Sample Facility Inspection Checklist 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
F-3 
Discipline 
Yes 
No 
Are detainees provided copies of the Geneva Conventions in their native languages? 
Are facility rules and the disciplinary process written in detainee native languages and displayed 
in plain sight? 
Are employment and compensation procedures in place in long-term facilities as provided by 
relevant international laws and service policy? 
Are labor and/or finance records maintained if applicable? 
INTERROGATION/INTELLIGENCE COLLECTION 
Yes 
No 
Do facility personnel ensure that capturing units completed DD Forms 2745 or their equivalent 
correctly when in-processing detainees? 
Do facility personnel seize, catalog, and safeguard the evidence, documenting from whom they 
took the property? 
Do facility personnel photograph evidence not suitable for storage or check to see if the 
capturing unit did? 
Is a military police guard designated to be responsible for detainee location during 
interrogations, particularly if the interrogations involve unconventional DOD forces or non-DOD 
agencies? 
Does a military police guard visually inspect the detainee after such interrogations, noting any 
bruises, cuts, or marks? 
Is a list of personnel qualified to interrogate detainees posted at the facility? 
Are interrogators qualified according to applicable MI and DOD regulations? 
Are there separate interrogation areas at the facility? 
Are interrogation areas sufficiently noncoercive; for example, are they well ventilated and well 
lit? 
Are interrogators using equipment or props during interrogations? 
Has the unit SJA reviewed and approved equipment used during interrogations? 
Is there a separate SOP for interrogators? 
Has the unit SJA reviewed and approved the interrogation SOP if it exists? 
Legend: 
DD 
Department of Defense 
DOD 
Department of Defense 
ICRC 
International Committee of the Red Cross 
MI 
military intelligence 
NGO 
nongovernmental organization 
OIC 
officer in charge 
RUF 
rules for the use of force 
SJA 
staff judge advocate 
SOP 
standing operating procedure 
Figure F-1. Sample internment facility inspection checklist (continued) 
Rearrange pdf pages reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pages in pdf online; how to move pages around in a pdf document
Rearrange pdf pages reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
move pdf pages in preview; move pages in pdf reader
This page intentionally left blank.  
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
reorder pages pdf file; how to rearrange pdf pages in preview
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
move pages in a pdf; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
G-1 
Appendix G 
Internment and Resettlement Forms 
This appendix contains a table that identifies most of the forms used during detainee 
operations. The forms in table G-1 are required for I/R operations. 
Table G-1. I/R forms 
Number 
Title 
Use 
DA Form 1124 
Individual Receipt Voucher Personal 
Deposit Fund 
Used as a receipt for a U.S. military prisoner’s 
personal funds. (See DODI 7000.14-R.) 
DA Form 1125-R 
Summary Receipt and Disbursement 
Voucher Personal Fund 
Used as a summary receipt of funds and checks 
issued. (See DODI 7000.14-R.) 
DA Form 1128 
Petty Cash Voucher–Personal Deposit 
Fund 
Used as a record of petty cash funds to be charged 
against a U.S. military prisoner’s personal funds 
account. (See DODI 7000.14-R.) 
DA Form 1129-R 
Record of Prisoners’ Personal Deposit 
Fund 
Used to record the balance of a prisoner’s personal 
deposit fund. 
DA Form 1134-R 
Request for Withdrawal of Personal 
Property 
Used to request the withdrawal of personal property. 
DA Form 1135-R  Personal Property Permit 
Used to show that prisoners are authorized to have 
the documented personal property in their cells. 
DA Form 2662-R  U.S. Army EPW Identity Card 
Issued to each detainee and carried at all times by 
that detainee. 
DA Form 2663-R  Fingerprint Card 
Used to collect fingerprints. 
DA Form 2664-R  Weight Register (Prisoner of War) 
Used to monitor the weight of each detainee. 
DA Form 2665-R  Capture Card for Prisoner of War 
Completed by each detainee upon capture and each 
time a detainee’s address changes, such as when a 
detainee is moved to the hospital. 
DA Form 2666-R  Prisoner of War Notification of Address
Used by detainees to notify their families of their 
present address. (See AR 190-8.) 
DA Form 2667-R 
Prisoner of War Mail (Letter) 
Used by detainees to send letters to their families. 
DA Form 2668 
Prisoner of War Mail (Post Card) 
Used by detainees to send post cards to their families.
DA Form 2669 
Certificate of Death 
Used to verify a detainee’s death details surrounding 
the death to include the person caring for the 
detainee at the time of death and the status of the 
detainee’s personal effects. 
DA Form 2670-R 
Mixed Medical Commission Certificate 
for EPW 
Used by the Mixed Medical Commission to determine 
whether a detainee is eligible or ineligible for 
repatriation or hospitalization and to note the location 
of the examination who made the diagnosis. 
DA Form 2671-R 
Certificate for Direct Repatriation for 
EPW 
Used to authorize direct repatriation and to note who 
authorized the action. 
DA Form 2672-R 
Classification Questionnaire for Officer 
Retained Personnel 
Used to document personal and/or professional 
information on officer detainees for classification 
purposes. 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
reorder pdf page; reorder pages in a pdf
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
pages simply with a few lines of C# code. C# Codes to Sort Slides Order. If you want to use a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange
how to reorder pages in pdf reader; how to reorder pdf pages in
Appendix G 
G-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Table G-1. I/R forms (continued) 
Number 
Title 
Use 
DA Form 2673-R 
Classification Questionnaire for 
Enlisted Retained Personnel 
Used to document personal and/or professional 
information on enlisted detainees for classification 
purposes. 
DA Form 2674-R 
Enemy Prisoner of War/Civilian 
Internee Strength Report 
Used to identify the number of detainees (by specified 
categories) at a facility during a 24-hour period. 
DA Form 2675-R 
Certification of Work Incurred Injury 
or Disability 
Used to substantiate an injury or disability that a 
detainee incurred through work details. 
DA Form 2677-R 
U.S. Army Civilian Internee Identity 
Card 
Issued to each CI and carried at all times by that CI. 
DA Form 2678-R  Civilian Internee Natl-Internment Card
Used by CIs to notify their families of their present 
address. (See AR 190-8.) 
DA Form 2679-R 
Civilian Internee Letter 
Used by CIs to send letters to their families. 
DA Form 2680-R  Civilian Internee Natl-Post Card 
Used by CIs to send post cards to their families. 
DA Form 2823 
Sworn Statement 
Used to record capture information. 
DA Form 3078 
Personal Clothing Request 
Used to request the issue of personal clothing. (See 
AR 700-84.) 
DA Form 3955 
Change of Address and Directory 
Card 
Used to notify relatives of a change in the address of 
a U.S. military prisoner. 
DA Form 3997 
Military Police Desk Blotter 
Used to account for activities within the confinement 
facility for a 24-hour period. 
DA Form 4137 
Evidence/Property Custody 
Document 
Used in an I/R facility to retain, account for, and track 
the custody of the personal property of I/R 
populations. (See AR 190-45 and AR 195-5.) 
DA Form 4237-R  Detainee Personnel Record 
Used to record personal information pertaining to a 
detainee and maintained by the unit that has custody 
of the detainee. 
DA Form 5162-R 
Routine Food Establishment 
Inspection Report 
Used to rate and record the results of routine 
inspections on food service establishments. 
DA Form 5456 
Water Point Inspection 
Used to record the results of inspections on water 
points and related equipment. 
DA Form 5457 
Potable Water Container Inspection 
Used to record the results of inspections on water 
trailers and water tank trucks. 
DA Form 5458 
Shower/Decontamination Point 
Inspection 
Used to record the results of inspections on 
shower/decontamination points, including water and 
associated equipment conditions. 
DA Form 5513 
Key Control Register and Inventory 
Used to record the accountability of key control. 
DD Form 2 
Armed Forces of the U.S. Geneva 
Convention Identification Card 
(Active) 
Used to identify individual U.S. military prisoners. 
DD Form 499 
Prisoner’s Mail and Correspondence 
Record 
Used to record all incoming and outgoing mail activity.
DD Form 503 
Medical Examiner’s Report 
Used by a medical examiner to show the mental and 
physical status of U.S. military prisoners and their 
communicable disease status. 
DD Form 504 
Request and Receipt for Health and 
Comfort Supplies 
Used by a prisoner to request health and comfort 
supplies. 
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages in extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to move pages in a pdf file; pdf rearrange pages
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
reverse page order pdf; reverse pdf page order online
Internment and Resettlement Forms 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
G-3 
Table G-1. I/R forms (continued) 
Number 
Title 
Use 
DD Form 506 
Daily Strength Record of Prisoners 
Used to record the number of prisoners at a facility 
during a 24-hour period. 
DD Form 509 
Inspection Record of Prisoner in 
Segregation 
Used to record inspections (conducted every 15 to 30 
minutes) on prisoners in segregation and to document 
the condition of the prisoner. 
DD Form 515 
Roster of Prisoners 
Used to record the prisoners who are in custody. 
DD Form 1131 
Cash Collection Voucher 
Used to impound U.S. currency and collect it; also 
used to exchange foreign currency to U.S. currency. 
DD Form 2707 
Confinement Order 
Used to order the confinement of a U.S. military 
prisoner. 
DD Form 2708 
Receipt for Inmate or Detained 
Person 
Used as a receipt for a detainee by a given individual 
and/or organization, such as the SJA. 
DD Form 2710 
Inmate Background Summary 
Used to record the personal history of a U.S. military 
prisoner. 
DD Form 2713 
Inmate Observation Report 
Used to report an observation of a prisoner. 
DD Form 2714 
Inmate Disciplinary Report 
Used to report an incident and the discipline that 
followed it. 
DD Form 2718 
Inmate’s Release Order 
Used to order the release of a U.S. military prisoner. 
DD Form 2745 
Enemy Prisoner of War (EPW) 
Capture Tag 
Used to record information on captured detainees, 
including the date and time of capture, name (if 
known), location of capture (grid coordinates), 
capturing unit, and circumstances of capture. It is a 
perforated, three-part form that has individual serial 
numbers. 
Legend: 
AR 
Army regulation 
CI 
civilian internee 
DA 
Department of the Army 
DD 
Department of Defense 
DODI 
Department of Defense instruction 
EPW 
enemy prisoner of war 
I/R 
internment and resettlement 
SJA 
staff judge advocate 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pages in a pdf file; moving pages in pdf
This page intentionally left blank.  
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
H-1 
Appendix H 
Use of Force and Riot Control Measures 
The I/R facility commander provides guidance to the military police guard force on 
the appropriate  use  of force for  protecting  detainees, U.S.  military prisoners,  and 
DCs. This  includes establishing  uniform procedures that  govern  the use of force, 
weapons (lethal and nonlethal), and restraining devices. The I/R facility commander 
ensures  that  the  quick-reaction  force  is  organized  and  trained  to  respond  to 
disturbances  inside  and  outside  the  facility,  whether  it  be  from  detainees,  U.S. 
military prisoners, or DCs. Supporting military police units will train, at a minimum, 
squad- to platoon-size quick-reaction forces and squad-size elements for extraction 
and apprehension teams. 
DEFINITIONS 
H-1.  The terms use of force, serious bodily harm, and deadly force have significant differences in their 
meanings. They are defined and/or described in the following paragraphs. 
R
ULES FOR THE 
U
SE OF 
F
ORCE
H-2.  Planning and preparing for the use of force is a necessary element in maintaining order. Commanders 
ensure that detainee facility security personnel are prepared for the effective use of force when necessary to 
protect  themselves,  other  members  of  the  force,  or  detainees.  Commanders  also  ensure  that  the  RUF 
continuum  is  applied  when  force  is  required  to  control  detainees.  Personnel  assigned  the  mission  of 
controlling detainees and providing security of the detention facility are issued and trained on  the RUF 
specific to that mission. Theater ROE remain in effect for defending the detention facility from external 
threat.  The  RUF  continuum  is used  in  determining  the appropriate  amount  of  force  needed  to  compel 
compliance. (See figure H-1, page H-2.) The use of deadly force against detainees is always considered a 
measure of last  resort.  Its use is authorized  when no other means of suppressing the dangerous activity 
(attack, escape) is feasible. Furthermore, the use of deadly force is preceded by warnings appropriate to the 
circumstances. The continuum recognizes five basic categories: 
Lethal. Attempts to kill or inflict serious injury (using knives, clubs, objects, firearms). 
Assaultive. Attempts to attack or inflict injury (striking with hands or feet, biting). 
Actively resistant. Does not follow orders and offers physical resistance, but does not attempt to 
inflict harm (bracing or pulling away, attempting to flee). 
Passively resistant. Does not follow orders, but offers no physical resistance to attempts to gain 
control (going limp). 
Compliant. Offers no resistance to instruction and complies with directions. 
H-3.  The continuum also incorporates five levels of force. (See figure H-1) Ideally, the service member 
starts at Level 1 and progressively moves up the continuum until the detainee complies. However, the use 
of  force is  dictated by the actions of  the  subject  during the  encounter. Subject  actions  may escalate or 
deescalate rapidly, possibly skipping one or more levels. There is no requirement for the following levels of 
force to be applied in order: 
Level  1:  Cooperative  controls.  Used  to  direct  a  compliant  person  (verbal  direction,  hand 
gestures). 
Level 2: Soft  controls.  Used  when  cooperative  control fails  and  the  level  of force  required 
escalates.  They  are  designed  with  a  low  probability  of  causing  injury  (compliant  or 
noncompliant escort positions, use of hand and/or leg restraints). 
Appendix H 
H-2 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
Level  3:  Hard  controls.  Used  when  escort  positions  fail  and  the  level  of  force  required 
escalates. They have a slightly greater possibility of causing injury (pressure points, joint locks, 
oleoresin capsicum spray [such as pepper spray], electronic stun devices). 
Level 4: Defensive techniques. Used when hard controls fail and the level of force required 
escalates.  They  also  have  a  higher  probability  of  causing  injuries.  (empty-hand  strikes  and 
blocks, baton strikes and blocks, NLWs, and MWDs). 
Level 5:  Deadly force.  Used as a last resort when all  lesser  means have  failed  or would  be 
impractical. Used to prevent death or serious injury to self or others; to prevent the theft, damage 
or destruction of resources vital to national security or dangerous to others; or to terminate an 
active escape attempt (firearms and strikes with nonlethal weapons should be directed at vital 
points of the body). 
Figure H-1. Use-of-force continuum 
H-4.  When the use of force is necessary, it is exercised according to the priorities of force and limited to 
the  minimum  degree  necessary.  The  use  of  deadly  force  is  prescribed  in  AR 190-14.  The  combatant 
commander  will  establish  the  RUF with  input  from  senior  military  police  and  SJA  officers. The  RUF 
predominantly  apply  inside  a  location  where  detainees  are  held.  The  ROE  generally  apply  to  combat 
operations  (areas  outside  a  facility).  The  application  of  any  or  all  of  the  RUF  listed  below,  or  the 
application of a higher-numbered priority without first employing a lower numbered one depends on, and is 
consistent with, the situation encountered during any particular disorder. 
H-5.  The  facility  commander,  in  coordination  with  the  higher  echelon  commander  and  the  SJA,  will 
designate representatives who are authorized the direct use of firearms and riot control agents in the event 
of a riot or other disturbance. The facility commander also sets forth guidelines for using these means in 
appropriate plans, orders, SOPs, and instructions. These guidelines specify the types of weapons to be used. 
The weapons do not have to be limited to the shotguns and pistols used for guarding prisoners. 
H-6.  Guard personnel will use the minimum amount of force necessary to reach their objective and carry 
out their duties according to the published criteria for the use of force. (See AR 190-14.) 
Compliant 
Passively 
resistant 
Actively 
resistant 
Assaultive 
Lethal 
Deadly 
force
Defensive 
technique
e
Hard 
control
Soft 
control
Cooperative 
controls 
Types of Subjects 
Levels of Force 
Use of Force and Riot Control Measures 
12 February 2010 
FM 3-39.40 
H-3 
S
ERIOUS 
B
ODILY 
H
ARM
H-7.  Serious bodily harm is the amount of harm that causes serious injury to the body without causing 
death. It does not include minor injuries, such as a black eye or bloody nose, but does include fractured or 
dislocated bones, deep cuts, torn members of the body, serious damage to internal organs, and other life-
threatening injuries. 
D
EADLY 
F
ORCE
H-8.  Deadly  force  is a  force  that  a  person knows, or  should  know,  would  create a  substantial risk  of 
causing death or serious bodily harm. Deadly force is a destructive physical force directed against a person 
or  persons  by  guards  using  a  weapon  or  equipment  which,  when  properly  employed  in  its  intended 
application, would inflict death or serious bodily harm. It is used only in extreme need and when all lesser 
means have failed or cannot reasonably be used. Deadly force, as described in AR 190-14, will only be 
used for— 
Self-defense and the defense of others. To protect military police Soldiers, other guards, or any 
other persons who reasonably believe themselves or others to be in imminent danger of death or 
serious bodily harm. 
Incidents involving national security. To prevent the actual theft or sabotage of assets vital to 
national security. 
Incidents not involving national security, but inherently dangerous to others. To prevent the 
actual  theft  or  sabotage  of  resources,  such  as  weapons  or  ammunition  that  are  inherently 
dangerous to others. 
Arrests or apprehensions. To arrest, apprehend, or prevent the escape of a person when there is 
probable cause to believe that person has committed an offense of the nature specified in the 
preceding three bullets. 
Serious offenses against persons. To prevent the commission of a serious offense that involves 
violence and could cause death or serious bodily harm. 
Escapes. When deadly force has been specifically authorized by the head of a DOD components 
and reasonably appears necessary to prevent escape. 
H-9.  The facility commander is responsible for ensuring that all Soldiers understand the RUF (including 
the use of the command “Halt”); the use of deadly force; and the ban on the use of deadlines. According to 
AR 190-8,  the facility commander  must  ensure that each detainee  understands  the meaning of the U.S. 
command “Halt.” When feasible, the use of deadly force should be preceded by warnings appropriate to the 
circumstances. Additionally, Article 42, GPW, requires warnings appropriate to the circumstances before 
the use of deadly force. When an individual attempts to escape, the guard will shout “Halt” three times. 
Thereafter, the guard will use the least amount of force necessary to halt the individual. If there is no other 
effective means of preventing escape, deadly force may be used. 
H-10. In an attempted escape from a fenced enclosure, individuals will not be fired on unless they have 
cleared the outside fence or barrier (razor, concertina wire) and is making further efforts to escape. 
H-11. Individuals attempting to escape outside a fenced enclosure will be fired on if they do not halt after 
the third command. An escape is considered successful if individuals— 
Reach the lines of the forces of which they are members or the allies of those powers. 
Leave the territory controlled by the United States or its allies. 
RULES FOR THE USE OF FORCE 
H-12. Facility commanders must balance the physical security of forces with mission accomplishment and 
the RUF issued for the I/R mission. Commanders and their staff, in concert with the SJA, develop the RUF. 
These rules are based on guidance from the President and/or Secretary of Defense; operational, political, 
diplomatic, and legal considerations; mission requirements; threat assessments; the law of war; and HN or 
third-country constraints on deployed forces. Commanders must clearly state their objectives with defined 
Appendix H 
H-4 
FM 3-39.40 
12 February 2010 
operational limits.  These  limits  must allow for mission  accomplishment  and the protection  of deployed 
forces. 
H-13. Restrictions on combat operations and the use of force must be clearly explained in the RUF and 
understood and obeyed at all levels. Soldiers must study and train in the RUF and discuss them for their 
mission. If Soldiers do not understand the RUF, their actions (no matter how minor) may have far-reaching 
repercussions, because friendly and enemy media can rapidly exploit any incident. 
H-14. The RUF must address the specific distinctions between the various categories of I/R populations and 
the  instruments  of control  available for each.  The following issues  should  be used in  developing  these 
guidelines: 
Under what conditions will— 
„ 
Deadly force be used? 
„ 
Nonlethal technology be employed? 
Note. The employment of NLWs must be clearly stated in the ROE. 
What will be the required warnings, if any, before nonlethal or lethal force is employed? (See 
AR 190-8 and AR 190-14.) 
NONLETHAL WEAPONS 
H-15. When drafting the RUF, it must be clearly articulated and understood that NLWs are an additional 
means of employing force for the particular purpose of limiting the probability of death or serious injury to 
noncombatants or belligerents. However, the use of deadly force must always remain an inherent right of 
individuals in instances when they, their fellow Soldiers, or personnel in their charge are threatened with 
death or serious bodily harm. NLWs add flexibility to the control of disturbances within the facility  by 
providing an environment where guard forces can permissively engage threatening targets with limited risk 
of noncombatant casualties and collateral damage. (See FM 3-22.40.) 
H-16. DOD defines NLWs as weapons that are explicitly designed and primarily employed to incapacitate 
personnel or material while minimizing fatalities, permanent injury to personnel, and damage to property 
and  the  environment.  Unlike  conventional  weapons  that  destroy  targets  principally  through  blast, 
penetration, and fragmentation, NLWs employ means other than gross physical destruction to prevent the 
target from functioning. 
H-17. The use of lethal force in self-defense or the defense of others, employed under the standing RUF, 
will never be denied. At no time will forces be deployed without the ability to defend themselves against a 
lethal threat nor will they forgo normal training, arming, and equipping for combat. Nonlethal options are a 
complement to, not a replacement for, lethal force. NLWs offer a way to expand the range of graduated 
responses across a variety of military operations. (See FM 3-22.40.) 
H-18. The  decision  to  use NLWs against  individuals  during  a confrontation  should  be delegated  to  the 
lowest possible level, preferably to the platoon or squad. However, this requires that all personnel, not just 
leaders, have a clear understanding of the RUF and the commander’s intent. 
H-19. Commanders and public affairs officers must be prepared to address media questions and concerns 
regarding  the  use  and  role  of  NLWs.  They  must make  it clear  that  the  presence of  NLWs  in  no  way 
indicates abandoning the option to employ deadly force in appropriate circumstances. 
A
DVANTAGES OF 
E
MPLOYING 
N
ONLETHAL 
W
EAPONS
H-20. The employment of NLWs provides a commander with alternatives to resolve a situation. They— 
Provide the commander with the flexibility to influence the situation favorably with a reduced 
risk of noncombatant fatalities and collateral damage. 
Can be more humane and consistent with the political and social implications of humanitarian 
and peacekeeping missions. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested