilities or sections of the facility. 
Keeping  families  together,  while  separating  unaccompanied  adult  males,  adult  females,  and 
children under the age of 18  (or abiding by the laws of the HN as to when a child becomes an 
adult). 
Allowing DCs to speak freely to facility officials. 
Involving the DCs in facility administration, work, and recreation. 
Quickly establishing contact with agencies for aid and family reunification. 
10-71.  Additionally,  the  facility  commander  must  ensure  that  all  DCs  are  treated  according  to  the 
minimum basic human standards by— 
Not restricting  their  movement,  other  than  those that  are  necessary in the  interests  of  public 
health and order. 
Allowing them to enjoy the fundamental rights internationally recognized, particularly those set 
out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. 
Treating  them  as  persons  whose  plight  requires  special  understanding  and  sympathy.  They 
should receive necessary assistance and should not be subjected to cruel, inhumane, or degrading 
treatment. 
Not discriminating against them on the grounds of race, religion, political opinion, nationality, or 
country of origin. 
Remembering that they are persons before the law, enjoying free access to the courts of law and 
other competent administrative authorities. 
Providing them with the necessities of life (food, shelter, basic sanitary and health facilities). 
Maintaining them in family units when possible. 
Providing them with all possible assistance for tracing lost relatives. 
Establishing adequate provisions for the protection of minors and unaccompanied children. 
Allowing them to send and receive mail. 
Permitting friends and relatives to provide material assistance to them. 
Making  appropriate  arrangements,  where  possible,  for  the  registration  of  births,  deaths,  and 
marriages. 
Granting the necessary means that enable them to obtain a satisfactory, durable solution. 
Permitting them to transfer assets that they brought into the territory to the country where the 
durable solution is obtained. 
Taking steps to facilitate voluntary repatriation. 
Affording them humane  treatment  and protecting  them  against acts of  violence,  intimidation, 
insults, and public curiosity. 
10-72.  In  the  administration  of  any  of  resettlement  facility,  the  dissemination  of  instructions  and 
information to the facility population is vital. Communication may be in the form of notices on bulletin 
boards,  posters,  public  address  systems,  loudspeakers,  facility  meetings  assemblies,  or  a  facility  radio 
station. CA and PSYOP units may be able to help with the information dissemination effort. 
10-73.  Another tool in the effective administration of a resettlement facility is the use of liaison personnel. 
Liaison  involves  coordination  with  all  interested  agencies.  U.S.  government  and  military  authorities, 
multinational liaison officers, representatives of local governments, and international agencies help in relief 
and assistance operations. 
Chapter 10 
10-16 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
S
ECURITY 
C
ONSIDERATIONS
10-74.  The exact location of the military police station depends on the facility layout and needs of the 
commander. Internal and external patrols are necessary; however, security for a resettlement facility should 
not give the impression that the facility is a prison. Military police patrol areas and the distribution plan are 
based on the size of the facility and the number of civilians housed inside each subdivision. FM 19-10 and 
FM 3-19.13 provide basic guidelines for law and order operations and investigations. 
10-75.  Additional sources for security officers may include HN police, security forces, or other military 
forces. Another potential source of security may come from the facility population itself. Police personnel 
within  the  population  might  supplement  security  teams  or  constitute  a  special  facility  police  force  if 
appropriate. When supporting civil support operations, civilian police will normally be used to conduct law 
enforcement functions within a facility. National Guard Soldiers operating under Title 32, USC, may also 
be used by their respective state governors to perform law enforcement functions. 
10-76.  Before a civilian is apprehended, the resettlement facility commander must coordinate with SJA 
and HN authorities to determine the following: 
Jurisdiction over the population. 
Authority to detain. 
Disposition and status of DCs. 
Disposition of case paperwork. 
Disposition of evidence, to include crime laboratory analysis results. 
Disposition of recovered property. 
Procedures and agreements unique to the supported HN. 
10-77.  The facility commander is prepared to perform operations to restore law and order by identifying a 
reaction force that  can  be  immediately  deployed and  employed  inside the  facility to  bring disturbances 
under control. The size of the reaction force depends on the size of the population and the available military 
forces. The reaction  force  is  well trained,  organized, and knowledgeable of  applicable ROE, the use of 
force policy, and the use of NLWs and civil disturbance measures. (See appendix H for more information 
on  the  use  of  force,  NLWs,  and  additional  civil  disturbance  measures;  and  FM 3-19.15  for  more 
information on civil disturbance operations.) 
R
ULES OF 
I
NTERACTION
10-78.  ROI provide Soldiers with a guide for interacting with the civilian population. ROIs include— 
Treating all DCs humanely and with respect. 
Avoiding discussions of politics and policies with DCs. 
Avoiding promises. If cornered, reply with “I will see what I can do.” 
Refraining from making obscene gestures. DCs may understand the meaning. 
Avoiding derogatory remarks. DCs may understand English and the local linguists surely do. 
Treating all DCs equally. DCs may become offended if they do not receive the same treatment 
or resources that other DCs receive. 
Respecting religious articles and materials. 
Treating medical problems seriously. 
Greeting DCs in their native language. 
Ensuring that any phrase taught by a DC to a Soldier is cleared through a linguist to ensure that 
it does not contain any obscenities. 
R
ULES FOR THE 
U
SE OF 
F
ORCE
10-79.  RUF used in resettlement operations vary from operation to operation. The combatant commander 
establishes RUF,  in conjunction with the SJA  and upon joint  staff  approval, and approves special RUF 
developed for use  in  resettlement facilities.  The RUF  evolve  to fit  the  changing  environment, ensuring 
continued protection and safety for the DC population and U.S. military personnel. Ensure that RUF remain 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested