Application of the Geneva Conventions to Internment and Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
D-7 
C
IVILIAN 
I
NTERNEE 
R
EVIEW 
T
RIBUNAL 
P
ROCEDURES
D-18. The following procedures are the minimum required for a CI review tribunal. This tribunal may be 
conducted  as a  result of an  appeal to the initial order of  internment  or  as part  of  the  6-month  review 
required  by  the Geneva Convention  Relative  to the Protection of  Civilian Persons (a  review tribunal is 
mandatory for the six-month review). Detainees whose status is to be determined— 
Receive notice (in a language they understand) of the intent to hold a hearing. 
Receive a fair opportunity to present evidence to the tribunal. 
Are advised of their rights, if present, at the beginning of their hearings. 
Receive a copy of the status determination, along with a notice of further review rights, before 
final action by the convening authority. 
D-19. Following the hearing of testimony (if applicable) and the review of documents and other evidence, 
the  tribunal  will  determine  the  status  of  the  detainee,  in  closed  session,  by  majority  vote.  The 
preponderance of evidence  will  be  the  standard  used  in  reaching  this  determination.  Hearsay  evidence 
offered by  the  detainee  or DOD  may be accepted  by  the tribunal.  If the  tribunal finds that  there  is an 
insufficient basis to deprive the CI of liberty or if the valid basis which necessitated internment no longer 
exists,  the  tribunal  will  recommend  that  the  convening  authority  order  the  detainee’s  release  from 
internment or placement. A written report of the tribunal’s decision is completed in  each case.  Possible 
board determinations are as follows: 
Innocent civilian who should be immediately returned to his home or released. 
CI  who  for  reasons  of  operational  security  should  be  detained  or  transferred  to  local  law 
enforcement authorities as appropriate. 
D-20. The  internment of  civilians  is a significant deprivation  of liberty  that may  solely be justified  for 
imperative  reasons  of  security.  Accordingly,  additional  procedures  may  be  appropriate,  especially  for 
periodic review proceedings. The following procedures may be added to the tribunal as time, resources, and 
circumstances permit: 
Oath. Members of the tribunal and the recorder may be sworn in. The recorder should be sworn 
in first by the president of the tribunal. The recorder may then administer the oath to all voting 
members of the tribunal, to include the president. 
Records. A complete summarized record may be made of the proceedings. The recorder may 
prepare  a  summarized  record  of  the  tribunal  following  the  announcement  of  the  tribunal’s 
decision. The record will then be forwarded to the first SJA in the internment facility’s chain of 
command. 
Proceedings. Open proceedings may be conducted, with the exception of deliberation, voting by 
the members, and testimony or other matters that might compromise security if held in the open. 
Notice  of  classification.  Detainees  may  receive  further  notice  of  the  factual  basis  for  their 
classification. 
Rebuttal. Detainees may also receive a fair opportunity to rebut the DOD factual assertions. 
Attendance.  Detainees  may be allowed to attend all open  sessions  and  be provided with an 
interpreter  if  necessary.  Detainees  may  be  excluded  from  sessions  on  the  basis  of  national 
security. 
Witnesses. Detainees may be allowed to call witnesses, if reasonably available, and to question 
those witnesses called by the tribunal. Witnesses will not be considered reasonably available if, 
as determined by their commanders, their presence at a hearing would affect military operations. 
In  these  cases,  written  statements,  preferably  sworn,  may  be  submitted  and  considered  as 
evidence.  All admissible  evidence  and  statements  may  be excluded, as  required, for national 
security. The recorder may also require additional witnesses. 
Right to testify. Detainees may be given a right to testify or otherwise address the tribunal; they 
may not be compelled to testify before the tribunal. 
Pdf rearrange pages - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pages in pdf document; pdf reorder pages online
Pdf rearrange pages - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to move pages in a pdf file; reorder pages in pdf file
Appendix D 
D-8 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Representation. CIs may also request a personal representative, or local civilian counsel. Such 
counsel will be at the expense of the detainee. No unreasonable delay in the proceeding will be 
permitted to obtain funding or otherwise engage the services of local counsel. 
D-21. The record of every tribunal proceeding that results in a determination denying CIs liberty will be 
reviewed for legal sufficiency when the record is received at the office of the SJA. 
D-22. A copy of the tribunal decision will be provided to the CI, along with a statement of further review 
rights (including the right to present a written response to the convening authority before his final decision). 
D-23. The decision of the tribunal, evidence admitted before the tribunal, and any additional information 
provided by the detainee will be presented to the convening authority after the proceedings have concluded 
in order for the convening authority to make a final decision as to the status of the detainee. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
rearrange pdf pages; change pdf page order reader
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
move pages within pdf; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
E-1 
Appendix E 
Agencies Concerned With Internment and Resettlement 
Operations 
This  appendix  provides  background  information  about  the  various  types  of 
government and nongovernment agencies interested in I/R operations. The interests 
and  support activities of these  agencies  include  ensuring  that proper  and  humane 
treatment  is given  to  individuals,  that the  rights  of  others  are protected, and that 
provisions for subsistence are present for individuals. 
U.S. FEDERAL AGENCIES 
E-1.  The DOD, Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and other 
federal agencies provide support for I/R operations. Often, there is more than one federal agency providing 
support  for  I/R operations. These  federal agencies  may support  nongovernment agencies  and/or private 
organizations in their I/R support roles. 
D
EPARTMENT OF 
D
EFENSE
E-2.  Under the provisions of the Geneva Conventions, the capturing power is responsible for the proper 
and  humane  treatment  of  I/R  populations  from  the  moment  of  capture.  The  OPMG  is  the  primary 
headquarters for and the DA executive agency with responsibilities for detainee programs. In this role, it is 
responsible  for  developing policy  and  guidelines  for  sustainment  support  (including  transportation  and 
general  engineering),  subsistence,  personnel,  organizational  forces,  protective  equipment  and  items 
consistent  with the threat environment,  mail  collection and distribution,  laundry  facilities,  and  detainee 
wash facilities. The OPMG is also responsible for developing DA policies; collecting, accounting for, and 
disposing  of  captured  enemy  supplies  and equipment  through  theater  logistics  and  explosive  ordnance 
disposal channels; and coordinating for personnel under U.S. control. U.S. Navy, Marine, and Air Force 
units that have detainees will turn them over to the U.S. Army at designated receiving points after initial 
classification and administrative processing. According to DODD 3025.1, the Secretary of the Army is the 
executive agent that tasks DOD components to plan for and commit DOD resources in response to civil 
authority requests from civil authorities for military support. 
E-3.  Examples of DOD decisionmakers for foreign I/R operations are the Under Secretary of Defense and 
the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Humanitarian and Refugee Affairs.  
Under Secretary of Defense who develops military policy for foreign humanitarian assistance, 
foreign relief operations, policy administration, and existing statutory programs.  
Deputy Assistant Secretary of the  Army for Humanitarian and  Refugee Affairs who executes 
DOD policy and tasks services accordingly. 
D
EPARTMENT OF 
H
OMELAND 
S
ECURITY
E-4.  In the event of a terrorist attack, natural disaster, or other large-scale emergency, the Department of 
Homeland Security is responsible for ensuring that emergency response professionals are prepared. This 
includes providing a coordinated, comprehensive federal response to any large-scale crisis and mounting a 
swift and effective recovery effort. 
F
EDERAL 
E
MERGENCY 
M
ANAGEMENT 
A
GENCY
E-5.  The  Federal  Emergency  Management  Agency  is  responsible  for  leading  the  nation’s  emergency 
management  system.  Local  and  state  programs  are  the  heart  of  the  nation’s  emergency  management 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
switch page order pdf; reverse pdf page order online
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
the button below and download your PDF. The perfect conversion tool. By dragging your pages in the editor area you can rearrange them or delete single pages.
how to move pages in pdf acrobat; how to reorder pdf pages in reader
Appendix E 
E-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
system, with most disasters being handled by local and state governments. When devastation is serious and 
exceeds the capability and resources of local and state governments, states turn to the federal government 
for help.  Once  the  President  has declared  a national  disaster,  Federal Emergency  Management  Agency 
coordinates with its own  response activities  and 28 other federal  agencies that  may provide assistance. 
Federal  agencies help  states and localities  recover  from  disasters  by  providing services, resources,  and 
personnel to perform necessary functions, such as transporting food and potable water to the affected area, 
assisting with medical aid and temporary housing for those whose homes are uninhabitable, and providing 
generators  for  electric  power  to  keep  hospitals  and  other  essential  facilities  in  operation.  Federal 
Emergency Management Agency also works with states and territories during nondisaster periods to help 
plan for disasters, develop mitigation programs, and anticipate what will be needed when national disasters 
occur. The Federal Response Plan provides the foundation on which the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency executes its responsibilities. 
E-6.  Title 42, USC, Chapter 68, (Robert T. Stafford Relief and Emergency Assistance Act), authorizes the 
federal government to respond to disasters and emergencies to provide assistance; save lives; and protect 
public health, safety, and property. 
E-7.  Federal  responses  to  natural  disasters  (earthquakes,  hurricanes,  typhoons,  tornadoes,  volcanic 
activity);  man-made  disasters  (radiological,  hazmat  releases);  and  other  incidents  requiring  federal 
assistance are also addressed in Title 42, USC. 
E-8.  The  National Response  Plan describes the  basic  mechanisms and structures by which the federal 
government mobilizes resources and  conducts activities to  augment state  and local  response  efforts. To 
facilitate the provisions of  federal assistance, the National Response Plan  uses a functional approach  to 
group the types of federal assistance that a state is most likely to need. Normally, a state needs no more 
than 12 emergency support functions. Each emergency support function is headed by a primary agency that 
has been selected based on its authorities, resources, and capabilities in the particular functional area. The 
12 emergency support functions serve as the primary mechanism through which federal response assistance 
is provided to assist the state in meeting response requirements in an affected area. Federal assistance is 
provided to the affected state by coordinating with the Federal Coordinating Officer, who is appointed by 
the director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency on the President’s behalf. 
O
THER 
F
EDERAL 
A
GENCIES
E-9.  Other federal agencies can provide advice and assistance in performing I/R operations. For example, 
the Department of Transportation has technical capabilities and expertise in public transportation and the 
Department  of  Agriculture  has  projects  and  activities  ongoing  in  foreign  countries  and  can  provide 
technical assistance and expertise upon request. Other federal agencies that can be resourceful in planning 
and implementing  I/R operations are the U.S. Agency for  International Development, Office of Foreign 
Disaster Assistance, U.S. Information Agency, Department of Justice, Public Health Service, and ICE. 
U.S. Agency for International Development 
E-10. The  U.S. Agency  for  International Development is  not under  direct  control  of the  Department of 
State. However, it coordinates activities at the department and country level within the federal government. 
Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance 
E-11. The Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance is responsible for providing prompt nonmilitary assistance 
to  alleviate  the  loss  of  life  and  suffering  for  foreign  disaster  victims.  The  Office  of  Foreign  Disaster 
Assistance  may  request  DOD  assistance  for  I/R  operations.  Coordination  and  determination  of  forces 
required are normally accomplished through the DOD and joint task force. 
U.S. Information Agency 
E-12. U.S. Information Agency helps achieve U.S. objectives by influencing public attitudes overseas. The 
agency advises the U.S. government on the possible impact of policies, programs, and official statements 
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
pages simply with a few lines of C# code. C# Codes to Sort Slides Order. If you want to use a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange
how to reverse page order in pdf; reorder pdf pages online
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages in extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf page order reverse; rearrange pdf pages reader
Agencies Concerned With Internment and Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
E-3 
on foreign opinions. The U.S. Information Agency aids humanitarian assistance forces in gaining popular 
support and countering attempts to distort and frustrate U.S. or joint task force objectives. 
Department of Justice 
E-13. The Department of Justice agency that the U.S. armed forces may contact for assistance in domestic 
humanitarian assistance operations is the Community Relations Service. Under the authority and direction 
of the attorney general, the Community Relations Service provides on-site resolution assistance through a 
field staff of mediators and negotiators. 
Public Health Service 
E-14. The  Public Health Service promotes the protection and advancement of the nation’s physical  and 
mental health. U.S. armed forces work with the Public Health Service during refugee operations in or near 
the United States and its territories. 
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
E-15. The ICE provides information and service to the public while enforcing immigration control. The 
ICE is essential in the processing and eventual disposition of migrants and refugees in the United States and 
its territories. 
UNITED NATIONS AGENCIES 
E-16. The UN is involved in the entire spectrum of humanitarian assistance operations, from prevention to 
relief, ensuring that the rights and privileges of persons affected by I/R operations are observed. 
U
NITED 
N
ATIONS 
H
IGH 
C
OMMISSIONER FOR 
R
EFUGEES
E-17. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees was established in 1951 as a subsidiary of the UN General 
Assembly; it has field offices in ninety countries. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees Handbook for 
Emergencies and other publications provide excellent guides for conducting refugee operations. The two 
main functions of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees are— 
Providing  refugees  with  international  protection  that  promotes  the  adoption  of  international 
standards for the treatment of refugees and supervises their implementation. 
Seeking permanent solutions for the refugee problem that facilitates the voluntary repatriation 
and reintegration of refugees into their country of origin or facilitates integration into a country 
of asylum or a third country. 
E-18. Other activities of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees include emergency relief counseling, 
education,  and  legal  assistance.  In  practice,  these  activities  entail  a  very  active  role  in  human  rights 
monitoring. In any case, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees role is to help governments meet the 
obligations that they have under various international statutes concerning refugees. (See chapter 1 for more 
information on the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and the Geneva Protocol Relating to the 
Status  of  Refugees,  in  which  subscribing  nations  undertook  to  cooperate  with  and  facilitate  UN  High 
Commissioner for Refugees tasks to provide international assistance and protection for refugees.) 
U
NITED 
N
ATIONS 
D
ISASTER 
R
ELIEF 
C
OORDINATOR
E-19. The UN disaster relief coordinator coordinates assistance for persons compelled to leave their homes 
because  of  disasters,  natural  or  otherwise.  Assistance  includes  items  such  as  temporary  housing  and 
provisions for daily living subsistence. 
RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT MOVEMENT 
E-20. Three main organizations compose the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. These organizations 
include the IFRC, the ICRC, and the International Federation of Red Crescent Societies. 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to move pages within a pdf document; how to reverse pages in pdf
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
pdf reverse page order preview; how to move pdf pages around
Appendix E 
E-4 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
I
NTERNATIONAL 
F
EDERATION OF 
R
ED 
C
ROSS AND 
R
ED 
C
RESCENT 
S
OCIETIES
E-21. The IFRC and the International Federation of Red Crescent Societies carry out relief operations to 
assist  victims  of  natural  and  manmade  disasters.  The  IFRC  and  the  International  Federation  of  Red 
Crescent Societies have a unique network of national societies throughout the world that gives them their 
principal  strengths.  The  IFRC  is  the  umbrella  organization  for  the  ICRC  and  its  network  of  national 
societies. 
I
NTERNATIONAL 
C
OMMITTEE OF THE 
R
ED 
C
ROSS
E-22. The ICRC received its mandate to act as a monitoring agent for the proper treatment of detainees 
from the Geneva Conventions. The  ICRC also coordinates international  relief operations for victims of 
conflict, reports human rights violations, and promotes awareness of human rights and further development 
among nations of the National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. 
E-23. Generally,  a  neutral  state  or  an  international  humanitarian  organization  (such  as  the  ICRC)  is 
designated  by  the  U.S.  government  as  a  protecting  power  to  monitor  whether  detainees  are  receiving 
humane treatment as required by U.S. policy and international laws, including the Geneva Conventions. 
Duly accredited representatives of the protecting power, the ICRC, and others visit and inspect internment 
facilities and other places of internment in the discharge of their official duties. If the visit or assistance is 
within  the  limits  of military and security  considerations,  the  commander grants these organizations  the 
necessary  access  to  detainees  and  internment  facilities.  At  times,  the  inspections  will  be  previously 
authorized  by  the  theater  commander.  Such  visits  will  not  be  prohibited,  nor  will  their  duration  or 
frequency be restricted, except for reasons of imperative military necessity and then only as a temporary 
measure. The detention facility commander, in consultation with the legal advisor, decides if this measure 
is required and immediately notifies higher headquarters and the ICRC/protecting power. Detention facility 
commanders, in consultation with the legal advisor, develop and foster relationships with ICRC personnel 
to address and resolve detainee issues, requests, or complaints. 
E-24. If  requested,  these  representatives  may  interview  detainees  without  witnesses.  Visiting 
representatives  may  not  accept  letters,  paperwork,  documents,  or  other  articles  for  delivery  from  the 
detainee. 
E-25. Detainees may make complaints or requests to the ICRC/protecting power regarding the conditions 
of their internment. Detainees may not be punished for making complaints, even if those complaints prove 
to  be  unfounded. Complaints will be received  in confidence because they  might endanger the safety of 
other  detainees.  Appropriate  action,  including  segregation,  will  be  taken  to  protect  detainees  when 
necessary. 
E-26. Detainees  exercising  the  right  to  complain  to  the  detention  facility  commander  or  the 
ICRC/protecting power (according to AR 190-8) may do so— 
By mail. 
In person to the visiting representative of the ICRC/protecting power. 
Through an existing, officially constituted detainee committee or representative. 
E-27. Internment facility commanders will attempt to resolve complaints and address requests. If a detainee 
is not  satisfied  with  the  way a commander  handles a complaint or  request,  he  or she  may submit  it  in 
writing through the necessary channels to Headquarters, DA, OPMG, Attention: NDRC. 
E-28. Written complaints to the ICRC/protecting power will be promptly forwarded to Headquarters, DA, 
OPMG, Attention: NDRC. A separate letter with detention facility commander comments will be included 
with the detainee complaint. Military endorsements will not be placed on detainee communication. Written 
communication from the ICRC/protecting power to a detention facility commander regarding a detainee 
complaint or request will be reported to Headquarters, Department of the Army, OPMG, Attention: NDRC, 
for inclusion in the detainee’s personnel file. 
E-29. ICRC  inspectors  make  oral  or  written  reports  of  their  inspection  findings  or  concerns  at  any 
command level. These reports are critically important to the chain of command and senior DOD leaders 
Agencies Concerned With Internment and Resettlement Operations 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
E-5 
and are immediately transmitted through command channels to the combatant commander. Oral reports are 
summarized in writing. The following must be included in the reports: 
A description of the ICRC visit or meeting, including the location, time, and date. 
A clear, concise summary of the reported observations. 
Corrective action initiated, if warranted. 
Identification of specific detainees, if applicable. 
Name of the ICRC representative. 
Name of the U.S. official who received the report. 
Name of the U.S. official who submitted the report. 
E-30. All  ICRC  communications,  including  summarized  reports,  will  be  marked  with  the  following 
statement: ICRC communications are provided to DOD as confidential, restricted-use documents. As such, 
these  documents  will  be  safeguarded  the  same  as  classified  documents.  The  dissemination  of  ICRC 
communications outside DOD is not authorized without approval of the Secretary of Defense or Deputy 
Secretary  of Defense.” While the ICRC has no enforcing  authority and  its  reports  are confidential,  any 
public revelation regarding the standards of detainee treatment can have a substantial effect on international 
opinion. 
This page intentionally left blank.  
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
F-1 
Appendix F 
Sample Facility Inspection Checklist 
While  U.S.  and  international  laws  are  important  at  all  I/R  levels,  there  is  an 
increasing  standard of requirements at  internment  facilities  located  at  theater  and 
strategic levels. Using a facility inspection checklist helps ensure that U.S. armed 
forces  within  and  around  the  internment  facility  are  operating  according  to 
established policy and  U.S. and international laws. Figure F-1
is a sample facility 
inspection checklist that can be used to help develop an actual checklist for theater 
and strategic facilities. This sample checklist should be expanded to include more 
necessary details and tailored to meet the specific OE impacting the given internment 
site. 
HOLDING FACILITY:  
DATE OF INSPECTION:  
FACILITY OIC:  
PERSONNEL PRESENT AT THE INSPECTION: _____________________________________________ 
FACILITY MANAGEMENT 
Facility SOP 
Yes 
No 
Does a facility SOP exist? 
Is the facility SOP centrally located so that everyone can refer to it if necessary? 
Is the facility SOP current (for example, does it incorporate relevant FRAGOs as they are 
published)? 
Does the facility SOP fully implement requirements from the applicable DOD policies and 
include, as a minimum–– 
•  All physical security policies? 
•  Guard and medic measures and/or procedures? 
•  RUF? 
•  In-processing procedures? 
•  Accountability and detainee-tracking procedures? 
•  Policies for processing DD Forms 2745? 
•  Procedures for documenting, safeguarding, and returning detainee property 
according to the Geneva Conventions? 
•  Procedures for accommodating NGOs and other similar organizations, such as the 
ICRC? 
•  Procedures for reporting allegations of potential criminal acts or violations of the 
law of war? 
•  Procedures for investigating and documenting detainee injuries or accidents? 
•  Policies and warnings against exposing detainees to public curiosity or releasing 
photographs without legal review? 
•  Procedures regarding the release or transfer of detainees? 
Has every facility employee read the SOP?
Figure F-1. Sample internment facility inspection checklist 
Appendix F 
F-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Inprocessing 
Yes 
No 
Is there an interpreter on-site or on-call for in-processing? 
Are the legal status and rights of detainees written in their native languages and displayed in 
plain sight for them as they in-process? 
Is there an initial medical screening performed by a medic or doctor? 
Are photos taken to document any injuries? 
Are grievance procedures for detainees written in their native languages and displayed in plain 
sight? 
Outprocessing 
Is there an interpreter on-site or on-call for out-processing? 
Has the detainee participated in segregation and an out-briefing? 
Is there a medical screening performed by a medic or doctor? 
Is there a conditional release statement (for detainees being released)? 
Has the releasing unit prepared, maintained, and reported the chain of custody and 
transfer/release documentation according to current transfer and release procedures? 
HUMANE TREATMENT OF DETAINEES 
Hygiene 
Yes 
No 
Do detainees have adequate washing facilities to keep them free from disease? 
Do detainees have blankets? 
Do detainees have mattresses or cots if available? 
Is the number of toilets equivalent to 1 for every 15 detainees? 
Do detainees have adequate and frequent access to toilets? 
Are adequate showers available in facilities that hold detainees more than 72 hours? 
Protection Measures (Indirect-/Direct-Fire Weapons) 
Yes 
No 
Do detainees have heating, air-conditioning, ventilation, shade, and/or overhead cover? 
Are detainees sufficiently protected from the harm of current operations? 
Are detainees sufficiently protected from each other? 
Are women and juveniles segregated from the general detainee population if possible? 
Are armed guards of sufficient force to control access points and protect detainees from each 
other? 
Are procedures in place to protect detainees from the public, the press, and nonmilitary entities?   
Food 
Yes 
No 
Are detainee diets adequate to keep them in good health? 
Are detainee diets culturally and religiously appropriate? 
Do detainees have access to potable water? 
Medical Support 
Yes 
No 
Is daily sick call available? 
Are accommodations made for special needs; for example, sight-impaired or contagious 
detainees? 
Morale 
Yes 
No 
Are detainees in long-term facilities permitted to correspond with family via the ICRC? 
Are detainees granted access to religious articles and permitted to pray? 
Are detainees in long-term facilities permitted exercise and/or recreation? 
Figure F-1. Sample internment facility inspection checklist (continued)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested