A forum for the exchange of circuits, systems, and software for real-world signal processing
In This Issue
Editors’ Notes .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .  2
A Practical Guide to High-Speed Printed-Circuit-Board Layout . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .  3
Authors and Product Introductions . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .  9
40th Anniversary Timeline .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. ..  10
Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) Controls Waveforms in Test, Measurement,  
and Communications . . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. ..  12
Encoder’s Spare Channel Embeds Whole-House Stereo Audio in Satellite  
Set-Top-Box Designs Stably and Cost-Effectively . .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. ..  16
Volume 39, Number 3, 2005
ÜÜÜ°>ʌ>ʃʐ}°VʐʇÉ>ʌ>ʃʐ}`ɼ>ʃʐ}Õi
Reverse page order pdf online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages pdf; reorder pages of pdf
Reverse page order pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pdf pages in reader; move pages in pdf file
ISSN 0161-3626 ©Analog Devices, Inc. 2005
Editors’ Notes
40
TH
ANNIVERSARY
We’re still celebrating the 40
th
anniversary 
of Analog Devices, Inc. Such events create 
a temptation to wax historical, and this is no 
exception. If you’re interested in the high points 
of our history, the spread on pages 10-11 depicts 
the contents page of a timeline accessible 
on the Web (www.analog.com/timeline); in 
it you can click on any year to access a brief 
audiovisual clip reviewing that year’s major 
corporate events.
As part of the celebration, we’ve devoted this year’s four print 
issues to articles with principal technological focus on (1) digital, 
(2) conversion, (3) analog, and (4) sensors. This issue is devoted 
to articles discussing aspects of analog technology. As you will see, 
even digital phenomena are analog at the hardware level.
RFI AGAIN—GONE!
On multiple occasions, we’ve referred to—or had our attention 
called to—the dc offset problems caused by common-mode RF 
interference with low-frequency measurements, particularly as 
manifested by rectification in the input stages of instrumentation 
amplifiers.
1,2,3
Our purpose for bringing this subject up again is to mention 
the availability, since July 2005, of a digitally programmable 
instrumentation amplifier that contains an intrinsic solution to the 
problem. The AD8556,
4
designed for automotive and industrial 
applications, features internal electromagnetic-interference (EMI) 
filtering; in addition, it has a very wide temperature range, low-offset 
voltage and drift, and open- and shorted-wire protection. It can 
provide a complete signal processing path from a bridge sensor to 
an A/D converter. Typical applications are with pressure sensors 
in anti-lock brake systems (ABS), occupant detection systems, 
fuel level sensors, transmission controls, and precision strain or 
pressure gauges.
The figure below shows where the on-chip EMI filters are applied 
to protect the device’s inputs: at the main differential inputs, at the 
clamp input, and at the input of the output amplifier. In brief, the 
problem that they solve is to filter out high frequencies before they 
reach the amplifier input junctions and create dc offsets through 
partial rectification.5
VDD
VSS
1
2
3
+IN
–IN
OUT
A3
VDD
VSS
1
2
3
+IN
–IN
OUT
A4
VDD
VSS
1
2
3
+IN
–IN
OUT
A2
VDD
VSS
1
2
3
+IN
–IN
OUT
A1
VSS
1
2
3
+IN
–IN
OUT
A5
R7
P4
R5
VDD
DIGIN
VCLAMP
R3
P2
P1
R1
R2
R4
R5
P3
DAC
LOGIC
RF
FILT/DIGOUT
AD8556
VSS
VPOS
VNEG
EMI
FILTER
V
OUT
EMI
FILTER
EMI
FILTER
EMI
FILTER
EMI
FILTER
The effectiveness of this filtering scheme can be seen in the 
figures at the top of next column, comparing responses of the 
AD8556 and the AD8555, a similar device—but without internal 
EMI protection. The graph at left compares their dc responses to 
200-mV common-mode high-frequency signals that drive both 
differential inputs (G = 70 mV/mV). The one at right measures 
dc output responses to 200-mV p-p of high-frequency sine waves 
driving VPOS, with VNEG grounded.
–1400
–1200
–1000
–800
–600
–400
–200
0
200
400
600
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
FREQUENCY (MHz)
DC OFFSET (mV)
–20
0
20
40
60
80
100
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
FREQUENCY (MHz)
DEVIATION FROM DC OUTPUT (mV)
NONENHANCED FOR EMI
AD8556 (ENHANCED PART FOR EMI)
AD8556
NONENHANCED PART 
More about the AD8556: specified with 10-V max offset 
voltage, 65-nV/C max offset drift, and 112-dB typical common-
mode rejection, it features digitally programmable gain (from 
70 mV/mV to 1280 mV/mV) and output-offset voltage, open- and 
short-circuited-wire fault detection, low-pass filtering, EMI 
filtering, and output voltage clamping. Output offset voltage 
can be adjusted with 0.39% resolution. Gain and offset can be 
temporarily programmed by the user and evaluated in-circuit, 
then permanently programmed by blowing polysilicon fuse 
links. The AD8556 operates on a single 2.7-V to 5.5-V supply and 
consumes 2 mA. Specified from –40C to +140C, it is available in 
8-lead SOIC and 16-lead, 3-mm  3-mm LFCSP packages.
Dan Sheingold [dan.sheingold@analog.com]
1 “Ask The Applications Engineer—14”
http://www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/Anniversary/14.html 
Ask The Applications Engineer, Analog Devices
http://www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/Anniversary/contents.html
“A Reader Notes” http://www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/Anniversary/
Reader_Notes.html
3 H.R. Gelbach, “A Reader Notes: High-Frequency-Caused Errors in Millivolt 
Measurement Systems,” Analog Dialogue 37-3, 2003, pp. 2, 14.
http://www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/archives/issues/vol37n3.pdf
http://www.analog.com, Search <AD8556>
5 W. Jung, ed., “Op Amp Applications Handbook”, Elsevier-Newnes, 2005, 
pp. 719-726. Similar material can be found online in the Analog Devices 
seminar version, http://www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/archives/ 
39-05/Web_Ch7_final_J.pdf, pp. 7.122-7.129.
THE ANALOG WORLD
In mixed-signal systems, an analog-to-digital 
converter (ADC) translates real-world analog 
signals into the digital domain so that further 
signal processing can be implemented by the 
DSP or embedded processor. A digital-to-
analog converter (DAC) then translates the 
digital signals back into the analog domain. 
At the start of the chain, and at the end of the 
day, the signals that we transmit, measure, 
and control are analog: audio, video, 
temperature, pressure, voltage, and current, for instance.
Some amount of analog signal conditioning is always required before 
the ADC and after the DAC. Even functions that may at first appear 
to be digital are often analog at their very heart. Take phased-lock 
loops (PLLs), for example. These include phase detectors, filters, 
and oscillators—all analog functions. Direct digital synthesis 
(DDS) devices, on the other hand, are mostly digital, but they 
provide output signals whose properties are measured using analog 
quantities such as phase, frequency, and amplitude.
When designing analog circuitry—especially where high speed, 
high resolution, or low noise is required—a good printed-circuit 
board layout becomes increasingly important. Careful attention 
to voltage levels and signal flow can minimize the need for an 
expensive, time-consuming redesign, and can maintain optimum 
performance throughout the signal path.
With all this in mind, we invite you to read the “analog” installment 
of Analog Dialogue’s tribute to ADI’s 40
th
anniversary. Here you 
will learn about adding stereo audio to a low-cost satellite set-top 
box; using DDS to generate waveforms for test, measurement, 
and communications; and avoiding the layout pitfalls inherent in 
high-speed amplifier designs. Enjoy!
Scott Wayne [scott.wayne@analog.com]
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to change page order in pdf acrobat; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
Analog Dialogue Volume 39 Number 3 
3
A Practical Guide to High-Speed 
Printed-Circuit-Board Layout
By John Ardizzoni [john.ardizzoni@analog.com]
Despite its critical nature in high-speed circuitry, printed-circuit-
board (PCB) layout is often one of the last steps in the design 
process. There are many aspects to high-speed PCB layout; 
volumes have been written on the subject. This article addresses 
high-speed layout from a practical perspective. A major aim is to 
help sensitize newcomers to the many and various considerations 
they need to address when designing board layouts for high-speed 
circuitry. But it is also intended as a refresher to benefit those 
who have been away from board layout for a while. Not every 
topic can be covered in detail in the space available here, but we 
address key areas that can have the greatest payoff in improving 
circuit performance, reducing design time, and minimizing time-
consuming revisions.
Although the focus is on circuits involving high-speed op amps, 
the topics and techniques discussed here are generally applicable 
to layout of most other high-speed analog circuits. When op amps 
operate at high RF frequencies, circuit performance is heavily 
dependent on the board layout. A high-performance circuit design 
that looks good “on paper” can render mediocre performance 
when hampered by a careless or sloppy layout. Thinking ahead and 
paying attention to salient details throughout the layout process 
will help ensure that the circuit performs as expected.
The Schematic
Although there is no guarantee, a good layout starts with a good 
schematic. Be thoughtful and generous when drawing a schematic, 
and think about signal flow through the circuit. A schematic that 
has a natural and steady flow from left to right will tend to have a 
good flow on the board as well. Put as much useful information 
on the schematic as possible. The designers, technicians, and 
engineers who will work on this job will be most appreciative, 
including us; at times we are asked by customers to help with a 
circuit because the designer is no longer there.
What kind of information belongs on a schematic besides the 
usual reference designators, power dissipations, and tolerances? 
Here are a few suggestions that can turn an ordinary schematic 
into a superschematic! Add waveforms, mechanical information 
about the housing or enclosure, trace lengths, keep-out areas; 
designate which components need to be on top of the board; 
include tuning information, component value ranges, thermal 
information, controlled impedance lines, notes, brief circuit 
operating descriptions … (and the list goes on).
Trust No One
If you’re not doing your own layout, be sure to set aside ample 
time to go through the design with the layout person. An ounce of 
prevention at this point is worth more than a pound of cure! Don’t 
expect the layout person to be able to read your mind. Your inputs 
and guidance are most critical at the beginning of the layout process. 
The more information you can provide, and the more involved you 
are throughout the layout process, the better the board will turn 
out. Give the designer interim completion points—at which you 
want to be notified of the layout progress for a quick review. This 
“loop closure” prevents a layout from going too far astray and will 
minimize reworking the board layout.
Your instructions for the designer should include: a brief description 
of the circuit’s functions; a sketch of the board that shows the input 
and output locations; the board stack up (i.e., how thick the board 
will be,  how many layers, details of signal layers and planes—power, 
ground, analog, digital, and RF); which signals need to be on each 
layer; where the critical components need to be located; the exact 
location of bypassing components; which traces are critical; which 
lines need to be controlled-impedance lines; which lines need to 
have matched lengths; component sizes; which traces need to kept 
away from (or near) each other; which circuits need to be kept away 
from (or near) each other; which components need to be close to (or 
away from) each other; which components go on the top and the 
bottom of the board. You’ll never get a complaint for giving someone 
too much information—too little, yes; too much, no.
A learning experience: About 10 years ago I designed a 
multilayer surface-mounted board—with components on 
both sides of the board. The board was screwed into a gold-
plated aluminum housing with many screws (because of a 
stringent vibration spec). Bias feedthrough pins poked up 
through the board. The pins were wire-bonded to the PCB. 
It was a complicated assembly. Some of the components on 
the board were to be SAT (set at test). But I hadn’t specified 
where these components should be. Can you guess where 
some of them were placed? Right! On the bottom of the 
board. The production engineers and technicians were not 
very happy when they had to tear the assembly apart, set 
the values, and then reassemble everything. I didn’t make 
that mistake again.
Location, Location, Location
As in real estate, location is everything. Where a circuit is placed 
on a board, where the individual circuit components are located, 
and what other circuits are in the neighborhood are all critical. 
Typically, input-, output-, and power locations are defined, but 
what goes on between them is “up for grabs.” This is where paying 
attention to the layout details will yield significant returns. Start 
with critical component placement, in terms of both individual 
circuits and the entire board. Specifying the critical component 
locations and signal routing paths from the beginning helps ensure 
that the design will work the way it’s intended to. Getting it right 
the first time lowers cost and stress—and reduces cycle time.
Power-Supply Bypassing
Bypassing the power supply at the amplifier’s supply terminals to 
minimize noise is a critical aspect of the PCB design process—both 
for high-speed op amps and any other high-speed circuitry. There 
are two commonly used configurations for bypassing high-speed 
op amps.
Rails to ground: This technique, which works best in most cases, 
uses multiple parallel capacitors connected from the op amp’s 
power-supply pins directly to ground. Typically, two parallel 
capacitors are sufficient—but some circuits may benefit from 
additional capacitors in parallel.
Paralleling different capacitor values helps ensure that the 
power supply pins see a low ac impedance across a wide band of 
frequencies. This is especially important at frequencies where the 
op amp power-supply rejection (PSR) is rolling off. The capacitors 
help compensate for the amplifier’s decreasing PSR. Maintaining 
a low impedance path to ground for many decades of frequency 
will help ensure that unwanted noise doesn’t find its way into the 
op amp. Figure 1 shows the benefits of multiple parallel capacitors. 
At lower frequencies the larger capacitors offer a low impedance 
path to ground. Once those capacitors reach self resonance, the 
capacitive quality diminishes and the capacitors become inductive. 
That is why it is important to use multiple capacitors: when one 
capacitor’s frequency response is rolling off, another is becoming 
significant, thereby maintaining a low ac impedance over many 
decades of frequency.
Analog Dialogue Volume 39 Number 3
��
����
���
��
���
��
���
����
�����
�����
���
��
���
��
���
����
���������������
�������������
�����
������
������
�����
�����
Figure 1. Capacitor impedance vs. frequency.
Starting directly at the op amp’s power-supply pins; the capacitor 
with the lowest value and smallest physical size should be placed 
on the same side of the board as the op amp—and as close to the 
amplifier as possible. The ground side of the capacitor should 
be connected into the ground plane with minimal lead- or trace 
length. This ground connection should be as close as possible to 
the amplifier’s load to minimize disturbances between the rails 
and ground. Figure 2 illustrates this technique.
��
��
������
����������
������
����������
����
Figure 2. Parallel-capacitor rails-to-ground bypassing.
This process should be repeated for the next-higher-value 
capacitor. A good place to start is with 0.01 F for the smallest 
value, and a 2.2-F—or larger—electrolytic with low ESR for the 
next capacitor. The 0.01 F in the 0508 case size offers low series 
inductance and excellent high-frequency performance.
Rail to rail: An alternate configuration uses one or more bypass 
capacitors tied between the positive- and negative supply 
rails of the op amp. This method is typically used when it is 
difficult to get all four capacitors in the circuit. A drawback to 
this approach is that the capacitor case size can become larger, 
because the voltage across the capacitor is double that of the 
single-supply bypassing method. The higher voltage requires a 
higher breakdown rating, which translates into a larger case size. 
This option can, however, offer improvements to both PSR and 
distortion performance.
Since each circuit and layout is different; the configuration, 
number, and values of the capacitors are determined by the actual 
circuit requirements.
Parasitics
Parasitics are those nasty little gremlins that creep into your PCB 
(quite literally) and wreak havoc within your circuit. They are the 
hidden stray capacitors and inductors that infiltrate high-speed 
circuits. They include inductors formed by package leads and 
excess trace lengths; pad-to-ground, pad-to-power-plane, and 
pad-to-trace capacitors; interactions with vias, and many more 
possibilities. Figure 3(a) is a typical schematic of a noninverting 
op amp. If parasitic elements were to be taken into account, 
however, the same circuit would look like Figure 3(b).
In high-speed circuits, it doesn’t take much to influence circuit 
performance. Sometimes just a few tenths of a picofarad is 
enough. Case in point: if only 1 pF of additional stray parasitic 
capacitance is present at the inverting input, it can cause almost 
2 dB of peaking in the frequency domain (Figure 4). If enough 
capacitance is present, it can cause instability and oscillations.
����
��
����
��
��
���
�����
���
��
��
���
���
���
�����
���
�����
���
���
���
���
���
���
���
���
���
���
Figure 3. Typical op amp circuit, as designed (a) and with parasitics (b).
Analog Dialogue Volume 39 Number 3 
5
��
���
���
��
��
���������������
���������
���
���
Figure 4. Additional peaking caused by parasitic capacitance.
A few basic formulas for calculating the size of those gremlins 
can come in handy when seeking the sources of the problematic 
parasitics. Equation 1 is the formula for a parallel-plate capacitor 
(see Figure 5).
C
kA
d
=
11.3
pF
(1)
C is the capacitance, A is the area of the plate in cm
2
, k is the 
relative dielectric constant of board material, and d is the distance 
between the plates in centimeters.
Figure 5. Capacitance between two plates.
Strip inductance is another parasitic to be considered, resulting 
from excessive trace length and lack of ground plane. Equation 2 
shows the formula for trace inductance. See Figure 6.
Inductance
H
=
+
(
)
+
+
+
00002
2
02235
05
.
ln
.
.
L
L
W
H
W
H
L
µ
(2)
W is the trace width, L is the trace length, and H is the thickness 
of the trace. All dimensions are in millimeters.
Figure 6. Inductance of a trace length.
The oscillation in Figure 7 shows the effect of a 2.54-cm trace 
length at the noninverting input of a high-speed op amp. The 
equivalent stray inductance is 29 nH (nanohenry), enough to 
cause a sustained low-level oscillation that persists throughout the 
period of the transient response. The picture also shows how using 
a ground plane mitigates the effects of stray inductance.
����
����
����
����
�����
�����
�����
�����
�����
���������
�����������
Figure 7. Pulse response with—and without—ground plane.
Vias are another source of parasitics; they can introduce both 
inductance and capacitance. Equation 3 is the formula for parasitic 
inductance (see Figure 8).
L
T
T
d
=
+
2
4
1
ln
nH
(3)
T is the thickness of the board and d is the diameter of the via 
in centimeters.
������������
Figure 8. Via dimensions.
Equation 4 shows how to calculate the parasitic capacitance of 
a via (see Figure 8).
C
TD
D
D
r
=
055
1
2
1
. ε
pF
(4)
r
is the relative permeability of the board material. T is the 
thickness of the board. D
1
is the diameter of the pad surrounding 
the via. D
2
is the diameter of the clearance hole in the ground plane. 
All dimensions are in centimeters. A single via in a 0.157-cm-thick 
board can add 1.2 nH of inductance and 0.5 pF of capacitance; 
this is why, when laying out boards, a constant vigil must be kept 
to minimize the infiltration of parasites!
Analog Dialogue Volume 39 Number 3
Ground Plane
There is much more to discuss than can be covered here, but we’ll 
highlight some of the key features and encourage the reader to 
pursue the subject in greater detail. A list of references appears at 
the end of this article.
A ground plane acts as a common reference voltage, provides 
shielding, enables heat dissipation, and reduces stray inductance 
(but it also increases parasitic capacitance). While there are many 
advantages to using a ground plane, care must be taken when 
implementing it, because there are limitations to what it can and 
cannot do.
Ideally, one layer of the PCB should be dedicated to serve as the 
ground plane. Best results will occur when the entire plane is 
unbroken. Resist the temptation to remove areas of the ground 
plane for routing other signals on this dedicated layer. The ground 
plane reduces trace inductance by magnetic-fi eld cancellation 
between the conductor and the ground plane. When areas of the 
ground plane are removed, unexpected parasitic inductance can 
be introduced into the traces above or below the ground plane.
Because ground planes typically have large surface and cross-
sectional areas, the resistance in the ground plane is kept to a 
minimum. At low frequencies, current will take the path of least 
resistance, but at high frequencies current follows the path of 
least impedance.
Nevertheless, there are exceptions, and sometimes less ground 
plane is better. High-speed op amps will perform better if the 
ground plane is removed from under the input and output pads. 
The stray capacitance introduced by the ground plane at the input, 
added to the op amp’s input capacitance, lowers the phase margin 
and can cause instability. As seen in the parasitics discussion, 1 pF 
of capacitance at an op amp’s input can cause signifi cant peaking. 
Capacitive loading at the output—including strays—creates a pole 
in the feedback loop. This can reduce phase margin and could 
cause the circuit to become unstable.
Analog and digital circuitry, including grounds and ground planes, 
should be kept separate when possible. Fast-rising edges create 
current spikes fl owing in the ground plane. These fast current 
spikes create noise that can corrupt analog performance. Analog 
and digital grounds (and supplies) should be tied at one common 
ground point to minimize circulating digital and analog ground 
currents and noise.
At high frequencies, a phenomenon called skin effect must be 
considered. Skin effect causes currents to fl ow in the outer surfaces 
of a conductor—in effect making the conductor narrower, thus 
increasing the resistance from its dc value. While skin effect is 
beyond the scope of this article, a good approximation for the skin 
depth in copper, in centimeters, is
Skin Depth
Hz
=
(
)
6.61
f
(5)
Less susceptible plating metals can be helpful in reducing 
skin effect.
Packaging
Op amps are typically offered in a variety of packages. The package 
chosen can affect an amplifi er’s high-frequency performance. 
The main infl uences are parasitics (mentioned earlier) and signal 
routing. Here we will focus on routing inputs, outputs, and power 
to the amplifi er.
Figure 9 illustrates the layout differences between an op amp in 
an SOIC package (a) and one in an SOT-23 package (b). Each 
package type presents its own set of challenges. Focusing on 
(a), close examination of the feedback path suggests that there 
are multiple options for routing the feedback. Keeping trace 
lengths short is paramount. Parasitic inductance in the feedback 
can cause ringing and overshoot. In Figures 9(a) and 9(b), the 
feedback path is routed around the amplifi er. Figure 9(c) shows an 
alternative approach—routing the feedback path under the SOIC 
package—which minimizes the feedback path length. Each option 
has subtle differences. The fi rst option can lead to excess trace 
length, with increased series inductance. The second option uses 
vias, which can introduce parasitic capacitance and inductance. 
The infl uence and implications of these parasitics must be taken 
into consideration when laying out the board. The SOT-23 layout 
is almost ideal: minimal feedback trace length and use of vias; 
the load and bypass capacitors are returned with short paths to 
the same ground connection; and the positive rail capacitors, not 
shown in Figure 9(b), are located directly under the negative rail 
capacitors on the bottom of the board.
��
�������
������
������������
������
�������
������
��������
���������
��
�������
���
�������
������
������������
������
��
���
������������
�������
�������
������
���
��
���
��
��
����������������
������������������
�������������������
�������������������
��
���
���
���
���
�������
������
������������
������
��
��
��
��
�������
���
�������
������
������������
������
�������
������
��������
���������
Figure 9. Layout differences for an op amp circuit. (a) SOIC 
package, (b) SOT-23, and (c) SOIC with R
F
underneath board.
Analog Dialogue Volume 39 Number 3 
7
Low-distortion amplifier pinout: A new low-distortion pinout, 
available in some Analog Devices op amps (the AD8045,
1
for 
example), helps eliminate both of the previously mentioned 
problems; and it improves performance in two other important 
areas as well. The LFCSP’s low-distortion pinout, as shown in 
Figure 10, takes the traditional op amp pinout, rotates it counter-
clockwise by one pin and adds a second output pin that serves as 
a dedicated feedback pin.
AD8099
DISABLE
1
FEEDBACK
2
–IN
3
+IN
4
+V
S
V
OUT
C
C
–V
S
8
7
6
5
Figure 10. Op amp with low-distortion pinout.
The low-distortion pinout permits a close connection between 
the output (the dedicated feedback pin) and the inverting input, 
as shown in Figure 11. This greatly simplifies and streamlines 
the layout.
��
��
�������
�������
������
������������
������
��
�������
������
������������
������
Figure 11. PCB layout for AD8045 low-distortion op amp.
Another benefit is decreased second-harmonic distortion. One 
cause of second-harmonic distortion in conventional op amp pin 
configurations is the coupling between the noninverting input and 
the negative supply pin. The low-distortion pinout for the LFCSP 
package eliminates this coupling and greatly reduces second-
harmonic distortion; in some cases the reduction can be as much 
as 14 dB. Figure 12 shows the difference in distortion performance 
between the AD8099
2
SOIC and the LFCSP package.
This package has yet another advantage—in power dissipation. 
The LFCSP provides an exposed paddle, which lowers the thermal 
resistance of the package and can improve 
JA
by approximately 
40%. With its lower thermal resistance, the device runs cooler, 
which translates into higher reliability.
���
���
���
���
���
����
����
����
���
��
���������������
�������������������������
������
���
���������
������
�������
����
���
���������������������������
���������������������������
Figure 12. AD8099 distortion comparison—the same 
op amp in SOIC and LFCSP packages.
At present, three Analog Devices high-speed op amps are 
available with the new low-distortion pinout:  AD8045, AD8099, 
and AD8000.
3
Routing and Shielding
A wide variety of analog and digital signals, with high- and low 
voltages and currents, ranging from dc to GHz, exists on circuit 
boards. Keeping signals from interfering with one another can 
be difficult.
Recalling the advice to “trust no one,” it is critical to think ahead 
and come up with a plan for how the signals will be processed on 
the board. It is important to note which signals are sensitive and 
to determine what steps must be taken to maintain their integrity. 
Ground planes provide a common reference point for electrical 
signals, and they can also be used for shielding. When signal 
isolation is required, the first step should be to provide physical 
distance between the signal traces. Here are some good practices 
to observe:
• Minimizing long parallel runs and close proximity of signal 
traces on the same board will reduce inductive coupling.
• Minimizing long traces on adjacent layers will prevent 
capacitive coupling.
• Signal traces requiring high isolation should be routed on 
separate layers and—if they cannot be totally distanced—
should run orthogonally to one another with ground plane 
in between. Orthogonal routing will minimize capacitive 
coupling, and the ground will form an electrical shield. 
This technique is exploited in the formation of controlled-
impedance lines.
High-frequency (RF) signals are typically run on controlled-
impedance lines. That is, the trace maintains a characteristic 
impedance, such as 50  (typical in RF applications). Two 
common types of controlled-impedance lines, microstrip
4
and 
stripline
5
can both yield similar results, but with different 
implementations.
Analog Dialogue Volume 39 Number 3
A microstrip controlled-impedance line, shown in Figure 13, 
can be run on either side of a board; it uses the ground plane 
immediately beneath it as a reference plane.
������������
����������
�����
Figure 13. A microstrip transmission line.
Equation 6 can be used to calculate the characteristic impedance 
for an FR4 board.
Z
r
0
87
141
598
08
=
+
(
)
ε
.
ln
.
.
H
W+T
(6)
H is the distance in from the ground plane to the signal trace, 
W is the trace width, T is the trace thickness; all dimensions 
are in mils (inches  10
–3
). 
is the dielectric constant of the 
PCB material.
Stripline controlled-impedance lines (see Figure 14) use two layers 
of ground plane, with signal trace sandwiched between them. This 
approach uses more traces, requires more board layers, is sensitive 
to dielectric thickness variations, and costs more—so it is typically 
used only in demanding applications.
��������
�����
����������
�������
�����
������
Figure 14. Stripline controlled-impedance line.
The characteristic-impedance design equation for stripline is 
shown in Equation 7.
Z
r
0
60
1
08
( )
=
( )
(
)
ε
ln
.
.9
+
B
W
T
(7)
Guard rings, or “guarding,” is another common type of 
shielding used with op amps; it is used to prevent stray 
currents from entering sensitive nodes. The principle is 
straightforward—completely surround the sensitive node with a 
guard conductor that is kept at, or driven to (at low impedance) 
the same potential as the sensitive node, and thus sinks stray 
currents away from the sensitive node. Figure 15(a) shows the 
guard ring schematics for inverting and noninverting op amp 
configurations. Figure 15(b) shows a typical implementation 
of both guard rings for a SOT-23-5 package.
���������
�����
����
������������
�����
����
���
INVERTING
AD8067
V
OUT
–V
+IN
+V
–IN
NONINVERTING
AD8067
V
OUT
–V
+IN
+V
–IN
���
Figure 15. Guard rings. (a) Inverting and noninverting 
operation. (b) SOT-23-5 package.
There are many other options for shielding and routing. The reader 
is encouraged to review the references below for more information 
on this and other topics mentioned above.
CONCLUSION
Intelligent circuit-board layout is important to successful op amp 
circuit design, especially for high-speed circuits. A good schematic 
is the foundation for a good layout; and close coordination between 
the circuit designer and the layout designer is essential, especially 
in regard to the location of parts and wiring. Topics to consider 
include power-supply bypassing, minimizing parasitics, use of 
ground planes, the effects of op amp packaging, and methods of 
routing and shielding. 
b
FOR FURTHER READING
Ardizzoni, John, “Keep High-Speed Circuit-Board Layout on 
Track,” EE Times, May 23, 2005.
Brokaw, Paul, “An IC Amplifier User’s Guide to Decoupling, 
Grounding, and Making Things Go Right for a Change,” 
Analog Devices Application Note AN-202.
Brokaw, Paul and Jeff Barrow, “Grounding for Low- and High-
Frequency Circuits,” Analog Devices Application Note AN-345.
Buxton, Joe, “Careful Design Tames High-Speed Op Amps,” 
Analog Devices Application Note AN-257.
DiSanto, Greg, “Proper PC-Board Layout Improves Dynamic 
Range,” EDN, November 11, 2004.
Grant, Doug and Scott Wurcer, “Avoiding Passive-Component 
Pitfalls,” Analog Devices Application Note AN-348.
Johnson, Howard W. and Martin Graham, High-Speed Digital 
Design, a Handbook of Black Magic, Prentice Hall, 1993.
Jung, Walt, ed., Op Amp Applications Handbook, Elsevier-Newnes, 2005.
REFERENCES–VALID AS OF NOVEMBER 2005
ADI website: www.analog.com (Search) AD8045 (Go)
ADI website: www.analog.com (Search) AD8099 (Go)
ADI website: www.analog.com (Search) AD8000 (Go)
http://www.microwaves101.com/encyclopedia/microstrip.cfm
http://www.microwaves101.com/encyclopedia/stripline.cfm
This article can be found at http://www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/archives/39-09/layout.html, with a link to a PDF.
Analog Dialogue Volume 39 Number 3 
9
www.analog.com/analogdialogue 
dialogue.editor@analog.com
Analog Dialogue is the free technical magazine of Analog Devices, Inc., published 
continuously for 39 years—starting in 1967. It discusses products, applications, 
technology, and techniques for analog, digital, and mixed-signal processing. It is 
currently published in two editions—online, monthly at the above URL, and quarterly 
in print, as periodic retrospective collections of articles that have appeared online. In 
addition to technical articles, the online edition has timely announcements, linking to 
data sheets of newly released and pre-release products, and “Potpourri”—a universe 
of links to important and rapidly proliferating sources of relevant information 
and activity on the Analog Devices website and elsewhere. The Analog Dialogue 
site is, in effect, a “high-pass-filtered” point of entry to the www.analog.com 
site—the virtual world of Analog Devices. In addition to all its current information, 
the Analog Dialogue site has archives with all recent editions, starting from Volume 
29, Number 2 (1995), plus three special anniversary issues, containing useful articles 
extracted from earlier editions, going all the way back to Volume 1, Number 1. 
If you wish to subscribe to—or receive copies of—the print edition, please go to 
www.analog.com/analogdialogue and click on <subscribe>. Your comments 
are always welcome; please send messages to dialogue.editor@analog.com 
or to these individuals: Dan Sheingold, Editor [dan.sheingold@analog.com] 
or Scott Wayne, Managing Editor and Publisher [scott.wayne@analog.com].
PRODUCT INTRODUCTIONS: VOLUME 39, NUMBER 3
Data sheets for all ADI products can be found by entering the model 
number in the Search Box at www.analog.com
July
Accelerometer, 2-g, dual-axis, 16-lead LFCSP package  ....... ADXL322
Amplifier, Digitally Programmable, includes EMI filters  ...... AD8556
Controller, TFT-LCD panels  .................................................  ADD8754
Detector, TruPwr
, dual, LF to 2.7 GHz, 
60-dB dynamic range  ............................................................... AD8364
Encoder, multichannel television sound (MTS)  .......................... AD1970 
Level Translator, 8-channel, bidirectional, 
1.15 V to 5.5 V operation  ....................................................... ADG3300
Switches, CMOS SPST, 0.28-, SC70 package,  
1.65-V to 3.6-V operation  ......................................... ADG841/ADG842
Transceiver, FSK/ASK, ISM band  .......................................... ADF7020
August
Accelerometer, 1.7-g dual-axis, precision  ............................. ADXL204
ADC, Successive-Approximation, 16-bit, 3-MSPS, 
2-LSB max INL  ........................................................................ AD7621
Amplifier, Transimpedance, 4.25-Gbps, 3.3-V operation  ..... ADN2882
Codec, SoundMAX® Audio, AC ’97 and HD interfaces  ......... AD1986A
Converter, Impedance-to-Digital, 12-bit, 250-kSPS  .............. AD5934
Laser-Diode Driver, 50-Mbps to 4.25-Gbps, single-loop  ....... ADN2871
Supervisory Watchdog Circuits, low-voltage,  
4-lead SC70 package  ........................................... ADM8616/ADM8617
September
ADC, 12-bit, 400-MSPS  ........................................................... AD12401
ADCs, Successive-Approximation, 
12-/10-/8-bit, 3-MSPS  ................................. AD7276/AD7277/AD7278
ADC, Successive-Approximation, 14-bit, 500-kSPS  .............. AD7946
Amplifier, Difference, 42-V compatible, 5-V operation  ............ AD8206
Amplifier, Operational, dual, low-noise, precision CMOS  ....... AD8656
Amplifier, Transimpedance, low-noise, 3.2-Gbps,  
3.3-V operation  ......................................................................  ADN2880
Codec, SoundMAX Audio, HD Audio 1.0-compliant  ........  AD1981HD
Controller, GSM Power Amplifier, 50-dB dynamic range  ....... AD8311
DAC, 14-bit, 32-channel, 50-V-to-200-V output-voltage range  .... AD5535
Detector, TruPwr, 100-MHz to 6-GHz  .................................. ADL5500
Direct Digital Synthesizer, 4-channel, 10-bit, 500-MSPS  ...... AD9959
Filter, Video, triple, 2-input, with selectable gain  
and cutoff frequencies, RGB, HD, SD  ................................. ADA4411-3
Filter, Video, triple, with selectable cutoff frequencies,  
RGB, HD, SD  ....................................................................  ADA4412-3
Isolator, Digital, 2-channel  .................................................. ADuM1210
Monitor-Controllers, Temperature- and Voltage,  
2-channel /5-channel  ............................................. ADT7466/ADT7476
Monitor-Controllers, Temperature  
and Fan Speed  ..................................................... ADT7473/ADT7475
MOSFET Drivers, dual, 12-V, high-side bootstrap,  
with output disable  ................................................ ADP3110/ADP3120
Multiplexer, iCMOS
, 4:1, low-capacitance,  
low-charge-injection  ..............................................................  ADG1204
Supervisory Circuit, microprocessor  ..................................... ADM6384
Switch, CMOS, dual, DPDT, 0.4-  ......................................... ADG888
Switches, iCMOS, quad SPST, low-capacitance,  
low-charge-injection  ............................  ADG1211/ADG1212/ADG1213
Switch/Multiplexer, CMOS, SPDT/2:1, 1.3-,  
1.8-V to 5.5-V operation  .......................................................... ADG859
Temperature Sensor, digital, local,  
and two remote temperatures  .................................................. ADT7481
AUTHORS
John  Ardizzoni  (page  3)  is  an 
applications engineer with Analog 
Devices in the High-Speed Amplifier 
group. John graduated from Merrimack 
College in 1988 and joined Analog 
Devices in 2002. Prior to that, he worked 
for IBM as an applications engineer and 
M/A-COM as a design engineer.
Victor  Chang  (page  16),  now 
a systems engineer at Raytheon 
Company, worked in the Central 
Applications group at Analog Devices 
in Wilmington, MA for five years. He 
has an MSEE from the University 
of Massachusetts, Lowell, and a 
BSEECS from the University of 
California, Berkeley. In addition to 
providing customer support for linear- 
and converter products, Victor worked 
to develop interactive Web tools to aid designers. In his spare 
time, he enjoys basketball, snowboarding, and traveling.
Jeritt Kent (page 16) is a senior linear 
field applications engineer for Analog 
Devices in Bellevue, Washington. 
He joined ADI in 1999 from Allegro 
Microsystems and has written articles 
on various engineering topics. Before 
1997 he was employed at American 
Microsystems as a mixed-signal design 
engineer, specializing in CMOS. One 
of Jeritt’s key projects was an 8-channel 
injector-driver ASIC for natural-gas-
powered vehicles. He has both an MEng in EE and a BSEE 
from the University of Idaho, Moscow.
Eva Murphy (page 12) is an applications 
engineer at ADI’s facility in Limerick, 
Ireland. She provides applications 
support for general-purpose, digital-to-
analog converters (DACs), switches and 
multiplexers, and direct-digital-synthesis 
(DDS) products. Joining Analog Devices 
in 2000, Eva holds a BEng from Cork 
Institute of Technology. Her interests 
include reading, traveling, and walking.
Colm Slattery (page 12) graduated in 
1995 from the University of Limerick, 
Ireland, with a bachelor’s degree in 
electronic engineering. After working 
at Microsemi in test-development 
engineering, he joined ADI in 1998 as 
a test-development engineer. He later 
(2001) moved to applications in the 
precision-data-converter product line.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested