c# show a pdf file : Reordering pages in pdf Library SDK component .net wpf html mvc USArmy-InternmentResettlement20-part75

Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
10-17 
simple  and  understandable  so  that  Soldiers  are  not  confused  and  do  not  have  to  memorize  extensive 
checklists. Standing RUF apply to Title 10 military police conducting operations in the United States and 
its territories, absent any explicit additional guidance from Secretary of Defense, Commanders may also 
submit supplemental RUF requests for the Secretary of Defenses approval. 
10-80.  Nonlethal measures can and may be authorized by the RUF during an operation to protect Soldiers 
and DCs from injury. NLWs may include riot batons, pepper spray, stun guns, and shotguns loaded with 
nonlethal munitions.  The RUF  may  include less-than-lethal force to protect mission-essential equipment 
from  damage  or  destruction.  Mission-essential  equipment  includes  tactical  and  nontactical  vehicles, 
communications equipment, weapons, computers, and office and personal equipment. 
Reordering pages in pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pdf pages; move pages in pdf document
Reordering pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pages in pdf file; how to reorder pdf pages
This page intentionally left blank.  
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
rotating function, PDF page inserting function, PDF page reordering function and single page, a series of pages, and random pages to be removed from PDF file
reorder pdf pages reader; rearrange pages in pdf
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Codes to Sort TIFF File with .NET
& manipulating multi-page TIFF (Tagged Image File), PDF, Microsoft Office it with our RasterEdge TIFF decoder, and then start reordering the pages for the
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; pdf change page order
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
A-1 
Appendix A 
Metric Conversion Chart 
This appendix complies with AR 25-30 which states that weights, distances, quantities, and measures 
contained in Army publications will be expressed in both U.S. standard and metric units. Table A-1 is 
a metric conversion chart. 
Table A-1. Metric conversion chart 
U.S. Units 
Multiplied By 
Equals Metric Units 
Feet 
00.30480 
Meters 
Inches 
02.54000 
Centimeters 
Inches 
00.02540 
Meters 
Inches 
25.40010 
Millimeters 
Pounds 
00.45359 
Kilograms 
Yards 
00.91440 
Meters 
Metric Units 
Multiplied By 
Equals U.S. Units 
Centimeters 
00.39370 
Inches 
Meters 
03.28080 
Feet 
Meters 
39.37000 
Inches 
Meters 
01.09361 
Yards 
Millimeters 
00.03937 
Inches 
Kilograms 
02.20460 
Pounds 
C# Excel - Sort Excel Pages Order in C#.NET
C#.NET Excel document page reordering control SDK (XDoc.Excel) is a thread-safe .NET library that can be used to adjust the Excel document pages order.
how to move pages in pdf; rearrange pdf pages reader
C# TIFF: C#.NET TIFF Document Viewer, View & Display TIFF Using C#
Support most common TIFF file page processing, like adding, deleting and reordering pages; Free to convert TIFF document to PDF document for management purpose;
reorder pdf pages; how to move pages within a pdf
This page intentionally left blank.  
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in insertion, PDF page deleting, PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF
how to rearrange pages in a pdf file; rearrange pages in pdf online
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
in following VB.NET Word page reordering API is Apart from this VB.NET Word pages sorting function powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to change page order in pdf document; how to move pages around in pdf file
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
B-1 
Appendix B 
Primary Military Police Units Involved With Internment and 
Resettlement 
This appendix provides a synopsis of various units from the Military Police Corps 
that typically support I/R operations within a theater of operations. It also lists their 
primary  capabilities  and  roles  relating  to  the  support  of  I/R  operations.  
(See FM 3-39.) 
MILITARY POLICE COMMAND 
B-1.  The MPC is typically assigned to an Army Service component command, and its commander usually 
serves as the theater CDO. This unit provides the following capabilities to the supported commander: 
C2, staff planning, and supervision for all military police functions (including I/R operations) 
performed by assigned or attached military police organizations at the theater level. 
C2 for nonmilitary police organizations operating in support of military police functions at the 
theater level. 
Implementation  of  theater-wide  standards  and  compliance  with  established  DOD  and  DA 
detainee policies. 
Tactical/operational  control with  augmentation  of  a tactical  combat force,  conducting  theater 
level response force operations as required. 
MILITARY POLICE BRIGADE 
B-2.  The military police brigade is typically assigned to an MPC, Army Service component command, or 
corps. In special situations, it may be assigned to a division. Its commander usually serves as the CDO in 
the absence of an MPC, but the brigade may require augmentation from an MPC. This unit provides the 
following capabilities to the supported commander: 
C2, staff planning, and supervision for all military police functions (including I/R operations) 
performed by assigned/attached military police organizations at the theater,  corps, or division 
level. 
C2 for up to five military police battalions. 
C2 for nonmilitary police organizations operating in support of military police functions at the 
theater, corps, or division level. 
C2 for the TDRC when the MPC is not required in the theater of operations. 
INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT BATTALION 
B-3.  The I/R battalion is typically assigned to a military police brigade or an MEB, and its commander 
may serve as the facility commander for a TIF. In small-scale contingency operations, it is possible that the 
battalion  commander may  also  serve  as  the  CDO.  This  unit  provides  the  following  capabilities  to  the 
supported commander: 
C2, staff planning, and supervision for long-term I/R operations. 
C2 for I/R, military police, and guard companies when these units are performing I/R operations. 
 battalion  normally  includes  a  headquarters  and  headquarters  company,  3  organic  I/R 
detachments  (consisting  of  24  Soldiers  each),  and  a  combination  of  2  to  5  I/R  and  guard 
companies.  When  task-organized  as  described  above,  the  I/R  battalion can  typically provide 
operational  control  for  a  TIF,  interning  up  to  4,000  compliant  detainees,  300  noncompliant 
detainees, or 8,000 DCs. 
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
page rotating function, Word page inserting function, Word page reordering function and options, including setting a single page, a series of pages, and random
pdf move pages; move pages in pdf reader
C# PowerPoint - Delete PowerPoint Document Page in C#.NET
page rotating function, PowerPoint page insert function, PowerPoint page reordering function and including setting a single page, a series of pages, and random
how to move pages in a pdf; move pages in pdf acrobat
Appendix B 
B-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
MILITARY POLICE BATTALION 
B-4.  The military police battalion is typically assigned to a military police brigade or an MEB. This unit 
provides the following capabilities to the supported commander: 
C2 for short-term I/R operations at the brigade, division, or corps level. 
The same capabilities as an I/R battalion for long-term I/R operations when properly augmented, 
equipped, and task-organized. 
C2 to one or more DHAs and/or DCPs. 
INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT COMPANY 
B-5.  The I/R company is typically assigned to an I/R battalion, but may be assigned to a military police 
battalion or brigade. This unit provides the following capabilities to the supported commander: 
A capability for stand-alone, long-term I/R operations. 
Staff augmentation to a battalion in support of prisoner administration and sustainment functions 
within an I/R facility. 
Custody  and control  in  stand-alone  operations  for  up  to  100 high-risk  detainees or  300 U.S. 
military prisoners. 
Missions as part of a  battalion  level  operation.  An  I/R  company provides  C2  to  support  the 
operation of one enclosure inside a TIF for up to 1,000 detainees or 2,000 DCs. It normally has 
operational control  of an  I/R  detachment assigned  to  the  battalion  and  is responsible  for  the 
accountability of detainees/DCs and the operation of compounds within their enclosure. 
GUARD COMPANY 
B-6.  The  guard  company  is  assigned  to  an  I/R  or  military  police  battalion.  This  unit  provides  the 
following capabilities to the supported commander: 
Security for the confinement of up to 900 U.S. military prisoners. 
Security  of  up  to  4,000  compliant  detainees,  600  high-risk  detainees,  or  300  noncompliant 
detainees when task-organized under an I/R battalion. 
Individual detainee escort. 
Guards for detainees at medical facilities that are separate from I/R facilities. 
Security and law enforcement for up to 8,000 DCs. 
MILITARY POLICE COMPANY 
B-7.  The military police company is typically assigned to a military police or I/R battalion. It may also be 
assigned to a BCT or an ACR as a C2 element for more than one military police platoon. This unit provides 
the following capabilities to the supported commander: 
Functionality as a guard company. 
Detainee escort guards and security during the transfer of detainees. 
Facilitation of DC movement. 
Selected detainee transport security, protection, and security patrols for TIFs. 
Operation and execution of detainee operations at a DHA or one or more DCPs. 
INTERNMENT AND RESETTLEMENT DETACHMENT 
B-8.  The  I/R  detachment  is  typically  assigned  to  an  I/R  battalion.  This  unit  provides  the  following 
capabilities to the supported commander: 
A capability for long-term I/R facility operations as part of a battalion level operation. 
C2 of one enclosure of housing up to 1,000 detainees or 2,000 DCs. 
Staff augmentation to a battalion headquarters for administration and sustainment functions at 
the facility. 
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Add Page(s) to TIFF Document Using C#
SDK still empowers developers and end users to do Tiff image rotating, deleting, reordering, extracting, etc. C# Tiff processing application - sort Tiff pages.
rearrange pages in pdf reader; reorder pdf pages in preview
Primary Military Police Units Involved With Internment and Resettlement 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
B-3 
THEATER DETAINEE REPORTING CENTER 
B-9.  The TDRC is a modular organization that is capable of breaking down into four, nine-person teams 
that are deployable in support of smaller contingency operations at the team level. It is typically assigned to 
the MPC, but may be assigned to the military police brigade. This capability is required when there is more 
than one detention facility reporting information to the NDRC at Headquarters, DA. This unit provides the 
following capabilities to the supported commander: 
 centralized  theater  agency  for  the  receipt,  processing,  maintenance,  dissemination,  and 
transmittal of  data and the  status of property  pertaining to  I/R operations within  a theater  of 
operations. 
Operation at the theater level, but can be directly linked to a TIF. 
I
NTERNMENT AND 
R
ESETTLEMENT 
C
AMP 
L
IAISON 
D
ETACHMENT
B-10. The I/R camp liaison detachment is typically assigned to a military police brigade. This unit provides 
the following capabilities to the supported commander: 
Continuous  accountability  of  detainees  who  have  been  captured  by  U.S.  armed  forces  and 
transferred to the control of HN or multinational forces. 
Custody and care monitoring of U.S. captured detainees being interned by HN or multinational 
forces according to the Geneva Conventions. 
Receipt  and  certification  of  multinational  and  HN  requests  for  reimbursement  of  expenses 
associated with interning detainees captured by U.S. forces. 
I
NTERNMENT AND 
R
ESETTLEMENT 
B
RIGADE 
L
IAISON 
D
ETACHMENT
B-11. The I/R brigade liaison detachment is typically assigned to a military police brigade (in a ratio of one 
detachment per three I/R battalions). This detachment provides the following capabilities to the supported 
commander: 
Staff augmentation to expand military police brigade planning, coordination, and C2 for detainee 
operations. 
I/R staff augmentation and a liaison link to the HN or multinational forces to ensure that the care 
and handling  of detainees captured  by U.S.  armed forces is  in compliance with  international 
treaties. 
I
NTERNMENT AND 
R
ESETTLEMENT 
I
NFORMATION 
C
ENTER
B-12. The I/R information center is typically assigned to a military police brigade. This unit provides the 
following capabilities to the supported commander: 
A central agency in the theater for the receipt, processing, maintenance, and dissemination (to 
authorized agencies) of required detainee and DC information. 
A central locator system for detainee personnel and detainees transferred to multinational or HN 
authorities. 
M
ILITARY 
W
ORKING 
D
OGS
B-13. MWDs  are  typically assigned  to  an  MPC  or  a  military  police  brigade.  There  are  three  types  of 
military  police  MWD  elements  capable  of  supporting  I/R  operations:  kennel  master,  explosives/patrol 
team,  and  narcotics/patrol  team.  Collectively,  they  provide  the  following  capabilities  to  the  supported 
commander: 
Reinforcement of security measures against penetration and attack by small enemy forces. 
Detection of narcotics or explosives. 
A deterrence to escape attempts during external work details. 
External facility security patrols as a deterrence to escape attempts. 
This page intentionally left blank.  
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
C-1 
Appendix C 
Contractor Support 
Government  contractors  may  be  used  to  provide  support  to  U.S.  armed  forces. 
Commanders  must  fully  understand  their  role  in  planning  for  and  managing 
contractors on the battlefield and ensure that their staffs are trained to plan for and 
manage contractor support. This appendix provides basic information on contractor 
support considerations and highlights some of the most likely contractors to support 
I/R operations. (See FM 3-100.21 and FM 100-10-2.) Military units receive guidance 
and instructions to conduct an operation from published plans and orders, usually 
operation  plans  and  orders.  These plans  and  orders  describe  the  mission and  the 
manner  in  which  an  operation  will  be  accomplished.  Contractors  receive  similar 
guidance via their contracts. A contract is a legally enforceable agreement between 
two or more parties for the exchange of products and/or services. It is the vehicle 
through which the military details the tasks that it wants a contractor to accomplish. It 
also specifies the monetary amount that the contractor will receive in return for the 
products  and services rendered. There  are  many different entities represented in  a 
contract. The following paragraphs identify those entities and their responsibilities. 
CONTRACTORS 
C-1.  Contractors are persons or businesses, including authorized subcontractors, that provide products or 
services  for  monetary compensation. A  contractor furnishes  supplies  or services  or performs  work  at a 
stated price or rate based on the terms of a contract. (See AR 715-9 and FM 3-100.21.) 
C-2.  In  military  operations,  a  contractor  may  provide  life  support,  construction  and/or  engineering 
support,  weapon  systems  support,  and/or  other  technical  services.  The  contractor  may  be  required  to 
provide one or multiple types of support. 
REQUIRING UNIT 
C-3.  All  requiring  units  are  responsible  for  providing  contracting  and  contractor  oversight  in  the 
operational  area  or  the  respective  AO  through  appointed  contracting  officer representatives,  to  include 
submitting contractor accountability and visibility reports as required. 
C-4.  A contracting officer is the official with the legal authority to enter into, administer, and/or terminate 
contracts.  Within  the  Army,  a contracting officer is  appointed in writing using  SF 1402 (Certificate  of 
Appointment). Only contracting officers who are duly appointed in writing are authorized to obligate funds 
of  the  U.S.  government.  Regular  Army  and  reserve  component  military  personnel  and  DOD  civilian 
personnel  may  serve  as  contracting officers supporting deployed  forces.  The  three  types  of contracting 
officers are— 
Procuring contracting officer. 
Administrative contracting officer. 
Terminating contracting officer. 
C-5.  Commanders will primarily work with procuring contracting officers and administrative contracting 
officers. (See FM 100-10-2.) 
Appendix C 
C-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
CONTRACTING OFFICER REPRESENTATIVE 
C-6.  The contracting officer representative is an individual appointed in writing by a contracting officer to 
act as the eyes and ears of the contracting officer. This individual is not normally a member of the Army’s 
contracting organizations,  such as  the Army Service component  command office, but most often comes 
from the requiring unit. 
C-7.  In all cases, the contracting officer assigns the contracting officer representative responsibilities (in 
writing) and authority limitations. The contracting officer representative represents the contracting officer 
only to the  extent delegated in  the written appointment.  The  contracting officer representative does not 
have  the  authority  to  change  the  terms  and  conditions  of  a  contract.  When  the  MPC,  military  police 
brigade,  or military police or I/R battalion is the requiring unit, it must have trained contracting officer 
representatives to coordinate and accomplish this mission. 
STATEMENT OF WORK 
C-8.  A  statement  of  work  defines  the  government’s  requirements  in  a  clear,  concise  language  that 
identifies the specific work to be accomplished. It is incorporated into the contract and is the contractor’s 
mission statement. 
C-9.   Statements of work are prepared by the requiring unit and must be individually tailored to consider 
the time period of performance, deliverable items (if any), and desired degree of performance. The work to 
be performed is described in terms of identifying the government’s required products. Any requirements 
beyond the statement of work may expose the government to claims and increased costs. 
CONTRACTOR MANAGEMENT 
C-10. Contractor  management  is  accomplished  through  a  responsible  contracting  organization,  not  the 
chain of  command. Command  authority over contractors in  support of military  operations  is somewhat 
limited when compared to the authority over military personnel and DA civilians. Contractor personnel are 
managed  according  to  their  performance  work  statements,  which  should  clearly  state  that  contractor 
personnel must follow the local protection and safety directives and policies. Commanders must manage 
contractors  through  the  contracting  officer  or  assistant  contracting  officer.  Contracting  officer 
representatives are appointed by contracting officers in coordination with the requiring unit to ensure that a 
contractor performs the work required according to the terms and conditions of the contract and federal 
acquisition  regulations.  The  contracting  officer  representative  serves  as  a  form  of  liaison  between  the 
contractor, supported unit, and contracting officer. 
C-11. The management and control of contractors are significantly different from the C2 of Soldiers and 
DA civilians. During detainee operations, Soldiers and DA civilians are under the C2 of the military chain 
of  command.  In  an  area  of  responsibility,  the  geographic  combatant  commander  is  responsible  for 
accomplishing the  mission  and ensuring the safety of  all U.S. armed forces, DA  civilians,  and contract 
employees in support of U.S. military operations. The supported combatant commander, through the Army 
Service component command, exercises C2 over Soldiers and DA civilians, including special recognitions 
and/or  disciplinary  actions.  Military  commanders  do  not,  however,  have  the  same  authority  over 
contractors and their employees. Military commanders have only management authority over contractors 
according  to  defense  acquisition  rules  and  regulations.  The  proper  military  oversight  of  contractors  is 
imperative to fully integrate contractor support into the theater operational support structure. 
C-12. It is important to understand that the terms and conditions of the contract establish the relationship 
between the military and the contractor. This relationship does not extend through the contract supervisor 
to the employees. Only the contractor can directly supervise the employees. The military chain of command 
exercises  management  control  through the contract  for  the  products and/or  services  provided.  Contract 
employees will not to be placed in a supervisory capacity over military or DA civilian personnel. 
C-13. The military link to the contractor, through the terms and conditions of the contract, is the contracting 
officer  or  duly  appointed  contracting  officer  representative,  who  communicates  specific  needs  to  the 
contractor.  The  contracting  officer,  not  the  contracting  officer  representative,  is  the  only  government 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested