Contractor Support 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
C-3 
official  with  the  authority  to  direct  the  contractor  or  modify  the  contract.  As  indicated  earlier,  the 
contracting officer representative has daily contact with the contractor, is responsible for rigorous oversight 
and  monitoring  of  contractor  performance,  and  is  key  to  contractor  management  and  control.  The 
contracting officer representative should be trained according to contracting regulations and policies and 
direction  from  the  contracting  officer.  When  possible,  the  contracting  officer  representative  should  be 
on-site where the contract is being performed. 
INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS 
C-14. International agreements and HN laws that apply to the operational area directly affect the use of 
contractors. They may establish legal obligations independent of contract provisions and may limit the full 
use of contractor support. Typically, these agreements and laws affect contractor support by— 
Directing the use of HN resources before contracting with external commercial firms. 
Placing restrictions on commercial firms to be contracted. 
Placing restrictions on the types of services to be contracted. 
Establishing legal obligations to the HN. 
Prohibiting contractor use altogether. 
C-15. These  agreements  must  be  considered  when  preparing  operation  plans,  operation  orders,  and 
contracts. The SJA within a commander’s operational area can provide guidance on legal obligations. 
POLICY 
C-16. In  the  event  of  emergency  or  contingency  operations,  contractors  are  often  required  to  perform 
services  in  the  operational  area.  With  the  increased  criticality  of  contractor  support,  especially  when 
conducting I/R operations, the Army (AR 715-9) and DOD policies (DODI 3020.41) are that— 
Civilian  contractors  may  be  employed  to  support  Army  operations  and/or  weapon  systems 
domestically or  overseas.  They  will generally be  assigned duties  at  echelons above  division. 
However, they may be temporarily  assigned or deployed anywhere, as needed and  consistent 
with the terms of the contract and the tactical situation. 
The management and control of contractors depends on the terms and conditions of the contract. 
Contract employees are required to perform tasks identified within the statement of work and 
provisions defined in the contract. They will comply with applicable U.S. and international laws 
when contracted to perform detainee operations. 
Contract employees are subject to court-martial jurisdiction only in times of officially declared 
war or contingency operations. Non-HN contract employees supporting U.S. military forces may 
be prosecuted for serious criminal offenses under the Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act. In 
all cases involving suspected contractor misconduct, commanders should immediately consult 
their SJA for specific legal advice. 
Contract employees deployed in support of I/R operations are provided with security and support 
services commensurate with those provided to DA civilians. 
Contract  employees  accompanying  U.S.  armed  forces  may  be  subject  to  hostile  actions.  If 
captured,  a  contract  employee’s  status  will  depend  on  the  type  of  conflict,  applicability  of 
relevant international agreements, and nature of the hostile force. 
TRAINING CONSIDERATIONS FOR CONTRACTORS 
C-17. Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom demonstrated that civilian contractors play a large 
role in sustainment and other operations in support of the maneuver commander. Contract interrogators are 
often  used in detainee operations. A contract interrogator is a contractor who is specifically trained and 
DOD-certified according to DODD 3115.09 to collect information from HUMINT sources for the purpose 
of  answering  specific  information  requirements.  Their  operations  must  be  conducted  according  to 
applicable U.S. laws, Geneva Conventions, and U.S. Army policies and regulations. Contract interrogators 
operate only in fixed facilities, not in tactical operations. (See DODD 3115.09 and DODI 3020.41.) 
Reorder pages in pdf file - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf move pages; how to reverse pages in pdf
Reorder pages in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
moving pages in pdf; how to move pages in pdf
Appendix C 
C-4 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
STATUS OF CONTRACT EMPLOYEES 
C-18. According  to  Hague  Convention,  Article  13,  “individuals  who  follow  an  army  without  directly 
belonging to it, such as newspaper correspondents and reporters, sutlers, and contractors, who fall into the 
enemy’s hands and whom the latter thinks expedient to detain, are entitled to be treated as prisoners of war, 
provided they are in possession of a certificate from the military authorities of the army which they were 
accompanying.” 
C-19. Contract employees are not combatants or noncombatants. They are not subject to attack unless, and 
for such time as, they take a direct part in hostilities, which is prohibited by DOD policies. Contractors 
should, therefore, not be consciously placed in a position where they might be perceived as directly taking 
part  in  hostilities  and,  thereby,  become  subject  to  intentional  attack. Commanders may  unintentionally 
compromise the status of contractors by subjecting them to the following conditions: 
Being commanded or controlled by a published chain of command. 
Wearing a distinctive insignia or uniform. 
Carrying arms openly. 
C-20. The employment and use of contractors must be carefully assessed by the commander to ensure that 
contract  personnel  are  not  placed  in  high-risk  locations  unnecessarily.  Therefore,  commanders  must 
carefully consider decisions regarding the use or location of contract employees in the theater of operations. 
In some cases, a source of support other than contractors may be more appropriate. While some support 
functions (interrogators, interpreters, supplies and services) may be appropriately contracted, the direction 
and  control of detention  facilities  for detainees in the operational  area  or a  specific  AO  are  inherently 
governmental and must be performed by military personnel. (See DODI 1100.22.) 
CONTRACTOR SUPPORT FOR DETAINEE OPERATIONS 
C-21. Contract employees have been used as HUMINT collectors in a variety of locations. Generally, these 
contract employees are former military HUMINT collectors (often former warrant officers or senior NCOs) 
with many years of experience. Occasionally, persons with other interrogation experience (law enforcement 
personnel)  have  been  used.  In  many  instances,  contract  employees  deploy  to  assignments  for  a  longer 
period of time than their military counterparts and offer a degree of continuity to the operation due to their 
longer service. Such use of contract employees in the detainee arena has proven to be highly successful. 
The key to this success lies in a clear understanding of the contract employee’s role within the supported 
unit’s overall mission and in understanding the contract employee’s responsibilities and limitations. (See 
FM 2-22.3 for more information on contracting HUMINT collectors.) 
C-22. The  statement of work outlines expectations of contract employees  in terms of  what the  required 
output is, rather than how the work is accomplished. Generally, contract employees will follow local SOPs 
and  policies  that describe how military counterparts accomplish  their day-to-day  missions, though  such 
SOPs  and  policies  may  make  special  provisions  or  exceptions  for  contract  employees.  Military 
commanders, officers in charges, NCOs in charge, and others who come in contact with contract employees 
in the course of their duties should familiarize themselves with the statement of work and applicable local 
policies  and procedures  so that  they  will be  fully  aware  of  the  capabilities  and  limitations  of  contract 
employees. 
C-23. Additionally,  military  personnel  who  interact  with  contract  employees  must  be  aware  that  only 
contractors manage, supervise, and give directions to their employees. Any questions or concerns as to a 
contract  employee’s  performance  or conduct should be  addressed  to  the  appropriate  contracting officer 
representative, who  should then  address such concerns  to  the  contractor. SOPs  and other local  policies 
should  clearly  identify  guidelines  and  procedures  for  addressing  questions  about  contract  employee 
performance and conduct. 
C-24. The terms and conditions of any contract must include provisions that require contract employees to 
abide  by  guidance  and  obey  instructions  and  general  orders  (including  those  issued  by  the  theater 
commander) applicable to the U.S. armed forces and civilians. Operational support contracts must include 
requirements for the contractor to— 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
change page order in pdf reader; change pdf page order online
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split may choose to only rotate a single page of PDF file or all
how to move pages in pdf acrobat; how to move pages around in pdf file
Contractor Support 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
C-5 
Ensure  that  contract  employees  comply  with  the  preceding  guidance  and  demonstrate  good 
conduct. 
Promptly resolve, to the satisfaction of the contracting officer representative, contract employee 
performance and conduct problems identified by the contracting officer representative. 
Remove and replace (at the contractor’s expense) contract employees who fail to comply with 
the preceding guidance when directed by the contracting officer representative. This provides a 
significant tool to aid in achieving good order and discipline within the operational  area or a 
specific AO. 
JURISDICTION OVER CONTRACTORS 
C-25. There are several ways that jurisdiction may be exercised over civilians and contractors. Determining 
whether  criminal  jurisdiction  exists  over contractors  may depend  on  the type  of  contractor involved  in 
misconduct and the applicable written provisions within the contract itself. Furthermore, civilians may be 
subject to the Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act, which establishes federal jurisdiction over offenses 
committed OCONUS by persons employed by or accompanying the Armed Forces, or by members of the 
Armed Forces who are released or separated from active duty prior to being identified and prosecuted for 
committing such offenses, and for other purposes. 
C-26. The  commander  has  the authority to initiate proceedings that could lead to charges under UCMJ, 
possible HN jurisdiction under a Status of Forces Agreement, or violations of the Military Extraterritorial 
Jurisdiction Act (Public Law 106-523). Administrative discipline for civilians can include a reduction in 
grade, suspension from duty without  pay, or removal from office. Military personnel may be  subject  to 
appropriate administrative discipline or to action under the UCMJ, which may include punishment under 
Article  15  or  trial  by  court-martial.  Government  contractors  may  be  held  liable  for  their  employee’s 
misconduct.  Contractor employees  may also be  held personally liable.  In  all  cases  involving suspected 
contractor misconduct, commanders should immediately consult their SJA for specific legal advice. 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; how to move pages in pdf files
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf reverse page order preview; change page order pdf reader
This page intentionally left blank.  
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
delete or remove certain page from PDF document file. C# PDF Page Processing: Sort PDF Pages - online C#.NET tutorial page for how to reorder, sort, reorganize
how to move pdf pages around; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
for image viewing to read, edit, create or write PDF documents from file or stream in Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF
how to change page order in pdf acrobat; move pages within pdf
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
D-1 
Appendix D 
Application of the Geneva Conventions to Internment and 
Resettlement Operations 
The purpose of  the  law of  war  is  to  diminish  the evils of war  by regulating the 
conduct  of  hostilities.  Various  international  agreements  have  been  designed  and 
adopted for the protection of individuals who are out of combat (hors de combat), 
including detainees and DCs interned and resettled in times of conflict. The Geneva 
Conventions are the primary sources of legal guidance for the care and treatment of 
these  individuals.  This  appendix  summarizes  various  provisions  of  the  Geneva 
Conventions  that are applied  to  I/R  operations. The principal conventions  are the 
GPW  and  GC.  The  Geneva  Conventions  speak  in  terms  of  POWs  and  detained 
civilians. When this appendix addresses the term detainee, it refers to all categories 
of detainees unless otherwise specified. The terminology of the Geneva Conventions 
is specific to prisoners of war without distinction to EPWs. The United States uses 
the term EPW to identify hostile forces taken captive and reserves the term POW to 
identify its own or multinational  armed forces who have been taken captive. In this 
appendix, the term POW is used in the general sense of the Geneva Conventions. 
Note.  Soldiers  conducting  I/R  operations  should  include  a  complete  copy  of  the  Geneva 
Conventions in their resource materials to use as a primary reference. 
INTENT OF PROTECTION 
D-1.  DOD policy is to apply the Geneva Conventions in all military operations unless directed otherwise 
by competent authority, usually at the theater level or above (the same level of authority that designates 
hostile forces). 
D-2.  The GPW will be applied, presumptively, for persons who are detained because of their hostile acts, 
from  the  POC  to  a  detention  facility,  until  directed  otherwise  by  competent  authority  (including  the 
determination of status by an Article 5 tribunal). EPWs will be treated according to the GPW at times. The 
GC will be applied, presumptively, to other detainees (including those who are determined not to be EPWs) 
and DCs unless directed otherwise by competent authority. Current DOD policy requires that all detainees 
be afforded the protections outlined in Common Article 3 to the Geneva Conventions (see figure D-1, page 
D-2). 
D-3.  Although the protocols have  not been ratified by  the  United States, many of  their  provisions  are 
binding on the United States as customary international laws. Moreover, many U.S. allies are under a legal 
obligation (as parties to both protocols) to comply with these treaties. In addition to the conventions and 
protocols,  AR 190-8  and  DODD 2310.01E  provide  detailed  guidance  for  the  implementation  of 
international agreements. 
H
UMANE 
T
REATMENT
D-4.  The minimum standard of treatment, dictated by DOD policy, is outlined in Common Article 3 to the 
Geneva Conventions. 
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pdf pages in preview; pdf reverse page order online
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
change page order pdf acrobat; move pages in a pdf file
Appendix D 
D-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Common Article 3 to the Geneva Conventions, 1949 
In the case of armed conflict not of an international character occurring in the territory 
of one of the High Contracting Parties, each Party to the conflict shall be bound to 
apply, as a minimum, the following provisions: 
(1) Persons taking no active part in hostilities, including members of armed 
forces who have laid down their arms and those placed hors de combat by sickness, 
wounds, detention, or any other cause, shall in all circumstances be treated 
humanely, without any adverse distinction founded on race, color, religion or faith, 
sex, birth or wealth, or any other similar criteria. 
To this end, the following acts are and shall remain prohibited at any time and in any 
place whatsoever with respect to the above-mentioned persons: 
a. Violence to life and person, in particular murder of all kinds, mutilation, 
cruel treatment and torture; 
b. Taking of hostages; 
c.  Outrages upon personal dignity, in  particular humiliating and  degrading 
treatment; 
d.  The  passing  of  sentences  and  the  carrying  out  of  executions  without 
previous judgment pronounced by a regularly constituted court, affording all 
the judicial guarantees which are recognized as indispensable by civilized 
peoples. 
(2) The wounded and sick shall be collected and cared for. 
An  impartial humanitarian  body,  such  as the  International  Committee  of  the  Red 
Cross, may offer its services to the Parties to the conflict. 
The Parties to the conflict should further endeavor to bring into force, by means of 
special agreements, all  or  part of the other provisions of the present Convention. 
The application of the preceding provisions shall not affect the  legal status of the 
Parties to the conflict. 
Figure D-1. Common Article 3 to the Geneva Conventions 
Basic Standard of Care 
D-5.  The basic standard of care for all detainees is outlined in DODD 2310.01E. Detainees, regardless of 
their status or the circumstances of their capture, receive the basic standard of care from the POC until the 
end of their detention. This basic standard of care is summarized as follows: 
Protect  detainees  (Articles  3  and  27,  GC;  Articles  3  and  13,  GPW).  Detainees  must  be 
protected  against  violence  and  harm from  external  sources  and  sources  within  the detention 
facility. 
Treat  detainees  humanely  (Articles  3  and  27,  GC;  Articles  3  and  13,  GPW)  and  show 
respect  for  their  person  (Articles  3  and  27,  GC;  Articles  3  and  14,  GPW).  These  two 
provisions are tied together and include respect for the detainee’s religion, culture, family, sex, 
and race, among others. 
Provide adequate food (Article 89, GC; Article 26, GPW). Ensure that detainees are provided 
a nutritious diet that is sufficient in quality, quantity, and variety to keep them healthy. This diet 
should  be  consistent  with  local  cultural  diet  if  possible  (for  example,  do  not  feed  pork  to 
Muslims). This does not include things like cookies, candy, and sweets; these items are luxuries 
Application of the Geneva Conventions to Internment and Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
D-3 
and may be provided as incentives. The common diet of detainees during the beginning of major 
combat operations can be stripped-down meals, ready-to-eat (the main meal and side dishes), but 
no  sweets.  Ensure  that detainee rations  are  consistent  with Soldier meals. For example, as  a 
theater  matures,  conditions  improve,  and  Soldiers  and  personnel  operating  the  facility  are 
provided three hot  meals per day, then  detainees  should also be provided (three hot  meals if 
possible) at least two hot meals and one cold meal per day. 
Provide  adequate  water  (Article  89,  GC;  Article  26,  GPW).  Ensure  that  detainees  have 
enough water to drink, wash with and, in some cases, do laundry. This does not include coffee, 
tea, or juice. Potable water should be at room temperature potable. 
Provide  adequate  shelter  (Article  85,  GC;  Article  25,  GPW).  Ensure  that  detainees  have 
shelter from the elements that is consistent with the level of shelter provided for Soldiers and 
personnel operating the facility. A hard-site shelter is not required, but protection from threats 
(mortars, rockets, improvised explosive devices) must be provided to protect detainees. 
Provide  adequate  medical  care  (Article 91, GC; Article  30, GPW). Ensure  that detainees 
receive adequate medical and dental care that is consistent with the level of care provided for 
Soldiers  and  personnel  operating  the  facility.  Treatment  can  include  mental  health  care, 
particularly with respect to suicidal detainees. Modern conflicts (focused on stability operations) 
do not result in the previously typical population of EPWs. Modern conflict result in detainees of 
all  ages,  both  male  and  female.  Special  attention  is  required  to  address  geriatric  conditions, 
diabetes, self-inflicted injuries, and other unusual health conditions. 
Provide sufficient clothing for the climate (Article 90, GC; Article 27, GPW). EPWs  who 
are captured while wearing military uniforms will be provided adequate clothing to replace their 
uniforms.  Any  person  detained  in  civilian  clothing  must  be  provided  clothing  only  if  their 
clothing is inadequate or if the facility commander directs that jumpsuits or other uniforms be 
worn. 
Provide adequate hygiene facilities (Article 85, GC; Article 29, GPW). Detainees must be 
allowed to wash, shower, and brush their teeth regularly. They should be allowed to wash their 
clothes or be provided with clean clothes on a regular basis. To prevent health risks within the 
detention facility, ensure that detainees stay clean, using force if necessary. 
Protect detainee property (Article 97, GC; Article 18, GPW). If detainee property is taken 
(retained), it must be annotated on DA Form 4137 and a copy of the form given to the detainee 
as a receipt. When the detainee is released, he or she will be allowed to file a claim for anything 
that is  missing.  Evidence  chain  of custody  is  important,  especially  if  the  individual  is to be 
prosecuted by U.S. or HN officials. Detainees are sometimes allowed  to keep family pictures 
and are usually allowed to keep religious literature and paraphernalia. Refer to the local SOP for 
guidance. 
Protect  detainees  from public  curiosity  (Article  27, GC; Article  13, GPW). Tours  of  the 
facility will be allowed for official purposes only, and consistent with DOD policy. Photographs 
will be taken for official purposes only. 
Allow detainees the freedom to exercise religion (Article 93, GC; Article 34, GPW). At a 
basic level, detainees are allowed to practice religion, but are not necessarily facilitated in that 
practice. The practice  of religion  may be  limited  by the  capturing unit based on security  and 
operational considerations. For example, the exercise of religion might be curtailed when a call 
to prayer occurs shortly after a detainee is captured and is physically restrained. At that point, the 
detainee would not be allowed the freedom to exercise his religion. 
Detainee Care at a Detention Facility 
D-6.  When  detainees move back  to a fixed facility, their treatment may change slightly  based on  their 
status and the rules in the facility. The following rights are not the only ones that detainees may be given at 
a fixed facility, nor will detainees necessarily be given all of these. The detention facility commander may 
determine that some limitations on these rights or benefits are justified for imperative reasons of security. 
However, as the theater matures,  detention facilities  improve,  and more  resources become available,  all 
rights and benefits discussed below will be provided to detainees and DCs. They will— 
Appendix D 
D-4 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Be  allowed  the  freedom to exercise  religion (Article 93, GC; Article 34, GPW). Detainee 
freedom to exercise religion is broadened at this level and in fact, will not be restricted without a 
significant reason (such as a lockdown at the detention facility after a riot). At this level, the 
facility will typically facilitate the practice of religion by providing religious personnel to assist 
detainees or DCs or by providing necessary items (such as copies of the Qur’an, Bible, or other 
religious materials). 
Be  allowed  to  exercise  (Article  9,  GC;  Article  38,  GPW).  Detainees  and  DCs  must  be 
provided  opportunities for physical exercise (to  include sports  and games) and  outdoor  time. 
Sufficient open spaces will be provided for these purposes in all facilities if available. 
Be allowed to send and receive mail (Article 107, GC; Article 71, GPW). Detainees must be 
allowed to send and receive mail unless the commander (usually the commanding general, three- 
or four-star in this context) determines that military necessity prevents it; and if so, it should be 
for a short period of time only. Detainees are allowed to send two letters and four postcards per 
month. 
Be  allowed  representation  (Article  102,  GC;  Article  79,  GPW).  Detainees  may  elect  a 
committee to represent them from within the facility. For EPWs, the representative will be the 
ranking  EPW.  EPW  representatives  are  one  method  for  detainees  to  advise  the  facility 
commander of complaints regarding detention conditions. In Muslim countries, when Imams and 
Sheiks are picked up and detained, they often fill the representative role simply because they are 
already leaders within the community. The same could be true for other religious leaders in other 
countries. 
Not  be  photographed  or  videotaped  for  unofficial  purposes  (AR 190-8;  Article 27,  GC; 
Article 13, GPW). Detainees  may  be  photographed  or videotaped for official purposes only. 
The  restriction  on  unofficial  photographs  and  videotapes  also  applies  to  detention  facility 
personnel—photographs of the detention facility are not souvenirs. Videotape surveillance of the 
facility for security purposes is fine; however, the videotaping of interrogations is authorized on 
a case-by-case basis and according to DODD 3115.09. The key factor is that all photographs and 
videotapes must be for administrative, security, or intelligence/counterintelligence purposes. 
Have access to the Geneva Conventions (in their own language) (Article 99, GC; Article 41, 
GPW).  Detainees  have  a  right  to  a  personal  copy of the  Geneva  Conventions.  The Geneva 
Conventions must also be posted in the facility in English and the detainee language. Copies will 
be supplied, upon request, to detainees who do not have access to posted copies. 
Be allowed to complete documentation to notify their family of their location and that they 
are alive and in U.S. custody (Article 106, GC; Article 70, GPW). DA Form 2665-R will be 
completed for EPWs; DA Form 2678-R (Civilian Internee NATL-Internment Card) will be used 
for CIs. Detainees must be allowed to complete these forms, which will be forwarded to their 
families. 
Be issued an identification card (Article 97, GC; Articles 17 and 18, GPW). EPWs will be 
issued  a  DA Form 2662-R;  CIs  will  be  issued  a  DA Form 2667-R  (Prisoner  of  War  Mail 
[Letter]). Detainees have the right to have an identification document. If they are military and 
the enemy military has an identification card system (similar to what the U.S. forces use), then 
they  maintain  their  military  identification  card.  If  they  are  civilian  and  there  is  a  civilian 
identification card (as there is in many countries), they will keep the civilian identification card. 
If they do not have an identification card, facility administration personnel must provide them 
with one. 
Be allowed visits by the ICRC (Article 143, GC; Article 126, GPW). Detainees have the right 
to visits by the ICRC. They also have the right to talk to the ICRC and voice their complaints. 
D-7.  The GPW and GC provide detailed guidance on procedures for the care of detainees and the use and 
maintenance of facilities. Some examples include procedures for the receipt of relief packages and money; 
treatment of personal property; provisions for EPWs, RP, and CIs to work; care of CI families; evacuation 
or transfer of detainees; and provisions of canteen facilities. These provisions of the Geneva Conventions 
are required to be implemented as soon as practicable after a detention facility is established. The detention 
facility commander  may,  if required by imperative  military necessity,  suspend all or  part  of  the rights, 
Application of the Geneva Conventions to Internment and Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
D-5 
benefits, and provisions annotated in this section; the humane treatment standards can never be abridged. 
The specific provisions of the Geneva Conventions and the SJA should be consulted to aid in developing 
detailed SOPs and the specific suspension of these provisions. 
I
NTERROGATION
D-8.  A detaining power may interrogate EPWs. EPWs, however, are only required to provide their name, 
grade, birth date, and serial number. EPWs cannot be punished if they refuse to give additional information. 
Article 17 of  the GPW states,  “No physical or  mental torture, nor  any other form of  coercion, may  be 
inflicted on prisoners of war to secure from them information of any kind whatever. Prisoners of war who 
refuse  to  answer  may  not  be  threatened,  insulted,  or  exposed  to  any  unpleasant  or  disadvantageous 
treatment of any kind.” Similarly, Article  32 of the GC states,  “No physical  or moral coercion shall be 
exercised against protected persons, in particular to obtain information from them or from third parties.” 
All  interrogation  procedures  in  FM 2-22.3  are  consistent  with  Common  Article  3  to  the  Geneva 
Conventions, the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005, and U.S. domestic laws. 
P
ROSECUTION
D-9.  EPWs have “combatant  immunity;”  they cannot be tried  or punished for their  participation  in an 
armed conflict. They may be prosecuted for committing war crimes, crimes against humanity, and common 
crimes under the laws of the detaining power or international laws. EPWs are entitled to be tried before the 
same courts and face the same procedures that detaining power military personnel would face (that is, the 
respective  UCMJ  for  EPWs  captured and  held by U.S. forces). EPWs are  entitled to representation  by 
competent counsel during the trial and must be advised of the charges against them; they also have a right 
to appeal their conviction and sentence. 
D-10. If, at the end of a conflict, an EPW has done nothing more than take up arms against opposing forces, 
the detaining power is required to repatriate the EPW. An EPW detained  in connection with  a criminal 
prosecution may also be repatriated if the detaining power consents. 
D-11. Other detainees are not afforded the same extensive rights of trial as an EPW. These individuals may 
be tried by HN courts,  international tribunals, or tribunals  established by  the detaining power. The trial 
rights they are afforded must, however, meet the minimum standards of Common Article 3 to the Geneva 
Conventions,  which  gives  them  judicial  guarantees  that  are  recognized  as  indispensable  by  civilized 
peoples. They— 
Must be informed of the charges against them. 
Are presumed innocent. 
Are allowed to— 
„ 
Present their defense and call witnesses. 
„ 
Be assisted by a qualified counsel of their choice. 
„ 
Have an interpreter. 
„ 
Be allowed to appeal the conviction and sentence. 
TRIBUNALS 
D-12. A tribunal is an administrative hearing, that is controlled by a board of officers. Article 5 tribunals 
determine the actual status of a detainee (CI, RP, or enemy combatant). A CI review tribunal determines 
the lawfulness of the internment of civilians who may be detained for security reasons. (See AR 190-8 for 
Article 5 tribunal procedures.) 
A
RTICLE 
5
T
RIBUNAL 
P
ROCEDURES
D-13. The following procedures are the minimum required for an Article 5 tribunal. Detainees whose status 
is to be determined— 
Will receive notice (in a language they understand) of the intent to hold a hearing. 
Appendix D 
D-6 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Will receive a fair opportunity to present evidence to the tribunal. 
Will be advised of their rights at the beginning of their hearings. 
Will receive a copy of the status determination and a notice (in a language they understand) of 
appeal rights. 
D-14. After hearing testimony (if applicable) and reviewing documents and other evidence, the tribunal will 
determine the status of the detainee by majority vote in a closed session. The preponderance of evidence 
will be the standard used in reaching this determination. Hearsay evidence offered by the detainee or DOD 
may  be  accepted  by  the  tribunal.  There  will  be  a  rebuttable  presumption  in  favor  of  creditable  DOD 
evidence, with the burden shifting to the detainee to rebut that evidence with more persuasive evidence. A 
written report of the tribunal decision will be completed in each case. Possible board determinations are as 
follows: 
EPW (lawful enemy combatant). 
Recommended RP. This is individual is entitled to EPW protection and may be considered for 
certification as a medical or religious RP. 
Civilian. 
„ 
Civilian accompanying the force, given EPW status. 
„ 
Innocent civilian who should be immediately returned to his home or released. 
„ 
CIs, who for reasons of operations security, should be detained or transferred to local law 
enforcement authorities as appropriate. 
„ 
Members of armed groups. 
D-15. The following procedures may be added to the tribunal as time, resources, and circumstances permit: 
Oath. Members of the tribunal and the recorder may be sworn in. The recorder should be sworn 
in  first  by  the  tribunal  president.  The  recorder  may  then  administer  the  oath  to  all  voting 
members of the tribunal, including the tribunal president. 
Records. A complete summarized record may be made of the proceedings. The recorder may 
prepare a record of the tribunal following the announcement of the tribunal decision. The record 
will then be forwarded to the first SJA in the internment facility chain of command. 
Proceedings. Open proceedings may be conducted, with the exception of deliberation, voting by 
the members, and testimony or other matters that might compromise security if held in the open. 
Notification of classification. Detainees may receive further notice of the factual basis for their 
classification. 
Rebuttal. Detainees may also receive a fair opportunity to rebut DOD factual assertions. 
Attendance. Detainees may be allowed to attend all open sessions and, if necessary, be provided 
an interpreter. Detainees may be excluded from sessions on the basis of national security. 
Witnesses. Detainees may be allowed to call witnesses, if reasonably available, and to question 
those witnesses called by the tribunal. Witnesses will not be considered reasonably available if, 
as determined by their commanders, their presence at a hearing would affect military operations. 
In  these  cases,  written  statements,  preferably  sworn,  may  be  submitted  and  considered  as 
evidence.  All admissible  evidence  and  statements  may  be excluded, as  required, for national 
security. The recorder may also require additional witnesses when a doctor, chaplain, or other 
expert witness is required to determine RP status. 
Right to testify. Detainees may be given the right to testify or otherwise address the tribunal; 
they may not be compelled to testify before the tribunal. 
D-16. The record of every tribunal proceeding that results in a determination denying EPW status will be 
reviewed for legal sufficiency when the record is received at the office of the SJA. 
D-17. If a detainee requests an appeal, the decision of the board, any evidence admitted before the tribunal, 
and any additional information provided by the detainee will be presented to the convening authority within 
a reasonable time after the proceedings have concluded. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested