c# show a pdf file : How to move pages within a pdf document application software tool html winforms azure online USArmy-InternmentResettlement2-part74

Internment and Resettlement Operations and the Operational Environment 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
1-9 
Note.  A  separate system  of  combatant status review  boards  have  been  adopted by  laws  and 
regulations to review the status of members of armed groups designated under approved DOD 
procedures. Recent executive decisions may provide further directives regarding the processing 
and  disposition  of  this  category  of  personnel.  Detainees  who  have  been  determined  by  a 
competent  tribunal  not  to  be  entitled  to  EPW  status  will  not  be  executed,  imprisoned,  or 
otherwise  penalized without further  proceedings  to determine  what acts they have committed 
and what penalty should be imposed. Commanders should notify the combatant command if a 
U.S. citizen or resident alien has been captured or has requested a tribunal. 
APPEALS AND PERIODIC REVIEWS OF CIVILIAN INTERNEES 
1-24. CIs may be interned or placed in assigned residences only when the security of the detaining power 
makes it absolutely necessary or there are imperative reasons of security of the occupying power. (See GC, 
Articles  27,  42, and  78.)  The  internment of  civilians  is a  serious  deprivation of  liberty for the civilian 
population. Accordingly, each CI— 
Is released by the detaining power as soon as the reasons which necessitated his internment no 
longer exist (Article 132, GC). 
Receives an order of internment (in a language the  CI understands) as directed in AR  190-8. 
This order must be provided without delay, usually within 72 hours of capture/internment. 
Receives  notice  (in  a  language  the  CI  understands)  of  the  right  to appeal  the  internment  or 
placement in an assigned residence. 
Has the right to appeal the internment or placement in an assigned residence. This appeal should 
receive  proper  consideration  and  a  decision  should  be  rendered  as  soon  as  possible  by  an 
appropriate administrative tribunal. 
1-25. The  convening  authority  of  the  administrative  tribunal  will  be  a  commander  exercising  general 
court-martial  convening  authority,  unless  such  authority  has  been  properly  delegated.  A  competent  CI 
review tribunal will— 
Convene  within  a  reasonable  time after  the  appeal  is  requested  (normally  within  72  hours). 
Processing time for the tribunal procedures will not normally exceed 14 days. Shorter processing 
times  are  encouraged,  particularly  when  there  is  a  potential  for  a  status  change  from  CI  to 
member of an armed group or common criminal. 
Is  composed of three commissioned  officers (a field grade). The  senior  officer  will serve  as 
president of the tribunal. Another nonvoting officer (preferably a judge advocate) will serve as 
the recorder. 
1-26.  Any detainee being subject to a CI review tribunal will be provided and entitled to a— 
Notice of the tribunal (in a language he or she understands). 
Opportunity to present evidence at the tribunal. 
Three-person administrative tribunal. 
Preponderance of the evidence standard. 
Written appeal to the convening authority upon request. 
1-27. In the event that the decision of internment or placement is upheld, the tribunal has an affirmative 
duty  (at  least  every  6  months)  to  periodically  review  the  lawfulness  of  the  internment  or  placement. 
Recognizing  the gravity  of  continued internment  as  a  deprivation  of  liberty  of  the  civilian  population, 
convening authorities are encouraged to incorporate more due process into the procedures for all periodic 
review  proceedings.  Detainees  who have been determined by a CI review  tribunal not  to be entitled  to 
release  from  internment  or  placement  in  an  assigned  residence  will  not  be  executed,  imprisoned,  or 
otherwise penalized without further judicial proceedings to determine what acts they have committed and 
what penalty should be imposed. 
How to move pages within a pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pdf pages; switch page order pdf
How to move pages within a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to rearrange pdf pages online; pdf change page order acrobat
Chapter 1 
1-10 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Note. The preceding procedures are the minimum standards for conducting a CI review tribunal 
as  resources  and  time  permit.  For  subsequent  reviews,  the  convening  authority  may  adopt 
additional procedures for these tribunals. 
GENERAL PROTECTION AND CARE OF DETAINEES, U.S. 
MILITARY PRISONERS, AND DISLOCATED CIVILIANS 
1-28. DOD personnel conducting I/R operations will always treat detainees, U.S. military prisoners, and 
DCs  under  their  custody  or  care  humanely,  no  matter  what  their  individual  status  is  under  U.S.  or 
international  laws  and  no  matter  how  the  conflict  or  crisis  is  characterized.  The  Geneva  Conventions 
provide internationally recognized humanitarian standards for the treatment of detainees. (See appendix D.) 
U.S.  military  prisoners  confined  in  a  battlefield  environment  are  also  entitled  to  the  constitutional 
protections  afforded  to  every  citizen of  the  United  States.  Some  DCs may  be  refugees  covered  by  the 
Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, which establishes minimum standards for the treatment of 
refugees and specifies the obligations of the HN and the refugees. 
H
UMANE 
T
REATMENT 
P
OLICIES
1-29. DODD  2310.01E
establishes  overarching  DOD  detainee  policies,  including  detainee  treatment 
policies. DODD  2310.01E applies to all detainee  operations conducted during armed conflicts, however 
such conflicts are characterized in all other military operations. The policies are applicable to— 
DOD personnel (civilian and military). 
DOD  contractors  assigned  to  or  supporting  the  DOD  components  engaging  in,  conducting, 
participating in, or supporting detainee operations. 
Non-DOD personnel as a condition of permitting access to internment facilities or to detainees 
under DOD control. 
1-30. The humane treatment of detainees by U.S. personnel is paramount to successful operations and an 
absolute moral and legal requirement. All DOD personnel will comply with the law of war at all times. 
Personnel conducting detainee operations will apply at a minimum and without regard to a detainee’s legal 
status, the standards articulated in Common Article 3 to the Geneva Conventions. Any persons detained 
will be afforded the protections of Common Article 3 to the Geneva Conventions from the moment they are 
under the control of DOD personnel until their release, transfer, or repatriation. 
Note. Certain categories of detainees, such as EPWs, enjoy protections under the law of war in 
addition to the minimum standards prescribed in Common Article 3 to the Geneva Conventions. 
D
ETAINEE 
T
REATMENT 
P
OLICIES
1-31. In addition to the standards required under the Geneva Conventions and the law of war, the following 
minimum standards for detainee treatment are required by DODD 2310.01E: 
Detainees  will  be  provided  adequate  food,  drinking  water,  shelter,  clothing,  and  medical 
treatment.  Detainees  will  be provided the  same  standard of health care  as U.S.  forces  in  the 
geographical area. 
Detainees will be granted free exercise of religion that is consistent with  the requirements of 
detention. 
Detainees will be respected as human beings. They will be protected against threats or acts of 
violence, including rape, forced prostitution, assault, theft, public  curiosity, bodily injury, and 
reprisals. They will not be subjected to medical or scientific experiments. Detainees will not be 
subjected to sensory deprivation. This list is not all-inclusive. 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document of adding and inserting a new blank page to the existing PDF document within a well
how to change page order in pdf document; change pdf page order
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with a dealing solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides order within C#.NET
pdf reverse page order online; reverse page order pdf online
Internment and Resettlement Operations and the Operational Environment 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
1-11 
The punishment of detainees known to have, or suspected of having, committed serious offenses 
will be administered according to due process of law and under legally constituted authority. 
The inhumane treatment of detainees is prohibited and is not justified by the stress of combat or 
deep provocation. 
U.S.
M
ILITARY 
P
RISONER 
P
OLICIES
1-32. The  same  standards  of  humane  treatment  apply  to  the  battlefield  confinement  of  U.S.  military 
prisoners as apply to other I/R operations. In addition, U.S. military prisoners have specific constitutional 
rights  and  protections  afforded  by  their  status  as  U.S.  persons.  As  Soldiers,  they  enjoy  rights  and 
protections under the UCMJ and the Manual for Courts-Martial (MCM). U.S. military prisoners will not be 
interned with detainees or DCs. (See chapter 7 and AR 190-47.) 
D
ISLOCATED 
C
IVILIAN 
P
OLICIES
1-33. DCs who have moved in response to a natural or man-made disaster have the following in common:  
They are unable or unwilling to stay in their homes. 
Their physical presence can affect military operations.  
They require some degree of aid, to include many of the basic human necessities. 
1-34. DCs  are  to  be  provided humane care and  treatment  consistent with  the Geneva  Conventions  and 
international laws, regardless of the categorization given to them by higher authority. 
1-35. Some  DCs  may  be  refugees  covered  by  the  Convention  Relating  to  the  Status  of  Refugees  and 
Article  73,  Geneva  Protocol  I  (wherein  stateless  persons  or  refugees  are  protected  persons  within  the 
meaning of Part I and Part III, GC). The Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees provides a general 
and  universally  applicable  definition  of  the  term  refugee  and  establishes  minimum  standards  for  the 
treatment and protection of refugees, specifying the obligations of the HN and the refugees to one another. 
Among the important provisions of this convention is the principle of nonrefoulement (Article 33), which 
prohibits the return or expulsion of a refugee to the territory of a state where his life, freedom, or personal 
security  would  be  in  jeopardy.  I/R  personnel  conducting  DC  operations that  involve  refugees  will  not 
repatriate refugees until directed by applicable governmental organizations through the chain of command. 
1-36. Refugees have the right to safe asylum  and basic civil, economic, and social rights. For example, 
adult refugees should have the right to work and refugee children should be able to attend school. In certain 
circumstances (such as large-scale inflows of refugees), asylum states may feel obliged to restrict certain 
rights. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees assists to fill gaps when no resources are available from 
the government of the country of asylum or other agencies. (See the UN High Commissioner for Refugees 
Handbook for the Military on Humanitarian Operations.) When possible, units conducting I/R operations 
involving refugees should  establish  provisions for the  protection of  these rights that are  consistent with 
military necessity and available resources. 
A
BUSE OR 
M
ISTREATMENT
1-37. All  DOD  personnel  (military,  civilian,  and  contractor)  must  correct,  report,  and  document  any 
incident or situation that might constitute the mistreatment or abuse of detainees, U.S. military prisoners, or 
DCs. Acts and omissions that constitute inhumane treatment may be violations of U.S. laws, U.S. policies, 
and the law of war. These violations require immediate action to correct. If a violation is ongoing, Soldiers 
have an obligation to take action to stop the violation and report it to their chain of command. 
1-38. All personnel who observe or have knowledge of possible abuse or mistreatment will immediately 
report the incident through their chain of command or supervision. Reports may also be submitted to the 
military  police, a judge advocate, a chaplain, or an inspector  general, who  will  then forward  the report 
through the recipient’s chain of command or supervision. Reports made to other officials will be accepted 
and immediately forwarded through the recipient’s chain of command or supervision, and an information 
copy will be provided to the appropriate combatant commander. 
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
It enables you to move out useless Word document pages simply with a You are capable of extracting pages from Microsoft Word document within C#.NET
reorder pages in pdf document; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Process TIFF, RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .
are: TIFF, JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, PDF, Word and to program more personalized TIFF document manipulating solutions & a high-level model of the pages within a Tiff
reordering pages in pdf; how to reorder pdf pages in
Chapter 1 
1-12 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
1-39. Any commander or supervisor who obtains credible information about actual or possible abuse or 
mistreatment involving personnel who are not assigned to a combatant commander will immediately report 
the  incident  through  command or supervisory channels  to  the  responsible  combatant  commander  or  to 
another appropriate authority (criminal investigation division [CID], inspector general) for allegations. In 
the latter instance, an information report is sent to the combatant commander with responsibility for the 
geographic area where the alleged incident occurred. 
AGENCIES CONCERNED WITH INTERNMENT AND 
RESETTLEMENT 
1-40. External  involvement  in  I/R  missions  is  a  fact  of  life  for  military  police  organizations.  Some 
government and government-sponsored entities that may be involved in I/R missions include— 
International agencies. 
„ 
UN. 
„ 
International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). 
„ 
International Organization of Migration. 
U.S. agencies. 
„ 
Local U.S. embassy. 
„ 
Department of Homeland Security. 
„ 
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). 
„ 
Federal Emergency Management Agency. 
1-41. The  U.S.  Army  National  Detainee  Reporting  Center  (NDRC),  supported  by  theater  detainee 
reporting  centers  (TDRCs),    detainee  accountability,  including  reporting  to  the  ICRC  central  tracing 
agency. 
1-42. There  are  also  numerous  private  relief  organizations,  foreign  and  domestic,  that  will  likely  be 
involved  in  the  humanitarian  aspects  of  I/R  operations.  Likewise,  the  news  media  normally  provides 
extensive coverage of I/R operations. Adding to the complexity of these operations is the fact that DOD is 
often not the lead agency. For instance, the DOD could be tasked in a supporting role, with the Department 
of State or some other agency in the lead. (See appendix E.) 
C
IVILIAN 
O
RGANIZATIONS
1-43. The most effective way for U.S. armed forces to understand the skills, knowledge, and capabilities of 
nonmilitary organizations is through the Military Education System and through the establishment and/or 
maintenance of a  liaison  once deployed to the operational area. In addition, having  those organizations 
provide  briefings  on  their  capabilities  and  limitations to  each  other  and  to  the  military  is  an effective 
method to gain understanding on both sides to support the mission. 
1-44. Civilian organizations are responsible for a wide range of activities encompassing humanitarian aid; 
human rights; the protection of minorities, refugees, and displaced persons; legal assistance; medical care; 
reconstruction of the local infrastructure; agriculture; education; and general project funding. It is critical 
importance  that  commanders  and  their  staffs  understand  the  mandate,  role,  structure,  method,  and 
principles of these organizations. It is impossible to establish an effective relationship with them without 
this understanding. 
1-45. Civilian organizations may already be providing humanitarian-assistance or some type of relief in the 
operational  area  when  I/R  operations  are  planned  and  implemented.  (See  appendix  E.)  The  principal 
coordinating federal agency is the U.S. Agency for International Development. Civilian organizations are 
required to register with the U.S. Agency for International Development to operate under the auspices of 
the United States. 
1-46. A detailed description of nonmilitary U.S. government agencies typically involved in I/R operations 
is contained in appendix E. The non-U.S. government organizations most likely to be encountered during 
I/R operations are international humanitarian organizations. These are impartial, neutral, and independent 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract View PDF document in continuous pages display mode Search text within file by using Ignore case or
reorder pages in a pdf; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy View PDF document in continuous pages display mode. Search text within file by using Ignore case or
how to move pages in pdf converter professional; reorder pdf pages online
Internment and Resettlement Operations and the Operational Environment 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
1-13 
organizations whose mission is to assist and protect victims of conflict. This group includes organizations 
such as the ICRC, the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC), and the Red Crescent Societies. 
They carefully guard their neutrality and do not desire to be associated with or dependent on the military 
for fear of losing their special status in the international community that allows them to fulfill their mission. 
The two principal types of non-U.S. government civilian organizations are— 
IOs. IOs are established by international agreements and operate at the nation-to-nation level. 
IOs  include  the  UN, the UN  Development  Program,  the UN Office for  the  Coordination  of 
Humanitarian Affairs, the UN World Food Program, and the International Medical Corps. The 
UN High Commissioner for Refugees is a key player in international detainee operations. 
Nongovernmental  organizations  (NGOs).  NGOs  are  voluntary  organizations  that  are  not 
normally funded  by  governments.  They  are  primarily  nonprofit  organizations that self-define 
their missions and philosophies. This independence from political interests is the key attribute of 
NGOs and can be a great benefit in rebuilding relations when political dialog has failed or is not 
practicable.  They  are  often  highly  professional  in  their  field,  extremely  well  motivated,  and 
prepared  to  take physical risks in  appalling conditions. Examples of NGOs include Save  the 
Children, Medecins Sans Frontières (Doctors  without  Borders), Catholic  Relief  Services,  and 
Catholic  Bishops  Council.  NGOs  are  classified  as  mandated  or  nonmandated  as  described 
below: 
„ 
A mandated NGO has been officially recognized by the lead IO in a crisis and is authorized 
to work in the affected area. The ICRC is an example of a mandated NGO. 
„ 
A nonmandated NGO has no official recognition or authorization and, therefore, works as a 
private concern. These organizations may be subcontracted by an IO or mandated NGO. In 
other cases, they obtain funds from private enterprises and donors. Catholic Relief Services 
is an example of a nonmandated NGO. 
U
NITED 
N
ATIONS
1-47. The  UN  is  involved  in the entire spectrum  of  humanitarian-assistance  operations, from  suffering 
prevention to relief operations. Typically,  UN relief agencies establish independent  networks to execute 
their  humanitarian-relief  operations.  The  UN  system  delegates  as  much  as  possible  to  the  agency’s 
elements located in the field; supervisory and support networks are traced from those field officers back to 
UN  headquarters.  Military  planners  must  familiarize  themselves  with  UN  objectives  so  that  these 
objectives are considered in planning and executing military operations. (See appendix E.) 
PROTECTING POWER 
1-48. The  primary  power  duty  of  the  protecting  power  is  to  monitor  whether  detainees  are  receiving 
humane treatment as required by international laws. A neutral state or a humanitarian organization, such as 
the ICRC, is usually designated as a protecting power. Representatives or delegates of a protecting power 
are  authorized  to  visit  detainees  and  interview  them  regarding  the  conditions  of  their  detention,  their 
welfare, and their rights. Depending on the circumstances, they may conduct interviews without witnesses. 
Such visits may not be prohibited except for reasons of imperative military necessity. 
I
NTERNATIONAL 
R
ED 
C
ROSS AND 
R
ED 
C
RESCENT 
M
OVEMENT
1-49. The ICRC, IFRC, and individual national Red Cross and Red Crescent organizations make up the 
International  Red  Cross  and  Red  Crescent  Movement.  These  groups  are  distinctly  different  and  have 
separate mandates and staff organizations. They should not be considered to be one organization. Although 
the ICRC was founded in Switzerland, it has a long and distinguished history of worldwide operation as a 
neutral  intermediary  in  armed  conflicts.  The mission  of the  ICRC is  to  ensure  that victims of conflict 
receive appropriate  protection  and assistance within the  scope  of  the  Geneva Conventions and Geneva 
Protocol II. 
Note. The  Red  Crescent  Movement  is found in  predominately Muslim countries  and  has  the 
same goals and mission as the Red Cross Movement. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
NET solution that supports converting each PDF page to Word document file by VB.NET code. All PDF pages can be converted to separate Word files within a short
moving pages in pdf; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
When converting PDF document to TIFF image using VB.NET program, do you know about a flexible raster image format for handling images and data within a single
reorder pages pdf; reorder pdf pages reader
Chapter 1 
1-14 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
C
IVILIAN 
L
EAD 
A
GENCIES
1-50. A civilian lead agency is an agency that has been designated by the appropriate IO to coordinate the 
activities of the civilian organizations that participate in an operation. It is normally a major UN agency 
such as the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Specific responsibilities of the lead 
agency include  acting  as a point  of contact for  other agencies  and coordinating field  activities to  avoid 
duplication of effort. 
PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS FOR INTERNMENT AND 
RESETTLEMENT OPERATIONS 
1-51. Proper planning before operations commence is vital. It is also essential that commanders recognize 
that  conditions  for  the  proper  conduct  of  I/R  operations  are  historically  set  in  the  planning  phase  of 
operations.  Commanders  should  establish  planning  mechanisms  that  ensure  effective  consideration  of 
potential detainee, U.S. military prisoner, or DC issues and the development of plans and procedures to 
respond  to  these  issues  as  early  in  the  planning  process as  feasible.  Commanders  should,  address  at  a 
minimum— 
Infrastructure requirements. The commander should analyze the wide array of sustainment  
and  operational  requirements  to  conduct  I/R  operations.  These  requirements  begin  with  the 
correct  number  and  type  of  personnel  on  the  ground  to  conduct  the  operation  and  the 
identification, collection, and the management of a sustainment plan to support I/R operations 
throughout the joint operations area. 
Security requirements. To the maximum extent possible, I/R facilities will be protected from 
the hazards of the battlefield. To protect the I/R population, commanders— 
„ 
Manage  the  control  of  captured  protective  equipment  that  could  be  used  to  meet 
requirements. 
„ 
Ensure  that when  planning for  individual protective  measures and facility  protection,  the 
potential presence of detainees is considered. As a general rule, detainees should derive the 
same benefit from protection measures as do members of the detaining force. 
Use-of-force  training. Planning and preparing  for  the use of force  is  a necessary element  in 
maintaining order. Personnel assigned the mission of providing for the control of detainees, U.S. 
military prisoners, and DCs and the security of  I/R facilities should  be issued and trained on 
RUF that are specific to that mission. Theater rules of engagement (ROE) remain in effect for 
defending an I/R facility from an external threat. 
Safety  and  evacuation  plans.  When  controlling  large  I/R  populations,  commanders  must 
develop  thorough  safety  and  evacuation  plans  to  evacuate,  shelter,  protect,  and  guard  (as 
appropriate) U.S. armed forces personnel and I/R populations from fire, combat hazards, natural 
elements,  and  nonbattle  injuries.  Safety plans must be  incorporated  into I/R  facility  standing 
operating procedures (SOPs) and refined through continuous  risk assessments  and mitigation. 
Commanders must ensure that safety and evacuation plans are routinely trained and rehearsed. 
Medical and dental care. I/R facility commanders must consider a wide range of topics when 
planning  for  medical  support,  to  include  a  credentialed  health  care  provider  to  monitor  the 
general  health,  nutrition,  and  cleanliness  of  detainees,  U.S.  military  prisoners,  and  DCs 
(appendix I). The medical facility must provide isolation wards for persons with communicable 
diseases  and  for  immunizations.  Special  consideration  may  be  necessary  for  behavioral  and 
dental  health  support.  The  Geneva  Conventions  provide  extensive  guidance  on  medical  and 
dental standards of care for wounded and sick EPWs and CIs. 
Sanitation requirements. Certain sanitation standards must be met to protect the health of all 
detainees, U.S. military prisoners, DCs, and U.S. armed forces associated with the facility (such 
as  disease  prevention  and  facility  cleanliness).  (See  appendix  J.)  These  standards  include 
providing  adequate  space  within  housing  units  to  prevent  overcrowding,  enforcing  food 
sanitation procedures, properly disposing of human waste, and conducting pest control activities 
as required. The Geneva Conventions provide extensive guidance on sanitation requirements for 
EPWs and CIs. 
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Read and Recognize EAN-13 Barcode from
Within document management library in VB platform, users can read and EAN-13 from MS Word and PDF document page, in notice, don't forget to move your activated
rearrange pdf pages online; move pages in pdf acrobat
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
images codec into PDF documents for a better PDF compression; RasterEdge JBIG2 codec SDK controls within C# project Move license text to the new project folder
rearrange pages in pdf; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
Internment and Resettlement Operations and the Operational Environment 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
1-15 
Intelligence and interrogation operations.  The U.S. armed forces operating  the  I/R facility 
need  to  plan  for  human  intelligence  (HUMINT)  collection  operations,  which  require  close 
cooperation with HUMINT collectors and counterintelligence agents. Further consideration must 
be  given  to  ensure  that  interrogation  operations  in  the  facility  are  conducted  according  to 
applicable U.S. laws and regulations, international laws, operation orders, FRAGOs, and other 
operationally  specific  guidelines  (DOD  policies).  The  internment  facility  commander  is 
responsible for ensuring proper care and treatment for detainees. (For a detailed discussion of 
responsibilities and support relationships dictated by DOD policies and for more information on 
HUMINT operations see FM 2-22.3.) 
Strategic  reporting.  Strategic  reporting  of  detainees  and  DCs  requires  adherence  to  the 
Detainee  Reporting  System  (formerly  known  as  the  Branch  Prisoner  of  War  Information 
System) procedures. The timely and accurate reporting of data is critical to ensuring detainee 
and  DC  accountability  and  compliance  with  U.S.  and  international  laws.  I/R  operations  are 
monitored at the strategic level. Overwatch and strategic accountability of detainees and DCs are 
exercised by the Office  of  the  Provost  Marshal General  (OPMG), NDRC  Branch. The  basic 
element of detainee and DC accountability is the ISN, which is used as the primary means of 
identification.  ISNs are  issued  at the  TIF.  They  are  also  used  to  link  detainees  and  DCs  to 
biometric data, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) data, personal property, medical information, and 
issued equipment. Military police commanders conducting detainee operations must plan for the 
acquisition and issuance of ISNs and maintenance of the Detainee Reporting System, to include 
training military police personnel. 
Legal support. I/R operations must comply with the law of war during armed conflicts. Proper 
legal support must be considered to ensure that U.S. policies, U.S. laws, and international laws 
are observed. Actively involving judge advocate general personnel and expertise at all stages and 
in  all  types  of  I/R  operations  is  essential.  All  personnel,  regardless  of  military  occupational 
specialty (MOS) or branch specialty, must receive I/R training and instruction, relevant to their 
role in advance of participating in or supporting detainee operations; I/R-specific training should 
be  conducted  annually  thereafter.  Training  requirements  and  completion  is  documented 
according  to  applicable  laws  and  policies.  Personnel  must  receive  instruction  and  complete 
training commensurate with their duties, regarding the— 
„ 
Geneva  Conventions  and  laws,  regulations,  policies,  and  other  issuances  applicable  to 
detainee operations. 
„ 
Identification and prevention of violations of the Geneva Conventions. 
„ 
Requirement  to report alleged or suspected violations that arise in the course of  detainee 
operations. 
Liaison  with  external  agencies.  During  the  course  of  I/R  operations,  it  is  likely  that  U.S. 
commanders will encounter representatives  of various government agencies, IOs, NGOs,  and 
international humanitarian organizations attempting to assert a role in protecting the interests of 
detainees, U.S. military prisoners, or DCs. Commanders must anticipate that these organizations 
will request access to I/R populations and will continue to do so throughout the operation. The 
ICRC will be given the opportunity to provide its services to detainees (to include detainees at 
TIFs).  The servicing staff judge  advocate is  generally the designated command liaison to  the 
ICRC. (See FM 27-10.) ICRC reports provided to U.S. commanders will be forwarded through 
combatant commander channels. 
Transportation requirements. The modes of transportation for movement of detainees, U.S. 
military prisoners,  and  DCs  are by foot,  wheeled vehicle  (preferably  bus  or  truck),  rail,  air, 
inland waterways and sea. Each operation requires unique security and accountability planning 
which must closely adhered to and carefully planned. The flow of personnel must be coordinated 
with movement control personnel as appropriate. (The movement  of detainees  is discussed in 
chapter 4.) 
Public affairs. Public affairs  planning requires an understanding  of the information needs of 
Soldiers,  the  Army  community,  and  the  public  in  matters  relating  to  I/R  operations.  In  the 
interest  of  national  security  and  the  protection  of  I/R  populations  from  public  curiosity,  I/R 
populations  will  not  be  photographed  or  interviewed  by  the  news  media.  The  public  affairs 
Chapter 1 
1-16 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
officer  also  facilitates media  efforts  to  cover operations by expediting the flow of  complete, 
accurate, and timely information. 
Transfers and transitions. The successful end state of I/R operations is the final disposition of 
detainees,  U.S.  military  prisoners,  and  DCs.  This  may  include  their  transfer,  release, 
resettlement, or continued detention. The permanent transfer or  release of detainees from  the 
custody  of  U.S.  armed  forces  to  the  HN,  other  multinational  forces,  or  any  non-DOD  U.S. 
government entity requires the approval of the Secretary of Defense or a specified designee. The 
permanent  transfer  of  a  detainee  or  DC  to  a  foreign  nation  may  be  governed  by  bilateral 
agreements or based on ad hoc arrangements. Any transfer to the HN or a foreign nation will 
include assurances  that the  receiving  nation is  willing  and able  to  provide  adequate care and 
treatment that is required by the Geneva Conventions. 
1-52. The preceding planning considerations are not all-inclusive. Thorough mission analysis is critical to 
determine requirements and establish adequate training plans to ensure success. I/R planning factors are 
covered in depth in chapter 5. 
MILITARY POLICE CAPABILITIES 
1-53. Military  police  personnel  (MOSs  31B  and  31E)  provide  indispensable  capabilities  required  for 
conducting of I/R operations.  Military police Soldiers hone their skills through I/R-specific training and 
complementary training and experience gained in performance of the other four military police functions. 
Of the four remaining military police functions, police intelligence operations and law and order operations 
provide  the  greatest  complementary  technical  and  tactical  capabilities  to  enhance  I/R  operations.  All 
military  police personnel  receive  I/R-specific training  and  instruction  in  advance of participating  in  or 
supporting detainee operations and received annually thereafter. Training requirements and completion are 
documented according to applicable laws and policies. All military police personnel receive instruction and 
complete training equal to their duties regarding the— 
Geneva  Conventions  and  all  laws,  regulations,  policies,  and  other  issuances  applicable  to 
detainee operations. 
Identification and prevention of violations of the Geneva Conventions. 
Requirement  to  report  alleged  or  suspected  violations  that  arise  in  the  course  of  detainee 
operations. 
1-54. When performing I/R operations, 31B personnel bring a variety of skill sets, inculcated through their 
training. These skills include— 
Interpersonal communications. 
Use-of-force guidelines and standards. 
Civil disturbance operations. 
Use of NLWs in any environment. 
Custody, control, and audit maintenance requirements for I/R operations. 
Police investigations. 
Cultural awareness. 
1-55. Military  police personnel  within  the  31E  MOS are  specifically  trained  to  conduct  I/R operations 
across the full range of potential environments. They provide technical capabilities specific to I/R, making 
them the subject matter experts in full-scale I/R operations. These skills include— 
Interaction  and  use  of  U.S.,  third  world  country,  and  local  national  interpreters  during  I/R 
operations. 
I/R facility operations (cell blocks, recreation areas, shower areas, latrines, mess areas). 
Safe and proper take-down techniques to ensure the well-being of all personnel involved. 
Proper  and  effective movement techniques  when  moving an  individual from  one  location  to 
another. 
Use of NLWs in any environment. 
Cultural awareness. 
Internment and Resettlement Operations and the Operational Environment 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
1-17 
Riot control measures, to include the use of riot control agents and dispersers. 
Quick-reaction force actions inside and outside the facility. 
Search techniques, to include the use of electronic detection devices. 
Detainee treatment standards and applicable provisions of the law of war. 
Current, approved interrogation techniques. 
This page intentionally left blank.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested